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Volunteer Mgmt Recruiting Keeping Rules & Habits
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Volunteer Mgmt Recruiting Keeping Rules & Habits

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Tips and habits for being a better volunteer manager. Includes what draws volunteers in and repels them.

Tips and habits for being a better volunteer manager. Includes what draws volunteers in and repels them.

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  • 1. RECRUITING & KEEPING VOLUNTEERS 2 Sure-Fire Actions! (1) Ask … 9 out 10 say YES when asked; 40% initially volunteer because they are asked! (2) Listen … for the WIIFM 7 Rules You Can Live By! 1. Create a welcoming environment – say “hello,” “please” and “thank you” 2. Match your needs to people – work in opposite direction identifying needs and then looking for people with requisite skills; avoid the Peter Principle: don’t over- promote 3. State expectations clearly – define a job well done; ask for public acceptance & commitment early (what will be done by when) 4. Coach & Mentor regularly – it’s about giving constructive feedback tackling positives & negatives (don’t sandbag!) 5. Communicate frequently – keep everyone in the loop and up-to-date; avoid surprises 6. Reward volunteers – Meaningful Reward = what is of value to volunteer + affordable/appropriate for organization 7. Re-purpose volunteers to avoid burn-out 8 Habits to Break 1. Give a job/task that doesn’t make a difference! 2. Delegate a job and … then take it back. 3. Delegate a job that is never done … offers no chance to celebrate completion. 4. Fail to explain what’s expected of the volunteer. 5. Fail to have an end date. 6. Hold endless, pointless board meetings. 7. Discuss the same topic or issue over and over and over again. 8. Disregard generational differences. 3517 Forest Haven Drive • Laurel, Maryland 20724 • 301.725.2508 (Phone) • 301.238.4579 (Fax) info@MarinerManagement.com • www.MarinerManagement.com
  • 2. A Volunteer Self-Assessment The best part about being an ASIS volunteer is … The greatest strength I bring to volunteering is … The most challenging part of being a volunteer anywhere is … The area of weakness for me in my volunteer role with ASIS is… The skills and abilities I’m successfully using in my ASIS volunteer work: I want/need to improve the following skills to make my ASIS experience more successful: Mariner Management & Marketing 3517 Forest Haven Drive • Laurel, Maryland 20724 • 301.725.2508 (Phone) • 301.238.4579 (Fax) info@MarinerManagement.com • www.MarinerManagement.com
  • 3. Volunteering Facts & Factoids Almost nine of 10 people say “Yes” when someone asks them to donate their time. Those who are asked are four times more likely to help as those who are not asked. Source: Points of Light Resources Why do people volunteer? A recent study by Washington, D.C.-based Independent Sector found there are three top reasons: They feel compassion for people in need. They feel needed. Volunteering gives them a new perspective on their community. The #1 Barrier …One barrier was constant among non-volunteers in all age, income, and employment status groups: unwillingness to make a year-round commitment. Source: National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating Who Volunteers in the US* … 64.5 million persons (28.8%) age 16 and over volunteered at least once and here’s a snapshot of who they are: Women volunteered at a higher rate than men across age groups, education levels, and other major characteristics (1/3 vs. 1/4). Persons age 35-44 were the most likely to volunteer (34.2%), closely followed by 45-54 year olds (32.8%) and 55-64 year olds (30.1%). Teenagers also had a relatively high volunteer rate, 29.4%, likely reflecting an emphasis on volunteer activities in schools. Volunteer rates were lowest among persons in their early twenties (20%) and those 65 and over (24.6%). Parents with children under age 18 were more likely to volunteer than persons without children of that age. Married persons volunteered at a higher rate than never married persons and persons of other marital statuses. Whites volunteered at a higher rate (30.5%) than did blacks (20.8%), Asians (19.3%), Hispanics or Latinos (14.5%). Total Annual Hours Spent Volunteering in US* … Volunteers spent a median of 52 hours on volunteer activities How Volunteers Become Involved* …Two in five volunteers became involved with the main organization for which they did volunteer work of their own volition while 42% were asked to become a volunteer. Reasons for Not Volunteering* … Among those who had volunteered at some point in the past, the most common reason given for not volunteering was lack of time (45%), followed by health or medical problems and family responsibilities or childcare problems. *Source: US DOL Bureau of Labor Statistics survey covering 9/03-9/04 The Generations Dance … Generations are different and that is manifested in many ways including Loyalty. Consider three interesting facts* that have an implication to volunteering. (1) 40% of Xers said having a mentor directly influenced their decision to stay at their current company. (2) When asked who they are most loyal to at work, Xers put co-workers first, their boss or projects second, and the company last. (3) Xers' number one reason to stay was "autonomy." *Source: BridgeWorks, LLC, 2001 www.generations.com More Facts & Figures … Visit the Resource Center at www.MarinerManagement.com Mariner Management & Marketing 3517 Forest Haven Drive • Laurel, Maryland 20724 • 301.725.2508 (Phone) • 301.238.4579 (Fax) info@MarinerManagement.com • www.MarinerManagement.com

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