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DTV Presentation Dec 2008

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A look at ASAE's Decision To Volunteer study

A look at ASAE's Decision To Volunteer study

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    DTV Presentation Dec 2008 DTV Presentation Dec 2008 Presentation Transcript

    • DECISION TO VOLUNTEER: A LOOK AT THE 2007 STUDY BY
      • About the Study
        • Study Rationale
        • Study Framework
      • Five Key Findings to Apply to
      • Your Organization Now
    • ABOUT THE STUDY What don’t we know about volunteering in the U.S.?
    • Study Framework
      • Sponsored by ASAE & The Center for Association Leadership
      • Collaboration with 23 cosponsoring associations:
        • engineering, health care, education, professional and technical fields
        • range of tax classifications; national, international membership, demographic profiles
    • Study Framework
      • Random sample of the active membership of these organizations + full sample of the known volunteers (weighted)
      • Internet survey fielded Nov. – Dec. 2007
      • 26,305 respondents, overall 14% response rate (margin of error < 1%)
    • FIVE KEY FINDINGS
      • 1. NOT ALL VOLUNTEERS ARE ALIKE
    • Patterns of Association Volunteering
    • Local Leaders
      • Focused on local chapter board and committee service
      • Mentoring, coaching, tutoring, and membership recruitment
      • Two thirds at entry or mid-career levels of employment.
    • Writers
      • The “subject matter experts” of your organization:
      • Presentations, expert panels
      • Publishing
      • Standards review
    • Teachers
      • Mentoring, coaching, tutoring, professional advice and membership recruitment
      • Contribute the fewest volunteer hours for the cosponsor organization
      • Lower satisfaction levels
    • Shapers
      • Engaged in every activity and perform the majority of volunteer work within the associations participating in this study.
        • Mentoring
        • Membership recruitment
        • Local and national board and committee service
        • Presentations
        • Fund raising
      • Older ages, longer membership span, more academic backgrounds, more senior career levels.
      • Highest satisfaction levels.
    • Volunteering & the Family Life Cycle
      • Differences among generations are subtle.
      • Difference more noticeable along professional & family situations.
      • Many paradoxes exist …
    • Many paradoxes
      • Younger members less engaged in association volunteering now but more likely to see the benefits of volunteerism generally.
    • Many paradoxes
      • Older members more engaged in volunteering now but less likely to intend to volunteer in future.
    • Many paradoxes
      • Members with families less likely to volunteer for associations but more likely to seek connections to professional world through volunteering.
    • Many paradoxes
      • Non-U.S. volunteers less likely to volunteer now but more likely to volunteer for professional reasons.
      • 2. IT’S POSSIBLE TO INCREASE ASSOCIATION VOLUNTEERING
    • First the good news…
        • Association members an ideal demographic group for volunteer recruitment:
          • History
          • Family tradition
          • Skilled
          • Satisfied
          • Link to career path
    • Address the Realities …
      • Community and professional volunteering – they need to see value
        • We need to work harder to demonstrate professional & societal value
      • Deliver on the professional benefits
      • Get their attention
      • 3. UNDERSTANDING WHY PEOPLE VOLUNTEER
      • The “Pro-Social” Volunteer:
      • Making a difference for others/society*
      • +
      • Career Benefits
      • * Such as building a stronger profession
      Reasons People Volunteer
    • Top Reasons Members Volunteer
      • Do something for profession/cause important to me
      • Its important to help others
      • Feel compassion for others
      • Gain new perspectives
      • Explore my own strengths
      • Volunteering important to people I respect
      • 4. UNDERSTANDING EFFECTIVE VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT
    • Power of the Direct Ask
      • How did you first learn about volunteering?
      • Direct Ask ... 51% were
      • Asked by staff or another volunteer
      • Local chapter or section
      • Meeting or conference
      • While only 13%
      • Answered a call for volunteers, ad, website or
      • Contacted organization
    • Why do members begin volunteering?
      • Meaningful opportunity
      • Right skills
      • Accessible location
      • Interest in volunteering / No loss of income
      • Short-term assignment
    • Why do members begin volunteering?
      • More interesting reasons …
      • More information about opportunities
      • Organization will train me
      • My employer supports me
      • I knew I could make a difference to my profession or work
      • I was actually asked
      • 5. RETAINING VOLUNTEERS AND ATTRACTING NON-VOLUNTEERS
    • Why don’t members volunteer?
      • Uncontrollable reasons:
      • Time constraints
      • Family or professional responsibilities
      • But the #1 reason is controllable!
    • Why don’t members volunteer?
      • Top 5 (controllable) reasons:
      • Lack of information about volunteer opportunities.
      • Volunteer elsewhere.
      • Never asked to volunteer.
      • Lack of information about virtual volunteer opportunities.
      • Lack of information about short-term assignments.
    • Other barriers:
      • Lack of follow through
      • Inadequate expense reimbursement
      • No tangible benefits
      • Lack of recognition
      • Tension with staff or other volunteers
      • Limitations imposed by job (or employer)
    • Ten Commandments for Improving your Volunteer Program
      • Know thy membership.
      • No cookie-cutter approaches.
      • Link your volunteer program to your mission.
      • Match opportunities and skills.
      • Treat volunteer involvement as a member benefit.
      • Recognize all volunteer contributions.
      • Effective volunteer programs must be adequately resourced.
      • … But money isn’t everything.
      • Train staff to work with volunteers.
      • Don’t write off the non-volunteer.