ASIS Member Experience Handout Research To Use

689 views
652 views

Published on

Quick look at two key association research studies - Decision to Volunteer and Decision to Join for the volunteer leader.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
689
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

ASIS Member Experience Handout Research To Use

  1. 1. Creating An Exceptional Member Experience  ASIS Leadership Conference   January 21, 2010    Research to Use  Two groundbreaking research studies provide insight on people’s decision to join professional  organizations and their decision to volunteer for those organizations. Both studies were conducted by  ASAE & The Center for Association Leadership, the leading national professional association for  membership‐based organizations. This paper summarizes the key points from these studies.    The Decision to Join, James Dalton & Monica Dignam, ASAE & The Center, 2007*  “A person’s decision to join an individual membership organizations is a not a cost‐benefit analysis …  [it] is not a classic procurement consideration.”  from The Decision To Join.  Study Highlights:  It’s all about the Good of the Order – Being part of something larger was consistently chosen  over personal benefit as the reason for joining an association. This doesn’t mean that personal  benefit isn’t important, but that it is the unity of personal benefits and benefits to the field that  make up the Yin and Yang of the decision.  Engagement increases retention – A key metric for renewal is found in level of involvement and  in fact the perception of value rises with involvement. This engagement was described by survey  participants largely as ad‐hoc or more formal volunteer roles. Interestingly, those not involved  are much more similar to former members in their assessment of the value of membership. One  additional point, the probability of being a promoter of the association also increases with  involvement.  It’s Not a Generation Thing – Research demonstrates that the primary driver to joining is stage  of career not generational attributes. A separate study supports The Decision To Join in its  finding that “young workers show every indication of joining association at even higher rates  than the Baby Boomers.” One caveat: younger professionals are more dissatisfied with how  associations are meeting their needs at the beginning of their careers and in the availability of  leadership opportunities.   Resignation is out of the association’s control about 50% of the time – In the study, about one‐ half of the respondents who had dropped their membership indicated it was due to career and  other life changes.  Of course that means we are responsible for drops about 50% and falls into  two broad areas: did not receive expected value and dissatisfaction with association  performance. 
  2. 2. It’s all about WOM (Word Of Mouth) – The top method of recruiting members is word of mouth  making colleagues, friends, connections our secret weapons.    The Decision to Volunteer, Beth Gazley, PhD & Monica Dignam, ASAE & The  Center, 2008*  “Volunteering that is related to a profession is viewed increasingly by employers and colleagues as a  virtue rather than detrimental to their professional responsibilities.”  from The Decision To Volunteer.  Study Highlights:  It’s all about the Good of the Order (Again!) – Values drive volunteering. People contribute  their time for both altruistic and instrumental (self‐serving) reasons telling us that volunteerism  is best considered a pro‐social activity. It offers the ability to benefit others without restricting  the volunteer’s own possible benefits.    One Size Does NOT Fit All – One of the key findings relates to patterns of volunteering and  underscores the trend that volunteers have diverse needs and desires. The study identified  distinct patterns in volunteers that offer a continuum for involvement from the ad hoc (short‐ term) volunteer to the shaper or super volunteer. It is important to note that more than one‐ half of association volunteers fall into the ad hoc category. And across all levels of affiliation,  there is a distinct trend in volunteering that mirrors the more individualistic and self‐directed  perspectives on work and leisure activities. This will require us to rethink volunteer  opportunities and build more flexibility into our programs.  Members see professional benefits of volunteerism – Interestingly, two‐thirds of the survey  respondents said they look for opportunities to connect volunteering to their professional work.  Many also said volunteering is a benefit of membership.    Meaning keeps volunteers engaged – Above all other elements, people volunteering for  associations expect to be involved effectively. The value being in the company of like‐minder  people and have the opportunity to contribute in a meaningful way to the cause/profession they  believe in. Endless meetings, unclear roles, and projects with no discernable outcome turn  members away.    Organizational strategies can support or discourage volunteering  – The top reason for mot  volunteering is lack of information about opportunities and among the top barriers that  discourage ongoing volunteering are poor follow‐through with volunteers, forgetting to thank  them, poor communication and lack of support and training. It is the organization that hinders  volunteering more than individual circumstances, however is should be noted that family, work  and geography are limitations on volunteer participation as well.  It’s all about WOM (Word‐of‐Mouth) – The number one recruitment strategy is the direct ask  by another member of staff. In fact 51% indicated they first volunteer through a direct request  compared to only 13% indicating they responded to a call for volunteer or ad.  2   
  3. 3. The New Vocabulary  • Engagement – Different from joining, broader than traditional volunteering, engagement is the  act of giving time or money to an association in return for value.  The big difference is that  engagement is a continuum and can start before the join happens. We also know it’s the key to  renewal.   • Adhocracy – A (not‐so‐new) model for volunteer program that embraces the episodic or micro‐ volunteering and seeks decentralized leadership.  • Net‐Promoter Score – This metric measures an association’s success based on members’  willingness to endorse the organization.  First used by corporate America, this measurement  focuses on members as promoters.  • Crowdsourcing – Also from corporate America, this strategy leverages group intelligence to  create, problem‐solve or produce something.  It creates opportunities for active participation by  members.  • Member‐citizen – A fully engaged member who has a vested interest in the community.     * Both the Decision to Join and Decision to Volunteer studies are available from ASAE & The Center, 1575  I St. NW, Washington, DC 20005, P. 888.950.2723, F. 202.371.8315 or P. 202.371.0940 (in Washington,  DC). Visit www.asaecenter.org for more details.              Prepared by: Peggy Hoffman, CAE  Mariner Management & Marketing LLC  www.MarinerManagement.com   email: phoffman@marinermanagement.com  phone: 301.725.2508  twitter: @peggyhoffman  blog: marinermanagement.com/idea‐center  3   

×