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Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
Inclusive Educative Gaming -  a holistic view
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Inclusive Educative Gaming - a holistic view

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As part of the presentation “Inclusive educative gaming: a holistic view”, ViPi was presented on Friday 13 at 15.15 to 16.30 in room G2 Cailliau in the session “Video Games for Learning” at the Media …

As part of the presentation “Inclusive educative gaming: a holistic view”, ViPi was presented on Friday 13 at 15.15 to 16.30 in room G2 Cailliau in the session “Video Games for Learning” at the Media and Learning event.

The event took place at the Flemish Ministry of Education Headquarters (Hendrik Consciencegebouw, Koning Albert II-laan 15, 1210 Brussels).

The ViPi KA3 LLL project (511792-LLP-1-2010-1-GR-KA3-KA3NW) has been partially funded under the Lifelong Learning program, subprogramme KA3 ICT. This presentation reflects the views only of the author(s), and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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  • 1. INCLUSIVE EDUCATIVE GAMING: A HOLISTIC VIEW 1 Prof. David Brown (NTU) Prof. Penny Standen (NU) Karel Van Isacker (PhoenixKM) With the financial support of:
  • 2. OVERVIEW A mosaic of needs and initiatives  Approach to Inclusion, Disability and User sensitive Design  Why we adopt a games based learning (GBL) approach for people with disabilities  The importance of engagement for our target audiences  Current GBL projects and initial evidence of effectiveness  A focus on GBL for improving mathematical skills  A case study approach to evaluating the ViPi project 2  Guidelines for accessible serious games Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 3. THE START: … A MOSAIC OF NEEDS AND INITIATIVES ICT skills, digital inclusion ICT AT competences Empowerment Social competences Efficient Caregiver support 3 Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 4. MANY INITIATIVES TOWARDS ICT TAKE-UP ViPi (Virtual Portal for Interaction and ICT Training for People with Disabilities)  e-MENTORING (European Mentoring Network for Disadvantaged Adults)  ATLEC (Assistive Technology Learning Through A Unified Curriculum)  SGSCC (Serious Games for Social & Creativity Competence)  DICE (Digital Inclusion Champions in Europe)  Future initiatives that are in the pipeline:  M-CARE (Mobile Training for Home and Health Caregivers For People with Disabilities and Older People)  ACAD2 (Accessibility in Accommodation & Catering Sectors for Disabled People)  Media and Learning, 13/12/2013 4
  • 5. INVOLVEMENT END-USERS & STAKEHOLDERS ACROSS ALL PROJECTS 1 •Collection user requirements 2 •Testing 3 •Validation 4 •Exploitation 5 Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 6. “SOCIAL INCLUSION CAN BE ACHIEVED BY REMOVING THE BARRIERS THAT TURN IMPAIRMENTS INTO DISABILITY” “IT….. HAS THE ABILITY TO MINIMIZE IMPAIRMENTS OR TURN THEM INTO DISABLING FACTORS. AS THE IT PROFESSIONAL BODY, WE THEREFORE HAVE THE ETHICAL OBLIGATION TO MAXIMIZE THE RAPIDLY INCREASING POTENTIAL OF TECHNOLOGY TO CREATE SOCIAL INCLUSION BY BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS PRESENTED BY CURRENT SOCIAL STRUCTURES AND PHYSICAL OR MENTAL IMPAIRMENTS.” DR GEOFFREY BUSBY MBE FBCS CENG, ADVISER TO THE BCS ON DISABILITY ISSUES Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 7. INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF FUNCTIONING, DISABILITY AND HEALTH • • • “Functioning and disability are viewed as a complex interaction between the health condition of the individual and the contextual factors of the environment ………..” “How can we make the social and built environment more accessible for all persons, those with and without disabilities?” Information technology should be able to be designed so that it is more accessible to people with disabilities and can provide an aid that minimises the effect of an impairment Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 8. INVOLVEMENT OF USERS IN THE DESIGN PROCESS  User sensitive inclusive design (USID) combines established guidelines on User Centred Design with those from contemporary HCI and product design research  Six stage, iterative, design process with users involved at each stage of the process.  Multidisciplinary Usability Team: guides the application of the user sensitive design methodology.  User team propose design requirements and how these could be met in potential design solutions and giving feedback on the prototypes developed.  May reduce number of devices distributed but never used: in UK national survey said that 29.3% of all AT was abandoned by users. Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 9. WHY WE ADOPT A BLENDED GAMES BASED LEARNING APPROACH Value of learning through playing computer or video games  Earlier work on computer games tended to focus on negative aspects  Play and games recognized as having important role in early learning  More recently, the positive aspects of games in formal education explored  Ability of games to engage learner voluntarily in sufficient repetitions  They provide immediate feedback an activity is easily linked with a learning outcome  Media and Learning, 13/12/2013 9
  • 10. ….AND GAMING IN A MOBILE ENVIRONMENT The significance of this particular technology and the status it carries with peers  First uses of mobile devices was in prompting individuals to complete everyday tasks  As part of a programme to improve employability iPhone app to teach fire safety  Supports learning in any environment the learner chooses  Particularly important for a target audience described as ‘concrete thinkers’:  Moving the environment of learning to a real world context might also help to compensate for the poor memory skills  Recognizing the social dimension of learning  Media and Learning, 13/12/2013 10
  • 11. THIS IMPORTANCE OF ENGAGEMENT FOR STUDENTS WITH COMPLEX LEARNING DIFFICULTIES AND DISABILITIES Engagement is the single best predictor of successful learning for children with learning disabilities (Iovannone et al., 2003).  Without engagement, there is no deep learning (Hargreaves, 2006), effective teaching, meaningful outcome, real attainment or quality progress (Carpenter, 2010).     Engagement Profile and Scale allows teachers to focus on the child’s engagement as a learner and create personalised learning pathways Engagement is multi-dimensional, and encompasses awareness, curiosity, investigation, discovery, anticipation, persistence and initiation Technological interventions & adaptations made, and the effect on the student’s level of engagement can be recorded on the engagement scale
  • 12. RESEARCH IN GAMES FOR DISABILITY AND INCLUSION Serious games for use by students with ID and those at risk of exclusion (Game On/GOAL/GOET)  Two current EU projects:  RISE: To change attitudes to migrant workers and refugees and to develop their employability skills  SGSCC: to develop social competences and creativity in students with mild and moderate disabilities   Standen and Brown – Choice Reaction Time, Independent Decision Making, Working Memory and Maths Skills
  • 13. EVALUATION STUDY FOR DGBL: CAN PARTICIPATING IN DGBL IMPROVE MATHS SKILLS?        DGBL (Digital Games Based Learning ) to improve working memory and maths skills Maths is a functional skill – use to make them effective and involved. Students with severe maths cognition deficits often possess underlying deficits in working memory Particularly suited to this heterogeneous population is matched pairs design to allow impartial comparison between intervention & control by matching individuals into pairs for a given variable and randomly assigning. Matching pairs – BPVS and P-scales Any differences between groups is due to intervention and not differences between groups. Trade offs between external and internal validity. Internal/eternal validity scale. Initial priority given to internal validity.
  • 14. EVALUATION STUDY: MATHEMATICAL SKILLS       Research Question: Can participating in SG improve the understanding of fractions, percentages and decimals in students with ID? Participants: 16 key stage 2-5 students with ID. Study design: matched pairs; 8 students using intervention software, 8 students using battery of control games, 5, 20 minute weekly sessions Baseline Measures - tests understanding of underlying language of fractions and whole-part concept in fraction notation Intervention Group – Cheese Factory Control Group - Hidden Shapes Game
  • 15. EVALUATION STUDY: RESULTS         BASELINE TEST 1: intervention group achieves far better results BT1: In the control group – pre and post intervention tests for baseline 1 are extremely similar BT1: In the Intervention Group: significant difference between post and pre intervention results for intervention group at 5% level BASELINE TEST 2: intervention group performed better than control BT2 : control group improves but not significantly so BT2: significant at the 5% level for the intervention group for baseline 2 measure Qualitative Analysis of individual performance - any variation in ability can be taken into consideration during analysis The external validity of this study is somewhat limited, but positive evidence
  • 16. VIPI - VIRTUAL PORTAL FOR INTERACTION AND ICT TRAINING FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 16 Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 17. VIPI PILOTING: DATA AND METHODS       RQ: Can the ViPi components improve ICT skills in people with disabilities? Materials Tested: ViPi training curriculum, exercises, games and platform Data for each Participant – collected at each pilot site (Age, Gender, Disability, …) Competences and Skills Progress Radars - to record changes over baseline measures after repeated intervention (Basic ICT Skills, Physical interaction with ICT, Confidence in use of ICT, self esteem, numeracy, literacy, timekeeping). Observational Checklist: identifies remaining usability/accessibility issues, engagement, cultural appropriateness etc. Likert Scale Questionnaire: effectiveness of each element of all 17 ViPi resources and how it met their needs. Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 18. PILOTING SITES Country Period Target group(s) Training course units Games BE May-November 2013 People with learning difficulties, mixed with intellectual disabilities (18+), teachers, trainers People with vision and mobility impairment (16+), teachers, trainers. People with mobility impairments (18+), teachers, trainers. People with intellectual disabilities (18+), teachers, trainers. Unit 1 (and 2) CY GR LT UK May-October 2013 May-October 2013 May-November 2013 May-October 2013 Online and offline Unit 2 and 3 Online and offline Unit 2 and 3 Online and offline Unit 1 Online and offline Desktop and mobile games Desktop and mobile games Desktop and mobile games Desktop and mobile games People with Customised version Desktop and mobile intellectual of unit 1 games disabilities (16+), Online and offline Media teachers, trainers. and Learning, 13/12/2013 Local end-user organisation In cooperation with various end-user groups School for the Blinds “Ayios Varnavas”, G.E English Center and individuals Disability Now / ΑΝΑΠΗΡΙΑ ΤΩΡΑ Valakupiai Rehabilitation Centre, the association of people with mental retardation “VILTIS” (“Hope”). Older students and 18 ex students from Oak Field School & Sports College.
  • 19. PILOT DETAILS: UK & BELGIUM  In    In   UK: 17 Participants at Oak Field School, key stage 5 and ex-students, 16-19 years and 2 in mid 30s with severe/moderate intellectual disabilities Voluntary participation, up to 4 sessions, and 1hr/session Belgium: 20 trainees and 6 teachers/trainers, mostly in sheltered work schemes, moderate-severe learning/intellectual disabilities Bi-weekly sessions 50 mins. each (3 sessions per day combined with lunch) Media and Learning, 13/12/2013 19
  • 20. HEADLINE RESULTS  Enables retention of information, increased measures of engagement and confidence and communicational skills  Identification of barriers to use of ICT and methods to overcome these  Improved evaluation Methods for those with severe intellectual disabilities 20 Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 21. CASE STUDIES - UK  Case Study 1: 17 with Downs Syndrome – learnt to turn on a tablet, start apps, take photos; use input technology on a PC and improve confidence  Case Study 2: 16 with physical disabilities, and intermediate ID – was engaged by the games, retained info between sessions, and used TTS  Case Study 3: 18 with mod ID – used games to maintain focus, retained information between sessions and could identify peripherals and remember procedures Media and Learning, 13/12/2013 21
  • 22. CASE STUDIES - BELGIUM  Case study 4: 37 with Williams Syndrome – very focussed on Facebook and training developed email, doc creations and editing skills. Training also developed awareness of online security  Case study 5: 47 mod/severe ID in sheltered workshop, lacking confidence – prospect of new PC at work was causing anxiety. Training developed skills needed and overcame anxiety and become more confident, and supported other members of the group 22 Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 23. APPENDIX 1: GUIDELINES FOR ACCESSIBLE SERIOUS GAMES: FROM BROWN DJ, STANDEN PJ, EVETT L, BATTERSBY S AND SHOPLAND N. (2010). DESIGNING SERIOUS GAMES FOR PEOPLE WITH DUAL DIAGNOSIS: LEARNING DISABILITIES AND SENSORY IMPAIRMENTS. IN EDUCATIONAL GAMING. CHAPTER IN ZEMLIANSKY, P AND WILCOX, D. M., (EDS), EDUCATIONAL GAMING, IGI GLOBAL  Ensure presentation at appropriate speed – it is essential that speed of presentation is appropriate for the particular target group, and may be modified during the iterative user-centred design process  Allow users to go back – essential for all users, and especially those who may have organisational, information processing and/or memory difficulties  Allow User Control – allow for user customisation based on user preference; for example, some users with dyslexia or visual impairment have distinct colour and contrast requirements, others may wish to slow things down, or to use keyboard access Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 24. Text – make any text plain text (rather than images or graphics), follow Clear Text for All guidelines (Evett & Brown, 2005, and see WCAG 2.0, W3C, 2008a), no dense blocks of text, plain English  Text Alternatives: Provide text equivalents for non-text content, including auditory and visual components, so that it can be changed into other forms people need, such as Braille, speech, symbols, other languages including sign language  Colour – never convey information by colour alone  Contrast – ensure sufficient contrast so that it is easier to distinguish items, both visual and auditory (cf. WCAG 2.0, W3C, 2008a)  Navigable – help users navigate, find content and know where they are: by placing navigation information in the same place (usually at the top) and ensuring that it is consistent and simple, using maps when appropriate, using home and back buttons, providing context and orientation information  Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 25. Maintain organisation – instructions, buttons, clearly displayed and in the same place (often at top) throughout presentations  Links – use unique and informative text descriptions for any hyperlinks (never click here!)  Use accessibility features – HTML/XML have inherent accessibility features (e.g., alt text, long desc) which should always be used; other formats (e.g., Java, Flash, Games environments) are not necessarily accessible, although this is improving with more recent versions having accessibility features, which should be used; provide alternatives where possible  Design simply – in simple layouts, it is relatively easy to draw attention to important features and differences; in more complex layouts it becomes harder to highlight features, thus making presentations even more complex  Use fallbacks – provide alternatives, provide equivalent content as accessible html when possible and design for graceful transformation (such as reflowing)  Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 26. Robust – make systems consistent and error free, provide appropriate error messages and error catching  Aim for compatibility with assistive technologies – e.g., screenreaders, text-to-speech, zoom features  Allow keyboard access – ensure the system can be controlled from the keyboard and not just by using the mouse  Seizures – do not include elements that are known to cause seizures, for example by having elements that flash or have particular spatial frequencies  Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 27. 27 Media and Learning, 13/12/2013
  • 28. CONTACT DETAILS  Prof. David Brown  Computing and Technology Team  Nottingham Trent University  Clifton Campus  Nottingham, NG118NS  david.brown@ntu.ac.uk  www.ntu.ac.uk Media and Learning, 13/12/2013 28
  • 29. CONTACT DETAILS  Prof. Penny Standen  Professor of Health Psychology and Learning Disabilities  School of Community Health Sciences, Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing, Learning Disabilities Section, University of Nottingham  P.Standen@nottingham.ac.uk Media and Learning, 13/12/2013 29
  • 30. CONTACT DETAILS  Karel Van Isacker  PhoenixKM BVBA  CEO, Project manager  karel@phoenixkm.eu  Amersveldestraat 189 8610 Kortemark Belgium  karel@phoenixkm.eu  www.phoenixkm.eu Media and Learning, 13/12/2013 30

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