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 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
 Pm archives photos w bios
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Pm archives photos w bios

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  • Fannie Pitt Jeffrey\nFannie Pitt Jeffrey was a dedicated advocate of religious education and spiritual leadership for African Americans and is remembered as a champion of equality within The Episcopal Church. Advocate for equal salaries between blacks and whites working for the UTO, supported education opportunities for lay workers.\n\n
  • Fannie Pitt Jeffrey\nFannie Pitt Jeffrey was a dedicated advocate of religious education and spiritual leadership for African Americans and is remembered as a champion of equality within The Episcopal Church. Advocate for equal salaries between blacks and whites working for the UTO, supported education opportunities for lay workers.\n\n
  • Fannie Pitt Jeffrey\nFannie Pitt Jeffrey was a dedicated advocate of religious education and spiritual leadership for African Americans and is remembered as a champion of equality within The Episcopal Church. Advocate for equal salaries between blacks and whites working for the UTO, supported education opportunities for lay workers.\n\n
  • Daniel Corrigan\nDaniel Corrigan, Episcopal Bishop and director of the Home Department of the Executive Council, was an activist for equal rights, peace and ecumenism.  His devotion to these issues involved him in two historical events in the history of the Episcopal Church: the Mass for Peace at the Pentagon and the ordination of the Philadelphia 11. \n\n
  • Daniel Corrigan\nDaniel Corrigan, Episcopal Bishop and director of the Home Department of the Executive Council, was an activist for equal rights, peace and ecumenism.  His devotion to these issues involved him in two historical events in the history of the Episcopal Church: the Mass for Peace at the Pentagon and the ordination of the Philadelphia 11. \n\n
  • Daniel Corrigan\nDaniel Corrigan, Episcopal Bishop and director of the Home Department of the Executive Council, was an activist for equal rights, peace and ecumenism.  His devotion to these issues involved him in two historical events in the history of the Episcopal Church: the Mass for Peace at the Pentagon and the ordination of the Philadelphia 11. \n\n
  • Daisuke Kitagawa\nThe Reverend Daisuke Kitagawa was a leading voice in the area of racial justice, ecumenism and Christian social ministry.  With the removal of Japanese Americans to the relocation camps, Kitagawa became priest-in-charge of Episcopalians in the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Newell, California.\n\n
  • Daisuke Kitagawa\nThe Reverend Daisuke Kitagawa was a leading voice in the area of racial justice, ecumenism and Christian social ministry.  With the removal of Japanese Americans to the relocation camps, Kitagawa became priest-in-charge of Episcopalians in the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Newell, California.\n\n
  • Daisuke Kitagawa\nThe Reverend Daisuke Kitagawa was a leading voice in the area of racial justice, ecumenism and Christian social ministry.  With the removal of Japanese Americans to the relocation camps, Kitagawa became priest-in-charge of Episcopalians in the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Newell, California.\n\n
  • William Stringfellow\nAnglican lawyer and lay theologian, a modern prophet who held the institutional church liable for being too close to the principalities of the corporate world.  He challenged the notion that the church should abstain from politics and believed, "all religious people, in both church and synagogue, should take a stand in politics." \n\n
  • William Stringfellow\nAnglican lawyer and lay theologian, a modern prophet who held the institutional church liable for being too close to the principalities of the corporate world.  He challenged the notion that the church should abstain from politics and believed, "all religious people, in both church and synagogue, should take a stand in politics." \n\n
  • William Stringfellow\nAnglican lawyer and lay theologian, a modern prophet who held the institutional church liable for being too close to the principalities of the corporate world.  He challenged the notion that the church should abstain from politics and believed, "all religious people, in both church and synagogue, should take a stand in politics." \n\n
  • Miriam Van Waters\nDaughter of an Episcopal priest, was a practitioner of the Social Gospel through prisoner rehabilitation.  As the superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory at Framingham, Van Waters introduced the principle of rehabilitation, changing the prison environment from an emphasis on punishment and tedium to the development of skills and educational opportunities for the inmates, separate and safe accommodation for younger inmates and nursing mothers, and physical activities that encouraged personal development with others over mere obligatory exercise. \n\n
  • Miriam Van Waters\nDaughter of an Episcopal priest, was a practitioner of the Social Gospel through prisoner rehabilitation.  As the superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory at Framingham, Van Waters introduced the principle of rehabilitation, changing the prison environment from an emphasis on punishment and tedium to the development of skills and educational opportunities for the inmates, separate and safe accommodation for younger inmates and nursing mothers, and physical activities that encouraged personal development with others over mere obligatory exercise. \n\n
  • Miriam Van Waters\nDaughter of an Episcopal priest, was a practitioner of the Social Gospel through prisoner rehabilitation.  As the superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory at Framingham, Van Waters introduced the principle of rehabilitation, changing the prison environment from an emphasis on punishment and tedium to the development of skills and educational opportunities for the inmates, separate and safe accommodation for younger inmates and nursing mothers, and physical activities that encouraged personal development with others over mere obligatory exercise. \n\n
  • Michael Yasutake\nThe Reverend Seichi Michael Yasutake carried out a ministry of peace, justice, and reconciliation for over fifty years as an Episcopal priest focusing on promoting interfaith responses to violations of human rights. He founded the United States-Japan Committee for Racial Justice and the Interfaith Prisoner for Conscience Project, which sought to redress injustices caused by individuals, businesses, and governments. \n\n
  • Michael Yasutake\nThe Reverend Seichi Michael Yasutake carried out a ministry of peace, justice, and reconciliation for over fifty years as an Episcopal priest focusing on promoting interfaith responses to violations of human rights. He founded the United States-Japan Committee for Racial Justice and the Interfaith Prisoner for Conscience Project, which sought to redress injustices caused by individuals, businesses, and governments. \n\n
  • Michael Yasutake\nThe Reverend Seichi Michael Yasutake carried out a ministry of peace, justice, and reconciliation for over fifty years as an Episcopal priest focusing on promoting interfaith responses to violations of human rights. He founded the United States-Japan Committee for Racial Justice and the Interfaith Prisoner for Conscience Project, which sought to redress injustices caused by individuals, businesses, and governments. \n\n
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  • The Philadelphia Eleven\nOn July 29, 1974, eleven women were irregularly ordained to the priesthood in a ceremony at the Church of the Advocate, Philadelphia.  An act that broke with the traditional interpretation of the Church's Canons at that time, the women, who were ordained without the recommendation of a Standing Committee, came to be known as the Philadelphia Eleven. \n\n
  • The Philadelphia Eleven\nOn July 29, 1974, eleven women were irregularly ordained to the priesthood in a ceremony at the Church of the Advocate, Philadelphia.  An act that broke with the traditional interpretation of the Church's Canons at that time, the women, who were ordained without the recommendation of a Standing Committee, came to be known as the Philadelphia Eleven. \n\n
  • Barbara Harris \nAn ardent supporter of the civil rights movement, Barbara Harris participated in voter registration efforts and the Selma march with Martin Luther King, Jr..  Inspired by the issue of women’s rights and her dedication to the Church, she entered the ministry and was ordained a deacon in 1979 and a priest the following year.  On February 11, 1989, Barbara Harris became the first female bishop in the Episcopal Church and first woman ordained in the Anglican Communion.\n
  • Barbara Harris \nAn ardent supporter of the civil rights movement, Barbara Harris participated in voter registration efforts and the Selma march with Martin Luther King, Jr..  Inspired by the issue of women’s rights and her dedication to the Church, she entered the ministry and was ordained a deacon in 1979 and a priest the following year.  On February 11, 1989, Barbara Harris became the first female bishop in the Episcopal Church and first woman ordained in the Anglican Communion.\n
  • Barbara Harris \nAn ardent supporter of the civil rights movement, Barbara Harris participated in voter registration efforts and the Selma march with Martin Luther King, Jr..  Inspired by the issue of women’s rights and her dedication to the Church, she entered the ministry and was ordained a deacon in 1979 and a priest the following year.  On February 11, 1989, Barbara Harris became the first female bishop in the Episcopal Church and first woman ordained in the Anglican Communion.\n
  • Barbara Harris \nAn ardent supporter of the civil rights movement, Barbara Harris participated in voter registration efforts and the Selma march with Martin Luther King, Jr..  Inspired by the issue of women’s rights and her dedication to the Church, she entered the ministry and was ordained a deacon in 1979 and a priest the following year.  On February 11, 1989, Barbara Harris became the first female bishop in the Episcopal Church and first woman ordained in the Anglican Communion.\n
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  • John Morris\nAs an activist striving to raise awareness of the racial divide in the Episcopal community, the Reverend John Morris is renown as an activist for racial integration and as a founding member of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity (ESCRU). \n\n
  • John Morris\nAs an activist striving to raise awareness of the racial divide in the Episcopal community, the Reverend John Morris is renown as an activist for racial integration and as a founding member of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity (ESCRU). \n\n
  • Pauli Murray\nPauli Murray was a lawyer, a professor, a feminist, a civil rights activist and the first African American female priest ordained by the Episcopal Church.  Murray saw the civil rights and women’s movements as intertwined and believed that black women had a vested interest in the women’s movement.  Called to the ordained ministry to realize equality in that role as a lesbian woman, Pauli Murray began her studies in her late 60s at General Theological Seminary in 1976.  She was ordained at the National Cathedral the following year. \n\n
  • Pauli Murray\nPauli Murray was a lawyer, a professor, a feminist, a civil rights activist and the first African American female priest ordained by the Episcopal Church.  Murray saw the civil rights and women’s movements as intertwined and believed that black women had a vested interest in the women’s movement.  Called to the ordained ministry to realize equality in that role as a lesbian woman, Pauli Murray began her studies in her late 60s at General Theological Seminary in 1976.  She was ordained at the National Cathedral the following year. \n\n
  • Pauli Murray\nPauli Murray was a lawyer, a professor, a feminist, a civil rights activist and the first African American female priest ordained by the Episcopal Church.  Murray saw the civil rights and women’s movements as intertwined and believed that black women had a vested interest in the women’s movement.  Called to the ordained ministry to realize equality in that role as a lesbian woman, Pauli Murray began her studies in her late 60s at General Theological Seminary in 1976.  She was ordained at the National Cathedral the following year. \n\n
  • William Scarlett\nWilliam Scarlett was a tireless crusader for social reform.  As Bishop of Missouri, he committed the resources of the diocese to helping those left jobless and homeless by the Great Depression. \n\n
  • William Scarlett\nWilliam Scarlett was a tireless crusader for social reform.  As Bishop of Missouri, he committed the resources of the diocese to helping those left jobless and homeless by the Great Depression. \n\n
  • Henri Stines\nRecognized as a preacher, a parish builder, and a critic of racism and sexism in the Church, Henri Stines is remembered as a multilingual liturgist and a leader in the ministry to the elderly who were often alone and forgotten in homebound situations.  He was an advocate for full integration and a voice for nonviolence and peace during the Civil Rights era. \n\n
  • Henri Stines\nRecognized as a preacher, a parish builder, and a critic of racism and sexism in the Church, Henri Stines is remembered as a multilingual liturgist and a leader in the ministry to the elderly who were often alone and forgotten in homebound situations.  He was an advocate for full integration and a voice for nonviolence and peace during the Civil Rights era. \n\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Fannie Pitt Jeffreywas a dedicatedadvocate of religiouseducation andspiritual leadershipfor AfricanAmericans and isremembered as achampion of equalitywithin The EpiscopalChurch.
    • 2. Daniel Corrigan, EpiscopalBishop and director of theHome Department of theExecutive Council, was anactivist for equal rights,peace and ecumenism. His devotion to theseissues involved him in twohistorical events in thehistory of the EpiscopalChurch: the Mass forPeace at the Pentagon andthe ordination of thePhiladelphia 11.
    • 3. Anglican lawyer, laytheologian, and writer,William Stringfellow isremembered as anactivist for civil rights,women’s ordination, gayliberation and peace inVietnam.  His faith ledhim to practice law inHarlem where herepresented the poor,African-Americans andHispanics.
    • 4. Miriam Van Waters, daughter of an Episcopal priest, was a practitioner of the Social Gospel through prisoner rehabilitation.  As the superintendent of the Massachusetts Reformatory at Framingham, Van Watersintroduced the principle of rehabilitation changing the prison environment in the United States.
    • 5. The Reverend Seichi Michael Yasutake carried out a ministry of peace, justice and reconciliation for over fifty years as an Episcopal priest focusing on promoting interfaithresponses to violations of human rights. 
    • 6. The Reverend Seichi Michael Yasutake carried out a ministry of peace, justice and reconciliation for over fifty years as an Episcopal priest focusing on promoting interfaithresponses to violations of human rights. 
    • 7. On July 29, 1974, eleven women were irregularlyordained to the priesthood in a ceremony at the Church of the Advocate, Philadelphia.  An act that broke with the traditional interpretation of the Churchs Canons at that time. The women, who were ordained without therecommendation of a Standing Committee, came to be known as the Philadelphia Eleven.
    • 8. Elected in 2003,V. Gene Robinson wasthe first openly gaybishop. He is bishopwith the people in theDiocese of NewHampshire andadvocate for theinclusion of all peopleand an end tohomophobia, racismand all the oppressivefunctions of society.
    • 9. As an activist strivingto raise awareness ofthe racial divide in theEpiscopal community,John Morris isrenown as achampion for racialintegration and as afounding member ofthe Episcopal Societyfor Cultural andRacial Unity (ESCRU). 
    • 10. William Scarlett was a tireless crusaderfor social reform.  As Bishop of Missouri, he committed the resources of the diocese to helpingthose left jobless and homeless by the Great Depression. 
    • 11. Recognized as a preacher,a parish builder, and acritic of racism and sexismin the Church, HenriStines is remembered as amultilingual liturgist andleader in the ministry tothe elderly who wereoften alone and forgottenin homebound situations. He was an advocate forfull integration and a voicefor nonviolence and peaceduring the Civil Rights era. 
    • 12. Jeanie Wylie-Kellermann was a journalist, outspoken advocate for women, anti-nuclearprotest organizer and author of an award winning documentary on the appropriation of a polish community in Detroit by Chrysler Motors.Editor of The Witness magazine and journalist for the Catholic Worker News.

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