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8 fish bol 5
 

8 fish bol 5

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  • On the subject of splitting clades, another interesting trend also fell out when we compared similar species from different continents. This list represents all species in our sample that were common to both Australian and South African waters. The names highlighted in green text represent offshore pelagics, while the red indicates those fishes which are tied to the reef. Strikingly there is a lot more divergence within species that are reef-associated for the duration of their adult life and rely on dispersive larvae to cross large oceans. These results suggest that the Indian Ocean may be a more effective barrier to gene flow for these fishes than was once thought. These results are counter to the idea that dispersive larvae keep the world’s oceans connected.
  • In closing, I would like to acknowledge the deep involvement of the whole DNA barcode group at Guelph in honing the protocols that I have discussed. If you have questions, I will try to answer them.

8 fish bol 5 8 fish bol 5 Presentation Transcript

  • Barcoding Marine Fishes: A Three-Ocean Perspective
  • Barcoding All Marine Fishes – 15 000 Species Target = 15 000 species Barcoding All Marine Fishes
  • Recovering Barcodes from Fishes Taxonomic Coverage 530 Species (3.5%) 317 Genera (10.5%) 130 Families (32%) 28 Orders (55%) 5’ 3’ 648-bp Fish F1 Fish F2 Fish R2 Fish R1 Fish Forward Fish Reverse
  • Distribution Map Pacific Indian Atlantic Collection Site Canada Australia South Africa Portugal
  • Within Region Analysis
  • Within Region: South Africa (254 species) Conspecific X = 0.61 ± 0.12 % Congeneric X = 13.86 ± 0.22 % 97% 96%
  • Within Region: Portugal (45 species) Conspecific X = 0.29 ± 0.04 % Congeneric X = 10.92 ± 0.51 % 100% 99%
  • Within Region: Canada (52 species) Conspecific X = 0.48 ± 0.08 % Congeneric X = 3.96 ± 0.05% 96% 90%
  • COI Divergences (%) 98% Species Possessed Unique Barcodes
  • Potentially Overlooked Diversity (Within Region) Conspecific 97% 99% 96% X = 5.64 ± 0.07%
  • Apparent Sequence Sharing Region % Sequence Sharing Canada 0.84% South Africa 1.08% Australia 0.14% Portugal - Overall 0.40%
    • Explanations:
    • Problematic Taxonomy
    • Error
      • Laboratory
      • Misidentification
    • Identical Barcodes
      • Introgressive hybrization
      • Recently diverged taxa
    E. rivulatus E. tukula
  • Apparent Sequence Sharing Congeneric 96% 100% 90% E. rivulatus E. tukula Single Aberrant Specimen 17%
  • Morphologically Problematic Taxa - Sebastes A B A B Sebastes crameri Sebastes reedi Sebastes zacentrus Sebastes wilsoni B
  • Specimen Vouchering
    • Whole Specimen
    • South Africa
    • Portugal
    • Tissue and Image
    • Canada
    • Tissue Only
    • Australia
  • Between Region Analysis
  • Potentially Overlooked Diversity (Between Regions)
    • 25 Species
      • 6 Pelagic
      • 19 Reef/Inshore
    South Africa vs. Australia 2%
  • Offshore Pelagics Reef Associated Range = 0 – 0.62 % Range = 1.95 – 16 % Mean = 0.20 ± 0.03 % Mean = 7.56 ± 0.43 % 16.00 ± 0.04 Parupeneus heptacanthus 15.96 ± 0.09 Otolithes ruber 15.71 ± 0.13 Chelidonichthys kumu 14.19 ± 2.03 Monodactylus argenteu 11.03 ± 0.07 Platycephalus indicus 10.39 ± 0.17 Parupeneus indicus 10.01 ± 0.03 Rhabdosargus sarba 9.38 ± 0.05 Acanthopagrus berda 9.29 ± 0.34 Alopias vulpinus 5.30 ± 0.09 Argyrops spinifer 5.17 ± 0 Himantura gerrardi 3.55 ± 0.10 Scomberomorus commerson 3.27 ± 0.12 Ariomma indica 2.01 ± 0.18 Cephalopholis sonnerati 1.95 ± 0.28 Epinephelus rivulatus 0.62 ± 0 Lampris guttatus 0.53 ± 0.04 Carcharhinus tiltsoni 0.31 ± 0.05 Xiphias gladius 0.09 ± 0.05 Cephalopholis miniata 0.09 ± 0.03 Euthynnus affinis 0.08 ± 0.02 Thunnus albacares 0 Carcharhinus obscurus % Sequence Div (X ± S.E.) Species
  • Conclusions
    • Highly conserved priming regions
    • High species resolution within each region
    • Species discovery through DNA barcodes
    • Specimen vouchering
  • Collaborators Paul Hebert Bob Ward Allan Connell Jim Boutillier Filip é Costa Bronwyn Innes
  • Acknowledgments Acknowledgements Laboratory Database Collections Funding & Support Jeremy deWaard Sujeevan Ratnasingham Jim Boutillier Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation NSERC CFI OIT Canada Research Chairs Program Rob Dooh Janet Topan Nataly Ivanova Angela Holliss Allan Connell Peter Last Pia Marquardt
  •