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Safeguarding Children level 1 for voluntary and community groups.

Safeguarding Children level 1 for voluntary and community groups.


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  • Transcript

    • 1. Safeguarding children Inter-agency Group/level one training
    • 2. 2 Aim Click icon to play audio
    • 3. 3 Learning outcomes By the end of the training you will: 1.Understand why it is everyone’s responsibility to protect children 2.Gain a basic awareness of child abuse 3.Know where to go to for advice and how to seek support 4.Know how to refer children who may be vulnerable, in need or suffering abuse or neglect Click icon to play audio
    • 4. 4 Staying safe online • We want you to be safe online whilst studying this course Some of the images and content are unsettling and can affect people in many different ways • We have put together a list of places online for you to visit where you can find out more information if you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this course • The following list is broken down into National Agencies and local support for residents of Kingston upon Thames. Click icon to play audio
    • 5. 5 Should you be affected by any of the issues addressed in this training, you can contact the following organisations for help: Kingston upon Thames ASCA – Addiction Support and Care Agency is dedicated to supporting individuals, families and the community to overcome alcohol and drug misuse through both prevention and treatment The Aurora Health Foundation - helps victims of childhood abuse to heal and move on with their lives Kaleidoscope - provides support to people with drug and alcohol problems, enabling them to make positive changes in their lives Kingston Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) forum reaching out to and engaging with Kingston LGBT community
    • 6. 6 Should you be affected by any of the issues addressed in this training, you can contact the following organisations for help: Kingston upon Thames Islamic Resource Centre - provide counseling and emotional support service to the community. Phone 020 8549 5499 or email: irc59@hotmail.com The One Stop Shop Kingston - provides confidential advice and support if you are experiencing domestic or sexual abuse. Tel. 07917 271 549 Or you can search the Directory of Domestic Violence Services in Kingston National AFRUCA's mission is to promote the rights and welfare of African children in the UK. Phone 0844 660 8607 Barnardo’s aim is to bring out the best in every child whether the issue is child poverty, sexual exploitation, disability or domestic violence
    • 7. 7 Should you be affected by any of the issues addressed in this training, you can contact the following organisations for help: National ChildLine – National Helpline 0800 1111 Crime Stoppers – Crime Stoppers is an independent charity fighting to stop crime Kidscape – Anti-bullying helpline for parents of bullied children. Bullying advice, helpline, information, anti-bullying resources and training. Phone 08451 205 204 NSPCC – National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.You can talk with an NSPCC counsellor for free, 24 hours a day. Call 0808 800 5000 Men’s Advice Line: 0808 801 0327
    • 8. 8 Should you be affected by any of the issues addressed in this training, you can contact the following organisations for help: National Police – reporting crime Child abuse Domestic violence Hate crime Rape and sexual assault Reporting indecent images of children Refuge - Refuge's network of safe houses provides emergency accommodation for women and children when they are most in need Talk to Frank – Information service around drugs helpline 0800 77 66 00 Victim Support – National charity supporting victims of crime. Support line 0845 30 30 900
    • 9. 9 Guidance for the Voluntary Sector Voluntary organisations play a key role in safeguarding the children and young people that they work with. These are the essential safeguarding measures which organisations working with children and young people need to have: 1. Child protection policy 2. Child protection procedure 3. Recruitment selection & vetting procedure 4. Whistle Blowing procedure 5. Safeguarding information for children/parents/young people 6. Confidentiality Policy 7. E-safety For additional information have a look at Safe Network website 1.No animations
    • 10. 10 Legislation The following legislation protects children: Children Act 1989 Read more - Children Act 1989 Education Act 2002 Read more - Education Act 2002 Children Act 2004 Read more - Children Act 2004
    • 11. 11 Guidance from the Department of Education This Safeguarding training is based on the following documents: Working Together to Safeguard Children (DCSF 2010) Read more - Working Together to Safeguard Children What to do if you’re worried a Child is being Abused (HM Government 2006) Read more - What to do if you're worried a child is being abused Safeguarding Children in Education and Safer Recruitment (DCSF 2006) Safeguarding in Education and Safer Recruitment Information Sharing Guidance for Managers and Practitioners (DCSF 2008) Information Sharing Guidance for Managers and Practitioners
    • 12. Exercise one Why is safeguarding children important?
    • 13. Exercise one Why is safeguarding children important?
    • 14. 14 Why is safeguarding children important? Take a few minutes to think about this issue, write your answers down and check against our reasons. Our list is not definitive and you may have thought of some other reasons. •Children’s welfare is paramount •Children and young people need to be safe Check list •We need to be able to spot the signs •People who want to hurt children, make it their business to find a weak link in an organisation •50,552 children in the UK are known to be at risk of abuse right now. Adults have a responsibility to protect children •Abuse and neglect are damaging •An abuser may well abuse many other children, who also have a right to protection
    • 15. 15 Safeguarding children includes: 1.Protecting children from maltreatment 2.Preventing impairment of children’s health or development 3.Ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care 4.Helping children to have the best start in life
    • 16. 16 Child Protection Child protection is part of safeguarding. It protects children who are suffering or likely to suffer significant harm.
    • 17. 17 What is Abuse and Neglect? Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by: • inflicting harm, or • failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting; by those known to them or, more rarely, by a stranger for example via the internet. They may be abused by an adult /adults or another child or children. Click icon to play audio
    • 18. 18 Categories of Abuse and Neglect • Physical Abuse • Sexual Abuse • Neglect • Emotional Abuse (including Domestic Abuse) Click icon to play audio
    • 19. Recognise the indicators Physical Abuse Physical Abuse
    • 20. 20 Recognise the indicators Physical Abuse Check the answer Physical Abuse Which of these are physical abuse?  Hitting  Scalding  Shaking  Throwing  Poisoning  Burning Drowning Suffocating
    • 21. 21 Recognise the indicators Physical Abuse Physical Abuse All are physical abuse This list is not exhaustive. For example, physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child.
    • 22. 22 Recognise the indicators Physical Abuse Physical Abuse Follow Adam’s Story about physical abuse Video courtesy of ChildLine
    • 23. Physical Abuse If you are worried about a child – always seek advice.  Don’t take the responsibility on your shoulders.  Your role is to raise your concerns with someone who can do something about it.
    • 24. Recognise the indicators This list is not exhaustive. For example, physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child. Follow Adams Story a file about physical abuse from Childline Emotional Abuse
    • 25. Recognise the indicators This list is Abuse Emotional not exhaustive. For example, physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child. Follow Adams Story a file about physical abuse from Childline Emotional Abuse Which of these is emotional abuse? •Not giving the child opportunities to express their views (True) •Not giving the child full attention all the time •Making fun of what children say or how they communicate (True) •Age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children (True) •Over protection, limitation of exploration and learning (True) 1 of 3
    • 26. 26 Recognise the indicators This list is not Emotional Abuse exhaustive. For example, physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child. Follow Adams Story Check physical a file about the abuse from Childline answer Emotional Abuse Which of these is emotional abuse? •Allowing a child to watch their favourite programme every day •Preventing the child participating in normal social interaction (True) •Witnessing domestic abuse (True) •Seeing or hearing another person being hurt (True) •Serious bullying causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger (True) •Cyber bullying (True) •Not buying designer sports wear 2 of 3
    • 27. 27 Recognise the indicators This list is not Emotional Abuse exhaustive. For example, physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child. Follow Adams Story Check physical a file about the abuse from Childline answer Emotional Abuse Which of these is emotional abuse? •Allowing a child to watch their favourite programme every day •Preventing the child participating in normal social interaction (True) •Witnessing domestic abuse (True) •Seeing or hearing another person being hurt (True) •Serious bullying causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger (True) •Cyber bullying (True) •Not buying designer sports wear 2 of 3
    • 28. 28 Recognise the indicators This list is not exhaustive. Emotional Abuse For example, physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child. Follow Adams Story a file about physical abuse from Childline Emotional Abuse This list is not exhaustive. For example it could include conveying to the child that they are worthless unloved, inadequate or valued only in so far as they meet the needs of another person. 3 of 3
    • 29. 29 Recognise the indicators Emotional Abuse . Watch this story of abuse after a family breakup Video courtesy of ChildLine
    • 30. Emotional Abuse Emotional abuse is not an occasional occurence to a child, but the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child, such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child's emotional development. If you are worried about a child – always seek advice.  Don’t take the responsibility on your shoulders.  Your role is to raise your concerns with someone who can do something about it.
    • 31. Recognise the indicators Sexual Abuse Sexual Abuse e
    • 32. 32 Recognise the indicators Sexual Abuse Sexual Abuse Which of these is sexual abuse? •Physical contact touching children in Check the answer inappropriate places (True) •Making children watch pornography (True) •Involving children in the production of pornography (True) •Encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways (True) •Bathing children of the opposite gender •Befriending a child on the internet in preparation for abuse (True) •Answering children’s questions about sexual relationships
    • 33. 33 Recognise the indicators Sexual Abuse Sexual Abuse This list is not exhaustive. For example, sexual abuse also involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in any sexual activity, not necessarily involving a high level of violence and whether or not the child is aware of what is happening.
    • 34. 34 Recognise the indicators Sexual Abuse Sexual Abuse Watch one child’s story of sexual abuse Video courtesy of ChildLine
    • 35. Recognise the indicators Sexual Exploitation Sexual Exploitation Sexual exploitation happens when someone takes advantage of a young person by encouraging them into a sexual relationship for his or her benefit. They have power over a young person either because they are an adult, they are stronger or more intelligent, or because they have more money. Any young person can be sexually exploited regardless of age, gender, race or sexual orientation
    • 36. Sexual Abuse/Exploitation If you are worried about a child, always seek advice.  Don’t take the responsibility on your shoulders.  Your role is to raise your concerns with someone who can do something about it.
    • 37. Recognise the indicators Neglect Neglect
    • 38. 38 Recognise the indicators Neglect Neglect Which of these is Neglect? •Failing to provide adequate food, shelter and clothing for a child’s need within available resources (True) •Failing to protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger (True) •Not listening to a child read every day •Failure to ensure adequate supervision (True) •Failure to ensure access to medical care or treatment (True) •Ignoring a child's basic emotional needs (True) •Leaving a child to cry for a while before they go to sleep Check the answer
    • 39. 39 Recognise the indicators Neglect Neglect This list is not exhaustive. Neglect may, for example, also occur during pregnancy, as a result of maternal substance abuse. Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development.
    • 40. 40 Recognise the indicators Neglect Neglect Watch this story of teenage neglect at home Video courtesy of ChildLine
    • 41. Neglect If you are worried about a child, always seek advice.  Don’t take the responsibility on your shoulders.  Your role is to raise your concerns with someone who can do something about it.
    • 42. Understanding the signs Understanding the Signs
    • 43. 43 Understanding the signs Examples •Significant changes in behaviour •Withdrawn •Aggressive •Lack of concentration at school It is sometimes difficult to know what is worrying a child but if you are worried about them pass your concerns on to someone who can help. Signs - Hidden
    • 44. 44 Understanding the signs Obvious •Bruised eyes •Broken limbs •Cutting A child tells you their worries about abuse or neglect You may see marks or bruises on a child that worry you . You do not need to decide if they are caused by abuse, pass your concerns on to someone who can help Signs - Obvious
    • 45. 45 Understanding the signs Typical •Repeated lateness at school •Failing to achieve their potential •Odd injuries •Anxious Children who are being abused often show a number of different signs in their behaviour. Other people may also be worried and your concerns may help to more fully understand the child’s situation Signs - Typical
    • 46. Exercise two myths and facts
    • 47. 47 True or False Police and social workers are the main people in society who are responsible for safeguarding children. 1/5 False All those who come into contact with children and families in their everyday work have a duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, including those who work mainly with adults.
    • 48. 48 True or False Allegations of child abuse or neglect always lead to a criminal investigation. 2/5 False Social care will decide if an assessment is needed in the child’s best interest They will decide on level of concern (Children Act 1989 s17 or s47) Police work alongside social workers and investigate possible crimes.
    • 49. 49 True or False Children are more likely to lie than adults. 3/5 False In the main children are no more likely to lie than adults, particularly in relation to abuse. The younger they are the less detail they remember but what they do recall is likely to be accurate.
    • 50. 50 True or False Particular groups of children are more likely to suffer abuse or neglect. True Children may be more vulnerable to being harmed if they are: •Babies •Disabled children •Children who are already thought of as a problem (including those who are beyond parental control) •Children living away from home 4/5 (children in residential care; children privately fostered.)
    • 51. 51 True or False Some organisations are more likely to be targeted by child abusers. 5/5 True •If someone wants to harm a child they are likely to find a place where children go. You can deter such a person by being alert to the possibility of someone targeting your organisation and by having effective policies and procedures in place and making sure your organisation follows safer recruitment guidance.
    • 52. break What to do about it?
    • 53. 53 Raising your concerns….. How to help Unless you are worried that the child will be at further risk of harm be open and honest with them and their family about why, what, how and with whom information will, or could be shared, and seek their agreement: 1.Always base your information sharing decisions on considerations of the safety and well-being of the child 2.You can share information even if the family do not want you to do so to protect a child or young person 3.Try to ensure that the information you share is necessary for the purpose for which you are sharing it, is shared only with those people who need to have it, is accurate and up-todate, is shared in a timely fashion, and is shared securely 4.Keep a written record of your decision and who you shared your concerns with If in doubt take advice from your line manager or child protection/safeguarding officer.
    • 54. 54 If a child tells you….. What to do Listen carefully DO Record the conversation in the child’s words and note the time Sign and date the record you make Take it seriously Reassure them that they are right to tell Explain what will happen next
    • 55. 55 If a child tells you …. DON’T What not to do Ask leading questions e.g. “was it mummy who hurt you?” Make promises you cannot keep Jump to conclusions Speculate or accuse anybody It is not your responsibility to decide if the allegation is true or not
    • 56. 56 What if a child doesn’t say anything? What if a child doesn’t say anything? •Often children don’t feel able to say what is happening to them. •So it is up to us to recognise the signs, and pass our worries onto someone who can do something about it
    • 57. 57 Contact: •Safeguarding lead in your agency •Advancing Services for Kingston’s Kids (ASKK) for advice and guidance on 020 8547 5888 •Safeguarding Children team on 020 8547 5004 •Police on 101 or emergency 999 •Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) – contact the LADO if you have concerns about a member of staff or volunteer who works with children 020 8547 5243. More information: Kingston Safeguarding Children Board: http://www.kingstonlscb.org.uk Information updated: 14/08/2012 (subject to change)
    • 58. 58 What to do now Click icon to play audio HELP call 020 8255 8040 if you are having difficulties opening the quiz
    • 59. Thank You Thank you to ChildLine for allowing us to use their videos, British Transport Police for letting us adapt the principals of HOT to safeguarding and to Kingston Safeguarding Children Board