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Diction i first day of class copeland

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A first-day presentation to Samford's Diction class, created by Dr. Kristin Kenning, adopted by Philip Copeland, derived from Sharon Lawhon.

A first-day presentation to Samford's Diction class, created by Dr. Kristin Kenning, adopted by Philip Copeland, derived from Sharon Lawhon.

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  • Each of us comes to pronunciation with dialect ‘baggage.’ Almost all inconsistencies can be fixed with practice, but it is nearly impossible to escape slight variations, even when highly trained in IPA and pronunciation. We all come from different trainings/cultures/and experiences, and collectively as voice instructors, we are going to get you very close. As you move on in your careers you’ll study with coaches with high specificity of training – i.e. French lyric diction coach before you sing the role Manon. Or a Southern Mississippi diction coach before you perform Babe in Crimes of the Heart.

Diction i first day of class   copeland Diction i first day of class copeland Presentation Transcript

  • Diction for Singers 1[wɛlkəm tu dɪkʃən fɔr sɪŋɚz pɑrt wʌn] [mɑɪ næm ɪz dɑktɚ koplənd]
  • Definition:The International PhoneticAlphabet is a symbol systemrepresenting the sounds used inspeech and singing.
  • The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a truephonetic alphabet in which one symbol stands forone sound.This alphabet has remained unchanged from it’screation in 1886. 2 beginning rules for writing in IPA: It’s always in brackets. It’s never capitalized.
  • [hoʊp ɪz ðə θɪŋ wɪð fɛðɚz]
  • [hoʊp ɪz ðə θɪŋ wɪð fɛðɚz]"Hope" is the thing with feathers—
  • [hoʊp ɪz ðə θɪŋ wɪð fɛðɚz][ðæt pɝtʃɪz ɪn ðə soʊl][ænd sɪŋz ðə tun wɪðaʊt ðə wɝdz]
  • [hoʊp ɪz ðə θɪŋ wɪð fɛðɚz]"Hope" is the thing with feathers— [ðæt pɝtʃɪz ɪn ðə soʊl] That perches in the soul— [ænd sɪŋz ðə tun wɪðaʊt ðə wɝdz]And sings the tune without the words—
  • [hoʊp ɪz ðə θɪŋ wɪð fɛðɚz][ðæt pɝtʃɪz ɪn ðə soʊl][ænd sɪŋz ðə tun wɪðaʊt ðə wɝdz][ænd nɛvɚ stɑps æt ɔl][ænd switɪst ɪn ðə ɡeɪl ɪz hɝd][ænd sɔr mʌst bi ðə stɔrm][ðæt kʊd ə’bæʃ ðə lɪtl bɝd][ðæt kɛpt soʊ mɛni wɔrm][aɪv hɝd ɪt ɪn ðə tʃɪlɪst lænd][ænd ɑn ðə streɪndʒɪst si][jɛt nɛvɚ ɪn ɪkˈstr məti] ɛ[ɪt æskt ʌ krʌm əv mi]
  • "Hope" is the thing with feathers—That perches in the soul—And sings the tune without the words—And never stops—at all—And sweetest—in the Gale—is heard—And sore must be the storm—That could abash the little BirdThat kept so many warm—Ive heard it in the chillest land—And on the strangest Sea—Yet, never, in Extremity,It asked a crumb—of Me.
  • Our roman alphabet of English is NOT a phoneticalphabet – sound and spelling are often not thesame.For example, the sound ee [i] may have sevendifferent spellings:
  • Our roman alphabet of English is NOT a phoneticalphabet – sound and spelling are often not thesame.For example, the sound ee [i] may have sevendifferent spellings:Be, eat, beet, receive, people, brief, Phoenix
  • Also, a single English letter might stand for severalsounds: my = [mɑɪ] lane = [leɪn]Or a dialect may demand even more sounds per vowel:pat [pæjət]; pet [pɛjət]; pit [pɪjət]Standard English: [pæt] [pɛt] [pɪt]
  • Sometimes dialects even add consonants!Wash [waʃ] becomes [wɔrʃ] in Appalachian SouthernEnglish! Awesome.In English, a single letter may have no sound at all, suchas the p in pneumonia.Other letters represent more that one sound, as in theword mix where the letter x has two sounds: ks.Two words may also be spelled differently, butpronounced alike: piece and peace.There are twenty-two vowel sounds in English = FUN!
  • Dialects are COOL, but when yousing, you should be singing instandard American English.Why?What are exceptions?Should your dialect influence yourpronunciation of foreignlanguages?
  • Famous diction scene:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZqESl-0OkA
  • How close can you get?  Learn IPA, pronunciation rules  Listen to recordings – be careful!  Train with a voice teacher  Coach with a native speaker. They offer pitch, rhythm, stress, and details a book can’t teach you well. But it must be speaker that understands LYRIC diction. What is Lyric Diction?
  • What if my voice teacher hasme pronounce something differentlythan I learned in Diction class???
  • Answer:You should do exactly what your voiceteacher says. The words ―Dr.Copeland says…‖ should not escapeyour mouth.
  • Because I don’twant you to hearthem say:―Dr. Copeland is anidiot. Everyoneknows that.‖
  • We have dialect baggage.
  • Why are we starting withItalian diction first?