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iMake CNC Global
iCraft CNC

             iMake CNC

              iFab CNC

  A line of home based CNC machines

  the next home appliance...
Our Mission

Our mission is to create new manufacturing jobs in the United States. We
want to generate new small to medium...
What is iMake?


•iMake CNC Global is a home crafting and manufacturing project that will
revolutionize manufacturing.

•i...
Integrated Design Apps


Similar to the iTunes
concept




     iMake integrated design app software will generate licensi...
CNC Offers 3 Different Home Size CNC Machines
iMake integrates new hardware and software, creating a new type of
custom ma...
An example of how our iMake CNC machines work
•A skilled laborer or crafter wants to upload his/her own model to quickly
p...
The Advantages of our CNC Global model?

        Beating the Cost of Overseas Manufacturing!

•No need for orders to an ov...
The Market Size ‐ Scalable With Tremendous Capacity
As the “next home appliance” our CNC machines have the ability to reac...
The Potential Market:
•Private individuals
•Schools (shop classes)
•Community learning centers
•Universities ‐ facilities ...
What is a CNC Machine?
CNC machines were first known as numerical control (NC) in the 1940s and 1950s.
Motors were program...
The Competition Today
Outdated industrialized CNC driven
by CAD/CAM programs with little
ability to interact with other CN...
The Competition Today – India




The photo above demonstrates an example of our competition in India today.

This smaller...
CNC Global Leadership

Philip Langton ‐ President, CNC Global Inc.
Principal, OFID Microdevices Inc. and CTO, DataIntent (...
CNC Global Leadership

Peter H. Muller ‐ Industrial Design, CNC Global Inc.
President, Interform (Silicon Valley, CA)
Ment...
The University of Notre Dame
Innovation Park in Notre Dame, Indiana
has agreed to provide CNC Global Inc.
with transitiona...
Contact
                                 Philip Langton
                                 President


                     ...
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CNC presentation 7 2010a

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Transcript of "CNC presentation 7 2010a"

  1. 1. iMake CNC Global
  2. 2. iCraft CNC iMake CNC iFab CNC A line of home based CNC machines the next home appliance …the next industrial revolution
  3. 3. Our Mission Our mission is to create new manufacturing jobs in the United States. We want to generate new small to medium cottage industries integrating new innovative technology. With one of our CNC Global Inc. machines, everyone in the United States has the potential to become a micro manufacturer in a high revenue vertical market.
  4. 4. What is iMake? •iMake CNC Global is a home crafting and manufacturing project that will revolutionize manufacturing. •iMake is a compact CNC machine sized for home and mobile use that manufactures parts and goods in a 3 axis (3D) environment from a variety of materials including wood, hard leather, metal, glass, and ceramics. •iMake CNC machines use licensed software applications (similar to the iTunes concept) that are purchased from CNC Global and downloaded via the internet. These can be complex CAD/CAM designs or simple product patterns.
  5. 5. Integrated Design Apps Similar to the iTunes concept iMake integrated design app software will generate licensing fees as iMake owners download patterns that interest them. (This revenue stream is apart from manufacturing of the hardware of our 3 different sized CNC home machines).
  6. 6. CNC Offers 3 Different Home Size CNC Machines iMake integrates new hardware and software, creating a new type of custom manufacturing for vertical markets. We will offer three different size iMake CNCs. All three sizes are meant for home and mobile use. iCraft CNC ‐ This is our most compact, desktop model designed for entrepreneurial small to medium size businesses, as well as higher‐end crafters and engineers. The outside dimensions of the machine are 18” x 12” x 12”. The largest size product that can be produced inside this machines measures 9” x 9” x 9”. iMake CNC ‐ The outside dimensions for this model are 30” x 16” x 15”. The largest product size produced by this machine is 12” x 12” x 12”. iFab CNC‐ The outside dimensions for this model are 30”x 24”x 24”. The largest product size produced by this machine is 18.5” x 18.5” x 18.5”.
  7. 7. An example of how our iMake CNC machines work •A skilled laborer or crafter wants to upload his/her own model to quickly produce a car part or home candle holder. •He or she purchases the software application from CNC Global and downloads to their iMake model via the internet. •He or she makes any necessary modifications to the design apps. •He or she inserts raw materials into the CNC machine. •Within a short period of time, he or she has a customized product for sale or personal use.
  8. 8. The Advantages of our CNC Global model? Beating the Cost of Overseas Manufacturing! •No need for orders to an overseas factory •No waiting for delivery •No paying shipping costs Simply make, market, and sell.
  9. 9. The Market Size ‐ Scalable With Tremendous Capacity As the “next home appliance” our CNC machines have the ability to reach a wide and diverse market. •Initial machines can be used to manufacture parts to make more iMake CNCs. •iMake can be used to manufacture “Made in the USA” products that generates jobs and meets home‐grown needs. •iMake will attract the home crafters, the part‐time worker, and the possibly retirees interested in generating products, machinist consulting services providing income from home.
  10. 10. The Potential Market: •Private individuals •Schools (shop classes) •Community learning centers •Universities ‐ facilities department, engineering department •Mobile CNC machine shops •Non‐profit organizations (i.e. the World Bank, United Nations) involved in international aid programs and developing country initiatives •Businesses and non‐profit organizations interested in promoting “green technology” •Philanthropic foundations •Government contractors and subcontractors •Internet technology (IT) and architecture companies and university departments for access to downloadable 3‐D modeling CAD/CAM software (similar to iTunes)
  11. 11. What is a CNC Machine? CNC machines were first known as numerical control (NC) in the 1940s and 1950s. Motors were programmed using abstract to operate machine tools instead of manually using hand wheels or levers. In the 1970s, as technology advances moved to the use of analog and digital computers to program the machines, they became known as computed numerical control machines (CNC). The computer programs used to issue commands to the machines became known as CAD/CAM (computer aid design and computer aided manufacturing) Left Photo: State of the art 1952 CNC machine. Featured in Scientific American as an example of new CAD/CAM technology Right Photo: Computerized control panel for state of the art 1952 CNC machine. Source: Pease, William. “An Automatic Tool,” Scientific American (Sept. 1952).
  12. 12. The Competition Today Outdated industrialized CNC driven by CAD/CAM programs with little ability to interact with other CNC machines.
  13. 13. The Competition Today – India The photo above demonstrates an example of our competition in India today. This smaller version of an outdated industrialized CNC is driven by old CAD/CAM programs with little ability to interact with other CNC machines. Source: Shri Govindram Seksaria Institute of Technology & Science, Indore, India
  14. 14. CNC Global Leadership Philip Langton ‐ President, CNC Global Inc. Principal, OFID Microdevices Inc. and CTO, DataIntent (Silicon Valley, CA) Philip Langton is currently Principal of OFID Microdevices Inc. and CTO, of DataIntent. He has over 30 years of direct hands‐on experience in manufacturing and engineering development environments, with extensive work as a wireless cost control consultant and JAVA project director. He invented and received two patents for his single circuit secure memory architecture, the active OFID, and a new approach to data authentication designed for the single memory architecture. Before becoming a cost effectiveness consultant for companies such as Infogear, Philips, Adept, Spectrian, and Vadem, Philip worked as a senior component engineer for Pyramid Systems and National Semiconductor. He received a B.S. in Marketing & Business Administration from San Jose State University.
  15. 15. CNC Global Leadership Peter H. Muller ‐ Industrial Design, CNC Global Inc. President, Interform (Silicon Valley, CA) Mentor, Product Realization Network, Stanford University Peter Muller is an internationally acclaimed product development designer. He has years of highly diversified international product development and design experience for major industries in the USA, Europe, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Australia and Hong Kong. Clients range from large multinational corporations to start‐up companies, with activities ranging from concept development and problem solving to engineering and software interface. Peter has a background in mechanical engineering with a Master’s degree in product design from Darmstadt, Germany and has received management training from Sundridge Park, London, UK. He was formerly Vice President of Frog Design (USA) and a Director of PA Technology and Management Consultants (Europe/International). He currently serves as a mentor for the Product Realization Network (PRN) at Stanford University.
  16. 16. The University of Notre Dame Innovation Park in Notre Dame, Indiana has agreed to provide CNC Global Inc. with transitional space for prototyping and subsequent management during the initial phase of manufacturing. “The mission of Innovation Park “is to facilitate the transformation of innovations into viable marketplace ventures.” For more see: http://www.innovationparknd.com/
  17. 17. Contact Philip Langton President Business Plan available Upon Request © Ofid Microdevices Inc., 2010
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