Using Semantic Analysis for Content Alignment and Gap Analysis

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This presentation illustrates how a semantic engine / cms was used to map learning assets in APUS's School of Business

This presentation illustrates how a semantic engine / cms was used to map learning assets in APUS's School of Business

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  • 1.  Using Semantic Analysis for Content Alignment and Gap Analysis
    Phil Ice, American Public University System
    Jennifer Staley, American Public University System
  • 2. You will learn how to:
    Map assets in the content universe as related to curricular goals and objectives
    Determine content interrelationships to facilitate object reusability
    Automate the gap analysis process
    Automated meta tagging through semantic analysis
    Implement content distillation and semantic analysis to increasing return on investment and time on task
    Improve instructional outcomes through ingestion of work products
  • 3. You will learn
    The use of semantic analysis in the instructional design workflow.
    How to map assets in the content universe as they relate to curricular goals and objectives
    Determine content interrelationships to facilitate object reusability
    Automate the gap analysis process
    Perform automated meta tagging through semantic analysis
  • 4. Current State
    In the LMS or CMS environment, content management frequently translates into single-purpose allocation of content resources, with cataloging and meta tagging being a haphazard affair.
    This results in potential duplication of content and significant time loss associated with asset retrieval for incorporation into new curricula.
  • 5. Current State
    Because content is created with the notion that all contributors have knowledge of the underlying taxonomies or common vernacular that information is based upon, it is difficult for organizations to survey their content universe for existing objects that can be incorporated into emerging workflows or to assess relationships between content across disciplines.
  • 6. Issues – Objectives - Needs
    A school within the University was looking for a way to:
    Survey: Existing Course Objects Smartly
    Examine: Course Content across Curriculums
    Fulfill: Unfulfilled Course Objectives
    Locate & Modify: Course Content / Learning Objects
    Align: Course Level Objectives, Programmatic outcomes, and Industry Standards
    Report: Provide accrediting body with an analysis of courses & program content – Alignment Analysis Report.
  • 7. Process
    Inception/Discovery Phase
    Scope and Project Plan
    Elaboration/Design Phase
    Issue Analysis and Project Architecture
    Construction/Development Phase
    Component Development and Initial Release
    Transition/Development Phase
    Training, Beta Testing, Quality Check
  • 8. Results
    Faculty/School Representative performs a Gap Analysis on a desired course to locate filled and unfulfilled objectives.
    Unfulfilled objectives can be fulfilled by utilizing the Gap Remediation Tool
    Locate resources within the Content Library
    Associate the resources with the unfulfilled objectives
    Perform a second Gap Analysis to point out newly fulfilled objectives.
  • 9. Gap Analysis & Remediation Tool Demo
  • 10. Gap Analysis
  • 11. Gap Analysis
  • 12. Gap Remediation
  • 13. Gap Remediation
  • 14. Gap Analysis Report
  • 15. Gap Analysis Report
  • 16. Common Library E-Reader & AIR Application Demo
  • 17. Common Library E-Reader
  • 18. Common Library E-Reader & AIR App
  • 19. Common Library E-Reader & AIR App
  • 20. Semantic Analysis:A Deep Dive
  • 21. The Learning Object Lifecycle
    + Creation & Acquisition are facilitated by uncovering obvious and non-obvious relationships across dedicated and/or publicly available repositories.
    + Interaction with objects (scope and sequence) is enabled through the learning environment (lightweight or robust) independent of modality.
    LCMS (federated or centralized) enables correlation to standards and outcomes, as well as collaboration between educators and content creators using multiple sources interspersed with original material.
    + Prescriptive learning is enabled through the correlation of relevant assets to the learners meta-data, profile, and assessment history.
  • 22. Granularity Model
  • 23. Granularity Model
  • 24. Smart Objects and Systems
    + Objects on their own are not “smart”
    + Systems can be built to infer or semantically correlate object bonds
    + By mapping Critical, Important and Desirable outcomes we can link learning objects, to their related:
    - Concept Elements, Components
    - Course Concepts and Curriculum segments
    + This can be accomplished independent of the content source when digitized
    + Learners can discover ancillary materials and even subject matter of interest that might not be on their identified curriculum
  • 25. Semantic Aware Content Development
    • Content when developed, should consider the lowest level of granularity and highest level of reuse
    • 26. Content that is easily consumed or tagged (Tag-cloud) by the creator can have additional downstream correlation or embed-ability.
    • 27. Engines such as Common Library, Open Calais, 2028 and other Platform As A Service (PAAS) components can extend existing content management strategies, approaches and systems.
    • 28. Collaborative teams in traditional Instructional Design (ID) processes (ID, SME, Producer) can offer insights and additional meta-information that makes the system more self-aware.
    • 29. By adopting standards (IEEE, IEEE-LOM, SCORM, DCMI, DCMI-Extended) content creators, consumers and aggregators can rapidly extend, enhance or assemble materials in new and relevant ways.
    • 30. Enables future individualized and cohort learning profiles.
  • Collaborative Development
    • Using tools in which network affects are default, collaborative links and recommendations should be dynamic (Facebook, LinkedIn, Common Library)
    • 31. Tools should not require a “Rip and Replace” approach and should operate within an existing technology portfolio (enabled by standards-based systems).
    • 32. Collaborative teams in traditional Instructional Design (ID) processes (ID, SME, Producer) can offer insights and additional meta-information that makes the system more self-aware.
    • 33. By adopting standards (IEEE, IEEE-LOM, SCORM, DCMI, DCMI-Extended) content creators, consumers and aggregators can rapidly extend, enhance or assemble materials in new and relevant ways.
    • 34. Enables future individualized and cohort learning profiles.
    • 35. Content Management is an enabling set of tools that collaborative development requires once it moves beyond a small set of documents and participants.
  • Collaborative Development
  • 36. Thank You!Phil Ice: pice@apus.eduJennifer Staley: jstaley@apus.edu
    American Public University System
    www.apus.edu