Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap
          Workshop 5: Soldier
   Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility
            Otta...
Acknowledgements
The Department of National Defence (DND), Defence Research and Development Canada
(DRDC), and Industry Ca...
Table of Contents
Executive Summary .........................................................................................
Breakaway Session 1. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Needs—the Vision ....... 21
          Instructions for Breakawa...
3.3       Intelligent Textiles for Protection—Overview of Technologies,
                   Ms. A. Begriche, Mr. D. Lachape...
Appendixes
A. Workshop Agenda ........................................................................................ 53
...
Executive Summary
This report describes the Soldier Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility Workshop
held in Ottawa in...
Preface: Survivability, Sustainability, Mobility and
the Soldier Systems TRM
The Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobi...
Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility and the Roadmap
Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility was the sixth         ...
The Workshop Process
The goal of the Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop was to:

   1. Converge on an overall ...
Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility
Workshop Introduction
The workshop was opened, and participants welcomed, by...
Soldier Systems TRM Update and S&T Efforts, LCol. M.A. Bodner (DRDC)
Places the workshop themes in the context of NATO fun...
1.     Overall Vision, Deficiencies, Future
       Requirements, Themes, Goals/Vision
This chapter provides abstracts of t...
1.2    Operational Clothing, Individual Equipment, & Load Carriage: Future
       Requirements, Maj. S. Dufour (DLR 5-4)
D...
1.4    Survivability & Ballistic Protection Equipment: Future Requirements,
       Capt R. Pierce (DLR 5-10-2)
           ...
Demonstration of the Challenges of Survivability, Sustainability, and
Mobility in the Field
During the presentations by Ma...
Volunteer 1 Feedback
Good points:
      The equipment is surprisingly comfortable, provides a good range of movement,
   ...
Seating Plan Instructions, Mr. Phil Carr, (SRG)




Describes the seating rules put into
effect following the first coffee...
1.5    Chemical and Biological (CB) Protective Equipment: Future
       Requirements, Lt(N) M. Willis (DND)
Outlines futur...
Luncheon Speaker: Dr. N. Buckley, Canadian Space Agency: A New Niche
for Canadian Textiles in Space
Describes activities o...
Breakaway Session 1. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility
Needs—the Vision
The goal of the first breakaway/working sessio...
Participants were then given an objective and questions to answer:




Results of Breakaway Session 1
Following the table ...
Breakaway Session 1 Results Summary
What follows is a summary of the results of the first breakaway session in these areas...
Footwear
Vision. Provide integrated and modular footwear for the soldier which is comfortable
(user acceptance), lightweig...
Load carriage
Vision. A load carriage system human-centric that contributes to self-sustainability and
operational effecti...
2.     Themes Vision/Goals, Technical Challenges
       (Performance Objectives), Barriers
This chapter provides abstracts...
2.2.   Soldier PPE Systems Development Trends & Technical Challenges:
       an Industry Perspective, Mr. D. Crossman, TSC...
2.4     Collaboration Tool (ICee) Presentation, Mrs. M. Huard (IC/DND)
Provides an overview of the
Innovation Collaboratio...
Breakaway Session 2: The Technical Challenges & Barriers
The goal of the second breakaway session was to identify technica...
Results of Breakaway Session 2
Following discussions at the tables, and the completion of the forms, a facilitated report-...
5. Operational Clothing
   C Table 1. Mission configurable and modular
   C Table 2. Improved comfort/fit/flexibility
   C...
3.     Brainstorming: Potential Solutions/Options
       and Related Technologies (Exploring Solution
       Sets)
This ch...
ICee Contest Winner: Conductive Textiles in Soldier Systems, Asha Peta
Thompson, Stan Swallow, Intelligent Textiles Limite...
ICee Contest Winner: Man-Portable Enhanced Evaporative Cooling
Garment, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering,...
3.2    Soldier Applications of Nanotechnologies, Dr. B. Simard (NRC)
                                                     ...
3.4    Personal Armour (Ballistic & Blast) Technologies: State-of-the-art
       Overview, Dr. K. Williams (DRDC)
        ...
3.6    Multi-Spectral Camouflage Technologies: State-of-the-art Overview,
       Mr. J. Dumas (DRDC)
                     ...
Luncheon speaker: New Developments in Transparent Armour Technology,
Dr. J. Sands (ARL)
Provides background on the
speaker...
Breakaway Session 3: Technologies
The objective of the third working session was to identify the potential solutions and t...
2. Post the stickies on the flipcharts under the proper technical challenge
Participants were asked to post their stickies...
Figure 4. Distribution of stickies on the wall by technical challenge (step 2)




                                       ...
Figure 5. Distribution of priority flags on the stickies for each challenge area (step 3)




                            ...
4.      Technology Gaps, R&D Focus Areas &
        Potential Collaborators
This chapter describes Breakaway Session 4, and...
Results of Breakaway Session 4
Following the workshop, the completed forms (see example in Figure 6 below) were
collected ...
Figure 7. R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the
                               ...
R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop
                                ...
R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop
                                ...
R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop
                                ...
R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop
                                ...
Next Steps, LCol M.A. Bodner
Reviews the objectives and
outcomes of the current
development phase of the
Soldier Systems T...
5.     Ongoing and Upcoming Roadmap Activities
The Survivability, Sustainability, Mobility Workshop was just part of the S...
Dates for these workshops, and information about them, is available at the Soldier
Systems Technology Roadmap website:
htt...
A.       Workshop Agenda

                  Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop Agenda
Day 1—Wednesday, May 12
...
Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop Agenda
14h50 – 15h05   2.3 Soldier Integrated Headwear Systems Lessons Lear...
Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop Agenda
3. Brainstorming: Potential Solutions/Options and Related Technologi...
B.     List of Participants
     Last          First         Title           Company
1    Afagh         Fred F.           ...
31   Carlen        Jordan                          DuPont Canada
32   Carr          Phil                            Strate...
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)

4,301 views
4,226 views

Published on

SSTRM Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 Report (Oct 8, 2010)

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,301
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
124
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
67
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

SSTRM - StrategicReviewGroup.ca - Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility, Volume 1 - Report (Oct 8, 2010)

  1. 1. Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap Workshop 5: Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Ottawa, May 12-13, 2010 Volume 1. Report Department of National Defence Defence Research and Development Canada Industry Canada September 15, 2010
  2. 2. Acknowledgements The Department of National Defence (DND), Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC), and Industry Canada (IC) would like to acknowledge the contributions and support provided by the IC Special Events team that organized the Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility workshop venue, logistics, and accommodations; the Soldier Systems Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility Technical Subcommittee and co-chairs, and the Executive Steering Committee for sharing their time and expertise; The Strategic Review Group (SRG) Inc., for facilitating the workshop; and the participants from across Canada, the United States, and abroad, who contributed to making the workshop a success. Special thanks to those who presented at the workshop, for sharing their time, energy, and knowledge. Page ii of 115
  3. 3. Table of Contents Executive Summary .............................................................................................vii Preface: Survivability, Sustainability, Mobility and the Soldier Systems TRM ....... 8 About the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap (TRM) ......................................... 8 Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility and the Roadmap .................................. 9 The Workshop Process .......................................................................................... 10 Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop Introduction ..................... 11 Introductory Presentation Abstracts ........................................................................ 11 Workshop Program and TRM Background, Mr. G. Nimmo (IC) ....................... 11 Soldier Systems TRM Update and S&T Efforts, LCol. M.A. Bodner (DRDC) ................................................................................... 12 Workshop Process, Mr. P. Carr (Strategic Review Group) .............................. 12 1. Overall Vision, Deficiencies, Future Requirements, Themes, Goals/Vision ................................................................................................. 13 Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Session 1 Presentation Abstracts .................... 13 1.1 Soldier Systems Requirements Vision (2020-2025), LCol. E. Tremblay (DLR-5)................................................................... 13 1.2 Operational Clothing, Individual Equipment, & Load Carriage: Future Requirements, Maj. S. Dufour (DLR 5-4) .................................. 14 1.3 Soldier Systems Footwear: Future Requirements, Capt. D. Westhaver (DLR 5-10-3) ........................................................ 14 1.4 Survivability & Ballistic Protection Equipment: Future Requirements, Capt R. Pierce (DLR 5-10-2) ........................................ 15 Demonstration of the Challenges of Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility in the Field .............................................................................. 16 Seating Plan Instructions, Mr. Phil Carr, (SRG) ............................................... 18 1.5 Chemical and Biological (CB) Protective Equipment: Future Requirements, Lt(N) M. Willis (DND) ........................................ 19 Luncheon Speaker: Dr. N. Buckley, Canadian Space Agency: A New Niche for Canadian Textiles in Space ....................................... 20 Return on C4I and Sensors Workshop, Mr. L. O'Neill (C4I TSC Industry Co-Chair) ................................................................ 20 Page iii of 115
  4. 4. Breakaway Session 1. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Needs—the Vision ....... 21 Instructions for Breakaway Session 1 .............................................................. 21 Results of Breakaway Session 1 ..................................................................... 22 2. Themes Vision/Goals, Technical Challenges (Performance Objectives), Barriers .............................................................. 26 Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Session 2 Presentation Abstracts .................... 26 2.1 CBRN Individual Protection Development Trends, Mr. J. Stewart, TSC Industry Co-Chair ................................................. 26 2.2. Soldier PPE Systems Development Trends & Technical Challenges: an Industry Perspective, Mr. D. Crossman, TSC Industry Co-Chair ..... 27 2.3 Soldier Integrated Headwear Systems Lessons Learned, Mr. S. Boyne (DRDC Toronto) ............................................................. 27 2.4 Collaboration Tool (ICee) Presentation, Mrs. M. Huard (IC/DND) ........ 28 2.5 ICee Vision for DND, LCol. M. Prudhomme (DND) .............................. 28 Breakaway Session 2: The Technical Challenges & Barriers ................................. 29 Instructions for Breakaway Session 2 .............................................................. 29 Results of Breakaway Session 2 ..................................................................... 30 3. Brainstorming: Potential Solutions/Options and Related Technologies (Exploring Solution Sets) .............................................................................. 32 Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Session 3 Presentation Abstracts .................... 32 ICee Contest Winner: Optimizing Design of Military Products Using Subjective and Objective Measures, Queens University Ergonomics Research Group ............................................................... 32 ICee Contest Winner: Conductive Textiles in Soldier Systems, Asha Peta Thompson, Stan Swallow, Intelligent Textiles Limited, London, UK ............................................................................ 33 ICee Contest Winner: Load Carriage: Solutions and Capabilities, Mr. Alain Bujold, Mawashi Protective Clothing Inc. ............................................. 33 ICee Contest Winner: Man-Portable Enhanced Evaporative Cooling Garment, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, University of Ottawa, Yang Y, Diagne BT, Cheng L, Seung C, Kenny G, Lan CQ .... 34 3.1 Multifunctional Materials Applications for the Future Dismounted Soldier, Dr. R.S. Underhill (DRDC Atlantic) .......................................... 34 3.2 Soldier Applications of Nanotechnologies, Dr. B. Simard (NRC) .......... 35 Page iv of 115
  5. 5. 3.3 Intelligent Textiles for Protection—Overview of Technologies, Ms. A. Begriche, Mr. D. Lachapelle (CTT) ............................................ 35 3.4 Personal Armour (Ballistic & Blast) Technologies: State-of-the-art Overview, Dr. K. Williams (DRDC) ....................................................... 36 3.5 Innovation in Footwear Technologies, Mr. D. Thibault (Cons.) ............. 36 3.6 Multi-Spectral Camouflage Technologies: State-of-the-art Overview, Mr. J. Dumas (DRDC) .......................................................................... 37 3.7 Innovations in Load Carriage and Headwear Systems at USMC, Mr. D. Tack (HSI) ................................................................................. 37 Luncheon speaker: New Developments in Transparent Armour Technology, Dr. J. Sands (ARL) ............................................................................... 38 Breakaway Session 3: Technologies ...................................................................... 39 Input for Breakaway Session 3 ........................................................................ 39 Instructions for Breakaway Session 3 .............................................................. 39 Results of Breakaway Session 3 ..................................................................... 40 4. Technology Gaps, R&D Focus Areas & Potential Collaborators .................. 43 Breakaway Session 4: Priorities and Collaborators ................................................ 43 Instructions for Breakaway Session 4 .............................................................. 43 Results of Breakaway Session 4 ..................................................................... 44 Next Steps, LCol M.A. Bodner ................................................................................ 50 5. Ongoing and Upcoming Roadmap Activities ................................................ 51 Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility Collaborations ......................................... 51 Sharing Knowledge with the ICee Database and Wiki ............................................ 51 Upcoming Workshops ............................................................................................ 51 Page v of 115
  6. 6. Appendixes A. Workshop Agenda ........................................................................................ 53 B. List of Participants ........................................................................................ 56 C. Breakaway Session 1 Participant Input: The Vision ..................................... 65 D. Breakaway Session 2 Participant Input: Challenges and Barriers ................ 76 E. Breakaway Session 3 Participant Input: Potential Solutions and Technologies ......................................................................................... 83 F. Mind Maps .................................................................................................. 111 List of Figures Figure 1. Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility and the Soldier Systems TRM ......................................................................................... 9 Figure 2. The Workshop Process........................................................................ 10 Figure 3. A workshop participant describes the challenges associated with wearing even part of the typical battledress of a Canadian soldier 16 Figure 4. Distribution of stickies on the wall by technical challenge (step 2) ....... 41 Figure 5. Distribution of priority flags on the stickies for each challenge area (step 3) ......................................................................................... 42 Figure 6. Example Technology Sheet Completed by Participants ...................... 44 Figure 7. R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop .................................................................... 45 Page vi of 115
  7. 7. Executive Summary This report describes the Soldier Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility Workshop held in Ottawa in May, 2010—the fifth in a series of workshops held as part of the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmapping (TRM) initiative. The Preface introduces the Soldier Systems TRM project, which involves industry, government, academia, and other interested parties in working toward developing an integrated system for the dismounted soldier. It places Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility in the context of the project, and describes the process followed during the workshop to achieve the ultimate goal of identifying priorities and collaborations for meeting the dismounted soldier's future needs in these areas. Chapter 1, Overall Vision, Deficiencies, Future Requirements, Themes, Goals/Vision, provides abstracts of the workshop presentations that focus on these areas. It describes a demonstration conducted to illustrate some of the challenges associated with current soldier systems components. It also describes the first of four breakaway sessions designed to gather input from the workshop participants. The following chapters—Chapter 2, Themes Vision/Goals, Technical Challenges (Performance Objectives), Barriers, Chapter 3, Brainstorming: Potential Solutions/Options and Related Technologies (Exploring Solutions Sets), and Chapter 4, Technology Gaps, R&D Focus Areas & Potential Collaborators—provide abstracts of the presentations for each of these, and describe breakaway sessions 2 through 4 discussions. Chapter 5, Ongoing and Upcoming Roadmap Activities, describes the next steps in the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap process. Appendixes to the report provide the workshop agenda, list the workshop participants, provide detailed participant input from the breakout sessions, and provide DND mind maps related to the areas of survivability, sustainability, and mobility in the context of the soldier system. Page vii of 115
  8. 8. Preface: Survivability, Sustainability, Mobility and the Soldier Systems TRM The Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop was held in the Château Laurier Hotel in Ottawa, May 12-13, 2010, as part of the development phase of the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmapping initiative. About the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap (TRM) The Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap (TRM) project is a unique industry- government collaboration to apply roadmapping principles and processes to develop a comprehensive knowledge-sharing platform and identify technology opportunities in support of the Canadian Forces Soldier Modernization Effort. Participation in the Soldier Systems TRM is free and voluntary and open to Canadian and international manufacturing, services, and technology-based companies of all sizes, and to researchers and other experts from academia, government, and not-for-profit research organizations from Canada and around the world. The focus of the Soldier Systems TRM—the soldier system—is defined within NATO as the integration of everything the soldier wears, carries and consumes for enhanced individual and collective (small unit) capability within the national command and control structure. It centers on the needs of the dismounted soldier, who is often away from the supply network, and must be self-sufficient for up to 72 hours. The overarching goal of the Soldier Systems TRM is to understand how today's technology—and tomorrow's—might contribute to a superior soldier system that increases capacities and operational effectiveness for the individual soldier in the five NATO capability areas of Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I); Survivability; Mobility; Lethality; and Sustainability. The Soldier Systems TRM exercise is governed by an Executive Steering Committee made up of government and industry representatives, and includes technical subcommittees dedicated to each capability area. For information about any aspect of the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap project, visit http://www.soldiersystems-systemesdusoldat.collaboration.gc.ca Page 8 of 115
  9. 9. Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility and the Roadmap Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility was the sixth Figure 1. Survivability, workshop held as part of the development phase of Sustainability, and Mobility the Soldier Systems TRM. (Figure 1. Survivability, and the Soldier Systems TRM Sustainability, and Mobility and the Soldier Systems 1. TRM). Visioning & Future Capabilities (Held in June 2009) Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Theme Areas 2. Technical Workshop: Because the subject of personal protective Power/Energy/Sustainability equipment and other aspects of survivability, sustainability, and mobility covers so many diverse, yet related areas of focus and interest, five themes 3. Technical Workshop: were established for the workshop: Weapons: Lethal & Non-Lethal 1. Operational Clothing & Equipment 2. Operational Footwear Systems 4. Technical 5. Technical 3. Operational Headwear Systems Workshop: Workshop: C4I Sensors 4. Operational Load Carriage & Mobility Systems (including exoskeleton) 6. Technical Workshop: 5. Operational Ballistic/Blast Protection Survivability/Sustainability/ Systems Mobility Tables at the workshop were labeled with these themes, giving participants the opportunity to sit at a 7. Technical Workshop: table that was most consistent with their primary Human & Systems Integration area of expertise and interest. 8. Overall Roadmap Integration Page 9 of 115
  10. 10. The Workshop Process The goal of the Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop was to: 1. Converge on an overall vision for the soldier sustainability, survivability, and mobility future capabilities. 2. Identify R&D focus areas that will contribute in creating potential solutions to future DND needs. 3. Begin a dialogue among stakeholders, leading to the development of the technologies identified. To achieve this goal, the workshop followed a carefully designed process (Figure 2. The Workshop Process) using a series of presentations and working sessions. This document summarizes the presentations and the results of the working sessions. It follows the structure of the workshop agenda (See Appendix A. Workshop Agenda). Figure 2. The Workshop Process From the "Workshop Process" presentation by Phil Carr of the Strategic Review Groups(SRG) Page 10 of 115
  11. 11. Soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop Introduction The workshop was opened, and participants welcomed, by Dr. R. Walker, Assistant Deputy Minister (Science and Technology at Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC)), and Mr. R. Parker, Assistant Deputy Minister (Industry Canada). A series of introductory presentations followed. These were designed to familiarize participants with the technical roadmapping process and with soldier systems. What follows are abstracts of those presentations. The full presentations are provided in Volume 2: Slide Decks. They are also available on the Innovation, Collaboration, and Exchange Environment (ICee), which is accessible from the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap web site: http://www.soldiersystems- systemesdusoldat.collaboration.gc.ca Introductory Presentation Abstracts Workshop Program and TRM Background, Mr. G. Nimmo (IC) Defines and provides an overview of the technology roadmapping process. Describes other Canadian roadmapping experiences. Outlines the Soldier Systems TRM Project, including its objectives and the roles of industry and government. Describes the overall TRM phases, including the current Development Phase. Describes Development Phase activities and outlines its schedule. Provides a list of the Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Technical Sub-Committee members, and an overview of the workshop agenda. Introduces the workshop's guest speakers and ICee contest winner speakers. Page 11 of 115
  12. 12. Soldier Systems TRM Update and S&T Efforts, LCol. M.A. Bodner (DRDC) Places the workshop themes in the context of NATO functions. Describes capability concepts and systems for the Army of Tomorrow. Outlines the Soldier Modernization Effort today, tomorrow, and into the future. Outlines the Army of Tomorrow Omni-dimensional shield concept, the $15 Billion soldier systems worldwide market, and Soldier systems R&D history. Describes the DND Mindmapping project. Provides a Soldier systems Technology Areas Tech Radar Map. Briefly summarizes results of the Visioning, Power and Energy, Lethal and Non-Lethal, and C4I/Sensor workshops already held. Emphasizes the need for integration and overall capability balance, and the challenge of keeping weight low as capabilities increase. Workshop Process, Mr. P. Carr (Strategic Review Group) Outlines the workshop objectives. Describes the workshop process: define a vision, validate theme areas goals, identify technical challenges/barriers, and identify R&D Focus Areas. Describes the theme areas for the workshop: clothing and equipment, footwear, headwear, load carriage and mobility, ballistic/blast protection. Outlines the overall workshop structure, including presentations and breakout working sessions. Describes the technical challenges. Defines workshop success as discussion, contribution, collaboration, creativity, interest and curiosity. Page 12 of 115
  13. 13. 1. Overall Vision, Deficiencies, Future Requirements, Themes, Goals/Vision This chapter provides abstracts of the presentations that focused on Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility deficiencies, future requirements, needs and goals. It also describes Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Breakaway Session 1. The Vision. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Session 1 Presentation Abstracts 1.1 Soldier Systems Requirements Vision (2020-2025), LCol. E. Tremblay (DLR-5) Describes the Soldier Systems requirements vision, context, and concept of operations. Introduces the Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS), and outlines priorities and goals associated with the strategy. Outlines CRDS challenges associated with climate and type of operation, and strategic plan deductions and expectations. Describes the process as a "work in progress." Page 13 of 115
  14. 14. 1.2 Operational Clothing, Individual Equipment, & Load Carriage: Future Requirements, Maj. S. Dufour (DLR 5-4) Describes improvements to operational clothing and load carriage technology since the 1950s. Outlines requirements of the soldier of today and of the future. Places operational clothing and equipment in the context of the overall soldier system. Outlines main deficiencies regarding clothing and equipment and load carriage in terms of functionality, comfort, and protection. Provides detailed descriptions of future requirements and timelines. Outlines the missions, tasks, and operating environment of the Canadian soldier. 1.3 Soldier Systems Footwear: Future Requirements, Capt. D. Westhaver (DLR 5-10-3) Describes army footwear of the past and present. Outlines army future operational footwear goals, and describes future footwear and capabilities. Emphasizes the importance of comfort and protection. Describes required performance criteria. Emphasizes operational relevance and/or mission configurability of footwear, as well as soldier acceptance. Describes areas for development. Page 14 of 115
  15. 15. 1.4 Survivability & Ballistic Protection Equipment: Future Requirements, Capt R. Pierce (DLR 5-10-2) Outlines common Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) issues, including weight and coverage, interoperability and commonality of parts, modularity and task tailoring, and human factors for user acceptance. Describes PPE today, including helmet, visor, throat guard, fragmentation vest (FPV), bullet-resistant plates (BRP) and brassards. Emphasizes weight of all this equipment (7.5-10 Kg) is too great. Provides a vision in all these areas for realization within 5 years, and a future vision for 20 years out. Page 15 of 115
  16. 16. Demonstration of the Challenges of Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility in the Field During the presentations by Major Dufour, Captain Westhaver, and Captain Pierce, three volunteers from the audience tried on various components of the Canadian soldier's battle dress, and reported back to the workshop on their experience (see Figure 3), describing what they thought was good about the equipment, and what needed to be done to improve it. Major Dufour noted that, although the volunteers were wearing some components of the soldier's outfit, they were not carrying weapons, rations, water, ammunition, radios, batteries, and other components that the soldier typically carries. As a result, the demonstration would only approximate some of the load carried by the Canadian soldier. Figure 3. A workshop participant describes the challenges associated with wearing even part of the typical battledress of a Canadian soldier Page 16 of 115
  17. 17. Volunteer 1 Feedback Good points:  The equipment is surprisingly comfortable, provides a good range of movement, and features well-distributed weight  It is heavy, and seems to get heavier the longer you wear it Bad point:  The helmet is difficult to adjust and doesn't fit well without a great deal of effort Volunteer 2 Feedback Good points:  The equipment does allow fairly good ease of movement  The pockets are easy to access Bad points:  The equipment is very heavy, and seems to get heavier over time  The helmet is extremely hard to adjust, and the visor broke during the adjustment process Volunteer 3 Feedback Bad points:  The volunteer couldn't breathe while wearing the outfit, because it had to fit tightly, and couldn't turn her head to see where the zipper was located  The design made it difficult to easily reach various components of the kit Food for Thought The presenters emphasized the challenges associated with ensuring survivability, mobility, and sustainability, and factors that they hoped the participants would keep in mind throughout the workshop. These included the need to:  control weight  provide options suited to the mission  generate and store power  be functional in a battle setting  provide protection and safety—including everything from bugs to blasts  be adjustable, and fit comfortably and well  ensure ease of putting on and taking off  manage moisture  conduct power and information  be layered—both clothing and load carriage  be accepted and readily adopted by the soldiers for whom they were designed Page 17 of 115
  18. 18. Seating Plan Instructions, Mr. Phil Carr, (SRG) Describes the seating rules put into effect following the first coffee break, to ensure a good mix of government, industry, and academia representatives at each table. Page 18 of 115
  19. 19. 1.5 Chemical and Biological (CB) Protective Equipment: Future Requirements, Lt(N) M. Willis (DND) Outlines future requirements for Canadian Forces general service respirator (GSR). Describes operational environment, CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear) GSR requirements, and timelines. Describes Chemical Biological Warfare (CBW) protective combat uniform future requirements and status. Describes Transportable Collective Protection requirements, operational environment, and current status. Page 19 of 115
  20. 20. Luncheon Speaker: Dr. N. Buckley, Canadian Space Agency: A New Niche for Canadian Textiles in Space Describes activities of the Canadian Space Agency, emphasizing challenges in common with soldier systems (e.g., weight issues, radiation protection). Outlines need to mitigate risks to crew health of space radiation, microgravity, and an ICE (isolated, confined, extreme) environment. Describes work done in space and on earth. Emphasizes shared needs with soldier systems researchers, and invites participants to work with the Canadian Space Agency to help meet these needs. Return on C4I and Sensors Workshop, Mr. L. O'Neill (C4I TSC Industry Co-Chair) Provides an overview of the results of the C4I/Sensors workshop held in March, 2010, which was attended by over 250 participants from industry, government, and academia. Describes what Industry has heard about soldier system needs, and priorities for meeting those needs. Concludes that the conference was a good kick off for the C4I/Sensor domain and emphasizes that the ICee tool is one way to share information among industry representatives and other partners in the ongoing Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap effort. Page 20 of 115
  21. 21. Breakaway Session 1. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Needs—the Vision The goal of the first breakaway/working session was to have participants validate the overall survivability/sustainability/mobility vision for the dismounted soldier based on what had been presented to them, and on their own knowledge in their respective areas of expertise. They were also asked to identify theme goals at each table. Instructions for Breakaway Session 1 In addition to the introductory presentations, participants were prepared for the first breakaway session in a these ways:  It had been emphasized that the success of the workshop depended on discussion, contribution, collaboration, creativity, interest and curiosity, and that participants were encouraged to engage fully in the breakaway sessions  Participants had already been distributed across approximately twenty tables based on the themes they were most interested in, and on whether they represented government, industry, or academia (See "Seating Plan Instructions," on page 18)  To guide the breakout session discussions, participants were given the following vision statement to consider: Soldier Survivability, Sustainability and Mobility Vision Statement To have a superior, fully integrated completely modular & mission- configurable Soldier System that contributes to and improves operational effectiveness, regardless of the terrain, weather and environment. Page 21 of 115
  22. 22. Participants were then given an objective and questions to answer: Results of Breakaway Session 1 Following the table discussions, a facilitated report-back was held, during which selected tables presented their results. The objective was to validate/converge on an overall vision of the soldier Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility future capabilities. Each table kept the flipchart with its visioning information for use during Breakout Session 2. A summary of the flipchart content follows. For the detailed flipchart content, see Appendix C. Breakaway Session 1 Participant Input: The Vision. Page 22 of 115
  23. 23. Breakaway Session 1 Results Summary What follows is a summary of the results of the first breakaway session in these areas:  Ballistic/Blast  Footwear  Headwear  Load Carriage  Operational Clothing and Equipment The detailed content is provided in Appendix C. Breakaway Session 1 Participant Input: The Vision. Ballistic/Blast Vision. Personal Protection optimal for the soldier, which is scalable and modular depending of the threats and the mission based on human factors/user acceptance with reduce hindrance. Provide basic layer for basic protection, configurable/modular for mission requirements/role and scalable protection per expected/evolving threats. The basic layer would be a trade-off of weight vs. coverage—to reduce ‗effective weight‘ using exoskeleton or mule for example. Part of an optimal, sustainable, fully integrated soldier system that contributes and improves operational effectiveness & efficiency. Timeline. We can only expect an evolution of systems in the 5-10 years, no revolution expected before that. Maybe almost full body coverage in 25 years if concepts/technologies changes. 3-5 years 10-15 years 20 years Weight reduction 2.5-10% 20-50% <<<75% (change of (assume same paradigm?) threat/protection level) Modularity/Scalability % achievement 10% 50% 100% Page 23 of 115
  24. 24. Footwear Vision. Provide integrated and modular footwear for the soldier which is comfortable (user acceptance), lightweight and less dependent on environment. Timeline. Waterproof/windproof boots based on new material, strength/support weight ratio, is expected within 3 years. Footwear with ballistic/blast protection is expected in a 5 years timeframe and in 10 years some adaptive camouflage. In 5-10 years it can be expected to have power generation on footwear with integrated connections. Headwear Vision. Headwear protection with full integration with mandible and ocular protection, integrated power and data capabilities. Timeline. CBRN protection within 3-5 years, cooling in helmets 5-10 years, mandible and ocular protection in 5-10 years. In 5 to 10 years headwear can be integrated with voice translation, quiet probe, and voice amplification. In more than 20 years, a fully encapsulated helmet is plausible. Today 3 Years 5 Years 10 years  Helmet – ballistic, Lighter weight (100% Decrease 40% wt Decrease 60% impact probability); decrease  Visor 20% wt  Ballistic Eyewear  NVG Integrate NVG (100%) Fully enclosed CBRN Single ANVG/IR  *CBRN Mask & cooling illuminator  Balaclava warmth Temp control for | comfort |  Breakaway chin strap < 50% | |  no mandible & 100% -- miniaturized | ocular integrate when helmet |  headset mfg to decrease wt | V  Off Bore target Current only at night ----------------------------------------------> about 100% engage  Scalable & modular  Integrated & C4I ST Sensors Page 24 of 115
  25. 25. Load carriage Vision. A load carriage system human-centric that contributes to self-sustainability and operational effectiveness with increase capability, mission configurable-modular- customizable and increase mobility. It will have increase comfort, weight reduction, reduce ‗perceived‘ weight by enhance design or the use of any kind of exoskeleton, external carriage system or mule. It will have to integrate energy generation/harvesting, data and power transmission/connections. Timeline. For today, modular and common components for load carriage. In 3-5 years, incorporation of lighter materials, e-textiles, mechanical systems (wheeled/legged), C4I integration and integration with body armour, clothing, hydration and energy harvesting (solar-mechanical). Within the same 3-5 years, enhance processing for better innovation. In 5-10 years, weight reduction of 25%, exoskeleton and external carriage systems, integration of CBRN protection, cooling systems and fully customizable Operational Clothing and Equipment Vision. Future soldier system including clothing and equipment with soldier acceptance that they accept to wear with confidence with improve performance and operational effectiveness, protection, with weight reduction, adaptable to upgrades and scalable to mission, incremental from actual system, with integration of e-textiles, interoperable, multi-functions, with moisture management. Timeline: Future Requirements Lighter weight fabric with more performance, integrated groin and knee NOW protection, anti-static/electric protection, all weather protection, mission configurable & modular, better design. Flexible display, BF tracking, Exoskeleton. 0-3 years Reduce weight by 20%, mission configurable, easier quicker donning/doffing, 0-5 years enhance breathability, reduce thermal stress. Integrated electronics (comms, GPS, etc.) fire/flame/flash retardant-resistant, 3-5 years integrated life monitoring, reduce weight 25%. Cooling and heating, stab-needle-bite protection, e-textile: integrated power 5-10 years generation, thermoplastic head form for each head. CBRN protection for every day clothing, adaptive camouflage, water +10 years recycling, completely integrated helmet. Page 25 of 115
  26. 26. 2. Themes Vision/Goals, Technical Challenges (Performance Objectives), Barriers This chapter provides abstracts of the presentations preceding the second working session, and describes Working Session 2: The Technical Challenges. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Session 2 Presentation Abstracts 2.1 CBRN Individual Protection Development Trends, Mr. J. Stewart, TSC Industry Co-Chair Explains CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosive) vs. TICs (Toxic Industrial Chemicals). Describes effects of both. Questions whether similar effects mean similar protection is needed. Describes procedures for active and passive defence, available PPE technologies against CBRNE, current deficiencies and gaps, and research projects. Page 26 of 115
  27. 27. 2.2. Soldier PPE Systems Development Trends & Technical Challenges: an Industry Perspective, Mr. D. Crossman, TSC Industry Co-Chair Describes capability trends and challenges in the areas of body armour (including helmets) and load carriage. Describes PPE linkage to C4I Systems. Emphasizes the importance of questioning requirements. Describes footwear and uniform requirements, including style issues and camouflage. Outlines programmatic issues. Describes human factors in future design, as well as programmatic issues. 2.3 Soldier Integrated Headwear Systems Lessons Learned, Mr. S. Boyne (DRDC Toronto) Describes aims and technology concepts associated with Soldier Integrated Headwear Systems (SIHS). Explores different approaches, including add on, modular, and encapsulated. Outlines the SIHS design process. Provides lessons learned for suspension systems, mandible guards, shells, visors, headwear mounted displays (HMDs), and more. Page 27 of 115
  28. 28. 2.4 Collaboration Tool (ICee) Presentation, Mrs. M. Huard (IC/DND) Provides an overview of the Innovation Collaboration and Exchange Environment (ICee), a database and wiki that supports the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap and can be accessed at the roadmap's web site. Explains the objectives and concepts of the ICee. Defines a wiki and explains its importance for the Soldier Systems TRM. Outlines advantages for participants. Describes steps that participants can take to start using the ICee. 2.5 ICee Vision for DND, LCol. M. Prudhomme (DND) Lieutenant Colonel Prudhomme emphasized the importance of using the ICee tool, and the opportunities it offers to all those involved in soldier systems activities. Page 28 of 115
  29. 29. Breakaway Session 2: The Technical Challenges & Barriers The goal of the second breakaway session was to identify technical challenges, barriers, and themes associated with realizing the vision that had been defined for soldier Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility in the first breakaway session. Instructions for Breakaway Session 2 Each table was asked to use the visioning information they had gathered on flipcharts during the first breakout session to complete the following form: Note that the information being requested included:  A theme for categorizing the content  The vision and goals from session 1  Information about key performance parameters, technical challenges, and technological barriers Page 29 of 115
  30. 30. Results of Breakaway Session 2 Following discussions at the tables, and the completion of the forms, a facilitated report- back was held, during which selected tables presented their results. The completed forms were kept for use by participants to feed the brainstorming session planned for Breakaway Session 3. In that session, the content from session 2 would be used to feed a brainstorming session aimed at proposing potential solutions to address the challenges. The technical challenges outlined in detail in that appendix can be summarized as follows: 1. Ballistic/Blast Protection BB Table 1. Threat characterization/quantification BB Table 2. Multi-function protection (e.g., energy storage integration) BB Table 3. Increased coverage (e.g., 360-degree and multi-threat protection at 75% lower weight) BB Table 4. Improved comfort (e.g., better thermal and increased mobility) 2. Footwear Systems F Table 1. All climate/terrain/threat protection in a single system F Table 2. Full mission comfort F Table 3. Improved moisture management/recycling (open/closed) F Table 4. Energy harvesting/storage 3. Headwear Systems H Table 1. Increased usability/comfort/fit H Table 2. Increased coverage (e.g., mandible and multi-threats— ballistic/blast/impact protection—while lowering weight) H Table 3. Interfaces optimization H Table 4. C4I integration (power/data) 4. Load Carriage LC Table 1. 100% mission-configurable and modular LC Table 2. Improved comfort/adjustability/stability (better load management) LC Table 3. Improved safety (quick release) LC Table 4. Energy harvesting capability (efficiency/optimization/release) Page 30 of 115
  31. 31. 5. Operational Clothing C Table 1. Mission configurable and modular C Table 2. Improved comfort/fit/flexibility C Table 3. All threats/hazard full body protection (ballistic/blast/CBRN) C Table 4. Functional clothing (embedded C4I/sensors—e.g., physiological) C Table 5. Integrated power generation, distribution and storage The participant input collected on the forms is provided in Appendix D, Breakaway Session 2 Participant Input: Challenges and Barriers. Page 31 of 115
  32. 32. 3. Brainstorming: Potential Solutions/Options and Related Technologies (Exploring Solution Sets) This chapter provides abstracts of the presentations that preceded the third breakaway session, and describes Breakaway Session 3: Technologies. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Session 3 Presentation Abstracts The second day of the workshop was opened by Mrs. J. Garrett, Director of Soldier Systems Program Management (DSSPM), who commented on the success of the Soldier Systems TRM process to date and elaborated on ways that the roadmap will likely contribute to a better, more streamlined process for meeting future soldier systems needs. This was followed by presentations by the four winners of the ICee contest, abstracts of which follow. The contest provided ICee contributors with an opportunity to present information on their technologies or areas of expertise. These presentations, in turn, were followed by additional DND and other presentations focused on potential solution options. ICee Contest Winner: Optimizing Design of Military Products Using Subjective and Objective Measures, Queens University Ergonomics Research Group Describes project designed to develop, evaluate, and design procedures or products that optimize human performance and safety. Object was to use scientifically rigorous and cost- effective evaluation methods and the highest levels of expertise and technology in biological and motion sensors and human factors testing. Outlines approach to improved design and provides examples of projects, including load carriage system, enhanced body armour, and rifle sighting. Outlines current initiatives. Page 32 of 115
  33. 33. ICee Contest Winner: Conductive Textiles in Soldier Systems, Asha Peta Thompson, Stan Swallow, Intelligent Textiles Limited, London, UK Outlines future soldier requirements, notably the need to reduce the weight of equipment, a quarter of which can be batteries. Describes problems with conventional conductive cables. Proposes conductive textiles as a solution, and outlines conductive textile research and prototype solutions from Intelligent Textiles Limited (ITL). Describes future evolution prototypes. Notes Canadian supply chain partners, and provides contact information. ICee Contest Winner: Load Carriage: Solutions and Capabilities, Mr. Alain Bujold, Mawashi Protective Clothing Inc. Describes Mawashi Protective Clothing Inc. capabilities in human factors and ergonomics, biomimetics, energy management, heat- stress management, advanced materials, and systems integration. Examines approaches to load carriage based on an understanding of anatomy. Describes lessons learned and how natural principles regarding load might be applied to the soldier. Describes Mawashi products and successes, and what the company can offer the Canadian Forces. Page 33 of 115
  34. 34. ICee Contest Winner: Man-Portable Enhanced Evaporative Cooling Garment, Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, University of Ottawa, Yang Y, Diagne BT, Cheng L, Seung C, Kenny G, Lan CQ Describes research conducted on heat stress management and personal cooling/ microclimate cooling. Outlines a range of garments designed with cooling properties, including fluid conditioned garments (FCG), phase change material (PCM), and evaporative cooling garments (ECG). Presents data indicating efficacy of various solutions, and conclusions with regard to current cooling capabilities. Outlines investigations planned for the future. 3.1 Multifunctional Materials Applications for the Future Dismounted Soldier, Dr. R.S. Underhill (DRDC Atlantic) Outlines needs that the Canadian Forces have identified, and states that multifunctional materials are needed to meet them. Defines multifunctional materials as capable of performing at least two functions with a single material, and outlines how they can contribute to meeting needs. Describes areas of interest for research, including nanomaterials, "smart" materials, fire resistant materials, organic light emitting diodes (OLED), and micro- and nano-electrochemical systems (MEMS & NEMS). Page 34 of 115
  35. 35. 3.2 Soldier Applications of Nanotechnologies, Dr. B. Simard (NRC) Defines nanotechnology and describes two approaches— top-down, and bottom-up—to developing nanotechnology. Describes how nanotechnology can improve soldier survivability and reduce weight of equipment. Describes carbon nanotubes (CNT), their different morphologies, and the National Research Council (NRC) pilot plant for their production. Explains the advantages of macroscopic fiber for strength and lightness. Summarizes NRC's expertise in CNT. 3.3 Intelligent Textiles for Protection—Overview of Technologies, Ms. A. Begriche, Mr. D. Lachapelle (CTT) Describes function of CTTGroup, a non-profit organization that offers networking and commercial and technical support services to businesses working with textile, geosynthetic, polymer, and related technologies. Outlines soldier needs regarding textiles. Describes how intelligent textiles can address these needs in the areas of bio-sensing, thermoregulation, communications, interconnection functions, and power generation and accumulation. Describes challenges in the areas of integration, standards, connections, and commercialization. Page 35 of 115
  36. 36. 3.4 Personal Armour (Ballistic & Blast) Technologies: State-of-the-art Overview, Dr. K. Williams (DRDC) Describes priorities for protection, and their impact on PPE design. Outlines challenges associated with developing better protective equipment, including a range of design and material challenges. Outlines the evolution of test methodologies used. Concludes that there is some promise that materials technologies will help improve protection and reduce weight, but that there is no indication of a major leap forward in materials performance at present. Describes requirements for further research and development going forward. 3.5 Innovation in Footwear Technologies, Mr. D. Thibault (Cons.) Describes the need for innovative footwear, and the main components of footwear where innovation can be applied. Explains how materials have evolved. Describes materials and manufacturing associated with footwear's sole and upper (including lacing systems), and joining the two. Discusses 3D custom fitting and new technologies and R&D. Speculates on "next generation" footwear that could be motorized and controlled, with a GPS component. Page 36 of 115
  37. 37. 3.6 Multi-Spectral Camouflage Technologies: State-of-the-art Overview, Mr. J. Dumas (DRDC) Provides a brief history of camouflage. Describes the camouflage environment and specialized uniforms. Discusses spectral differences, including near infrared, thermal (SWIR), and ultraviolet. Describes prototypes of desert camouflage uniforms and arctic camouflage uniforms. Discusses techniques and materials associated with camouflaging. Outlines future challenges. 3.7 Innovations in Load Carriage and Headwear Systems at USMC, Mr. D. Tack (HSI) Describes the mission of the Marine Expeditionary Rifle Squad (MERS), including the need to manage the squad as an integrated system. Provides information about individual assault load and its effect on performance. Outlines the aims of the MERS program, describes approaches to research, and presents initial findings. Discusses packaging and re-design, sensor integrated modular protection (SIMP), and hearing protection. Page 37 of 115
  38. 38. Luncheon speaker: New Developments in Transparent Armour Technology, Dr. J. Sands (ARL) Provides background on the speaker. Explains transparent materials applications, with the focus on protection. Discusses design process for transparent armour, the need for new materials, and how polymer capability can be improved through engineering. Describes new generations of transparent ceramics, and the challenges associated with combining materials. Highlights need for research involving partnerships that include international collaborators. Page 38 of 115
  39. 39. Breakaway Session 3: Technologies The objective of the third working session was to identify the potential solutions and their underlying technologies to address the key technical challenges identified in Breakaway Session 2. Input for Breakaway Session 3 Following Breakaway Session 2, staff collected the forms that had been completed by the workshop participants, and used them to generate a list of technical challenges for each theme. These were then arranged on flipcharts throughout the room. There were three steps to the instructions for Breakaway Session 3. Instructions for Breakaway Session 3 1. Propose solutions on stickies The workshop participants were each given three stickies (shown here) and asked to fill them in. The stickies provided areas to describe:  the technical challenge they were addressing  the solution they were proposing  the timeframe for developing the proposed solution  related technologies that would require research and development  the TRL (technology readiness level) as described on mind map handouts (see Appendix E).  The key players to involve in the research and development Page 39 of 115
  40. 40. 2. Post the stickies on the flipcharts under the proper technical challenge Participants were asked to post their stickies on the flipcharts distributed throughout the room, under the appropriate technical challenge heading. 3. Identify the most promising solutions Finally, participants were asked to return to the flipcharts distributed throughout the room, study the proposed solutions, and place a red flag on the three most promising proposed solutions in terms of addressing the technical challenges. Specifically, they were asked to pick the technical challenges related to their areas of expertise. Results of Breakaway Session 3 Figures 4 and 5, which follow, show the results of the breakaway session:  Figure 4 shows the results of step 2 of the working session: the distribution of stickies on the flipcharts by technical challenge  Figure 5 shows the results of step 3 of the working session: distribution of the red flags on the stickies, indicating priority solutions Following the workshop, the stickies were collected for further analysis. Their contents are provided in Appendix E, Breakaway Session 3 Participant Input: Technologies. Page 40 of 115
  41. 41. Figure 4. Distribution of stickies on the wall by technical challenge (step 2) Page 41 of 115
  42. 42. Figure 5. Distribution of priority flags on the stickies for each challenge area (step 3) Page 42 of 115
  43. 43. 4. Technology Gaps, R&D Focus Areas & Potential Collaborators This chapter describes Breakaway Session 4, and provides an abstract of the closing workshop presentation by LCol. Bodner. Breakaway Session 4: Priorities and Collaborators The objective of Breakaway Session 4 was to identify the R&D focus areas and the key players that should be involved in order to address the technical challenges identified in Session 2. Instructions for Breakaway Session 4 Workshop participants were asked use forms provided to them (shown here) to: 1. Select 2 or 3 of the most promising individual technologies (from the list) to be pursued to address one of the technical challenges. 2. Identify the technology gaps that need to be addressed. 3. Identify key R&D areas to address the gaps. 4. Identify key R&D collaborators that could or should be involved in this R&D effort. Page 43 of 115
  44. 44. Results of Breakaway Session 4 Following the workshop, the completed forms (see example in Figure 6 below) were collected to be used to analyze the solutions and participants suggested. Figure 6. Example Technology Sheet Completed by Participants The table that follows (Figure 7. R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop) summarizes the information consolidated from breakaway session 4. It indicates R&D focus areas to be prioritized in order to contribute to the development of the technologies that can contribute to addressing the technical challenges. Page 44 of 115
  45. 45. Figure 7. R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop Challenge Technology Key Potential Technical Area (What to develop) Barriers/Gaps R&D Focus Area Collaborators C4 Functional Clothing  New polymers and  Commercialization  Spinning  NRC, CTT, nanotechnology  Availability  Weaving/Knitting Chemists  CNT fibres/yarns  Manufacturing  Dyeing  Nanocomp.  Process at mills  Finishing  Univ.of Texas  Printing  CSIRO, Difco  (chemistry scale-up)  Univ. Waterloo C5 Electronic Textiles  Intelligent Textiles  Cut/sew issues  Secondary power  ITL and Power ltd.  where is the product: source  BAE Generation Storage  Weaving, knitting  R&D,  Manufacturing  CTT commercialization? processes at mills  Printing?  Storage  Environmental impact  Magnetic field? Nanotechnology  Fibre/with films  R&D to full scale  Technology transfer  University  Polymer production  Proper recycling of researchers to applications nanomaterials industry and government  ―Pull‖ Injury Mapping  Information sharing N/A N/A Industry can respond  Change and adjust to build classification of appropriate protective pertinent materials in more information current time frames Composite Materials  New high Engineers are not being  Composite material performance trained in new material manufacturers materials And composites as a  Composite  nanotechnology required curriculum practitioners in industry  Boeing Page 45 of 115
  46. 46. R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop (continued) Key Potential Challenge Technology Technical Area (What to develop) Barriers/Gaps R&D Focus Area Collaborators At the Sole Level  Monomere science  Knowing current Adapting product to  PCE producers (Weight) products from tire or footwear technologies  Monomere other industries, and producer adapting it  Footwear equipment  CIE.  Government Lab Quick release  These systems are  ability to incorporate - Functional design: currently available  Multiple components of must change the the system as a whole  L.C. system to one quick  Release option Choosing the  So multi dimensional compromise that That will be needed to  There is no specific develop the system priority Kinetic ―e‖ Harvesting  Utilization of  inability to capture and  capacitor Industry: Zen (cars) movement of load retain enough energy  ability to use and Mawashi to generate energy receive energy  Harness energy potential from leg movement Exo-skeleton  Off human loading  computerization/robotics  robotics intelligence/  control of system control development Noise reduction  inner ear device  Ear interface  Mass customization  University (Laval, technology  dynamic selective  Signal processing signal processing Ecole De filtering (sound  (algonither,  Speech audio Technologie isolation) processing Superieure (ETS) implementation)  Pattern recognition  Industry (hearing aids, entertainment) Page 46 of 115
  47. 47. R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop (continued) Key Potential Challenge Technology Technical Area (What to develop) Barriers/Gaps R&D Focus Area Collaborators Augmented Reality  positioning  accuracy  data miming  University (Laval, (Visual System) technology  processing  data storage ETS)  data fusion  availability  rendering  Gaming Industry  human display  CAE interface  Thales  (user friendly) C2 Improved  Nanotechnology  Transfer from lab to  Improved dispersion  CNR – Dr. Simard comfort/fit/ commercial production and control  Polytech. Montreal flexibility and temper-  How to incorporate  Manipulation et (Dr. Ajji) ature control  nanotechnology in detection de  CTT groupe textile nanoparticule Plus – C3 all Threads BB3  Nanotechnology  Show that it can be  Chemistry Nanotube  NRC Increase coverage and integrated to specific  Test method and  Process material such as multi-threat protection facilities  collaborations, ceramic and that it will at 75% weight  Prioritization of the weavers, ceramic resist processing effort (where can a manufacturing,  Needs to be save the most weight) academia, system demonstrated at a  integrators ―ballistic‖ scale  Link between property and ballistic performance LC1 – 100%  Standardizing power Mission configurable demand and modular  Innovative fastening systems LC2 – Improved  Load transfer  Need to fund R&D  Human factors  Mawashi comfort/ technology projects to build  Ergonomics  Queens adjustability/stability  Load balance and prototype and  Biomechanics (Ergonomic (better load stabilization evaluate/trials Research Group)  Industrial Design management)  Load mapping and  TRL 1> TRL 9  Human Systems  Systems integration distribution International  System Integrators Page 47 of 115
  48. 48. R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop (continued) Key Potential Challenge Technology Technical Area (What to develop) Barriers/Gaps R&D Focus Area Collaborators Improved – Spectral  Counting  Limitation in dynamic  Material science,  Univ. of Waterloo Signature Management technology that is  material properties developing and  Univ. of Toronto multi-spectral manufacturing new  DRDC types of materials  GMA Energy Generation  scale down  Material definition  Medical - create the pumping  weight down science Community system & location  durability  Thermodynamics  Material  temperature range  Electrical Engineer Manufacturing  Fluid mechanics  Academia (research center) All Climate/Terrain  sensor technology  power generation  Material science  - Medical - create a second skin  thermal insulation  knowledge of how Community that react automatically  heat air materials react  - Material  reactive technology thermally and  Manufacturing electrically  integration  - Academia  (research center  - Michel Bisson BB1 Threat Industry can not Information sharing gap Real statistics in current  DND with threat Nanomodeling tools respond to (with regards to info time info on casualty improvement needs assessment and respond  Univ. and industry as threat changes to ballistic casualty and providers without current threat knowledge threat info real time BB2 Threat Models being used Need updating  Martimtek today are outdated  Fibre producers Models for fabrics and re: textiles and new  3D textiles bullets materials  Hybrid 3D textiles  Ceramics Data collection technologies Page 48 of 115
  49. 49. R&D Focus Areas and Collaborators for each Technical Challenge Identified at the Workshop (continued) Key Potential Challenge Technology Technical Area (What to develop) Barriers/Gaps R&D Focus Area Collaborators Comfort/fit cell threats Nanotechnology  durability  evaluate method  DRDC functional clothing  safely issued standards  CTT  compatibility with  handle safely, test  National institute of materials method nanotechnology  mass production  toxicity  NRC  tools to work with them  cost evaluation  new materials  machinery development  industry evaluation  design of machines  adapting equipment  testing and trials Mission Configurability/ Functional Design  interpreting  start from naked Modular understanding weight soldier distribution on the body  industrial design  understand the effect of  software/simulation load on the body design  customize to body  multidisciplinary shape individually approach and  Technology and communication logistics and economics  gender adaptability to fitting Page 49 of 115
  50. 50. Next Steps, LCol M.A. Bodner Reviews the objectives and outcomes of the current development phase of the Soldier Systems TRM. Describes overall TRM phases. Discusses objectives of upcoming implementation phase, its approach and governance. Introduces the Soldier Systems Technology Hub, which will be at the core of the implementation phase. Outlines potential funding programs. Discusses next steps in the development phase. Page 50 of 115
  51. 51. 5. Ongoing and Upcoming Roadmap Activities The Survivability, Sustainability, Mobility Workshop was just part of the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmapping process. It represents one step on the journey to a superior soldier system for the Canadian Forces. Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility Collaborations One of the key results of the workshop was the identification of R&D focus areas for ongoing, collaborative effort. The Survivability, Sustainability, and Mobility Technical Subcommittee, with guidance from the Soldier Systems TRM Executive Steering Committee, will continue to clarify these collaborations. Together with industry and government participants, they will help realize the potential of these focus areas. Sharing Knowledge with the ICee Database and Wiki A key to the success of any technical roadmapping initiative is ensuring easy collaboration among its participants. For the Soldier Systems TRM, the Innovation, Collaboration and Exchange Environment (ICee) provides collaboration opportunities. To reiterate, the Innovation, Collaboration and Exchange Environment (ICee) is an online database of information relevant to soldier systems, and a Wiki that enables online networking, communication, and contribution to the roadmapping process on an ongoing basis. It is a password-protected single tool that includes sections for communicating restricted, sensitive information meant for a selected audience. The ICee is open to all who wish to participate in the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap. Participants can contribute to both the database and the Wiki. For more information about the ICee tool visit http://www.soldiersystems-systemesdusoldat.collaboration.gc.ca Upcoming Workshops Discussion and collaboration in all aspects of the Soldier Systems TRM is expected to continue throughout this development phase of the roadmap and beyond. To ensure this, additional Soldier Systems TRM workshops are planned in focus areas that include:  Human and Systems Integration  Overall Roadmap Integration Page 51 of 115
  52. 52. Dates for these workshops, and information about them, is available at the Soldier Systems Technology Roadmap website: http://soldiersystems-systemesdusoldat.collaboration.gc.ca/ Page 52 of 115
  53. 53. A. Workshop Agenda Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop Agenda Day 1—Wednesday, May 12 8h00 – 8h15 Welcome and Opening Remarks, Dr. R. Walker (ADM S&T) TBC and Mr. R. Parker (ADM IC) 8h15 – 8h25 Workshop Program and TRM Background, Mr. G. Nimmo (IC) 8h25 – 8h40 Soldier Systems TRM Update and S&T Efforts, LCol. M.A. Bodner (DRDC) 8h40 – 8h50 Workshop Process, Mr. P. Carr (SRG) 1. Overall Vision, Deficiencies Future Requirements, Themes Goals/Vision 8h50 – 9h05 1.1 Soldier Systems Requirements Vision (2020-2025), LCol. E. Tremblay (DLR 5) 9h05 – 9h25 1.2 Operational Clothing, Individual Equipment, & Load Carriage: Future Requirements, Maj. S. Dufour (DLR 5-4) 9h25 – 9h45 1.3 Soldier Systems Footwear: Future Requirements, Capt. D. Westhaver (DLR 5-4-2) 9h45 – 10h05 1.4 Survivability & Ballistic Protection Equipment: Future Requirements, Capt R. Pierce (DLR 5-10-2) 9h05 – 10h05 Demonstration of Current Soldier Equipment 10h05 – 10h10 Sitting Plan Instructions, Mr. P. Carr 10h10 – 10h35 Coffee Break (ICee Registration & Networking) 10h35 – 10h55 1.5 Chemical and Biological (CB) Protective Equipment: Future Requirements, Lt(N) M. Willis (DND) 10h55 – 11h05 Breakaway Session Instructions (1) 11h05 – 12h05 Breakaway Roundtables Facilitated Discussions (1) 12h05 – 13h25 Lunch (no host) 13h00– 13h20 Guest Speaker: Dr. N. Buckley, Canadian Space Agency: A New Niche for Canadian Textiles in Space 13h25 – 14h05 Report Back (Plenary), Mr P. Carr 14h05 – 14h15 Return on C4I and Sensors Workshop, Mr. L. O‘Neill (C4I TSC Industry Co-chairs) 2. Themes Vision/Goals, Challenges (Performance Objectives), Technical Barriers 14h15 – 14h30 2.1 CBRN Individual Protection Development Trends Mr. J. Stewart, Industry Co-Chair 14h30 – 14h50 2.2 Soldier PPE Systems Development Trends & Technical Challenges: an Industry Perspective Mr. D. Crossman, Industry Co-Chair Page 53 of 115
  54. 54. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop Agenda 14h50 – 15h05 2.3 Soldier Integrated Headwear Systems Lessons Learned, Mr. S. Boyne (DRDC Toronto) 15h05 – 15h20 Coffee Break 15h20 – 16h30 Breakaway Roundtables Facilitated Discussions (2) 16h30 – 17h05 Report Back, Mr. P. Carr 17h05 – 17h20 ICee Tool, Mrs. M. Huard (DND) 17h20 – 17h25 ICee Vision for DND, LCol. M. Prudhomme (DND) 17h25 – 17h30 Closure of Day 1, Mr. G. Nimmo 14h15 – 14h35 2.1 CBRN Individual Protection Development Trends Mr. J. Stewart, Industry Co-Chair 14h35 – 14h50 2.2 Soldier PPE Systems Development Trends & Technical Challenges: an Industry Perspective Mr. D. Crossman, Industry Co-Chair 15h05 – 15h20 Coffee Break 15h20 – 16h30 Breakaway Roundtables Facilitated Discussions (2) 16h30 – 17h05 Report Back, Mr. P. Carr 17h05 – 17h20 ICee Tool, Mrs. M. Huard (DND) 17h20 – 17h25 ICee Vision for DND, Lcol. M. Prudhomme (DND) 17h25 – 17h30 Closure of Day 1, Mr. G. Nimmo 15h05 – 15h20 Coffee Break 15h20 – 16h30 Breakaway Roundtables Facilitated Discussions (2) 16h30 – 17h05 Report Back, Mr. P. Carr 17h05 – 17h20 ICee Tool, Mrs. M. Huard (DND) 17h20 – 17h25 ICee Vision for DND, Lcol. M. Prudhomme (DND) 17h25 – 17h30 Closure of Day 1, Mr. G. Nimmo 17h30 – 18h30 ICee Registration/Individual Training Sessions 17h30 – 18h30 Cash Bar Reception Day 2—Thursday, May 13 8h00 – 8h05 Program of the Day, Mr. G. Nimmo 8h05 – 8h10 Welcome and Opening Remarks, Mrs. J. Garrett (DSSPM) Page 54 of 115
  55. 55. Survivability/Sustainability/Mobility Workshop Agenda 3. Brainstorming: Potential Solutions/Options and Related Technologies (exploring solution sets) 8h10 – 8h55 ICee Contest Winners Presentations 8h55 – 9h10 3.1Multifunctional Materials Applications of the Future Dismounted Soldier Dr. R. S. Underhill (DRDC Atlantic) 9h10 – 9h25 3.2 Soldier Applications of Nanotechnologies, Dr. B. Simard (NRC) 9h25 – 9h45 3.3 Intelligent Textiles for Protection – Overview of Technologies, Ms. A. Begriche, Mr. O. Vermeersch (CTT) 9h45 – 10h00 3.4 Personal Armour (Ballistic & Blast) Technologies: State-of-the-art Overview, Dr. K. Williams (DRDC) 10h00 – 10h15 Coffee Break 10h15 – 10h30 3.5 Innovation in Footwear Technologies, Mr. D. Thibault (Cons.) 10h30 – 10h40 3.6 Multi-Spectral Camouflage Technologies: State-of-the-art Overview, Mr. J. Dumas (DRDC) 10h40 – 11h00 3.7 Innovations in Load Carriage and Headwear Systems at USMC, Mr. D. Tack (HSI) 11h00 – 11h05 Breakaway Session Instructions, Mr. P. Carr 11h05 – 12h10 Brainstorming Session: Stickies on the Wall (3) 12h10 – 13h30 Lunch (no-host) 13h05 – 13h30 Guest Speaker: Dr. J. Sands (ARL), New Developments in Transparent Armour Technology 13h30 – 14h05 Report Back (Plenary) & Next Session Instructions, Mr. P. Carr 4. Technology Gaps, R&D Focus Areas & Potential Collaborators 14h05– 15h05 Breakaway Roundtables Facilitated Discussions (4) 15h05 – 15h35 Coffee Break 15h35 – 16h20 Report Back (Plenary), Mr. P. Carr 16h20 – 16h40 Soldier Systems TRM Next steps, LCol. M.A. Bodner 16h40 – 16h55 Closure of Soldier Workshop, LCol. M.A. Bodner (DRDC), Mr. J. Steward and Mr. D. Crossman (TSC Co-Chairs) Page 55 of 115
  56. 56. B. List of Participants Last First Title Company 1 Afagh Fred F. Carleton University 2 Ajji Abdellah Professor Ecole Polytechnique of Montréal 3 Anctil Benoit Biokinetics 4 Andrukaitis Ed Defence R&D Canada 5 Appleton Andrew CAE Professional Services 6 Armstrong Wes TSL Aerospace Technologies Ltd 7 Avishai Gadi KG Canada 8 B. Charron Peter Lennox Charron International Univeristy of Waterloo, 9 Bagheri Saeed Commercialization Office (WatCO) DND/ADM(Mat)/DGLEPM/DSSPM 10 Balma Bob 3-7 11 Barre Mike NRC-IRAP 12 Batcheller Jane University of Alberta 13 Beaudoin R (Bob) Vanguard Magazine 14 Bedirian Mireille Canadian Space Agency 15 Begriche Aldjia ctt group 16 Belzile Jean École de technologie supérieure 17 Benaddi Hamid Stedfast Inc 18 Beth Andre lincolnfabrics 19 Bisson Michel STC Footwear Inc. 20 Blais Marc-Andre Industrial Technologies Office 21 Bodner LCol. Mike DRDC 22 Bourne Orson Bus. Dev. Off NRC 23 Bowes Rick DRS Technologies Canada Ltd 24 Boyne Maj. S. DND Dr. Malcolm 25 Bright DND M. Design Development and Sizing - 26 Brown Patricia DND 27 Buckley Dr. N. CSA 28 Bujold Alain Mawashi Protective Clothing, Inc 29 Burns Brian NACRE VP, Business 30 Cao Linli BM Technology Inc. Development Page 56 of 115
  57. 57. 31 Carlen Jordan DuPont Canada 32 Carr Phil Strategic Review Group 33 Carson Dave FELLFAB Limited 34 Charlebois Scott DND 35 Cochran Bruce 36 Cohen Rachamim Elbit VP Business 37 Connolly Peter Fidus Systems Inc Development Directeur R&D / 38 Couture Sebastien FilSpec Inc. R&D Manager 39 Couturier Jean-Pierre Rheinmetall Canada Equipment 40 Craigie Ian J. DND Program Manager Associate 41 Cronin Duane University of Waterloo Professor 42 Crossman Danny PSP Inc 43 Croteau Dominique Revision Eyewear 44 Dalakis Mike VP Operations kristoFOAM Ind Inc 45 Darling Marie Rockwell Collins 46 Davie Nicole DND Director, 47 Davis Greg Advanced BAE Systems systems 48 Demers Gaetan Bennett Fleet Quebec Inc 49 d'Entremont Ellen RCMP 50 Detellis Jillian Polartec LLC 51 Dickson Eva Royal Military College of Canada Jean- 52 Dionne Allen Vanguard Philippe 53 Dixon Anthony Peerless Garments LP 54 Doherty Ian SRG 55 Dolez Patricia Ecole de Technologie Superieure 56 Downing Warren DRS Technologies Canada Ltd DLR 5-4 (Army Individual Maj Clothing, 57 Dufour DND Stéphane Equipment & Ballistic Protection) 58 Duheme Yvon Monterey Textiles 1996 Inc 59 Dumas J. DRDC Page 57 of 115

×