Transcendent Interactions Collaborative Contexts and Relationship-based Computing

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Not a presentation by me …

Not a presentation by me

BUT

A presentation
by
Stewart Butterfield
Ben Cerveny
Eric Costello
Ludicorp Ltd.
(I was always referring to it, so now there\'s a URL to refer to ;)

More in: Technology
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  • note to slide 13 cont.

    note to thirteenth slide (cont.)
    Today it is nearly taken for granted that people are using computers to create, to communicate, to express themselves — and to seek out the same from others.

    If, as developers, we want to support this movement, we require a new and powerful reframing of the metaphor of computation: relationship-based computing.

    We use computation to extend our relationships with others. Our computational acts and the objects they generate exist in the context of a relationship with another person or group.

    And it won't be long before the idea of double clicking a document seems as specialized (or even quaint) as standing back while the computer 'executes its program'.
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  • note to slide 13 cont.

    note to thirteenth slide (cont.)
    Over time, the focus of computation moved sharply from means (applications) to the ends (documents). Documents were where value accreted through the operation of the computer.

    But it is only in the last several years, since computation has become pop-cultural, that we began to address a more fundamental question: why are we, as casual computer users, generating these documents using these applications? The reason: other people.

    And the rise of the network meant that there were, as often as not, humans on the other end of our computing activities.
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    Once upon a time, computation was a raw, ungainly act with physical switches thrown and vacuum tubes replaced by hand. Later, punchcards flipped bits inside the computer, lights blinked, and equations were solved: programs ran, and then produced results.

    Eventually, to aid the operator in navigating this process, a metaphor was wrapped around the code. Initially, this metaphor presented operations framed as tasks, and applications became the means by which you could produce or alter some potential permenant result: the document.

    If you wanted to write, you opened a work processor. If you wanted to draw, you used a drawing application.
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  • notes on slides 6 cont.

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    While it may not make sense to faciliate the acknowledgement and interlinking of these relationships in, say, the design of a sport, it can make sense in the design of software.

    In fact, the more the software acknowledges the human behind the user (or the player behind the character, the person behind he database record), the more value people will find — and create.
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  • notes on slide 6

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    Often, the state of play arises spontaneously, especially in contexts where creative collaboration takes place. Ludicorp’s flagship playspace, the Game Neverending, is a system in which the building of the environment itself is a playful act. The mechanisms by which players create their own content for the spaces in the game they inhabit take on the roles of games within the larger game.
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Transcript

  • 1. Transcendent Interactions Collaborative Contexts and Relationship-based Computing Stewart Butterfield Ben Cerveny Eric Costello Ludicorp Ltd.
  • 2. Don't build applications. Build contexts for interaction.
  • 3. The architecture of entertainment has been shaped by the idea of ‘Immersion’.
  • 4. But it turns out play is about people, not places.
  • 5. In fact, play is often about building things [including places] collaboratively.
  • 6. The most expressive forms of play involve improvisational collaboration and sharing
  • 7. The ‘Badge’ – a simple javascript include that queried for your presence in GNE and allowed people to send you messages.
  • 8. … the message became a ‘note’ – a game object that could be picked up, dropped, further annotated and given to other people.
  • 9. The first “out-of-application” use of in-game relationship data.
  • 10.
    • Number of people in-world over time
    Originally created by scraped presence information off the site, until we made an API.
  • 11.
    • Public groups and their overlap
  • 12. GNE neighborhood browser “ Transposing” the relationships from the game context to the blog context (instant blogroll).
  • 13.
    • Application-based Computing
    • Document-based Computing
    • Relationship-based Computing
  • 14.  
  • 15. Applications, like architecture, can shut down possibility.
  • 16. Fluid contexts for interaction are where rich social systems arise.
  • 17. Thank you. This presentation will be available on ludicorp.com