Modern Service Professional Series Week #4 - Aperitif to Digestif
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Modern Service Professional Series Week #4 - Aperitif to Digestif

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A look at the Apertif to Digestif world and what it, along with great Bitters knowledge can do for your bar or restaurant.

A look at the Apertif to Digestif world and what it, along with great Bitters knowledge can do for your bar or restaurant.

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Modern Service Professional Series Week #4 - Aperitif to Digestif Presentation Transcript

  • 1. MSP SERIES - WEEK #4 -APERITIF & DIGESTIFMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 2. Aperitifs & DigestifsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 3. Itinerary• Cocktail - Negroni• White Wines• Dry fortified wines• Aromatized Wines (Wermut)• Bitters• Liqueurs & Cordials• Brandy & Cognac• Bitters• don’t be bitter... (Kathy Casey Shout!)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 4. Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 5. AperitivoMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 6. Aperitivo• An apéritif (also spelled aperitif) is an alcoholic beverage usually servedbefore a meal to stimulate the appetite, and is therefore usually dry ratherthan sweet. Common choices for an apéritif are vermouth; champagne; fino,amontillado or other styles of dry sherry (but not usually cream sherry,which is very sweet and rich); and any still, dry, aromatized, light white wine.• "Apéritif" is a French word derived from the Latin verb aperire, which means“to open.”• from Latin apre`- before the mealMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 7. Aperitivo• An apéritif (also spelled aperitif) is an alcoholic beverage usually servedbefore a meal to stimulate the appetite, and is therefore usually dry ratherthan sweet. Common choices for an apéritif are vermouth; champagne; fino,amontillado or other styles of dry sherry (but not usually cream sherry,which is very sweet and rich); and any still, dry, aromatized, light white wine.• "Apéritif" is a French word derived from the Latin verb aperire, which means“to open.”• from Latin apre`- before the mealDigestivoMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 8. Aperitivo• An apéritif (also spelled aperitif) is an alcoholic beverage usually servedbefore a meal to stimulate the appetite, and is therefore usually dry ratherthan sweet. Common choices for an apéritif are vermouth; champagne; fino,amontillado or other styles of dry sherry (but not usually cream sherry,which is very sweet and rich); and any still, dry, aromatized, light white wine.• "Apéritif" is a French word derived from the Latin verb aperire, which means“to open.”• from Latin apre`- before the meal• A digestif is an alcoholic beverage served after a meal, in theory to aid digestion. Ifserved in the middle of a meal, it is called a trou normand, and when served after acoffee course, it may be called pousse-café.• Digestifs are usually taken straight. Common kinds of digestif include brandy (Cognac,Armagnac, Calvados, alambric, etc.) eaux de vie (fruit brandies), a pomace brandy(likegrappa), various bitter or sweet liqueursDigestivoMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 9. AperitivoMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 10. • should be offer within thefirst thirty seconds after theguests have been seatedAperitivoMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 11. • should be offer within thefirst thirty seconds after theguests have been seated• It should be low in alcohol, soas not to numb the taste budsAperitivoMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 12. • should be offer within thefirst thirty seconds after theguests have been seated• It should be low in alcohol, soas not to numb the taste buds• It should be Dry, so as tostimulate the appetiteAperitivoMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 13. • should be offer within thefirst thirty seconds after theguests have been seated• It should be low in alcohol, soas not to numb the taste buds• It should be Dry, so as tostimulate the appetite• …Sweet drinks can cause theguest to feel full before themeal has even begun.AperitivoMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 14. NegroniMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 15. Negroni• GLASS - Rocks• 1 part Campari• 1 part SweetVermouth• 1 part Gin• GARNISH - Lemon Wedge &Orange Rind• METHOD - add ingredientsto glass, stir well, orange rindfinishMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 16. WinesMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 17. Wines• Wines “by the glass” are best served as “Aperitif”Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 18. Wines• Wines “by the glass” are best served as “Aperitif”• Guests may request for the wine list as to order abottle for aperitif as well.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 19. Wines• Wines “by the glass” are best served as “Aperitif”• Guests may request for the wine list as to order abottle for aperitif as well.• Or choose from some of the most popular wineaperitif cocktails:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 20. Wines• Wines “by the glass” are best served as “Aperitif”• Guests may request for the wine list as to order abottle for aperitif as well.• Or choose from some of the most popular wineaperitif cocktails:• Kir - chilled white wine and splash of crèmede cassis (black currant) w/ lemon twistMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 21. Wines• Wines “by the glass” are best served as “Aperitif”• Guests may request for the wine list as to order abottle for aperitif as well.• Or choose from some of the most popular wineaperitif cocktails:• Kir - chilled white wine and splash of crèmede cassis (black currant) w/ lemon twist• Kir Royale - made with sparkling wine andcrème de cassisMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 22. Wines• Wines “by the glass” are best served as “Aperitif”• Guests may request for the wine list as to order abottle for aperitif as well.• Or choose from some of the most popular wineaperitif cocktails:• Kir - chilled white wine and splash of crèmede cassis (black currant) w/ lemon twist• Kir Royale - made with sparkling wine andcrème de cassis• Champagne Cocktail - Champagne witha sugar cube, few drops of angostura andlemon twistMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 23. Wines• Wines “by the glass” are best served as “Aperitif”• Guests may request for the wine list as to order abottle for aperitif as well.• Or choose from some of the most popular wineaperitif cocktails:• Kir - chilled white wine and splash of crèmede cassis (black currant) w/ lemon twist• Kir Royale - made with sparkling wine andcrème de cassis• Champagne Cocktail - Champagne witha sugar cube, few drops of angostura andlemon twist• Bellini - Sparkling wines with Peach puree,(invented at the Harry’s Bar inVenice byCipriani)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 24. Fortified WinesMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 25. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcoholMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 26. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcohol• (usually brandy) during the blending process to“fortify” them.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 27. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcohol• (usually brandy) during the blending process to“fortify” them.• Sherry, Porto, Madeira, Malaga, Marsala.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 28. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcohol• (usually brandy) during the blending process to“fortify” them.• Sherry, Porto, Madeira, Malaga, Marsala.• Dry Sherries such as:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 29. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcohol• (usually brandy) during the blending process to“fortify” them.• Sherry, Porto, Madeira, Malaga, Marsala.• Dry Sherries such as:• Tio Pepe or Dry Sack - Nutty Woodsy flavourMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 30. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcohol• (usually brandy) during the blending process to“fortify” them.• Sherry, Porto, Madeira, Malaga, Marsala.• Dry Sherries such as:• Tio Pepe or Dry Sack - Nutty Woodsy flavour• Harvey’s Bristol Cream - Dry zabaione wood tasteMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 31. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcohol• (usually brandy) during the blending process to“fortify” them.• Sherry, Porto, Madeira, Malaga, Marsala.• Dry Sherries such as:• Tio Pepe or Dry Sack - Nutty Woodsy flavour• Harvey’s Bristol Cream - Dry zabaione wood taste• Alcohol content range between 16 to 23%Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 32. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcohol• (usually brandy) during the blending process to“fortify” them.• Sherry, Porto, Madeira, Malaga, Marsala.• Dry Sherries such as:• Tio Pepe or Dry Sack - Nutty Woodsy flavour• Harvey’s Bristol Cream - Dry zabaione wood taste• Alcohol content range between 16 to 23%• Since fortified wines tend to be somewhat sweet theyare ordered after dinner, except for sherry.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 33. Fortified Wines• These are wines that have been mixed with distilledalcohol• (usually brandy) during the blending process to“fortify” them.• Sherry, Porto, Madeira, Malaga, Marsala.• Dry Sherries such as:• Tio Pepe or Dry Sack - Nutty Woodsy flavour• Harvey’s Bristol Cream - Dry zabaione wood taste• Alcohol content range between 16 to 23%• Since fortified wines tend to be somewhat sweet theyare ordered after dinner, except for sherry.• Sweet fortified wines such as Madeira, are moreappropriate for after the mealMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 34. 97 quick FORTIFIED facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 35. •Sherry is has to be made in the Jerez region of Southern Spain. It can bemade from three types of grapes – Palomino, Pedro Ximenez and Muscat.97 quick FORTIFIED facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 36. •Sherry is has to be made in the Jerez region of Southern Spain. It can bemade from three types of grapes – Palomino, Pedro Ximenez and Muscat.•The style of Sherry made depends on whether yeast (flor) has beenallowed to grow on top during maturation.97 quick FORTIFIED facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 37. •Sherry is has to be made in the Jerez region of Southern Spain. It can bemade from three types of grapes – Palomino, Pedro Ximenez and Muscat.•The style of Sherry made depends on whether yeast (flor) has beenallowed to grow on top during maturation.•Both Port and Sherry are made by the addition of brandies that helparrest fermentation and so keep a high sugar natural content in theproduct.97 quick FORTIFIED facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 38. •Sherry is has to be made in the Jerez region of Southern Spain. It can bemade from three types of grapes – Palomino, Pedro Ximenez and Muscat.•The style of Sherry made depends on whether yeast (flor) has beenallowed to grow on top during maturation.•Both Port and Sherry are made by the addition of brandies that helparrest fermentation and so keep a high sugar natural content in theproduct.•Sherry can be served chilled both as an Aperitif and a Digestif.97 quick FORTIFIED facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 39. •Sherry is has to be made in the Jerez region of Southern Spain. It can bemade from three types of grapes – Palomino, Pedro Ximenez and Muscat.•The style of Sherry made depends on whether yeast (flor) has beenallowed to grow on top during maturation.•Both Port and Sherry are made by the addition of brandies that helparrest fermentation and so keep a high sugar natural content in theproduct.•Sherry can be served chilled both as an Aperitif and a Digestif.•There are five different styles of Port –Vintage,Tawny, Ruby, Late BottleVintage (LBV) and White.97 quick FORTIFIED facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 40. •Sherry is has to be made in the Jerez region of Southern Spain. It can bemade from three types of grapes – Palomino, Pedro Ximenez and Muscat.•The style of Sherry made depends on whether yeast (flor) has beenallowed to grow on top during maturation.•Both Port and Sherry are made by the addition of brandies that helparrest fermentation and so keep a high sugar natural content in theproduct.•Sherry can be served chilled both as an Aperitif and a Digestif.•There are five different styles of Port –Vintage,Tawny, Ruby, Late BottleVintage (LBV) and White.•Port can be made anywhere in the world but the best Ports come fromPorto in Portugal.97 quick FORTIFIED facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 41. •Sherry is has to be made in the Jerez region of Southern Spain. It can bemade from three types of grapes – Palomino, Pedro Ximenez and Muscat.•The style of Sherry made depends on whether yeast (flor) has beenallowed to grow on top during maturation.•Both Port and Sherry are made by the addition of brandies that helparrest fermentation and so keep a high sugar natural content in theproduct.•Sherry can be served chilled both as an Aperitif and a Digestif.•There are five different styles of Port –Vintage,Tawny, Ruby, Late BottleVintage (LBV) and White.•Port can be made anywhere in the world but the best Ports come fromPorto in Portugal.•Port is normally served as a Digestif although White Port (from whitegrapes) is often served as an Aperitif97 quick FORTIFIED facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 42. Aromatized WinesMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 43. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spicesMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 44. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 45. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.• Vermouth or Doubonet Lillet are the most popularMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 46. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.• Vermouth or Doubonet Lillet are the most popular• produced by Martini & Rossi,Cinzano, NollyPrat orBoissiere.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 47. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.• Vermouth or Doubonet Lillet are the most popular• produced by Martini & Rossi,Cinzano, NollyPrat orBoissiere.• Vermouth may be white or red, dry or sweetMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 48. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.• Vermouth or Doubonet Lillet are the most popular• produced by Martini & Rossi,Cinzano, NollyPrat orBoissiere.• Vermouth may be white or red, dry or sweet• DryVermouth (Lightly floral and Herbal)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 49. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.• Vermouth or Doubonet Lillet are the most popular• produced by Martini & Rossi,Cinzano, NollyPrat orBoissiere.• Vermouth may be white or red, dry or sweet• DryVermouth (Lightly floral and Herbal)• SweetVermouth (Clove & licorice)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 50. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.• Vermouth or Doubonet Lillet are the most popular• produced by Martini & Rossi,Cinzano, NollyPrat orBoissiere.• Vermouth may be white or red, dry or sweet• DryVermouth (Lightly floral and Herbal)• SweetVermouth (Clove & licorice)• they run between 16 to 20% in alcohol.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 51. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.• Vermouth or Doubonet Lillet are the most popular• produced by Martini & Rossi,Cinzano, NollyPrat orBoissiere.• Vermouth may be white or red, dry or sweet• DryVermouth (Lightly floral and Herbal)• SweetVermouth (Clove & licorice)• they run between 16 to 20% in alcohol.• They are served mostly on the rocks orMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 52. Aromatized Wines• These are wines to which alcohol and someflavouring, such as: herbs, barks, roots, or spices• have been added during the process.• Vermouth or Doubonet Lillet are the most popular• produced by Martini & Rossi,Cinzano, NollyPrat orBoissiere.• Vermouth may be white or red, dry or sweet• DryVermouth (Lightly floral and Herbal)• SweetVermouth (Clove & licorice)• they run between 16 to 20% in alcohol.• They are served mostly on the rocks or• if straight up, will be chilled and garnished with citrustwist example Martini cocktailMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 53. 115 quick ‘WERMUT’ facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 54. •The word ‘Vermouth’ comes from the German‘Wermut’ that translates as wormwood. It was firstused by Antonio Benedetto in 1786.115 quick ‘WERMUT’ facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 55. •The word ‘Vermouth’ comes from the German‘Wermut’ that translates as wormwood. It was firstused by Antonio Benedetto in 1786.•The area where modern vermouths are made isknown as ‘Savoy’ in NW Italy and SE France.115 quick ‘WERMUT’ facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 56. •The word ‘Vermouth’ comes from the German‘Wermut’ that translates as wormwood. It was firstused by Antonio Benedetto in 1786.•The area where modern vermouths are made isknown as ‘Savoy’ in NW Italy and SE France.•Originally, Italian vermouth is based on red wineswhereas French vermouths were based on whitewines.115 quick ‘WERMUT’ facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 57. •The word ‘Vermouth’ comes from the German‘Wermut’ that translates as wormwood. It was firstused by Antonio Benedetto in 1786.•The area where modern vermouths are made isknown as ‘Savoy’ in NW Italy and SE France.•Originally, Italian vermouth is based on red wineswhereas French vermouths were based on whitewines.•Most Italian vermouths are made in Turin.115 quick ‘WERMUT’ facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 58. •The word ‘Vermouth’ comes from the German‘Wermut’ that translates as wormwood. It was firstused by Antonio Benedetto in 1786.•The area where modern vermouths are made isknown as ‘Savoy’ in NW Italy and SE France.•Originally, Italian vermouth is based on red wineswhereas French vermouths were based on whitewines.•Most Italian vermouths are made in Turin.•Vermouths are, essentially, wine fortified with eau-de-vie, flavoured with herbs and spices and matured.115 quick ‘WERMUT’ facts...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 59. BittersMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 60. Bitters• are made with alcohol and additions ofherbs or other aromatic plants tomake it bitter.• “Campari”, spicy, bitter orange• “Pimms”or• “Angostura” are some of the mostpopular.• These bitters are often used as mixerwith club soda and lemon twist, orother sodas in generalMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 61. 8 quick facts about bitters...13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 62. 8 quick facts about bitters...1. Bitters are spirits that are flavoured with any number of herbs, spices, fruits, flowers, barks etc.13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 63. 8 quick facts about bitters...1. Bitters are spirits that are flavoured with any number of herbs, spices, fruits, flowers, barks etc.2. Most Bitters started off as medicines and many still have medicinal benefits.13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 64. 8 quick facts about bitters...1. Bitters are spirits that are flavoured with any number of herbs, spices, fruits, flowers, barks etc.2. Most Bitters started off as medicines and many still have medicinal benefits.3. There are two main types of Bitters: Bar Bitters that are used in very small amounts andPouring Bitters that are consumed in mixed drinks or neat.13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 65. 8 quick facts about bitters...1. Bitters are spirits that are flavoured with any number of herbs, spices, fruits, flowers, barks etc.2. Most Bitters started off as medicines and many still have medicinal benefits.3. There are two main types of Bitters: Bar Bitters that are used in very small amounts andPouring Bitters that are consumed in mixed drinks or neat.4. Within Bar Bitters there are two main styles: 1) Fruit bitters that are (oddly enough)flavoured with fruits such as orange and peach and 2) Aromatic Bitters that have far more spiceand herb elements.13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 66. 8 quick facts about bitters...1. Bitters are spirits that are flavoured with any number of herbs, spices, fruits, flowers, barks etc.2. Most Bitters started off as medicines and many still have medicinal benefits.3. There are two main types of Bitters: Bar Bitters that are used in very small amounts andPouring Bitters that are consumed in mixed drinks or neat.4. Within Bar Bitters there are two main styles: 1) Fruit bitters that are (oddly enough)flavoured with fruits such as orange and peach and 2) Aromatic Bitters that have far more spiceand herb elements.5. Bar Bitters are actually used to smooth out spirits within cocktails and the most obvious areAngostura Bitters in a Manhattan and Old Fashioned and also in Pink Gin.13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 67. 8 quick facts about bitters...1. Bitters are spirits that are flavoured with any number of herbs, spices, fruits, flowers, barks etc.2. Most Bitters started off as medicines and many still have medicinal benefits.3. There are two main types of Bitters: Bar Bitters that are used in very small amounts andPouring Bitters that are consumed in mixed drinks or neat.4. Within Bar Bitters there are two main styles: 1) Fruit bitters that are (oddly enough)flavoured with fruits such as orange and peach and 2) Aromatic Bitters that have far more spiceand herb elements.5. Bar Bitters are actually used to smooth out spirits within cocktails and the most obvious areAngostura Bitters in a Manhattan and Old Fashioned and also in Pink Gin.6. Pouring Bitters are drank in cocktails (e.g. the Campari in a Negroni) or as digestifs (e.g.FernetBranca).13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 68. 8 quick facts about bitters...1. Bitters are spirits that are flavoured with any number of herbs, spices, fruits, flowers, barks etc.2. Most Bitters started off as medicines and many still have medicinal benefits.3. There are two main types of Bitters: Bar Bitters that are used in very small amounts andPouring Bitters that are consumed in mixed drinks or neat.4. Within Bar Bitters there are two main styles: 1) Fruit bitters that are (oddly enough)flavoured with fruits such as orange and peach and 2) Aromatic Bitters that have far more spiceand herb elements.5. Bar Bitters are actually used to smooth out spirits within cocktails and the most obvious areAngostura Bitters in a Manhattan and Old Fashioned and also in Pink Gin.6. Pouring Bitters are drank in cocktails (e.g. the Campari in a Negroni) or as digestifs (e.g.FernetBranca).7. Due to their reputed restorative abilities, the original herb and spice bitters were often made bymonks and apothecaries.13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 69. 8 quick facts about bitters...1. Bitters are spirits that are flavoured with any number of herbs, spices, fruits, flowers, barks etc.2. Most Bitters started off as medicines and many still have medicinal benefits.3. There are two main types of Bitters: Bar Bitters that are used in very small amounts andPouring Bitters that are consumed in mixed drinks or neat.4. Within Bar Bitters there are two main styles: 1) Fruit bitters that are (oddly enough)flavoured with fruits such as orange and peach and 2) Aromatic Bitters that have far more spiceand herb elements.5. Bar Bitters are actually used to smooth out spirits within cocktails and the most obvious areAngostura Bitters in a Manhattan and Old Fashioned and also in Pink Gin.6. Pouring Bitters are drank in cocktails (e.g. the Campari in a Negroni) or as digestifs (e.g.FernetBranca).7. Due to their reputed restorative abilities, the original herb and spice bitters were often made bymonks and apothecaries.8. The biggest selling bitters in the world is Campari.13Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 70. Digestivo or DigestifMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 71. • Can be of a sweet, dry, or bitterflavours• Served at the end of the meal tohelp in digestion• Usually served at roomtemperature• by itself or as an accompanimentof another beverage.Digestivo or DigestifMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 72. Cordials and LiqueursMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 73. Cordials and Liqueurs• Are aromatic, sweetened and flavoured spirits.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 74. Cordials and Liqueurs• Are aromatic, sweetened and flavoured spirits.• A liqueur (US /lɪˈkɜr/ or UK /lɪˈkjʊər/) is analcoholic beverage made from a distilled spiritthat has been flavoured with fruit, cream,herbs,spices, flowers or nuts and bottled withadded sugar or other sweetener (such ashigh-fructose corn syrup).Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 75. Cordials and Liqueurs• Are aromatic, sweetened and flavoured spirits.• A liqueur (US /lɪˈkɜr/ or UK /lɪˈkjʊər/) is analcoholic beverage made from a distilled spiritthat has been flavoured with fruit, cream,herbs,spices, flowers or nuts and bottled withadded sugar or other sweetener (such ashigh-fructose corn syrup).• In parts of the United States, liqueurs may alsobe called cordials or schnapps,[1][2][3][4]while in large parts of the BritishCommonwealth,cordial means a concentratednon-alcoholic fruit syrup that is diluted totaste and consumed as a non-carbonated softdrink, and in Germany and Scandinavia,schnapps means a form of brandy or aquavit.(wikipedia.org)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 76. liqueursMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 77. liqueurs1. Liqueurs are sweetened alcoholic drinks made by mixing or re-distilling spirits withflavourings and colourings.They must have a minimum alcohol content of 15% abv and aminimum sugar content of 100 grams per litre.2. All liqueurs have one thing in common.They all have spirits as a base.3. The first recipes for liqueurs appear in Egyptian tombs and classical Greek scrolls.However, it is the monks who are credited with the development of liqueurs during theMiddle Ages4. The new herbs and spices being discovered and imported from the New World and theEast gave a greater range of exotic ingredients to use in the liqueurs5. There are five main ways of making a liqueur. Maceration, Infusion, Percolation,Distillation, Maturation6. There are 2 main types of liqueurs – Generics and Proprietaries. Generics are known bytheir ingredient, proprietary from their branding.7. Most generic liqueurs are known by their French name.8. Liqueurs current popularity is down to the cocktail, but of course they can be enjoyedneat or over ice.9. 5 most popular generics. Crème de cassis, fraise and Framboise, menthe and mure.10. 5 most popular proprietaries. Cointreau, Grand Marnier, Baileys, Kahlua, Midori.11. Liqueurs are most commonly drank in poussé cafés such as B52’s or as modifiers incocktailsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 78. liqueursMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 79. liqueurstechnical:Liqueurs are sweetened alcoholic drinks made by mixing or re-distillingspirits with flavourings and colourings.They must have a minimumalcohol content of 15% abv and a minimum sugar content of 100grams per litre. All liqueurs have one thing in common.They all have spirits as abase.trivial:There are five main ways of making a liqueur. Maceration, Infusion,Percolation, Distillation, Maturation There are 2 main types of liqueurs – Generics and Proprietarys.Generics are known by their ingredient, proprietary from theirbranding.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 80. liqueursMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 81. Understanding LiqueursBoth generic and proprietary liqueurs are used for their fruit and herb flavourings, but allliqueurs used as a modifier or a base in cocktails add a sweetness to the drink.Understanding how to balance the sweetness of the liqueur with the sour of the citrus firstneeds the understanding of liqueurs.Use these exercises on commonly used liqueurs;1. freshly squeeze and filter 1 litre of lemon and lime juice2. fill 6 rocks glasses with 25ml of lemon juice. Using different glasses do the same withlime juice.3. In the first of the rocks glasses with lemon juice, add 5ml of sugar syrup (gomme). Inthe next glass, add 15ml of sugar syrup, 25ml in the next, all the way up to 55ml. Followsame procedure with fresh lime juice.4. Now follow the same procedure swapping sugar syrup with Cointreau.5. Now follow the same procedure swapping Cointreau withTriple Sec6. Now follow the same procedure swappingTriple Sec with crème de Mure.Taste the glasses in sequence starting with the sugar syrup mixture. Comparisons should bemade across the liqueurs using the 25ml balance of lemon juice and sugar syrup as thecontrol.The aim of the exercise is to identify the perfect balance of sweet and sour using thecontrol, and showing how using liqueurs as sweeteners as well as flavourings will greatlyeffect the balance of cocktails produced. In achieving this you will be able to compare andcontrast the sugar quantities across generic and proprietary liqueurs.liqueursMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 82. BrandyMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 83. Brandy• Definition:• “A spirit resulting from the distillationof a fermented fruit-based liquid”• Produced in the 16th century for thepurpose of transporting wine at lessvolume and cost.• The word Brandy derives from theword “branywihn” literally “burnt wine”• Grapes are the most common fruitsused in making Brandy• Most brandies are between 80 to 94proofMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 84. CognacMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 85. Cognac• Is the most famous type of Brandy inthe world• Producers include: Martel, Hennessy,Hine, Remy Martin.• Is a single distilled brandy from theArmagnac region south of cognac(sweeter)• Calvados is an apple brandy fromNormandyMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 86. brandy  &  cognacMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 87. brandy  &  cognac1.   Brandies  are  made  from  fruit  (any  part  of  it),  whiskies  and  vodkas  are  made  from  grain.2.   Unaged  brandy  is  called  eau-­‐de-­‐vie  (or  aqua  vitae).3.   The  science  of  disFllaFon  arrived  into  Europe  from  North  Africa  with  the  Moors  into  Spain  and  Southern  France.4.   The  word  ‘Brandy’  comes  from  the  Dutch  ‘Brandewijn’  meaning  ‘burnt  wine’.5.   Cognac  and  Armagnac  are  both  types  of  French  Grape  Brandy  with  specific  appellaFons.  Armagnac  is  the  oldest  daFng  back  to  1419.6.   There  are  six  regions  to  Cognac,  three  to  Armagnac  and  two  to  Calvados.7.   The  Phylloxeravastatrix  louse  nearly  wiped  out  all  French  brandy  producFon  in  the  late  1800’s.8.   The  main  grape  varieFes  used  in  French  brandy  producFon  are  Ugni  Blanc,  Folle  Blanche  and  Colombard.9.   Brandies  can  be  made  in  both  pot  and  column  sFlls.  Cognac  has  to  be  double  disFlled  in  pot  sFlls  as  are  the  finest  Calvados,  Grappa  and  Foreign  (non-­‐French)  Brandies.  Armagnac  is  made  in  column  sFlls.10.   The  ‘Big  Four’  of  Cognac  producers  are  Remy  MarFn,  Hennessy,  Martell  and  Courviosier.  They  are  responsible  for  4/5  of  Cognac  sold  outside  of  France.11.   There  are  many  factors  affecFng  the  quality  of  the  brandy:  The  terroir,  the  quality  of  the  fruit,  the  sFll  type,  the  sFll  size,  the  maturaFon  period  (wood  type,  barrel  size  and  length  of  maturaFon),  and  the  fermentaFon  Fme.12.   Most  brandies  are  blended  although  Armagnac  is  oben  released  in  vintages.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 88. brandy  &  cognacMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 89. brandy  &  cognactechnical:Brandies  are  made  from  fruit  (any  part  of  it)   The  main  grape  varieFes  used  in  French  brandy  producFon  are  Ugni  Blanc,  Folle  Blanche  and  Colombard.trivial:     The  Phylloxeravastatrix  louse  nearly  wiped  out  all  French  brandy  producFon  in  the  late  1800’s.   The  ‘Big  Four’  of  Cognac  producers  are  Remy  MarFn,  Hennessy  (“Terroirs”),  Martell  and  Courviosier.  They  are  responsible  for  4/5  of  Cognac  sold  outside  of  France.  (Kim  Jong  Il  &  Hennessey)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 90. brandy  &  cognactechnical:Brandies  are  made  from  fruit  (any  part  of  it)   The  main  grape  varieFes  used  in  French  brandy  producFon  are  Ugni  Blanc,  Folle  Blanche  and  Colombard.trivial:     The  Phylloxeravastatrix  louse  nearly  wiped  out  all  French  brandy  producFon  in  the  late  1800’s.   The  ‘Big  Four’  of  Cognac  producers  are  Remy  MarFn,  Hennessy  (“Terroirs”),  Martell  and  Courviosier.  They  are  responsible  for  4/5  of  Cognac  sold  outside  of  France.  (Kim  Jong  Il  &  Hennessey)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 91. brandy  &  cognactechnical:Brandies  are  made  from  fruit  (any  part  of  it)   The  main  grape  varieFes  used  in  French  brandy  producFon  are  Ugni  Blanc,  Folle  Blanche  and  Colombard.trivial:     The  Phylloxeravastatrix  louse  nearly  wiped  out  all  French  brandy  producFon  in  the  late  1800’s.   The  ‘Big  Four’  of  Cognac  producers  are  Remy  MarFn,  Hennessy  (“Terroirs”),  Martell  and  Courviosier.  They  are  responsible  for  4/5  of  Cognac  sold  outside  of  France.  (Kim  Jong  Il  &  Hennessey)Cognac  to  change  world  policy?Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 92. Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 93. RegionsThere  are  six  regions  to  Cognac  produc:on.  Each  area  has  different  soils  and  climate  condi:ons  which  give  differing  quali:es  of  Cognac.Grande  ChampagnePe:te  ChampagneBorderiesFins  BoisBon  BoisBois  OrdinairesThe  best  Cognac  comes  from  the  Champagne  regions.  A  Cognac  can  only  be  called  a  ‘Fine  Champagne  Cognac’  if  it  is  made  from  grapes  exclusively  from  the  Champagne  regions  (e.g.  Remy  Mar:n  V.S.O.P.).  There  is  only  one  Cognac  I  know  of  which  is  made  en:rely  from  grapes  from  the  Borderies  region  –  Reserve  de  Martell.Most  Cognac  is  blended,  so  the  age  statements  refer  to  the  youngest  Cognac  in  the  blend.  Cognac  cannot  be  sold  in  France  un:l  it  is  at  least  2.5  years  old:VS  (Very  Special)  -­‐  2.5  yearsVSOP  (Very  Superior  Old  Pale)  –  4.5  yearsXO  (Extra  Old),  Napoleon,  Vieux,  Vieille  reserve  –  6.5  years  (since  2000,  8.5  years)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 94. GrappaMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 95. GrappaMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 96. Grappa• Is and Italian brandy similar to Marc from France• Is a traditional Italian drink made from pomace(pressed skins and seeds of grapes) after winemaking.• The Pomace is fermented without adding any sugaror alcohol, and then distilled.• The resulting clear spirit is Grappa• Usually between 80 and 90 proofCIA list include:• Banfi• Nadini Riserva• Zenato di Amarone• Fruits infused Grappa: apricot, cranberry, and raisinMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 97. Bitter digestives “Amari”Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 98. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 99. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:• angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata),Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 100. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:• angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata),• cinchona (or quinine) bark (Cinchona spp.),Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 101. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:• angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata),• cinchona (or quinine) bark (Cinchona spp.),• bitter gentian root (Gentiana lutea) and/orMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 102. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:• angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata),• cinchona (or quinine) bark (Cinchona spp.),• bitter gentian root (Gentiana lutea) and/or• quassia chips (Quassia amara) as the principalcomponents.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 103. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:• angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata),• cinchona (or quinine) bark (Cinchona spp.),• bitter gentian root (Gentiana lutea) and/or• quassia chips (Quassia amara) as the principalcomponents.• There are other Bitters that have more liqueursconsistency:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 104. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:• angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata),• cinchona (or quinine) bark (Cinchona spp.),• bitter gentian root (Gentiana lutea) and/or• quassia chips (Quassia amara) as the principalcomponents.• There are other Bitters that have more liqueursconsistency:• Cynar, Fernet Branca, Ramazotti,Amaro Montenegro,Amaro Averna, Unicum, Brancamenta, JägermeisterMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 105. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:• angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata),• cinchona (or quinine) bark (Cinchona spp.),• bitter gentian root (Gentiana lutea) and/or• quassia chips (Quassia amara) as the principalcomponents.• There are other Bitters that have more liqueursconsistency:• Cynar, Fernet Branca, Ramazotti,Amaro Montenegro,Amaro Averna, Unicum, Brancamenta, Jägermeister• Flavour profile:bitter minty, intense, palate coatingMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 106. Bitter digestives “Amari”Historically, the most popular digestives, have beenalcoholic bitters, which usually include:• angostura bark (Angostura trifoliata),• cinchona (or quinine) bark (Cinchona spp.),• bitter gentian root (Gentiana lutea) and/or• quassia chips (Quassia amara) as the principalcomponents.• There are other Bitters that have more liqueursconsistency:• Cynar, Fernet Branca, Ramazotti,Amaro Montenegro,Amaro Averna, Unicum, Brancamenta, Jägermeister• Flavour profile:bitter minty, intense, palate coating• Due to the beneficial digestive effect these beverages areconsumed toward the end of the meals and mostly atroom temperature, (not iced cold as Jagermeister).Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 107. don’t be bitter...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 108. What is it?Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 109. What is it?• Chances are there is a bottle behind your bar right now….Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 110. What is it?• Chances are there is a bottle behind your bar right now….• Bitters are….Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 111. What is it?• Chances are there is a bottle behind your bar right now….• Bitters are….• The salt and pepper or soy sauce of cocktails– they round outflavours in drinks and highlight more subtle flavours. Often thedifference between good … and great cocktails.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 112. What is it?• Chances are there is a bottle behind your bar right now….• Bitters are….• The salt and pepper or soy sauce of cocktails– they round outflavours in drinks and highlight more subtle flavours. Often thedifference between good … and great cocktails.• are an invaluable tool in the creation of classic and contemporarycocktails.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 113. What is it?• Chances are there is a bottle behind your bar right now….• Bitters are….• The salt and pepper or soy sauce of cocktails– they round outflavours in drinks and highlight more subtle flavours. Often thedifference between good … and great cocktails.• are an invaluable tool in the creation of classic and contemporarycocktails.• The best-known commercial bitters are practically household namesthough most people have little idea what exactly to do with them.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 114. What is it?• Chances are there is a bottle behind your bar right now….• Bitters are….• The salt and pepper or soy sauce of cocktails– they round outflavours in drinks and highlight more subtle flavours. Often thedifference between good … and great cocktails.• are an invaluable tool in the creation of classic and contemporarycocktails.• The best-known commercial bitters are practically household namesthough most people have little idea what exactly to do with them.• Angostura Peychaud’s Regan’sMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 115. What is it?• Chances are there is a bottle behind your bar right now….• Bitters are….• The salt and pepper or soy sauce of cocktails– they round outflavours in drinks and highlight more subtle flavours. Often thedifference between good … and great cocktails.• are an invaluable tool in the creation of classic and contemporarycocktails.• The best-known commercial bitters are practically household namesthough most people have little idea what exactly to do with them.• Angostura Peychaud’s Regan’s• If you’ve had a Manhattan, Martini, Rob Roy, orMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 116. What is it?• Chances are there is a bottle behind your bar right now….• Bitters are….• The salt and pepper or soy sauce of cocktails– they round outflavours in drinks and highlight more subtle flavours. Often thedifference between good … and great cocktails.• are an invaluable tool in the creation of classic and contemporarycocktails.• The best-known commercial bitters are practically household namesthough most people have little idea what exactly to do with them.• Angostura Peychaud’s Regan’s• If you’ve had a Manhattan, Martini, Rob Roy, or• Old Fashioned, then you already like bittersMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 117. But what is it?Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 118. But what is it?• Cocktail bitters as we know them today originated in the19th century. Combining herbs, bark, and berries withalcohol and promoting the initial results as medicinal tonics.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 119. But what is it?• Cocktail bitters as we know them today originated in the19th century. Combining herbs, bark, and berries withalcohol and promoting the initial results as medicinal tonics.• In 1906, selling bitters as a health remedy was outlawed, sotoday they are found primarily in cocktails.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 120. But what is it?• Cocktail bitters as we know them today originated in the19th century. Combining herbs, bark, and berries withalcohol and promoting the initial results as medicinal tonics.• In 1906, selling bitters as a health remedy was outlawed, sotoday they are found primarily in cocktails.• Bitters are prepared by infusion or distillation, usingaromatic herbs, bark, roots, and/or fruit for their flavourand medicinal propertiesMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 121. But what is it?• Cocktail bitters as we know them today originated in the19th century. Combining herbs, bark, and berries withalcohol and promoting the initial results as medicinal tonics.• In 1906, selling bitters as a health remedy was outlawed, sotoday they are found primarily in cocktails.• Bitters are prepared by infusion or distillation, usingaromatic herbs, bark, roots, and/or fruit for their flavourand medicinal properties• Common ingredients include:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 122. But what is it?• Cocktail bitters as we know them today originated in the19th century. Combining herbs, bark, and berries withalcohol and promoting the initial results as medicinal tonics.• In 1906, selling bitters as a health remedy was outlawed, sotoday they are found primarily in cocktails.• Bitters are prepared by infusion or distillation, usingaromatic herbs, bark, roots, and/or fruit for their flavourand medicinal properties• Common ingredients include:• angostura bark, chinchona, cassia, gentian, citrus peels,angelica rootMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 123. But what is it?• Cocktail bitters as we know them today originated in the19th century. Combining herbs, bark, and berries withalcohol and promoting the initial results as medicinal tonics.• In 1906, selling bitters as a health remedy was outlawed, sotoday they are found primarily in cocktails.• Bitters are prepared by infusion or distillation, usingaromatic herbs, bark, roots, and/or fruit for their flavourand medicinal properties• Common ingredients include:• angostura bark, chinchona, cassia, gentian, citrus peels,angelica root• Modern bitters are made with all kinds of ingredientsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 124. But what is it?• Cocktail bitters as we know them today originated in the19th century. Combining herbs, bark, and berries withalcohol and promoting the initial results as medicinal tonics.• In 1906, selling bitters as a health remedy was outlawed, sotoday they are found primarily in cocktails.• Bitters are prepared by infusion or distillation, usingaromatic herbs, bark, roots, and/or fruit for their flavourand medicinal properties• Common ingredients include:• angostura bark, chinchona, cassia, gentian, citrus peels,angelica root• Modern bitters are made with all kinds of ingredients• Chocolate, rhubarb, peach, cherries, celeryMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 125. Potable/Un-PotableMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 126. Potable/Un-PotableNon- POTABLEBitters are classified as non-potable not because they are “unsafe” forhuman consumption, but because of their strong flavours and highalcohol content (usually between 70 and 90 proof).Also allows them to be sold in grocery stores…. there are no lawscurrently on selling cocktail bitters.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 127. Potable/Un-PotableNon- POTABLEBitters are classified as non-potable not because they are “unsafe” forhuman consumption, but because of their strong flavours and highalcohol content (usually between 70 and 90 proof).Also allows them to be sold in grocery stores…. there are no lawscurrently on selling cocktail bitters.POTABLE BittersThe best-known potable bitters are Fernet-Branca, Jägermeister, andCampariPoured as a digestive: to aid digestion after a big meal or pre-meal tostimulate the appetite.Can be drunk straight or mixed into cocktailsSweeter than non-potable bitters.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 128. Jerry ThomasAromaticPeychauds:AmericanPersonal CreationMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 129. Jerry ThomasAromaticPeychauds:AmericanPersonal CreationMethods for tasting bitters:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 130. Jerry ThomasAromaticPeychauds:AmericanPersonal CreationMethods for tasting bitters:On the hand -- AROMAMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 131. Jerry ThomasAromaticPeychauds:AmericanPersonal CreationMethods for tasting bitters:On the hand -- AROMA– Rub a small amount in between yourhands to warm and extract the essenceof the herbs and spices.“Clap yourbitters!”Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 132. Jerry ThomasAromaticPeychauds:AmericanPersonal CreationMethods for tasting bitters:On the hand -- AROMA– Rub a small amount in between yourhands to warm and extract the essenceof the herbs and spices.“Clap yourbitters!”Solo -- BITTERMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 133. Jerry ThomasAromaticPeychauds:AmericanPersonal CreationMethods for tasting bitters:On the hand -- AROMA– Rub a small amount in between yourhands to warm and extract the essenceof the herbs and spices.“Clap yourbitters!”Solo -- BITTER- Taste aVERY SMALL amount straightfrom your finger or a cocktail straw.Bitters are very concentrated so becareful not to overwhelm your palette.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 134. Jerry ThomasAromaticPeychauds:AmericanPersonal CreationMethods for tasting bitters:On the hand -- AROMA– Rub a small amount in between yourhands to warm and extract the essenceof the herbs and spices.“Clap yourbitters!”Solo -- BITTER- Taste aVERY SMALL amount straightfrom your finger or a cocktail straw.Bitters are very concentrated so becareful not to overwhelm your palette.With soda - SWEETNESSMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 135. Jerry ThomasAromaticPeychauds:AmericanPersonal CreationMethods for tasting bitters:On the hand -- AROMA– Rub a small amount in between yourhands to warm and extract the essenceof the herbs and spices.“Clap yourbitters!”Solo -- BITTER- Taste aVERY SMALL amount straightfrom your finger or a cocktail straw.Bitters are very concentrated so becareful not to overwhelm your palette.With soda - SWEETNESS- Diluting bitters will give you a bettersense of the flavour, carbonation alsoaccents the sweet flavours.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 136. Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 137. Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 138. Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 139. Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 140. The OriginalAngostura BittersMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 141. The OriginalAngostura BittersOldest and mostrecognized brand ofbitters. Invented by aGerman doctor, inAngostura,Ven. in 1824.Now produced in Trinidadusing the same secretrecipeRum based, bittered bygentian, and carrydominating flavours ofcinnamon, clove, orangepeel, and coffee.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 142. American ClassicPeychaud’s BittersInvented by AntoinePeychaud, an apothecary in1830s New Orleans.Peychaud mixed up his secret-recipe bitters with brandy andabsinthe and created the firstSazerac. It is known for it’sstriking red colour. Based on aneutral spirit, bittered withgentian and carry a lightflavour of anise and cherry.The OriginalAngostura BittersOldest and mostrecognized brand ofbitters. Invented by aGerman doctor, inAngostura,Ven. in 1824.Now produced in Trinidadusing the same secretrecipeRum based, bittered bygentian, and carrydominating flavours ofcinnamon, clove, orangepeel, and coffee.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 143. American ClassicPeychaud’s BittersInvented by AntoinePeychaud, an apothecary in1830s New Orleans.Peychaud mixed up his secret-recipe bitters with brandy andabsinthe and created the firstSazerac. It is known for it’sstriking red colour. Based on aneutral spirit, bittered withgentian and carry a lightflavour of anise and cherry.Modern InterpretationStirrings Blood OrangeBittersA sweeter and moremellow interpretation of‘bitter sweet’ flavours.Made without the use ofa base spirit, so it has noalcohol.The idea is toadd a complex elementof flavour to drinkswithout overpoweringthem.The OriginalAngostura BittersOldest and mostrecognized brand ofbitters. Invented by aGerman doctor, inAngostura,Ven. in 1824.Now produced in Trinidadusing the same secretrecipeRum based, bittered bygentian, and carrydominating flavours ofcinnamon, clove, orangepeel, and coffee.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 144. Better Food : Better Cocktailsrevival vs. innovationFoodMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 145. Better Food : Better Cocktailsrevival vs. innovationFoodRevival:• Purchasing local/seasonal• Foraging• Charcuterie• Hand Crafted cheeses• Canning/ preserving• Butchering meatsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 146. Better Food : Better Cocktailsrevival vs. innovationFoodRevival:• Purchasing local/seasonal• Foraging• Charcuterie• Hand Crafted cheeses• Canning/ preserving• Butchering meatsInnovation:Sous-vide cookingMolecular gastronomyImproved freezing andrefrigerationFusionUsing global productsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 147. Better Food : Better Cocktailsrevival vs. innovationCocktailsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 148. Better Food : Better Cocktailsrevival vs. innovationCocktailsRevival:• Bitters• Micro distilleries• Classic recipes• Service• Glassware• TechniqueMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 149. Better Food : Better Cocktailsrevival vs. innovationCocktailsRevival:• Bitters• Micro distilleries• Classic recipes• Service• Glassware• TechniqueInnovation:Molecular Mixology(foams, gels, gases)flavour combinationsInfusionsCollaboration andnetworkingMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 150. Bitters & SpiritsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 151. Bitters & SpiritsTaste cocktail as is.Add Stirrings to the gin and tonicAdd Angostura to Whisky drink(You can divide the cocktails in aseparate tasting glass and try bothcombinations)Stir and taste againWhat flavours come out in each cocktail?Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 152. Gin (Plymouth)& TonicBitters & SpiritsTaste cocktail as is.Add Stirrings to the gin and tonicAdd Angostura to Whisky drink(You can divide the cocktails in aseparate tasting glass and try bothcombinations)Stir and taste againWhat flavours come out in each cocktail?Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 153. Layering flavoursMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 154. Layering flavours• Taste Margarita• Add a dash of Peychaud’s• Taste: note difference in flavour• Taste again• Note the complexity and flavourlayers of the cocktail.• This is a perfect example of how totake a classic presentation and makea new seasonal or specialty cocktailwith lots of layers of flavours!Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 155. Layering flavours• Taste Margarita• Add a dash of Peychaud’s• Taste: note difference in flavour• Taste again• Note the complexity and flavourlayers of the cocktail.• This is a perfect example of how totake a classic presentation and makea new seasonal or specialty cocktailwith lots of layers of flavours!Classic MargaritaMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 156. Layering flavours• Taste Margarita• Add a dash of Peychaud’s• Taste: note difference in flavour• Taste again• Note the complexity and flavourlayers of the cocktail.• This is a perfect example of how totake a classic presentation and makea new seasonal or specialty cocktailwith lots of layers of flavours!Classic MargaritaPeychaud’s BittersMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 157. Incorporating bitters in amulti-unit location.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 158. Incorporating bitters in amulti-unit location.• Find the stray bottle in yourbar… it’s there somewhere,usually under the register or in acupboard somewhere.• Conduct the ‘bitters challenge’with staff.• Get creative with classics, menustandards, or creative inspiration….Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 159. The bitter challenge...Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 160. The bitter challenge...• Just like salt in food, bittersround out and finish thecombination of flavours.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 161. The bitter challenge...• Just like salt in food, bittersround out and finish thecombination of flavours.• Cocktails can be dramaticallyimproved with addition ofbitters.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 162. The bitter challenge...• Just like salt in food, bittersround out and finish thecombination of flavours.• Cocktails can be dramaticallyimproved with addition ofbitters.• Try with popular cocktails:Vodkaand Cranberry, Gin and Tonic,Whiskey & Ginger, Martini,Manhattan, Rum DrinksMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 163. Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 164. the aromatics play just asmuch a role as the bitter herbsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 165. the aromatics play just asmuch a role as the bitter herbsThe ‘flavour Pot’ of herbs and spices focuseson the bitter and aromatic qualities eachbrings to the infusion.Gentian, Cardamom,Anise, SchizandraBerry, Orange Peel, Hibiscus, Fennel, Fir,Citrus, Cinchona are a few of our selectedingredientsMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 166. to the .01 to be exactWe measured ingredients to the hundredth of a gram.Toextract the most of their natural essence, we toasted someherbs, crushed others, before combining with the alcohol.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 167. the mashesEach one has its own distinct colourful and texturalcharm.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 168. straining the mashMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 169. Craft your own blendMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 170. Craft your own blendMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 171. Craft your own blend• There are as many methods as there are mixologists, but the most important thing is howthe bitters perform in a cocktail.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 172. Craft your own blend• There are as many methods as there are mixologists, but the most important thing is howthe bitters perform in a cocktail.• Alcohol:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 173. Craft your own blend• There are as many methods as there are mixologists, but the most important thing is howthe bitters perform in a cocktail.• Alcohol:• Use a spirit with a high proof or alcohol content, such as grain alcohol, vodka, rye orwhiskey.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 174. Craft your own blend• There are as many methods as there are mixologists, but the most important thing is howthe bitters perform in a cocktail.• Alcohol:• Use a spirit with a high proof or alcohol content, such as grain alcohol, vodka, rye orwhiskey.• Higher-proof alcohols extract flavour more quickly but can leave a harsh aftertaste.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 175. Craft your own blend• There are as many methods as there are mixologists, but the most important thing is howthe bitters perform in a cocktail.• Alcohol:• Use a spirit with a high proof or alcohol content, such as grain alcohol, vodka, rye orwhiskey.• Higher-proof alcohols extract flavour more quickly but can leave a harsh aftertaste.• AromaticsHere’s where you get to personalize your bitters and experiment.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 176. Craft your own blend• There are as many methods as there are mixologists, but the most important thing is howthe bitters perform in a cocktail.• Alcohol:• Use a spirit with a high proof or alcohol content, such as grain alcohol, vodka, rye orwhiskey.• Higher-proof alcohols extract flavour more quickly but can leave a harsh aftertaste.• AromaticsHere’s where you get to personalize your bitters and experiment.• Commercial bitters ingredients such as gentian, and angelica root. Measure ingredientscarefully; bitter herbs are potent and a can become overwhelming. If you want to make itagain it is important to keep precise records of weights, time and volume of bitters.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 177. Craft your own blend• There are as many methods as there are mixologists, but the most important thing is howthe bitters perform in a cocktail.• Alcohol:• Use a spirit with a high proof or alcohol content, such as grain alcohol, vodka, rye orwhiskey.• Higher-proof alcohols extract flavour more quickly but can leave a harsh aftertaste.• AromaticsHere’s where you get to personalize your bitters and experiment.• Commercial bitters ingredients such as gentian, and angelica root. Measure ingredientscarefully; bitter herbs are potent and a can become overwhelming. If you want to make itagain it is important to keep precise records of weights, time and volume of bitters.• Aging and Agitating- These are key steps in flavour development.Aging (or steeping) helps extract flavour.Toolittle time and your bitters will be flat; too much and they’ll be unbalanced.Agitating (givingthe mixture a shake every now and then) ensures that those flavours are dispersedthroughout the mix, with no unexpected taste spikesMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 178. Simple Orange BittersMonday, 22 April, 13
  • 179. Simple Orange Bitters• INGREDIENTS• 1 (750-milliliter) bottle grain alcohol, such as Everclear 151• 1/2 pound orange peel pieces• 1 tsp fennel seed• 1/2 tsp coriander seed• 4 cardamom pods• 20 drops gentian extract or aprox ½ teaspoon gentian root• ½ tsp. dry chinchonaINSTRUCTIONS:Combine all ingredients in a 2-quart jar with a tight fitting lid. Close and store atroom temperature. Let steep 14 days, shaking the jar every other day.Strain alcohol from spices and store in a jar with a tight fitting lid in a dark place.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 180. The amazing elixir forevery ailment!Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 181. The amazing elixir forevery ailment!• Other Uses for BittersBitters can no longer be sold legally as health remedies,many people still turn to them for just that purpose. Hereare a few of the more common (if unscientific) applications:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 182. The amazing elixir forevery ailment!• Other Uses for BittersBitters can no longer be sold legally as health remedies,many people still turn to them for just that purpose. Hereare a few of the more common (if unscientific) applications:• HiccupsTake a lemon wedge, coat it in sugar, then douse it withsome bitters. Bite down, and your hiccups are supposed todisappear.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 183. The amazing elixir forevery ailment!• Other Uses for BittersBitters can no longer be sold legally as health remedies,many people still turn to them for just that purpose. Hereare a few of the more common (if unscientific) applications:• HiccupsTake a lemon wedge, coat it in sugar, then douse it withsome bitters. Bite down, and your hiccups are supposed todisappear.• Upset StomachA few dashes of bitters added to a glass of club soda orginger ale may cure indigestion.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 184. The amazing elixir forevery ailment!• Other Uses for BittersBitters can no longer be sold legally as health remedies,many people still turn to them for just that purpose. Hereare a few of the more common (if unscientific) applications:• HiccupsTake a lemon wedge, coat it in sugar, then douse it withsome bitters. Bite down, and your hiccups are supposed todisappear.• Upset StomachA few dashes of bitters added to a glass of club soda orginger ale may cure indigestion.• Everything ElseBitters are nearly a panacea: It is suggested that a fewdashes will cure anything from a headache to the flu.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 185. The amazing elixir forevery ailment!• Other Uses for BittersBitters can no longer be sold legally as health remedies,many people still turn to them for just that purpose. Hereare a few of the more common (if unscientific) applications:• HiccupsTake a lemon wedge, coat it in sugar, then douse it withsome bitters. Bite down, and your hiccups are supposed todisappear.• Upset StomachA few dashes of bitters added to a glass of club soda orginger ale may cure indigestion.• Everything ElseBitters are nearly a panacea: It is suggested that a fewdashes will cure anything from a headache to the flu.• Mosquito Repellent?Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 186. The amazing elixir forevery ailment!• Other Uses for BittersBitters can no longer be sold legally as health remedies,many people still turn to them for just that purpose. Hereare a few of the more common (if unscientific) applications:• HiccupsTake a lemon wedge, coat it in sugar, then douse it withsome bitters. Bite down, and your hiccups are supposed todisappear.• Upset StomachA few dashes of bitters added to a glass of club soda orginger ale may cure indigestion.• Everything ElseBitters are nearly a panacea: It is suggested that a fewdashes will cure anything from a headache to the flu.• Mosquito Repellent?• Rub it on… It keeps away all the mosquitoes! (don’t quoteus on this one!)Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 187. Other Brands on themarket:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 188. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 189. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:• Produced in Rochester NewYork since the 1950s. One of the most diverse lines of bitters.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 190. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:• Produced in Rochester NewYork since the 1950s. One of the most diverse lines of bitters.• -Offered in a multitude of flavours such as grapefruit, mint, and peach, lemon, chocolate, andwhiskey barrel aged bitters.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 191. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:• Produced in Rochester NewYork since the 1950s. One of the most diverse lines of bitters.• -Offered in a multitude of flavours such as grapefruit, mint, and peach, lemon, chocolate, andwhiskey barrel aged bitters.• Regan’s No.6 Bitters:Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 192. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:• Produced in Rochester NewYork since the 1950s. One of the most diverse lines of bitters.• -Offered in a multitude of flavours such as grapefruit, mint, and peach, lemon, chocolate, andwhiskey barrel aged bitters.• Regan’s No.6 Bitters:• One of the newest bitters on the scene, Regans Orange Bitter No. 6 is a shining star in thecocktail world. Gary and Mardee Regan, who in the 1990s wanted a better orange bitter created Regan’s.The result is a versatile bitter of orange peel, cardamom, caraway, coriander and other herbs inspired byan old recipe.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 193. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:• Produced in Rochester NewYork since the 1950s. One of the most diverse lines of bitters.• -Offered in a multitude of flavours such as grapefruit, mint, and peach, lemon, chocolate, andwhiskey barrel aged bitters.• Regan’s No.6 Bitters:• One of the newest bitters on the scene, Regans Orange Bitter No. 6 is a shining star in thecocktail world. Gary and Mardee Regan, who in the 1990s wanted a better orange bitter created Regan’s.The result is a versatile bitter of orange peel, cardamom, caraway, coriander and other herbs inspired byan old recipe.• -This products character is exceptionally rich and carry flavours of coriander, cardamom, andorange including orange peel.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 194. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:• Produced in Rochester NewYork since the 1950s. One of the most diverse lines of bitters.• -Offered in a multitude of flavours such as grapefruit, mint, and peach, lemon, chocolate, andwhiskey barrel aged bitters.• Regan’s No.6 Bitters:• One of the newest bitters on the scene, Regans Orange Bitter No. 6 is a shining star in thecocktail world. Gary and Mardee Regan, who in the 1990s wanted a better orange bitter created Regan’s.The result is a versatile bitter of orange peel, cardamom, caraway, coriander and other herbs inspired byan old recipe.• -This products character is exceptionally rich and carry flavours of coriander, cardamom, andorange including orange peel.• The Bitter Truth: Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 195. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:• Produced in Rochester NewYork since the 1950s. One of the most diverse lines of bitters.• -Offered in a multitude of flavours such as grapefruit, mint, and peach, lemon, chocolate, andwhiskey barrel aged bitters.• Regan’s No.6 Bitters:• One of the newest bitters on the scene, Regans Orange Bitter No. 6 is a shining star in thecocktail world. Gary and Mardee Regan, who in the 1990s wanted a better orange bitter created Regan’s.The result is a versatile bitter of orange peel, cardamom, caraway, coriander and other herbs inspired byan old recipe.• -This products character is exceptionally rich and carry flavours of coriander, cardamom, andorange including orange peel.• The Bitter Truth: • The Bitter Truth was founded in 2006 by Stephan Berg and Alexander Hauck out of the frustrationof being unable to find quality cocktail bitters in the European market. Since then,The Bitter Truth hasexpanded its portfolio to include other flavourings, liqueurs and spirits.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 196. Other Brands on themarket:• Fee Brothers Bitters:• Produced in Rochester NewYork since the 1950s. One of the most diverse lines of bitters.• -Offered in a multitude of flavours such as grapefruit, mint, and peach, lemon, chocolate, andwhiskey barrel aged bitters.• Regan’s No.6 Bitters:• One of the newest bitters on the scene, Regans Orange Bitter No. 6 is a shining star in thecocktail world. Gary and Mardee Regan, who in the 1990s wanted a better orange bitter created Regan’s.The result is a versatile bitter of orange peel, cardamom, caraway, coriander and other herbs inspired byan old recipe.• -This products character is exceptionally rich and carry flavours of coriander, cardamom, andorange including orange peel.• The Bitter Truth: • The Bitter Truth was founded in 2006 by Stephan Berg and Alexander Hauck out of the frustrationof being unable to find quality cocktail bitters in the European market. Since then,The Bitter Truth hasexpanded its portfolio to include other flavourings, liqueurs and spirits.• -Offers various flavours from the lost Celery bitters to a rich Xocolatl Mole that exemplifies thesubtle character of bitter chocolate.Monday, 22 April, 13
  • 197. Thank you, and don’t beafraid to be bitter!Monday, 22 April, 13