Evaluation Rubrics

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An overview of the design and use of evaluation rubrics, with examples.

An overview of the design and use of evaluation rubrics, with examples.

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  • awesome where in this we can more improve in making rubrics for our becoming and future students someday,, :) super like it much,,
    a BIG HELP for TEACHER'S,,:))
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  • 1. EVALUATION RUBRICS Gonna make your life sooooo easy!! © 2009 Peter Gow per Creative Commons; use must be attributed
  • 2. What is a RUBRIC, anyhow?
    • It’s a set of clearly stated criteria by which a piece of work will be evaluated
    • It sets forth a clear description of levels of performance, from EXCELLENT down to some version of “unacceptable”
    • It’s a tool for giving students clear feedback on work
    • It’s a tool for helping you evaluate work efficiently and in a meaningful way
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 3. What does a RUBRIC look like?
    • They come in many forms—here are some examples, and check out the handout packet
    • Some are highly detailed descriptive rubrics; others are really just scoring guides
    • Most are a kind of table—performance categories on one axis, performance levels on the other
    • You just have to poke around (in the packet, on the web) to find a design or two that meets your needs. Try a few out; tailor your own.
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 4. HISTORY WRITING ASSESSMENT PERFORMANCE LEVELS 4 Exceptional performance. Student surprises with especially imaginative, interesting, well-conceived work; deep understanding 3 Good performance; meets all expectations; carefully prepared; satisfactory understanding 2 Somewhat below expectations; some areas not fully addressed; gaps in understanding or preparation 1 Poor performance, well below expectations; inconsistent or poor effort and understanding CATEGORIES CONTENT 4 3 2 1 Inclusion of significant topics and accurate evidence; knowledge of topic; depth of research and understanding; use of detail to establish factual background. ANALYSIS 4 3 2 1 Analysis of trends and themes; use of detail to establish point of view ; appropriate point of view; acknowledges differing opinions or viewpoints; logical and accurate analysis DEVELOPMENT OF CONTENT 4 3 2 1 Establishment of theme; clear logic and presentation of evidence; development of issues; clear point of view; plausibility WRITING STYLE 4 3 2 1 Proper sentence structure, paragraph formation, spelling, usage, grammar, and vocabulary. Effective transitions. GENERAL COMMENTS: Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 5. Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009 WRITING RUBRIC  THESIS EVIDENCE and ORGANIZATION OF ARGUMENT POINT OF VIEW GRAMMAR and USAGE ADHERENCE TO STANDARDS FOR WRITTEN WORK SOPHISTICATED Thesis shows advanced or original conceptualization Evidence and arguments presented with exceptional clarity; reader brought to new understanding of issue(s) under discussion Writer's point of view consistently maintained, but argument definitively acknowledges and addresses differing or alternative viewpoints Language shows exceptional sophistication in usage, idiom, sentence formation, and vocabulary; clichés avoided All standards for formal written work, including use of scholarly apparatus, observed; no proofreading errors or errors of form APPROPRIATE Thesis is well-conceived and clearly stated Evidence and arguments presented in clear, readable form; organization of material leads reader to clear understanding of issue(s) under discussion Writer's point of view maintained, but argument acknowledges and addresses differing or alternative viewpoints Language is clear and effective; standards of usage and vocabulary are observed; sentence structure consistently correct All standards for formal written work, including use of scholarly apparatus, observed; high quality proofreading; minimal errors of form DEVELOPING Thesis can be discerned by reader but is not clearly conceived or presented; may be overly simplistic Evidence and arguments present, but organization and/or overall reasoning lacks consistent clarity Writer's point of view maintained, but alternative viewpoints unacknowledged Some problems with usage and sentence structure; ineffective use of vocabulary Some standards for formal written work, including use of scholarly apparatus, not observed; inconsistent proofreading; some errors of form IMMATURE Thesis unclear or indiscernible Insufficient evidence presented; logic and/or organization of argument does not consistently address or support main point(s) under discussion; evidence may be irrelevant or insufficient; argument fails to support or address point(s) under discussion Writer's point of view inconsistent or indiscernible; alternative viewpoints unacknowledged Serious problems with grammar, usage, and/or vocabulary; some passages unintelligible or unreadable Many standards for formal written work not observed; deficiencies in use of scholarly apparatus; poor proofreading; serious errors of form
  • 6. CLOSE-UP OF PART OF THAT ONE Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009 WRITING RUBRIC  THESIS EVIDENCE and ORGANIZATION OF ARGUMENT POINT OF VIEW SOPHISTICATED Thesis shows advanced or original conceptualization Evidence and arguments presented with exceptional clarity; reader brought to new understanding of issue(s) under discussion Writer's point of view consistently maintained, but argument definitively acknowledges and addresses differing or alternative viewpoints APPROPRIATE Thesis is well-conceived and clearly stated Evidence and arguments presented in clear, readable form; organization of material leads reader to clear understanding of issue(s) under discussion Writer's point of view maintained, but argument acknowledges and addresses differing or alternative viewpoints
  • 7. Not quite a RUBRIC—a scoring guide, really
    • Group being Evaluated ________________________________
    • RABBIT PRESENTATION SCORING
    • CATEGORIES :
    • Equal Participation 5 4 3 2 1
    • Clarity of Presentation 5 4 3 2 1
    • Research and Use of Facts 5 4 3 2 1
    • Visual Aid 5 4 3 2 1
    • Addresses the Main Question 5 4 3 2 1
    • TOTAL PTS. __________/25
    • HOW COULD THIS BE MADE MORE USEFUL TO STUDENTS? WHAT INFORMATION DOES IT LACK?
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 8. How do I make RUBRIC?
    • One way is to start by asking your students: “So, what would a perfect essay (project, homework assignment, proof, skit, …) look like?” They’ll give you a whole big list of categories you can use. (This is a great thing to do at the start of a project, or of the year.)
    • Then build your rubric using the Rubric-O-Matic
    • Just kidding (but there is software called the Rubricator that does this)
    • See the next pages
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 9. PERFORMANCE CATEGORIES
    • What are the most important parts of the work you are assigning? What matters most —ideas, spelling, neatness, content, accuracy, creativity?
    • Don’t try to include everything. Some larger general categories may be better than a zillion small ones.
    • Decide for yourself what are the most important things to evaluate—write ´ em down
    • This is one axis—half the work is done
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 10. PERFORMANCE LEVELS
    • What would ideal, exceptional, surprising, perfect work look like in any of your categories? Write down some descriptors of what “the best of the best” would look like.
    • You can assign “best” work whatever value you like—descriptive, numerical, narrative.
    • Do this for all your categories
    • Now work your way down: good, satisfactory, needs specific improvement, unsatisfactory, etc. Some people like levels with names like “Expert,” “Proficient,” “Novice,” “Inept.” Others like 4-3-2-1(-0).
    • This is the second axis of your rubric. Now it’s just a matter of editing it to suit you.
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 11. BUT WHAT ABOUT THE GRADE ?
    • Well, that’s a good question.
    • Here’s MY advice:
      • Don’t use straight percentages—15 on a 20-point rubric (five 3’s on a 4-point scale)—is not necessarily a 75.
      • Decide what “satisfactory, okay plus, good average” is—I try to set my “3” on a 4-point scale there: the point where the student shows solid competence if not excellence. At our place that seems to be right at the B-/C+ line.
      • Use this level as the baseline for defining the ups and owns
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 12. A COOL HINT
    • If that baseline is a B- and you have a 4- category, 4-point rubric (16 points total), there is a neat conversion:
      • Four 3s = 12 points. Call it a B-. Make sure your criteria reflect that level of performance
      • Then 16 points = A; 15 = A-; 14 = B+; 13 = B; 11 = C+; 10 = C; 9 = C-, 8 = D+; 7 = D; 6 = D-; 5 = F. It may seem moderately inflated at the low end (although you probably won’t be giving too many 8s or 9s to students who know the criteria for evaluation in advance).
      • Here’s an example:
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 13. HISTORY WRITING ASSESSMENT PERFORMANCE LEVELS 4 Exceptional performance. Student surprises with especially imaginative, interesting, well-conceived work; deep understanding 3 Good performance; meets all expectations; carefully prepared; satisfactory understanding 2 Somewhat below expectations; some areas not fully addressed; gaps in understanding or preparation 1 Poor performance, well below expectations; inconsistent or poor effort and understanding CATEGORIES CONTENT 4x 3 2 1 I nclusion of significant topics and accurate evidence ; knowledge of topic; depth of research and understanding; use of detail to establish factual background. ANALYSIS 4 3x 2 1 Analysis of trends and themes; use of detail to establish point of view ; appropriate point of view; acknowledges differing opinions or viewpoints; logical and accurate analysis DEVELOPMENT OF CONTENT 4 3x 2 1 Establishment of theme; clear logic and presentation of evidence ; development of issues; clear point of view; plausibility WRITING STYLE 4 3 2x 1 Proper sentence structure, paragraph formation , spelling , usage, grammar, and vocabulary. Effective transitions. GENERAL COMMENTS: 12 points = B-. The underlining tells the student what was notable. The comments section lets me be even more specific Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 14. MORE HINTS
    • Make the rubric up early and hand it out with the assignment. This is especially true for big papers and projects—it helps the students plan to do their best work. This is what we want.
    • Keep it simple, stupid! The more categories, the more the rubric becomes a burden.
    • Rubrics are especially useful when you are going into non-traditional territory. They help you figure out how you’re going to evaluate that skit or that poster project BEFORE you realize you don’t have a clue how to do this.
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 15. BUT
    • You’ll have to work with a mentor or supervisor to determine what local norms are for grading and for giving feedback. (Maybe you can teach them about using rubrics.)
    • Some teachers feel that they are not doing their job if their students’ papers are not aswim in red ink, with useful little comments (“ awk ” “ more clear ” “ w ” “ ?? ”) scattered throughout. Do you remember how much such comments meant to you? Make these comments, but use them wisely.
    • And don’t ever think that a rubric alone does the job. You have to talk to your students about their work—the point of our work is to REACH EVERY STUDENT , and nothing does this like a conference
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009
  • 16. LAST HINT
    • You may find that making the rubric is a lot of work at first. If you need help, google “geometry test rubric” or “Spanish rubric” or the like, and you’ll find all the help you need. These things are neither rocket science nor new, and so there are plenty of examples out there. There’s even
    • www.rubrics4teachers.com
    Rubrics--Peter Gow 2009