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  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} In this unit, we will discuss datacenter overview, rack, power and cooling considerations. This is topic 8 of the 11 part series for course XTW01 – Technical Principles.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} At the completion of this topic, you should be able to: Identify the concepts and considerations for rack design and implementation in the datacenter List the power requirements options and planning tools Identify System x and BladeCenter chassis cooling concepts List the benefits of IBM Cool Blue Technologies
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This section provides an overview of a data center design considerations, rack concepts and tools, and includes power and cooling considerations. We will begin with reviewing some data center design considerations.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} Because hot air rises, this style of data center is ideal for proper air flow. Rack units are designed to bring air in the front and discharge hot air out the back of the rack. Units placed as shown bring cool air in the front and discharge air to the back of both rows which is then pulled into the return air ducts in the ceiling.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} A raised floor has the following benefits: The cabling can be run under the flooring Airflow is optimal for cooling rack-mounted equipment The following should also be considered for a raised floor: The expense involved in installation Weight/loading capacity limits must be factored Consideration of a solid floor includes the following: The load rating is less of a factor than with raised flooring Cabling may require overhead or other facilities for safety and maintenance Rack/chassis cooling
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This section introduces rack concepts and tools.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} The following three IBM rack offerings are examples of the capacity and functional choices to made in rack selection. NetBAY42 Enterprise Rack 42U of fan-free rack space designed for enhanced air flow Four 1U sidewall compartments for power distribution and other components Designed to be shipped preloaded and ready to run, plus can be relocated easily even when fully loaded IBM S2 42U Rack 42U of fan-free rack space designed for enhanced air flow Six 1U sidewall compartments for power distribution and other components Priced for entry-level and midrange rack solutions IBM S2 25U Rack 25U of full-function, EIA-compatible fan-free rack space designed for enhanced air flow Two 1U sidewall compartments for power distribution and other components Small rack cabinet ideal for branch office, small-business or space-constrained environments Designed to be shipped preloaded and ready to run
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} NetBAY11 Standard Rack 11U of full-function, EIA-compatible fan-free rack space designed for enhanced air flow Big rack features in 11U capacity to help you squeeze more computing power into a smaller space Designed to provide the framework for complete small business solutions that are assembled, tested and ready to run
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} IBM BladeCenter S Office Enablement Kit is a new enclosure specifically designed for the BladeCenter S chassis for use in offices where the noise requirements are important. Based on the NetBAY11, the Office Enablement Kit is an 11U enclosure with security doors and special acoustics and air filtration to suite office environments. With the BladeCenter S chassis installed, this leaves an extra 4U of space to hold other rack devices. The Office Enablement Kit has the following benefits: Acoustical Module: Noise can be a major issue because of the high powering fans. The Office Enablement Kit comes with an acoustical module which includes an acoustics filter on the back, which can radically cut down on the noise - making BladeCenter S quiet for the office environment. Locking Door: Security is an important consideration in any office environment. The Office Enablement Kit comes with a front locking door that helps ensure that your data will remain safe and secure in any environment. 4U of extra space for other devices: Different businesses use different tools to enable their office IT. The Office Enablement Kit includes 4U of extra space for other types of IT that an office may need. This space can take any IT that fits into a 4U or smaller standard rack space. Easily Mobile: The Office Enablement Kit comes with lockable wheels to make your BladeCenter S easily transportable. Contaminants Filter: To help deploy BladeCenter S in any environment, the Office Enablement Kit can include an optional Contaminants Filter. This filter helps protect the BladeCenter S from dust and dirt and can help prolong the life of your IT. The enclosure has the following approximate dimensions: Height: 24” Width: 24” Depth: 42”
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} Access to peripherals is an important aspect in planning rack installation. BladeCenter chassis and System x servers provide front access to USB ports, along with removable storage (DVD/CDROM drives). A rack mounted flat-screen display and keyboard are commonly shared through use of a KVM. Other important considerations include service clearances in the front and rear of the rack, and the operational activities planned for the installation, requiring use of the keyboard and display.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} Standalone Solutions Configuration Tool (SSCT) is a software application with technical guidelines incorporated in its database which has been developed to aid IBM sales and business partners and to facilitate technical collaborations in configuring IBM BladeCenter and System x systems and rack cabinets. The application is designed to support an interactive interface with graphics for determining the price, ideal environment, available rack cabinet space and available resources along with a variety of other operations associated with ordering and configuring a whole solution. The application is also capable of saving or exporting data in several different formats.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This slide illustrates a sample configuration comprised of the following: BladeCenter H DS3400 controller and disk unit Keyboard and display High voltage PDU After selecting the systems and components, SSCT can be used to verify power connections and auto-place the systems into the rack chosen.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} After positioning the components into the selected rack, the SSCT can then be used to map out the floor plan resulting from the configuration. In this slide, the measured drawing provides the weight of the rack and components, along with the service clearance required.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This section provides an overview of the power considerations. We will be discussing: Chassis power requirements PDU selection Connection options
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} As shown in the pie chart, system level power has many components and some of these have decreasing power requirements, while others have increasing requirements. The rack level power consideration includes increasing density of components. IBM System x servers and BladeCenter chassis supports a very broad portfolio of low-voltage processor options, which enables lower power usage without sacrificing performance consume The processors 30% of the power., and other factors such as memory consumes very little power. So what is the other 44%. That percentage represents AC to DC transitions, DC to DC deliveries, power supplies and cooling.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} IBM BladeCenter chassis offer the biggest benefit with power supplies that are as much as 90 percent efficient so that much less power is wasted as heat and more power is available for the chassis to use. In addition, the internal power topology means that IBM can perform a single power conversion from AC direct to 12V DC. The chassis blower and fan modules are designed to adjust to compensate for changing thermal characteristics. At the lower speeds they draw less power.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This rackable power distribution unit (PDU) option is designed to help customers take control of their rack environment by simplifying installation, consolidating line cords and reducing electrical infrastructure required to feed the rack. This slide illustrates a displacement of a power distribution unit (PDU) in a rack.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} IBM offers a variety of PDU options to meet almost any IT environment needs: DPI Universal Rack PDU Universal voltage (100-240V) AC power input Seven C13 outputs (Nema version also available) DPI Front-End PDU Available either as low voltage (100-120V) or high voltage (220-240V) Available in either single phase (30,60 Amp) or 3 phase (32, 63 Amp) Provides three C19 outlets Includes nonreplaceable fuse for protection DPI High Density PDU Available as high voltage (208-250V) Available in either single phase (60, 63 Amp) or 3 phase (32, 60 Amp) Provides twelve C19 outlets Includes nonreplaceable fuses for protection DPI Enterprise PDU Available either as low voltage (100-120V) or high voltage (220-240V) Available in either single phase (30,60 Amp) or 3 phase (32, 63 Amp) Provides either six C19 or twelve C13 outlets Nonreplaceable fuses for protection, outlets and cord connection are all on the same side for easier access.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This section provides an overview of the Cooling aspects. Tools and options will be discussed.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} IBM System x servers and BladeCenter chassis are designed to work with front to back airflow. Inlet air temperatures must be maintained at or below 35C temperature and 8-80% relative humidity which is actually slightly higher than other server vendors due to our enhanced airflow dynamics within the servers. Add to that the other basic physical requirements such as plenty of space in front and rear as well as over head to handle thermal physics and enough Cubic Feet per Minute ( CFM) of air to cool the server.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} A poorly designed rack can lead to poor cooling efficiency. A rack that is not set up properly will cause air re-circulation within the rack. By providing extra depth between units allows room for cable spacing so that air can move through the server properly, and allowing a maximum amount of open space in front and rear door help aid in cooling and serviceability. Physics dictates that to maintain no more than 30 degrees temperature rise across a server, each kilowatt of power requires 120 Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) of cool air moving through the server. So if a cabinet is running at 20 Kilo Watt (KW) of power it requires (20 KW x 120 CFM/KW) = 2400 CFM of air. Therefore, the higher the server is located in the cabinet, the more difficult the cooling problem, as cool air is typically supplied from the floor of the data center.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This section provides an overview of the IBM Cool Blue initiative.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} IBM has led the technology industry in energy-smart innovation for over forty years, from radical breakthroughs in mainframe cooling efficiency to the development of the world’s most powerful computer in Blue Gene that delivers the most performance per kilowatt of power consumed. IBM will continue to drive leadership in power efficiency with its “Cool Blue” portfolio of innovation. IBM Cool Blue portfolio of technologies and solutions addresses the challenges of power and cooling in the System x and BladeCenter server line. These solutions are designed to improve power efficiency and management in the datacenter without compromising throughput or compute performance. IBM offers a range of products and services, it has identified for a successful corporate power management strategy. These stages include: IBM Power Configurator: A tool to deliver better sizing information PowerExecutive: A powerful software suite designed to give users better information over their power consumption Rear Door Heat eXchanger: An effective solution to the Datacenters looking to limit server cooling consumption requirements IBM Data Center Energy Efficiency services to help optimize and future-proof your infrastructure.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} Cool Blue Energy Management has three levels of operation effectiveness which it’s components fall under: Budget: Power Configurator Plan: Active Energy Manager Save: Rear Door Heat Exchanger and PowerExecutive We will discuss each energy management in the next slides beginning with the Power Configurator.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This Power Configurator is a tool that will provide better data center sizing information for specific configurations of BladeCenter and System x servers for the following information: Power input (watts) PDU sizing information (amps) Heat Output (BTU) Airflow requirements through chassis (CFM-cubic feet per minute) VA Rating (VA) Leakage current (mAmps) Peak inrush current (Amps)
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} The IBM BladeCenter & System x Power Configurator is a freely downloadable tool that provides an estimate of the power usage for BladeCenter and System x systems. The tool uses a rack-based approach in forecasting the total power consumption for server complexes, including peripheral devices. In the following slides, a brief introduction is presented using a single rack and BladeCenter H configuration.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} In this example, a NetBAY42 Enterprise Rack is chosen as the base for housing the BladeCenter H and System x3650.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} The first component added to the rack is the BladeCenter H.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} Using the configurator options, components are selected to model the maximum configuration for the BladeCenter H.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} The next component added to the rack will be the System x3650. This configuration is again built using components that will model maximum power consumption.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} The Power Configurator produces an Excel spreadsheet listing total power for the rack. This slide illustrates one section of the spreadsheet, detailing total estimated load. In planning for power input load requirements, the Power Configurator, along with the SSCT tool, are useful in the design and estimation for the PDU requirements in implementing the rack.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} IBM Active Energy Manager offers three fundamentals of power management that provide a view of power consumption across your IT equipment over hours, weeks, even months. Reducing your power/thermal requirements and consuming available power/cooling before investing in additional infrastructure costs such as HVAC, UPS, and Generators. It also helps reduce power consumption during periods of low utilization resulting in saving power costs.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} IBM Active Energy Manager tool facilitates monitoring and tracking of trends within the server, including power, cooling and trends over time. You can also download IBM BladeCenter Power Calculator tool to estimation of power consumption for the specific configuration. It shows power consumption for each power domain and overall powers consumption as well as other characteristics. This tool can be downloaded from IBM System x and BladeCenter Support site.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} How does Active Energy Manager work? Hardware, firmware, and systems management software in servers and blades can take inventory of components IBM Active Energy Manager adds the power draw up for each server/blade and tracks that usage over time When power is constrained, IBM Active Energy Manager allows power to be allocated on a server by server basis - Care should be taken that limiting power consumption does not affect performance - Sensors and alerts can warn the user if limiting power to this server is affecting performance. In the future, group power policies may be developed across groups of servers and reallocated dynamically.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} In this illustration we show three identical 10KW racks, the first rack contains 23 1U servers with a power output of 427 watts, resulting in a high volume of power usage. The second rack contains two BladeCenter chassis with a total of 28 blade servers consuming 270 watts of power. In the third and final rack, we have added two more chassis providing a total 44 blade servers; in addition we installed Active Energy Manager Power Virtualization; however there is no increase of power wattage. This is because Active Energy Manager helps increase your server density and improves performance and wattage by up to 90%, allowing customers to increase capacity, utilizing existing resources, all without risking reliability.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} IBM Active Energy Manager gives you all the information and control you need to make more efficient use of power in the data center. It enables you to collect electrical power consumption levels of IBM-supported servers and to track power consumption trends, allowing you to make informed decisions about allocating power. With the Systems Director Active Energy Manager Cap feature, you can allocate exactly the right amount of power to servers to help meet your business goals of server increased application availability and lowered operational costs. In addition, Systems Director Active Energy Manager helps control cooling costs by enabling you to set up the right amount of cooling when it’s needed based on actual server power usage and air temperature. You can use IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager to track exactly how much power servers consume, based on utilization levels and other factors that you had no visibility into before—and plan accordingly. Benefits of IBM Active Energy Manager: Allocate less power and cooling infrastructure to IBM servers Lower power usage on select IBM servers Plan for the future by viewing trends of power usage over time Determine power usage for all components of a rack
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} The IBM Rear Door Heat eXchanger is designed to help keep your growing data center at a safer temperature by bringing more cooling capacity to areas where the heat is greatest—around racks of servers with more powerful and multiple processors. The Rear Door Heat eXchanger is a water-cooled door that utilizes above dew-point chilled water from existing air conditioning systems to tackle heat, circulating the water through sealed coils. It is similar to a standard rack acoustical 26” wide door and designed to attach to back of a 42U IBM Enterprise rack, adding a mere 4” to the depth of a rack—cooling the air that the system puts out. This technology reduce server heat emissions by up to 55 percent, enabling customers to ease the burden on existing air conditioning units and potentially lower energy costs by up to 15 percent.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} Data center managers are finding that high-density equipment causes problems such as hotspots and rising cooling costs. Most “hot spots” form from clustered components, fully populated racks and racks filled with components such as Blade servers. In a “traditional data center thermal control”, cold air is pumped from the AC units through the raised floor of the data center and into the cold aisles between facing server racks. Air-conditioned air is pulled from the cold aisle through the racks and exits the back of the servers. The heat from the server racks exhausts into the hot aisles where it is returned to the AC units to be chilled. However, as many more high-powered datacom components are introduced into these rows of racks, the heated air may eventually exceed the capabilities of the AC units and hot spots develop as shown in this illustration.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} With the Rear Door Heat eXchanger many of the issues with “hot spots” are eliminated. A single door may remove up to 50,000 Btu of heat or up to 15,000 watts of component killing heat. With this improved cooling feature, data center managers will now be able to fully populate individual racks, freeing valuable floor space without the need to purchase additional air conditioning units. No fans or electricity is needed. No chance for mechanical failure. It is a passive system – cooling the environment without opening/removing the door.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} Three simple steps to get more from your power dollars. Start with the most efficient server designs/products/technologies to get the most from every kilowatt. Make better choices to maximize your spend on data center infrastructure and for ongoing operational costs. Let IBM help you by bringing in energy-efficiency experts that know the data center and the IT. We can make the most of what you have or help you plan for the future.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} This slide lists the significant key words used in this module.
  • {DESCRIPTION} {TRANSCRIPT} After completing Topic, you should be able to: Identify the concepts and considerations for rack design and implementation in the datacenter List the power requirements options and planning tools Identify System x and BladeCenter chassis cooling concepts List the benefits of IBM Cool Blue Technologies
  • {DESCRIPTION} This screen displays html links. {TRANSCRIPT} Listed are some additional resources that will help you learn more about the IBM System x. IBM offers a rich library of resources on a variety of topics - from customized Web-based education to downloadable brochures, planning and installation guides on popular solutions, as well as maintaining IBM Systems.
  • {DESCRIPTION} Displays the statement of “End of Presentation” in the center of the slide. {TRANSCRIPT} Thank you!

Xtw01t8v0901 power rack_cooling Xtw01t8v0901 power rack_cooling Presentation Transcript

  • © 2006 IBM Corporation This presentation is intended for the education of IBM and Business Partner sales personnel. It should not be distributed to customers. IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation IBM System x ™ Rack, Power and Cooling Infrastructure XTW01 Topic 8
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 2 Course Objectives At the completion of this topic, you should be able to: > Identify the concepts and considerations for rack design and implementation in the datacenter > List the power requirements options and planning tools > Identify System x and BladeCenter chassis cooling concepts > List the benefits of IBM Cool Blue Technologies
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 3 Topic 8 - Course Agenda > * Data Center Design Considerations * > Rack Concepts and Tools > Power Considerations > Cooling Considerations > Cool Blue Technologies
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 4 > Perforated tiles > Raised floor > Aisle ways - hot and cold > Ceiling height > Density in the cabinet > Cooling assets > Cable opening > Types of racks > Number of racks > KW load of equipment The typical data center is a complex environment with many items: For more information see Challenges of Data Center Thermal Management ibm.com/research/journal/rd/494/schmidt.html Data Center Environment Design Considerations Perforated Floor Tiles Air Conditioning Unit Front of Racks
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 5 Data Center Flooring Considerations Raised Floor > Good for running cables out of site > Good for cooling systems > Can be expensive > Must check rating before loading racks Solid Floor > Load rating excellent > Cannot easily run cables out of site > Can cause cooling issues Raised Floor Supply Ceiling Supply
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 6 Topic 8- Course Agenda > Data Center Design Considerations > * Rack Concepts and Tools * > Power Considerations > Cooling Considerations > Cool Blue Technologies
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 7 Rack Considerations - Type and Capacity > Standardized Form Factor  42U  25U  11U > Designed to support power components and attachments > Fan-free design > Can be ordered with component systems installed NetBAY42 Enterprise S2 42U S2 25U NetBAY11 Standard
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 9 Special cover filters dust and environment contaminants Ample space for all your IT IBM BladeCenter S Rear module enables office friendly acoustics Acoustics Declared sound power level: • 6.3 bels - with all “low power blades” installed • 6.8 bels – if any “high power blades” installed Dimensions: Height: 24” Width: 24” Depth: 42” Rack Considerations - BC-S Office Enablement Kit
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 10 Rack Considerations - Access & Console Support > Console support  Service  Operations requirements > Peripherals  USB  DVD/CDROM  Cabling − Power − Network − Fibre Channel Rack-mounted flat screen and keyboard options
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 11 Rack SSCT Planning Tool (1 of 2) IBM Standalone Solutions Configuration Tool > Downloadable tool to aid in configuration > Provides system configuration, power and rack placement
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 12 Rack SSCT Planning Tool (2 of 2) SSCT Rack Configuration Sample > Component selection > Rack placement > Power cabling
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 13 Rack Considerations - SSCT Floor Plan SSCT floor plan developed from the configuration
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 14 Topic 8 - Course Agenda > Data Center Design Considerations > Rack Concepts and Tools > * Power Considerations * > Cooling Considerations > Cool Blue Technologies
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 15 IBM Power & Cooling Usage The processor power growth is the largest single contributor but there are many other areas. The more you pack into a server the more power it needs. Planar 4% Standby 2% Processor 30% Memory 11% HDD 6% PCI 3% Other 44% IBM Can Control IBM Can Influence Little IBM Control • AC to DC Transitions • DC to AC Deliveries • Fan Typical 1U server power distribution
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 16 Less DC AssetsLess AirLess Heat Typical Power Supply IBM BladeCenter High Efficiency Power Supplies Typical Power Supply 220V AC in 12V DC out Example: 2000W AC in at 70% efficiency = 1400DC output Heat BladeCenter Power Supply 220V AC in 12V DC out Example: 2000W AC in at 91% efficiency = 1820DC output HeatUpdated 11/17/07 > DC – Power the server components use > AC – Power distributed in most data centers > Power supplies convert AC to DC Less Power More processor per rack Less IT expense Lower TCO Lower operating cost
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 17 Displacement of PDU in Rack Power Distribution Units (PDU) Power Distribution Unit Effectively distributes power in moderate and high-density rack environments anywhere power must be distributed to multiple pieces of equipment.
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 18 > DPI Universal Rack PDU > DPI Front-End PDU > DPI High Density PDU > DPI Enterprise PDU DPI Universal Rack DPI Front End DPI Enterprise DPI High Density Power Considerations - PDU Options
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 19 Topic 8 - Course Agenda > Data Center Design Considerations > Rack Concepts and Tools > Power Considerations > * Cooling Considerations * > Cool Blue Technologies
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 20 Cooling Considerations - Air Flow Front Cold Back Hot Cable Opening Subfloor Underfloor Chilled Air Air flow Perf tile Tile floor Rack Design: > Rack should be engineered to be part of the thermal solution > IBM racks allow for highly efficient cooling Temperature: > 10.0° to 35.0°C (50° to 95°F) at 0 to 914 m (0 to 3,000 ft) > 10.0° to 32.0°C (50° to 90°F) at 914 to 2,133 m (3,000 to 7,000 ft) Relative humidity: 8% to 80% Maximum altitude: 2,133 m (7,000 ft)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 21 How data center cooling works? The key requirement is to maintain rack inlet temperatures within manufacturer’s specifications For more information see the IBM Rack Planning Guide ibm.com and search on MIGR-52898 Chilled WaterCool Air Warm Air Hot Aisle Cold AisleCold Aisle Rack RackRack • There are two separate and complex thermal problems: • Air distribution under the floor • Air and temperature distribution above the floor Perforated Tile Perforated Tile Under the Floor
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 22 Topic 8 - Course Agenda > Data Center Design Considerations > Rack Concepts and Tools > Power Considerations > Cooling Considerations > * Cool Blue Technologies *
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 23 Cool Blue Portfolio of Technologies Cool Blue Portfolio Powerful tools that help you optimize your data center infrastructure so you can be responsive. Tools that help: > IBM Power Configurator  Understand your power requirements > IBM Active Energy Manager  Monitor, control and virtualize your power > IBM Rear Door Heat eXchanger  Reduce data center hot spots > IBM Data Center Energy Efficiency services  Optimize and future-proof your data center
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 24 Cool Blue Energy Management Innovation Active Energy Manager
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 25 IBM Power Configurator > Get better information for up-front planning by sizing the power needs of your unique configurations > Select systems and IT infrastructure that best fit your data center infrastructure before you commit to buying the first serve > Available via the web for customers and IBM Business Partners > Tool provides the following useful information:  Power input (watts)  PDU sizing information (amps)  Heat Output (BTU)  Airflow requirements through chassis (CFM-cubic feet per minute)  VA Rating (VA)  Leakage current (mAmps)  Peak inrush current (Amps)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 26 IBM Power Configurator Installation IBM BladeCenter & System x Power Configurator > Downloadable tool to estimate power usage > Rack-based configurator
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 27 IBM BladeCenter & System x Power Configurator > BladeCenter H and System x3650 IBM Power Configurator Example (1 of 5)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 28 IBM BladeCenter & System x Power Configurator > Addition of the BladeCenter H Power Configurator Example (2 of 5)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 29 IBM BladeCenter H > Maximum power configuration applied for the model Power Configurator Example (3 of 5)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 30 IBM System x3650 > Configuration for maximum power Power Configurator Example (4 of 5)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 31 Total rack power requirements > Component power summarized for the rack Power Configurator Example (5 of 5)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 32 IBM Active Energy Manager > Measure/Trend Power Consumption (Phase 1)  Determine the power (watts) is being consumed now  Why assume label power?  Power meter (internal) or PDU with watt meter (external) > Cap or Allocate Power Correctly (Phase 2)  Power consumed is a function of the HW options, OS, Apps and App footprint application and the application data footprint  Allocate power based on past history using power measurements: −to match the need of each server −to match the P/T limits of the data center > Reduce power consumed (Phase 3)  CPUs can reduce power in periods of low utilization  Save power costs Three Fundamentals of Power Management > A view of power consumption across the data center (units of hours, weeks, months) using your applications and workloads > Reducing your power/thermal requirements (saving infrastructure costs – ex. HVAC, UPS, generators) > Reducing power consumption during periods of low utilization (saving power costs – ex. utility company) Active Energy Manager will Provide:
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 33 IBM Active Energy Manager Overview > Enables management of actual power consumption and resulting thermal loads > Intelligence to control and manage datacenter server power utilization  Hardware, embedded management logic  Sensors and alerts exist to warn the user if limiting power to this server is affecting performance > More accurate data center planning:  Actual power draw instead of conservative “label/spec power” estimates This tool can be downloaded from: www.ibm.com/systems/bladecenter /powerconfig/
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 34 Active Energy Manager in Action
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 35 IBM Active Energy Manager - Increased Density Inefficient 1U servers 10KW rack holds 23 1Us (427W) Power-efficient BladeCenter servers 10KW rack holds 28 blades (270W) Power-efficient BladeCenter with Active Energy Manager power virtualization Improve performance/watt by up to 90% 10KW rack holds 44 blades (270W)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 36 IBM Active Energy Manager - Allocated Power > Rack density is based on power consumption estimates, which typically leads to a 20 percent over allocation of power Result is multiple servers, each with wasted overhead power Allocation before IBM Active Energy Manager Server 1 Server 6 Server 5 Server 2 Server 4 Server 3 Server 7 > With Active Energy Manager exact power usage is possible Server 1 Server 6 Server 5 Server 2 Server 4 Server 3 Server 7 Server 8 Server 9 Allocation after IBM Active Energy Manager +2 additional servers Power is virtualized so you can add more servers > The power virtualization feature allows you to turn that wasted power into real productivity Put the power where it is needed
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 37 Rear Door Heat eXchanger Features Benefits Rear Door Heat eXchanger Maximum Performance Per Watt Per Sq Ft.
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 38 Hot Spots in Datacenter ServerR acks AC Units Hot Spot Areas
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 39 Eliminating Hot Spots in Datacenter Cool Blue Solution ServerR acks AC Units Rear Door Heat Exchanger Water cooling is more energy efficient than air
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 40 Become more energy efficient - Go Green Make smarter choices based on better information Plan, monitor and control with IBM Cool Blue™ portfolio Take advantage of innovative technology Improve efficiency >Right-size the infrastructure >Get the most for data center spend >Take control of your power usage with simple tools >Utilize energy-efficient technologies to get more work per kilowatt >Improve compute power per kilowatt with virtualization >Get the most efficient mechanism for temperature reduction in data center >Get top-to-bottom, efficient data center solutions >Recycle old hardware in eco-friendly methods instead of sending to landfill Bring in the experts on energy-smart computing Benefit from IBM experience
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 41 Active Energy Manager Alternating Current (AC) British thermal unit (BTU) Celsius (C) Cool Blue Technology Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) Direct Current (DC) Distributed Power Interconnect (DPI) Electronics Industry Association (EIA) Glossary of Terms Europe, Middle East, Africa (EMEA) Fahrenheit (F) Front-End Power Distribution Unit (FEPDU) Kilowatt (KW) Power Distribution Unit (PDU) Rear Door Heat eXchanger Vital Product Data (VPD) Volt (V) Watt (W)
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 42 Course Summary After completing Topic, you should be able to: > Identify the concepts and considerations for rack design and implementation in the datacenter > List the power requirements options and planning tools > Identify System x and BladeCenter chassis cooling concepts > List the benefits of IBM Cool Blue Technologies
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 43 Additional Resources IBM STG SMART Zone for more education on Webinar, Web Lectures, etc..: > Internal: http://lt.be.ibm.com/smartzone/modulartechnical > BP: http://www.ibm.com/services/weblectures/dlv/partnerworld IBM System x and BladeCenter Power Configurator > http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/bladecenter/resources/powerconfig/index.html IBM Rack and Power Solutions > http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/xseries/storage/rack.html / IBM System x Support > http://www-304.ibm.com/systems/support/supportsite.wss/brandmain?brandind=500000
  • IBM Systems & Technology Group Education & Sales Enablement © 2009 IBM Corporation 44 End of Presentation