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Teq Magazine

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As an award-winning magazine, TEQ focuses on the technology, business and entrepreneurial communities in the region.

As an award-winning magazine, TEQ focuses on the technology, business and entrepreneurial communities in the region.

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  • 1. P I T T S B U R G H A Publication of the F A L L 2 0 1 0 2010 DATA AWARD WINNER, JESSE BEST, LIVES UP TO HIS NAME READ THE STORY ON PAGE 12. NATURAL GAS DRILLING EXPERTS, KW INTERNATIONAL, OPEN PITTSBURGH OFFICE P. 16 FOSSIL FREE FUEL AND OPTIMUS TECHNOLOGIES ARE GROWING THEIR OPERATIONS IN BRADDOCK P. 6 .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. teQ BESTinShow uuuuuu
  • 2. FROM THE PRESIDENT Let’s change our entrepreneurial culture! teQ P I T T S B U R G H A Publication of the TECHNOLOGY. ENTREPRENEURSHIP. QUALITY. VOLUME SIXTEEN, ISSUE SEVEN, FALL 2010 WEB: news.pghtech.org BLOG: techburgher.pghtech.org TWITTER: pghtech RADIO: TechVibe Radio 1410 AM KQV 8 ON THE COVER [12] MUST READ [5] TECHKNOW Tech companies can build better communities. [16] TECHBURGHER Technology news from techburgher.com. [19] BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE Use business intelligence to create value. [25] WHY IT WORKS Brand basics from Rick Cancelliere. FEATURE [6] ASA WATTEN AND COLIN HUWYLER ARE GROWING FOSSIL FREE FUEL AND OPTIMUS TECHNOLOGIES IN BRADDOCK. ............................................................................................................................................................................................. JESSE BEST, THE 2010 DATA AWARD WINNER, LIVES UP TO HIS NAME. PITTSBURGH TEQ is published seven times a year by the Pittsburgh Technology Council, 2000 Technology Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15219-3110; © Pittsburgh Technology Council, 2010. All rights reserved. PITTSBURGH TEQ can be found on the World Wide Web at www.pghtech.org. Address all editorial mail and letters to Jonathan Kersting, Editor, PITTSBURGH TEQ. Address all changes of ad- dress and undeliverable copies to Circulation Department, PITTSBURGH TEQ. Adjustment to request should be accompanied by a mailing label. RATES: $29.95 per year. Out-of-town and foreign subscriptions are available at regular rates, plus required postage. [26] uuuu ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ CONTENTS Jesse Best: People just need to buy more art and less flat screens. Applied correctly, this formula should work in any city. eteq.pghtech.org 3
  • 3. ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL MAIN NUMBER: 412 687 2700 FAX NUMBER: 412 687 5232 TOLL-FREE NUMBER: 800 388 8820 e-mail: info@pghtech.org WEB SITE: www.pghtech.org Dial412.918.4280andthethree-digit extensionbelowtoreachoneofour staffmembers: MEMBER SERVICES Brian Kennedy, x297 SPONSORSHIP Brian Lang, x249 ADVERTISING/SALES Emily Goss, x235 EDITORIAL Jonathan Kersting, x295 The Pittsburgh Technology Council is a regional association of technology companies, professional service firms, and academic and civic organizations working to foster the development and growth of the technology industry in western Pennsylvania. This newsmagazine serves the business- to-business information needs of area technology companies. Information is obtained from sources considered to be reliable, but its accuracy cannot be guar- anteed. No information or opinion ex- pressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any securities. Opinions expressed are those of the iden- tified spokespersons and do not necessar- ily reflect the views of this newsmagazine or the Pittsburgh Technology Council. The acceptance of advertising does not imply an endorsement by the publisher. PRESIDENT AND CEO Audrey Russo ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND EDITOR Jonathan Kersting CREATIVE DIRECTOR Kim Chestney Harvey PRODUCTION MANAGER/ STAFF WRITER Matt Pross ADVERTISING SALES Emily Goss CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rick Cancelliere Tim Hayes Mike Matesic Ron Morris Dave Nelsen Michael Righi Greg Steffine PHOTOGRAPHY Jonathan Kersting PROOFREADER/ COPY EDITOR Chris McClure PRINTING Fry Communications COUNCIL CONNECTIONS 14 FLASH FORWARD Chorus Call launches new social networking platform - Concert-oh. 15 BUY THIS Go anywhere with high-speed CLEAR 4G. 16 FIRST LOOKS Houston-based KW International hopes to grow operations in SWPA. 17 PULSE Local tech entrepreneur, Razi Imam, is “Driven” to succeed. FEATURES [14] [17][16 [15] [18] [21][20] [22] [23] ON THE MIND [24] COMMUNITY CAUSE The Refresh Kittanning Project is leading economic development efforts in this quaint town. [28] PUBLIC POLICY Can governor-elect Corbett transform state government? [30] STEM TALENT The best tech talent is at your fingertips! [ 3 1 ] COUNCIL BIZ-DEV Explore the Floor is the perfect environment for manufacturers to build business. 18 BUSINESS ADVISOR Venture capital investment in the cleantech sector continues to grow. 20 OFF THE SHELF Why HTML5 will save the world. 21 START ME UP To ensure a successful product launch, master the art of publicity. 22 E-CORNER True entrepreneurs always “find a way” in the face of adversity. 23 INTERACTIVE Increase sales by establishing rapport through social media. KNOW HOW! KW INTERNATIONAL ESTABLISHES PITTSBURGH PRESENCE TO SERVICE MARCELLUS SHALE DRILLERS
  • 4. ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... eteq.pghtech.org 5 By Jonathan Kersting, Associate Publisher jkersting@pghtech.org I’M ALWAYS GOING ON RECORD PRO- CLAIMING MY LOVE AND PASSION FOR PITTSBURGH AND ITS SURROUNDING REGION. I LIKE THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY, THE NITTY AND THE GRITTY IF YA KNOW WHAT I MEAN. There are so many things going for our region, from a diverse business climate, thriving tech community, killer cost of living and access to the great outdoors. The list goes on and we all know it. However, like any region, some of our communities are really taking off while others are struggling. Just look at Lawrenceville, the South Side and East End. As Pittsburgh reinvented itself after the collapseofthesteelindustry,thesepartsoftownarebouncingbackwith auniquemixofthearts,smallbusiness(includingtechstartups),retail and residential development. Brownfields in Hazlewood have been converted to technology parks. The Pittsburgh Technology Council sits on the Pittsburgh Tech- nologyCenter,oneofthefirstreclaimedbrownfields.Homestead’sWa- terfront and the South Side Works have begun integrating retail, residentialandofficespaceintoformerindustrialsites,drawingcrowds of people to live, work, play and, yes, shop. On the inverse, there are still plenty of communities that are having a hell of a time trying to find their way. Communities up and down the Monongahela Valley like Clairton and McKeesport are holdingontighttryingtoattractnewindustriesandmaintaintheirwith- ering population bases. Inparticular,Braddock,justafewmilesupthe“MightyMon”from Pittsburgh,hasbeenseverelyhit.Justthispastyear,thingsdeteriorated further as the community lost its namesake hospital. But, there is hope. A renaissance could be taking shape in Braddockinaslightlylesstraditionalwayastwogreentechnologycom- panies have leveraged inexpensive rent, a centralized industrial setting andaccesstoaskilledworkforce.OptimusTechnologiesandFossilFree Fuel are true technology pioneers setting up shop along the main drag in Braddock to take a chance on building an alternative fuels hub. FossilFreeFuelisinthebusinessofproducingfuelfromwasteoils. Theycollectdiscardedgreasefromrestaurantsandturnitintofuelthat a converted diesel engine can chug all day long. Optimus creates conversions kits for diesel engines to burn bio-diesel and other fuels without fossil origins. We’re talking engines forindustrialequipment,heavymachinery,deliverytrucksandevenan old Mercedes Benz 300D. The market is massive! ThecompanieshaveambitiousplanstoturnBraddockintoagreen energy center, hopefully helping to also play a role in revitalizing this long-ailing town, without a TGI Fridays or Target. Learn more about thesecompaniesonpage6.Whileyou’reatit,seehowKittanningistry- ing to attract more businesses on page 24. Withtheintroductionoftechcompaniesandbrashentrepreneurs, troubled communities, like Braddock, can afford our region a canvas to create something great and truly transformative. Our blighted commu- nities can become our biggest assets and zones for true opportunity. I TECH COMPANIES CAN BUILD BETTER COMMUNITIES TECH KNOW
  • 5. 6 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................FEATURE FUTURETwo small, Braddock-based startups are betting big on biofuel. If successful, they will develop an industry niche that could create energy independence and rebuild a struggling community... With the UPMC Braddock hospital closing down ear- lierthisyear,thepainandsufferingofoneofAllegheny County’s most economically depressed communities doesn’t seem to have an end. But, if you look closely, there is hope. Against all odds, a group of pioneers are tryingtobringbackthestrugglingcommunitybystart- ing and developing new businesses on Braddock’s his- toric main street. Fossil Free Fuel and Optimus Technologies are two green technology startups that are committed to growing their operations in Brad- dock and redeveloping the community in the process. THE TECHNOLOGY FoundedinMedina,NYin2005asFossilFreeFuel,thecompany relocated to Pittsburgh in 2007 and launched the first genera- tion of its diesel-to-biofuel conversion technology. Since then, the company has converted more than 200 individually-owned vehicles with its technology, which is a bolt-on fuel conversion technology that allows diesel vehicles to utilize various types of biodiesel, year-round in any climate. p By Matt Pross, Staff Writer > Photography by Jonathan Kersting > Design by Kim Chestney Harvey FUTURE
  • 6. ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................FEATURE E FUELS eteq.pghtech.org 7 CONTINUED >> “Whenwefirststartedthecompany,wewereconvertingvehiclesonaone-offbasis,”ColinHuwyler,Co-founderofFossilFree Fuel and CEO of Optimus Technologies, explained. “While this provided a good starting point for Fossil Free, it wasn’t a scalable business model. “Since then, we have developed a second-generation technology called the Vector System, which is modular and has appli- cationsinagricultural,commercialandindustrialmarkets,”hecontinued.“ThecommercialapplicationoftheVectorSystemcosts between$8-10Kpervehicleandwearecurrentlyworkingwithseveralclientsacrossdifferentmarketsinpilottestsofthesystem.” In addition to its vehicle applications, Optimus now offers on-site, closed-loop power generation systems for restaurants and food service facilities that produce waste vegetable oil; and a waste oil burner and heating system for forced air and boiler applications. Huwylerco-foundedFossilFreeFuelwithDavidRosenstraus,whoisnowCOOofOptimusTechnologies.Inadditiontobeing responsible for the day-to-day operations of the company, Rosenstraus is focused on manufacturing, servicing and installing the Vector technology. THE FUEL Along with the company’s shift away from one-off conversions to a more scalable, modular business model, Fossil Free split into two separate companies (Fossil Free Fuel and Optimus Technologies) in July 2010. Before this strategic reorganization, the com- bined company was not only focused on creating, manufacturing and installing the technology, but it was also heavily involved in the collection and processing of waste oil. Now Optimus is solely focused on further product development of its Vector technol- ogy, commercialization and further market expansion. Fossil Free Fuel is now totally focused on the collection of waste oils from regional outlets and the subsequent processing and distribution. E FUELS
  • 7. 8 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL TEQ: Quickly tell us about Optimus and its products. COLIN HUWYLER: Optimus is a Pittsburgh-based company with our oper- ations located in Braddock, Pa. The primary product that we manufacture is the Vector system; this system enables diesel engines to operate on a variety of renewable fuels. The system is a retrofit that can be utilized in any application with a diesel engine; our focus is on commercial and in- dustrial users. The great thing about this technology is it has such diverse applica- tions; diesel engines power our economy. From agricultural tractors to over-the-road trucks and everything in between, there is almost nothing that exists that doesn’t rely on a diesel engine at some point in its produc- tion. The down side is that we are heavily dependent on imported oil, which raises huge national security and environmental issues. For businesses, the volatility in the petroleum market can have a huge impact on their bottom line; the Vector product allows our clients to save money and stabilize their costs by utilizing next-generation renewable fuels. We also manufacture two additional product lines, the Apex and the Exotherm. The Apex is a self-contained combined heat and power unit de- signed for food service facilities. The Apex plumbs into a facility’s fryer bank and processes used vegetable oil into electricity. The system provides the additional benefit of offsetting hot water usage for the kitchen or restrooms. The Exotherm is a commercial heating system that can operate on waste petroleum oils such as hydraulic fluid, transmission oil or motor oils in addition to any of the biofuels compatible with the Vector system. TEQ: So the Vector, Apex and Exotherm are all designed and built in the region? Tell us more about that. CH: We currently design and manufacture these products at our Braddock facility. We’ve been at our current location since 2007 but we’ve run out of space. At the moment, we’re in the planning phases of expansion; we’re looking t0 redevelop a site that’s just a few blocks away from our current UP CLOSE& PERSONAL WITH ColinHuwyler “For a number of years, our fuel operations have been in bootstrapping mode,”AsaWatten,CEOofFossilFreeFuel,explained.“Now,wearecompletely focused on scaling the company to a size where fuel collection and production can entirely support the company. Pittsburgh will serve as our test market and then we hope to expand into other markets as well.” Currently, Fossil Free has agreements with 40 restaurants and grocery storesintheareatocollectthewasteoil-orpureplantoilasWattenreferstoit - created from their deep-fat fryers. Additionally, the company also has collec- tion agreements with several Giant Eagle locations and also offers a drop point for residential waste oil. Once the pure plant oil is collected, it is processed at Fossil Free’s fuel processing site in Braddock, where it is turned into a vehicle-grade fuel. While Fossil Free is currently seeking investment to scale to a 2 million-gallon test facility,thispastsummerthecompanyexpandeditscurrentcapacityfrom800 to2,500gallonsamonthandisontrajectorytocontinuedoublingitscollections several times a year. “PurePlantOilhasseriousenvironmentalbenefitsoverotherbiofuelslike corn ethanol and biodiesel because it takes minimal energy and cost to produce,” Watten explained. “When compared with petro-diesel, it is far superior from a cost standpoint and an environmental perspective as it offers significant decreases in the emission of poisonous unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, particulates and sulfur oxides.” Optimus’ Vector technology is capable of but not limited to operating on pure plant oil, algae oil, animal fats, bio-crude, pyrolysis oil and all blends of biodiesel. THE COMMUNITY Although Optimus and Fossil Free Fuel officially split their operations earlier this year to maximize growth opportunities, the two companies are still work- inghand-in-hand.Bothstartupsareportfoliocompaniesofseed-stageinvestor, Idea Foundry. In collaboration with the non-profit organization, Pittsburgh Region Clean Cities (PRCC), Optimus and Fossil Free are pursuing the devel- opmentoftheBraddockBiofuelsBlock,whichisaprojectdesignedtoredevelop the vacant gateway block of Braddock and establish a regional biofuels innovation hub through the development of: an advanced fuel system manufacturing,installationandtechnologydevelopmentfacility,analternative fuel station, public resource center and headquarters for PRCC, and a zero-waste biofuel pilot facility and biomass liquid fuel research laboratory. While the $2 million needed to fund the project has yet to be approved, Huwyler and Watten said that if the Braddock Biofuels Block does indeed become reality it would create approximately 100 jobs, produce 2.5 million gallons of biofuel annually and redevelop two brown fields in Braddock. “It will be terrific if we pull this project off because it will be the first thing you see as you enter Braddock,” Watten said. “The only thing slowing us down is the necessary capital to move forward with development.” I [ABOVE] IF STATE FUNDING IS APPROVED FOR THE BRADDOCK BIOFUELS BLOCK, THE PROJECT WOULD REDEVELOP THIS VACANT LOT INTO A REGIONAL BIOFUELS INNOVATION HUB. ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................FEATURE
  • 8. p eteq.pghtech.org 9 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................FEATURE CONTINUED >> [BELOW] OPTIMUS COO, DAVE ROSENSTRAUS, WELDING A COMPONENT OF THE COMPANY’S VECTOR TECHNOLOGY FUEL SYSTEM. ROSENSTRAUS CO-FOUNDED FOSSIL FREE WITH HUWYLER IN 2005. facility. That would give us space to scale our production and build a much larger, much needed, research lab. Although our sales are primarily regional, we have a deployment strategy to distribute our products nationally; however, we are committed to the region and intend to keep all of our production right here is southwestern Pa. TEQ: You’re a pioneer in this industry and leading the charge to rejuvenate Brad- dock. Tell us what’s happen- ing in Braddock and how Optimus and Fossil Free are playing a role. CH: When we moved to the area, we had a new company and two employees; we’ve now expanded into two companies, more than doubled our staff and Optimus alone is targeted to be at 12 em- ployees by the end of next year. Braddock is a place with a rich his- tory and a promising future and there are a lot of great things going on here that we’re excited to take part in. Our primary focus is on growing our business and ulti- mately that’s a driver for so many other things, but we’re active in the community as well. As we scale, we’ll be looking to employ people from the region and we’ll have a variety of positions all requiring different skill sets. This region has a legacy of industrial knowledge that has been lost in most other parts of the country but we also have an expansive and ever-emerging tech industry. It’s really the best of both worlds; for our scale-up we will be hiring ma- chinists, welders and engineers, but we’ll also need a sales force and management team that under- stands emerging industry and new technologies. I think that business development and job creation is the key to revitalizing economically depressed areas. TEQ: What’s been the coolest thing about building Optimus? CH: That’s tough. Building a com- pany is such a challenging process, but seeing your ideas transform
  • 9. into a commercialized product is really awesome. We have a partnership with Giant Eagle that we’re expanding upon right now. They’ve been piloting an early version of the Vector system for about two years now and with the next phase of the part- nership we’re going to be retrofitting 10 of their distribution trucks. I’d say most people don’t put too much thought into how groceries actually get onto the shelves at Giant Eagle. It’s been amazing working with them and seeing the logistics and operational infrastructures that go into actually getting a loaf of bread onto the shelves. It’s really cool to shop there knowing that we had something to do with that process. We get to work with people from all different backgrounds and who have had a variety of different experiences. I’d have to say that the relationships we’ve built have beenthemostrewardingaspectofbuildingthecompany.Asayoungentrepreneur,the thing I appreciate the most is the willingness of people to help. It’s incredible to have somanypeoplethatarewillingtolendahandorgiveaperspectiveonsomethingthat may be similar to a situation that they’ve experienced in the past. TEQ: Where do you see the company in five years? CH: Growing. We’re taking things a step at a time but our goal is to see the Vector system integrated at an OEM level. Ideally, Giant Eagle will be able to go to Volvo and place an order for their new trucks and our technology would be integrated as a standard feature. There are a significant number of improvements we can bring into the picture if we’re integrated at a factory level rather than as a retrofit. Most of the major manufacturers are struggling with biofuel integration strategies and the Vector technology has a number of proprietary solutions that would simplify their lives. The technology is designed in such a way that it is fuel neutral. There are a variety of fuels that can be utilized and our system optimizes the combustion re- gardless of the base fuel. The primary fuels utilized today are pure plant oil and biodiesel. The feedstock of these is typically waste vegetable oil from the food service industry, but we anticipate a commercial scale algae oil solution to emerge in the next few years. The main constraint on algae oil production currently is the cost; most manufacturers are try- ing to combine the oil growth, extraction and biodiesel processing in one operation. The Vector system would enable the algae oil to be used without post-processing it into biodiesel, which brings the cost down significantly. Algae oil is the most promising next-generation fuel and we’re here to help ensure that you’ll be able to utilize it within the next five years! I ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................FEATURE As a young entrepreneur, the thing I appreciate the most is the willingness of people to help. It’s incredible to have so many peo- ple that are willing to lend a hand or give a perspective on something that may be similar to a situation that they’ve experienced in the past. 10 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL
  • 10. SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA’S ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER IS GROWING QUICKLY AND GAINING MOMENTUM AS A REGIONAL EM- PLOYMENT ENGINE THANKS TO INNOVATIVE COMPANIES LIKE FOSSIL FREE FUEL AND OPTIMUS TECHNOLOGIES. HERE IS A BRIEF LOOK AT SOME KEY INDUSTRY DATA BETWEEN THE YEARS 2005-2009 FROM THE PITTSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL’S STATE OF THE INDUSTRY REPORT: [TOP] COLIN HUWYLER (LEFT) AND ASA WATTEN STANDING NEXT TO FOSSIL FREE’S 450-GALLON FUEL COLLECTION VEHICLE, BIG RED. [BOTTOM] AS PART OF THE BRADDOCK BIOFUELS BLOCK REDEVELOPMENT, THIS VACANT GAS STATION WOULD BE TRANSFORMED INTO AN ALTERNATIVE FUELS FILLING STATION. ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................FEATURE THE TOTAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER GREW FROM 832 COMPANIES IN 2005 TO 902 COMPANIES IN 2009. EMPLOYMENT IN THE INDUSTRY ROSE MARKEDLY AS WELL, GROW- ING 12.9 PERCENT FROM 26,744 JOBS IN 2005 TO 29,940 JOBS IN 2009. IN TERMS OF TOTAL ANNUAL PAY- ROLL, THE REGION’S ENERGY TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY GREW NEARLY 20 PERCENT BETWEEN 2005-2009. THE AVERAGE WAGE OF A JOB IN THE INDUSTRY IS IMPRESSIVE AS WELL, COMING IN AT $71,645 IN 2009, A 7.1 PERCENT INCREASE FROM 2005. p p p p eteq.pghtech.org 11 Industry Stats CLICK HERE TO WATCH A VIDEO OF COLIN AND ASA DETAIL THEIR COMPANIES.
  • 11. 12 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ONTHECover arallel universes, Pittsburgh, deep space, and blue collar alcoholism are just a small sample of mixed media artist Jesse Best’s subject matter. Sick of the hyper-intellectual art world that alienates viewers, Jesse tries to make his work accessible and grounded with his self-professed style of industrial expressionism. His no-nonsense approach of incorporating haunting imagery with wood and ankle-deep resin made him the logical pick for this year’s 15 Minutes Award at the Pittsburgh Technology Council’s Design, Art & Technology (DATA) Awards and Regional Art Exhibition. Part of the Council’s Art and Tech Initiative, the awards recognize excellence in several categories from video to music to innovation, with the 15 Minutes Award honoring the highest excellence in 2-D visual arts. This year, Jesse’s “Thin Villains” really caught our attention and gets the nod. He’s truly living up to his name ;-) “Thin Villains” is representative of Jesse’s industrial expressionism style. His work incorporates tight graphic imagery tied with loose organic brush strokes. Jesse’s wooden textures create a near three-dimensional quality with the addition of a few deep layers of his signature high-gloss resin. We asked Jesse a few questions about his art and inspira- tion. Here’s what he had to say: TEQ: Tell our readers a little about your background and your art. JESSE BEST: Initially I wanted to be a director, but after working on a few films I quickly realized what a daunting task that actually is and how difficult it can be to have your creative vision carried out by a team of strangers. Painting allowed me to create whatever I imagined and 2010 DATA 15 MINUTES AWARD WINNER LIVES UP TO HIS NAME P “TECHNOLOGYDEFINITELYINFLUENCESMYWORK. WHETHERIT’STHE MATERIALSIUSE,SUCHASTHEEPOXYRESINORTHESCIENCESPECIALI WATCHONDEEPSPACE,TECHNOLOGYISAFFECTINGWHATICREATEAND HOWICREATEIT. ATTHISPOINTINHISTORY,ITHINKIT’SUNAVOIDABLE.” BESTinShow DON’T MISS JESSE’S UPCOMING SHOW AT THE GALLERY 4 IN SHADYSIDE SPRING 2011 By Jonathan Kersting, Associate Publisher [jkersting@pghtech.org]
  • 12. eteq.pghtech.org 13 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ONTHECover wasn’t limited by budget or politics. I’m addicted to the freedom and control I have as a fine artist. TEQ: What inspires you to do what you do? JB: As for the work, I am a mixed media painter working with wood, stains, acrylic, spray-paint, and resin. My subject matter swings from blue- collar alcoholism to parallel universes and whatever else falls in between. I’m attracted to not only the conceptual message of the work, but also the physical presence of each painting. A photograph can only tell you so much, it’s important to experience the work in person. TEQ: Does technology ever inspire or impact your art? JB: Technology definitely influences my work. Whether it’s the materials I use, such as the epoxy resin or the science special I watch on deep space, technology is affecting what I create and how I create it. At this point in history, I think it’s unavoidable. It still trips me out that my daughter was playing her Nintendo DS at the age of 2. She went from saying her first couple words to playing video games? It seems to be inherently woven into our DNA. TEQ: What have been some of your biggest influences? JB: Pretty standard: TV, movies, Internet, family, friends, good art, beer and whiskey. TEQ: How can Pittsburgh grow a tighter art scene and support up-and-coming artists? JB: People just need to buy more art and less flat screens. Applied correctly, this formula should work in any city. TEQ: Duchamp or Warhol? JB: Warhol without question, although I pretty much have to say that since my fiancé is from the Warhola family. But in all fairness, Duchamp was no slouch. I CHECK OUT HIS WORK AT WWW.JESSEBEST.COM. [BOTTOM RIGHT] JESSE HARD AT WORK AT HIS HOUSE IN SOUTH OAKLAND, WHICH CO- INCIDENTALLY IS THE VERY SAME HOUSE THE WORLD-FAMOUS PITTS- BURGH ARTIST, ANDY WARHOL, GREW UP IN. [TOP RIGHT]“TOOTS” [BELOW] EXCERPT FROM “KARL” PHOTOGRAPHY BY JONATHAN KERSTING CLICK HERE TO WATCH A VIDEO OF JESSE BEST.
  • 13. 14 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL ouldn’t it be great to take the “work” out of social network- ing? To type less and talk more, in other words? The innova- torsatlongtimeMonroeville-basedtechpioneerChorusCall thoughtso,andhaveintroducedanewapplicationthattakes social networking to the next level. Dubbed “Concert-oh,” its aim is nothing less than to revolutionize the socialnetworkingworldthroughmulti-user,live,interactiveaudioandvideo. It’s like Skype on steroids, and it’s absolutely free. The product will be sup- ported by advertising once user rates have reached a critical mass. “We’re using the world-class teleconferencing and videoconferencing capabilities of Chorus Call to elevate social networking,” explained Ben Schmitt, Marketing Specialist for Concert-oh. “This product allows you to sign up, make friends, and set up live video chats with up to 10 friends at a time, using your webcams. Concert-oh audio conferencing can include an unlimited number of participants.” Add in document sharing functions, the choice to make chats public or private, use of simultaneous PowerPoint presentations, and other features, and you can tell Go to Meeting to go someplace else. And,inwhatmaybethemostinspiredordiabolicalapplicationofall,de- pending on your point of view about such things – Concert-oh is also being marketed to politicians as the perfect way to conduct Town Hall meetings with large groups of voters and constituents, as Schmitt explained. “Concert-ohisWeb-basedandsimpletouse,it’savailablefreeofcharge, and it has superb video and audio quality,” he said. “During the campaign season and afterward, elected officials can use Concert-oh to communicate directly with groups of people they represent, and then can use a special Q&A feature. This permits the host to speak directly to individuals one at a timewhiletherestoftheparticipantscanhearwithoutdistractionsorback- groundnoise.It’sawaytointeractdirectlywhilekeepingtheeventorganized and respectful.” Introduced in early September, the company has incorporated im- provementssuggestedbyearlyuserstomakeConcert-oh’sregistrationand navigation easier, and those efforts will continue, he said. Schmitt acknowledged that the idea behind Concert-oh, as manifested inthecleartechnologicaladvancementbeyondthefamiliarandcomfortable world of social networking today, may hold some potential users back. But he offered these thoughts on that subject. “Once you get over the intimidation factor of using this new offering, people have found that it’s really easy and they stick with it.” “OurgoalistomakeConcert-ohasuser-friendlyandwelcomingaspos- sible,” he added. “The opportunities for users in accessing this product are endless. Catching up with old friends, conducting business meetings, hold- ing fantasy football drafts, coordinating study groups, hosting virtual uni- versitylectures,orjustgettingtogethertoholddiscussionsonanytopicyou and your friends like – it’s the new way to meet and socialize with less typ- ing and more talking.” I NEW CHORUS CALL TECHNOLOGY HAS POTENTIAL TO REVOLUTIONIZE SOCIAL NETWORKING…MORE TALKING, LESS TYPING W CONCERT-OHBy Tim Hayes, Contributing Writer FLASHForward ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Dubbed“Concert-oh,”itsaimisnothinglessthanto revolutionizethesocialnetworkingworld CHORUS CALL’S AIMEE MILLER, JOE HEULER AND BEN SCHMITT ARE READY FOR CONCERT-OH TO TAKE SOCIAL MEDIA TO A NEW LEVEL.
  • 14. eteq.pghtech.org 15 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................BUYThis CLEARWIRECORPORATION,ONEOFTHETOP PROVIDERS OF WIRELESS BROADBAND SERV- ICES AND OPERATOR OF THE LARGEST 4G NETWORK IN THE COUNTRY, LAUNCHED ITS CLEAR® 4G, A TAKE-IT-WITH-YOU INTERNET SERVICE FOR BUSINESSES AND CONSUMERS IN PITTSBURGH EARLIER THIS FALL. With CLEAR, anyone can now use the Internet at speeds four times faster than 3G – whether at home, in the office, or on-the-go within CLEAR coverage. In Pittsburgh, CLEAR covers more than 820,000 people. Regionally, service extends from North Hills to South Park and from Monroeville to Carnegie. A detailed coverage map of CLEAR 4G service is available at www.clear.com/coverage. “WithCLEAR,residentsnowhaveafast,mobile Internet connection that goes with them over the rivers and throughout the Pittsburgh area,” said Jeannie Weaver, Regional General Manager for CLEAR.“We’reofferinggame-changingaccesstothe Internet. For the first time, consumers are able to wirelessly access the Internet at super-fast speeds, ataffordableprices,andwithoutlimitsonhowmuch data they use.” The CLEAR experience is similar to wi-fi but without the short-range limitations. CLEAR uses wireless 4G technology that differs from wi-fi because it provides service areas measured in miles, notfeet.CLEARalsooffersaveragemobiledownload speeds of 3 to 6 mbps with bursts over 10 mbps. Outside the CLEAR 4G service area, dual-mode 4G/3Gmodemskeepuserscontinuallyconnectedby leveraging Sprint’s 3G data network. With CLEAR, people can stay better con- nected and more productive. For example: • Atravellingbusinessexecutivenolongerneeds to seek out wi-fi hotspots or be constrained by the speeds and limitations of 3G modem cards; • A college student can now have affordable Internet service whether at home, on campus or on-the-go; • A commuter can now work on large files or stream their favorite shows while riding the bus or train; • A busy parent can now keep kids occupied studying or playing games in the back of the family minivan. Clearwire offers several ways to connect to CLEAR 4G service – via a modem, mobile device, or a 4G-embedded laptop or netbook. I tested out the CLEAR 4G+ Mobile USB on my MacBookPro.Isimplyplugged-inthecompactClear 4G+ Mobile USB into my laptop to get online. This dual-mode 4G/3G modem gives users access to the 4G network in the CLEAR coverage area and to 3G coverage nationwide. Thedeviceworkedseamlesslyafteraquicksoft- ware download. I never tapped into the 4G network andallofitsgoodness.The3Gwasworkingjustfine. This is a pretty simple solution to ensure Internet access. For more information, hit www.clear.com. I PLUG ‘N PLAYBy Jonathan Kersting, Associate Publisher [jkersting@pghtech.org] CLEAR 4G SERVICE MAKES INTERNET ACCESS EASY
  • 15. 16 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................FIRSTLooks PA NANO CENTER ANNOUNCES $980,000 IN AVAILABLE RESEARCH GRANTS The Pennsylvania NanoMaterials Commercialization Center (the Center) is issuing its largest request for proposals to accelerate the commercialization of nano-materials research. On November 1, 2010 the Center made available $980,000 in grant funds to Pennsylvania- based university researchers and small and large companies to support the development of innovative product ideas using advanced materials and nanotechnology. There are two categories of funding: $30,000 grants for fast-track pre-commercialization projects and $200,000 for full commercialization projects. The Center is a not-for-profit organization that has proven results in accelerating and supporting nanotechnology commercialization for new and enhanced products/processes critical to the U.S. economy and manufacturing base. To date, the Center has awarded more than $4 million to support the development of nanotechnology. The Center has developed a unique partnership model which encourages the proposing teams consisting of a combination of universities, small and/or large companies. This collaborative approach produces an innovative technology supported by a business development team with experience in the market, customer base and manufacturing; components necessary for commercial success. The Center will be hosting informational Webinars for the RFP. Visit the Web site, www.pananocenter.org, for more details. Submissions are due no later than January 28, 2011. CHEMIMAGE LAUNCHES GATEWAY ANALYTICAL Gateway Analytical, a new quality-focused analytical testing and consulting services company, opened its doors for business recently. Despite a weak economy, testing companies like Gateway Analytical are thriving, with an expected annual growth rate of 5.7 percent in the next five years according to a March 2010 IBISWorld report on U.S. laboratory testing services. ChemImage launched the company as a subsidiary. “Gateway Analytical fills a necessary niche out there—providing regulatory expertise in the face of increased government regulations on consumer, pharmaceutical and food products,” said David Exline, Senior Vice President of Gateway Analytical. BREAKING NEWS FROM P Get your tech news fresh off the grill Decades of Texas-based natural gas drilling expertise is being brought to Pennsylvania and the subterranean bonanza of the Marcellus Shale natural gas deposit. Lone Star to lodestar, one might say. At the forefront of this Texas tidal wave stands KW International, headquartered in Houston. Ken Wind, Founder and namesake of this 50-year-old family run firm brings third-generation expertise to his company. Son Kurt Wind, President and CEO, said the Marcellus Shale offers enormous potential for economic development and greater energy independence, and that's why their company has established a post here. "You're sitting on top of one of the hottest en- ergyplaysinthecountryinPennsylvania,"Windsaid. "Support services have been weak to this point, we saw an opportunity there, and there is a vast talent pool available in the region to draw from.” KW International sells, services, and manufac- turessurface-levelproduction/processingequipment for the part of the industry that operates above the surfaceonceoilandgashavebeenextractedthrough the well head. Examples of their products and serv- ices include: "sand traps" that filter out frac and for- mation sand extracted from natural gas; "slug catchers"thatprocessliquidcollectinginthepipeline; "separatorsandscrubbers”forentrained liquidsep- aration; “glycol dehydrators” to remove moisture in the gas stream; and a patented process to reduce or eliminate BTEX emissions to name a few. "Our goal is to bring the same high-caliber serv- ice to the Marcellus region as we have done in Texas for many years," Wind said. "We opened an office in West Mifflin last February, in the middle of that incredible snowstorm. We chose that particular location because it is geographically in the center of the Marcellus Shale territory, giving us the most efficient client accessibility." Themoststrikingvaluepropositionrepresented byKWInternationaltoitsMarcellus-basedclientsis the ability of its onsite staff to help their clients sort throughequipmentrentalandpurchaseoptions,then customizetheequipmenttotheclient'sspecificneeds andbudget.Thisissupportedfromthebiddingstage through startup by a seasoned team of engineers, sales, service and project managers. "Our company is known for its field-friendly designed equipment that is easy to operate and maintain," he noted. "One example that we will be introducing in the fourth quarter of 2010 is a modified version of the sand trap that's better equipped to filter out sand from the fracing process. It will be a lower profile, higher capacity, and more economicoptiontothecurrentequipmentofferedto the industry." Wind said his team in West Mifflin is eager to play a larger role in development of the Marcellus region – for economic reasons, naturally, but for a larger purpose at the same time. "There's enough natural gas in the region to provide energy for the country for more than 100 years. If we could get everyone on board and behind natural gas, it's real impact for the U.S. could be meaningful employment for thousands of the currently under- and unemployed – not just in the industry itself, but for the effect it would have on all facets of the economy." I KW INTERNATIONAL ESTABLISHES PITTSBURGH PRESENCE TO SERVICE MARCELLUS SHALE DRILLERS .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... By Tim Hayes, Contributing Writer
  • 16. eteq.pghtech.org 17 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................PULSE GET IN THE ZONE. HIT THE WALL. FIND YOUR FLOW. ALL ADMIRABLE AND PERSONALLY REWARDING STATES OF MIND. BUTEACHPALESWHENCOMPARED WITH JUNOON. “Junoon,” a Persian word with no English equivalent, describes a hypnotic zeal that drives ordinarypeopletoachieveextraordinarythings.It’s a state of healthy obsession toward achieving a high-impactgoalthatchangesnotonlythelifeofthe person at its center, but the lives of many others – and all for the better. Razi Imam, a highly successful entrepreneur, has devoted 12 years of research into the concept of Junoon and has published a new book titled “Driven” (Amazon) to explain it and offer ideas on how anyone can achieve this ideal state of thought, focus, purpose, achievement and impact. “I have been intrigued and puzzled as to why some people become so successful and others struggle so hard,” said Imam. “Education is a big piece of it, but it’s not all. What gives people this ability to achieve as they experience Junoon? They enter a state of pure inspiration where one can look at all aspects of a goal and see the plan that must be followed to reach it. “There is nothing unhealthy about this obses- sive focus,” he continued. “You are able to attract opportunities that move you closer to your extra- ordinary goal. You reach a metaphysical phase that protectsyoufromfatigueandillness,andthatkeeps your mental energy high. “Finally, Junoon brings you to a level of moral energy, where you have the ability to do the right thing in every instance, regardless of criticism or obstacles,” Imam said. “You stick to your moral principles and your commitment to achieve this goal. It is an extraordinary process, and one that I have experienced several times in my life.” Imam points to global icons such as Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, and Madam Curie as examples of those who have experienced Junoon, but stresses that anyone can tap into this font of intellectual, emotional and moral clarity with the proper direc- tionandencouragement.Forthatreason,heoffersa workshop to help people get into a state of Junoon. HislatestpracticaldemonstrationofJunoonin actioncomesthroughhisfirm113Industries,whose purpose is to build and sustain an “advanced materialscluster”forPittsburgh,centeredatthefor- mer Seagate facility in the Strip District. “We have a building right here, ready for im- mediate use, that is the best advanced materials re- search facility in North America – and it’s standing there empty,” he said. “At 113 Industries, we are working to attract advanced materials companies and support funding here to transform the region intoacenterofresearchandinnovation.Asthishap- pens,theeconomicbenefitscanbeverypowerfulas support and service providers come in, high-level talentlocatesherebecausetheyknowtherearemul- tipleemployers,andPittsburghcanbecomeabrand location for advanced materials.” I DRIVEN TO SUCCEED BNY MELLON RECEIVES EPA GREEN POWER LEADERSHIP AWARD BNY Mellon recently announced that it has received a 2010 Green Power Leadership Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The annual awards recognize the country’s leading green power purchasers for their commitment and contribution to helping advance the development of the nation’s voluntary green power market. BNY Mellon was one of only 10 organizations nationwide to receive a Leadership Award in the Green Power Purchase category. The award recognizes EPA Green Power Partners who distinguish themselves through purchases of green power from a utility green-pricing program, a competitive green marketer or a renewable energy certificate (REC) supplier. BNY Mellon purchases nearly 230 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green power annually, which is enough green power to meet more than 75 percent of the organization’s purchased electricity use in the United States. BNY Mellon is buying a utility green power product and RECs from NextEra Energy Resources and Pepco Energy Services for renewable energy projects in the United States that use wind and solar power to generate electricity without producing carbon dioxide or other harmful pollutants. Through the NextEra partnership, which represents a majority of BNY Mellon’s green investment to date, 100 percent of the revenue is directed to The EarthEra Renewable Energy Trust to build new facilities, accelerating the construction of renewable energy projects. BNY Mellon currently ranks #17 on EPA’s National Top 50 list. EPA updates its Top Partner Lists quarterly at www.epa.gov/greenpower/toplists. NEWTON CONSULTING NAMED TO PRESTIGIOUS INC. 5000 LIST Newton Consulting, LLC, an information technology and human resource management consulting services outfit, has been named to the prestigious Inc. 5000 list, a compendium of the most entrepre- neurial and fastest growing companies in America. “We are thrilled to have been named by Inc. magazine as one of the nation’s top entrepreneurial companies,” said Rick Newton, the company’s President and Founder. “Our company differentiates itself in the marketplace by our customer-focused, values-driven services and our unique shared ownership operating model that attracts and retains the top talent in the consulting industry,” he said. burgerITTSBURGH’S TECH SCENE every day at www.techburgher.com. .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... LOCAL TECH ENTREPRENEUR RAZI IMAM’S NEW BOOK DETAILS THE CONCEPT OF “JUNOON” WHAT GIVES PEOPLE THIS ABILITY TO ACHIEVE AS THEY EXPERIENCE JUNOON? THEY ENTER A STATE OF PURE INSPIRA- TION WHERE ONE CAN LOOK AT ALL ASPECTS OF A GOAL AND SEE THE PLAN THAT MUST BE FOLLOWED TO REACH IT. By Tim Hayes, Contributing Writer
  • 17. IN ADVANCE OF THIS YEAR’S ALWAYSON GOING GREEN SILICON VALLEY CONFERENCE, KPMG AND ALWAYSON SURVEYED LEADERS IN THE VENTURE CAPITAL COM- MUNITY ON SOME OF THE CRITICAL ISSUES FACING THE CLEANTECH SECTOR. BETWEEN THE ECONOMY, THE RECOVERY IN THE IPO MARKET, AND LOOMING TAX AND REGULATORY CHANGES, 2010 IS TURNING OUT TO BE AN INTERESTING YEAR FOR THE VENTURE CAPITAL COMMUNITY. Cleantech continues to be a key investment sector for venture capital, and our respondents see that trend continuing in the coming year. Similar to last year, 75 percent see a continued increase in cleantech investment next year compared to this year. When asked where that investment will focus, energy storage and effi- ciency led the list, just as in 2009. In terms of which U.S. geographies are going to see more investment, the West leads by a healthy margin with 64 percent followed by the Southwest (15 percent), the Northeast (12 percent) and the Midwest (9 per- cent). Outside of the U.S., Asia leads the pack with 57 percent of respondents list- ing it as the non-U.S. geography that will see more investment, followed by Europe at 24 percent. Transaction activity is starting to rebound, and VCs are bullish on prospects for that trend to continue. Sixty-eight percent expect an increase in M&A activity compared to more than 70 percent last year. Seventy-one percent of respondents predict an increase in IPOs in the next year; down a bit from last year’s 75 percent. When asked if this is going to be another investment bubble, 75 percent opti- mistically say no. In terms of the IPO market, 52 percent expect valuations to be about the same compared to the last two years and 29 percent expect higher val- uations. Government and public sector involvement last year was a key driver of clean- tech activity. Respondents are unsure how that will continue. Fifty-one percent expect further increases in cleantech funding from the federal government, re- gardless of the economy, and an additional 25 percent foresee an increase only if the economy improves. Public-private partnerships fill part of the gap in govern- ment backing, and our leaders see that growing. Eighty-eight percent of those sur- veyed envision a continued increase in public-private partnerships compared to 83 percent in 2009. In terms of other industry trends, 64 percent do not believe that cellulosic ex- traction for ethanol will be a success. Conversely, 59 percent expect algae-based fuels to be a commercial success. A majority of respondents (57 percent) believe that regulating C02 emissions will effectively mitigate global warming and 47 per- cent expect increased carbon-trading activity. Looking into their crystal ball re- garding oil prices, 67 percent of venture-capital leaders surveyed expect crude oil prices to close this year between $75 and $99 per barrel and 53 percent expect oil prices to peak after 2012. KPMG and AlwaysOn are excited about our involvement with the GoingGreen Silicon Valley conference. If you would like a full copy of the survey, please shoot me an email and I’ll get it out to you. I’d be happy to meet with you and discuss the results of this survey. I 18 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL B Y T O M M O O N E Y, K P M G T M O O N E Y @ K P M G . C O M VC INVESTMENT IN CLEANTECH WILL CONTINUE TO INCREASE CLEANTECH CONTINUES TO BE A KEY INVESTMENT SECTOR FOR VENTURE CAPITAL, AND OUR RESPONDENTS SEE THAT TREND CONTINUING IN THE COMING YEAR. SIMILAR TO LAST YEAR, 75 PERCENT SEE A CONTINUED INCREASE IN CLEANTECH INVESTMENT NEXT YEAR COMPARED TO THIS YEAR. WHEN ASKED WHERE THAT IN- VESTMENT WILL FOCUS, ENERGY STORAGE AND EF- FICIENCY LED THE LIST, JUST AS IN 2009. BUSINESS Advisor ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
  • 18. eteq.pghtech.org 19 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... BUSINESS Intelligence CREATING VALUE STARTS WITH STRATEGIC THINKING BY GREG STEFFINE SDLC PARTNERS This is the fifth article in a continuing series on business intelligence and value creation. Thane Yost once wrote, "The will to win is use- less if you don’t have the will to prepare.” Strat- egy is all about preparation. It’s the cornerstone of an effective and sustainable business intelli- gence (BI) competency and a mission-critical piece of your requirements-gathering effort. That’swhyit’sthefoundationoftheRightThink- ing™ Model. Strategy’s function is to guide and direct all BI-related activity so that short-term decisionsarealwaysinalignmentwithlong-term objectives.Strategyfocusesneededattentionon the “big picture.” Alvin Toffler, the American writer and futurist recognized by Accenture as one of the world's top business thought leaders, writes about the concept of “big picture” thinking. "You've got to think about big things while you are doing small things,” says Toffler, “so that all of the small things go in the right direction." That's particularly true in the world of business intelligence where organizations often deploy tactical, uncoordinated solutions in order to eliminate pressing business pain. Not a preferred approach, but one that certainly reflects the kind of demanding, fast-paced business climate that pres- suresdecision-makerstocreateandmaximizevalue as quickly as possible. Thing is, these tactical solu- tionsoftengrowtomission-criticalapplications.It’s only through an appropriate strategy that organiza- tionscaneffectivelyintegratetheseinformationsilos into a unified and sustainable business intelligence capability. Those that fail to adequately plan ulti- mately pay the price. Gartner analyst Betsy Burton predictsthatcompanieswithoutacohesiveBIstrat- egy spend upwards of 70 percent of their total BI budgetresolvingissuesaroundpeople,processand technology resulting from poor planning. Theprimaryreasonyoupreparebeforeyoude- liver is to help future-proof your work effort. Peter Drucker puts it best when he says, "Strategic think- ingdoesnotdealwithfuturedecisions.Itdealswith the futurity of present decisions [emphasis mine]." In other words, do the up-front work necessary to ensure today's decisions have future life. Thinking strategically helps you to "do it once, do it right, and make it last.” Aspirational Modeling (figure 1) is the tech- nique I use to flesh-out strategic requirements around BI. It’s a “big picture” look at where you are today (point A), where you want to be tomorrow (point B), and how you intend to move your busi- ness in order to create value for your constituent groups. As you can see from the diagram, a lot of atten- tion is given to understanding your organization’s current operating model. That’s because there’s no such thing as a “one size fits all” BI strategy, and nothing beats real-world insight into how decision- makersinyourparticularcompanycurrentlyuse(or can’t use) business intelligence to create value. As- pirational Modeling is used in conjunction with The Right Thinking Model to focus attention on BI com- petenciesandrelatedcapabilitiesmostimportantto long-term BI success (figure 2). Here’s an overview of the components: BI Competency: People People represent an organization's greatest source of competitive advantage. This competency focuses on improving the performance of human capital in order to maximize BI-driven value creation. People Capability: Organizational Planning BI-savvy organizations establish a company-wide respect for fact-based decision-making and they build a leadership structure to encourage and support it. Organizational planning guides strategic thinking around culture, leadership, and your people roadmap for BI. People Capability: Performance Management Smart organizations evolve. They leverage strengths, strengthen weaknesses, and build value- impactingintellectualcapitalbyhiring,training,and retaining the right people. Performance manage- ment guides strategic thinking around skill assess- ment, recruiting and retaining, and training and development. BI Competency: Process For BI to work, data must be relevant, information mustbemeaningful,andinsightmustbeactionable. Thiscompetencyfocusesonthepracticesthatmake data an invaluable enterprise asset. Process Capability: Information Planning Smart organizations effectively use right informa- tion to create value. Information planning guides strategic thinking around the organization’s busi- ness plan for BI, its strategy map, and performance measures. .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. [continued on pg. 34] (figure 1) (figure 2)
  • 19. 20 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................OFF THE Shelf thatanuclearbombhasbeenplacedsomewhereinPittsburgh. You have 24 hours to locate it, and the terrorist's only clue is “YouTubeDoubleRainbowVideo.” You'rehappytohaveaclue, but what does it mean? WHAT DOES IT MEAN!?!? Until recently you weren't able to watch YouTube videos at work because the Adobe Flash plugin is banned at the FBI. However, YouTube recently started encoding its videos in an open format that can be played in browsers that support HTML5.WithoutFlash,you'renowabletowatchthevideo,find thebomb,andsavethecity.Pittsburghisreleasedfromthegrip of terror, and more importantly the Web is freed from the bur- den of having to install Adobe Flash. (This is just one of many reasons why HTML5 will kill Flash. Huzzah!) Offline Web Applications Imagine you're a cancer researcher. Now imagine you're on a train. Now imagine you're on a laptop pouring over the results of an experiment and you stumble across a cure for all cancers. This is a big deal. You fire up a Web-based email app to share the exciting news with colleagues, typing with excitement for an hour. Just before you click “send” the train enters a 30-mile tunnel, dropping your Internet connection. Did I mention your laptop only has two minutes of battery left? Did I mention you suffer from a rare condition known as Tunnel-Induced Mem- ory Loss? That's right, you're about to forget the cure to cancer becauseofthesameconditionthatcausesPittsburgherstofor- get how to drive when they enter a tunnel. Fortunately, your Web-based email takes advantage of HTML5'sofflineWebcapabilities.HTML5allowsWebpagesto behave like desktop software, only occasionally needing to dial intoaserver.Itworkslikethis:WhenyoulostyourInternetcon- nection inside the tunnel, the Web page saved your email to a local database within your Web browser. Even though a dead battery is about to shut off the computer, the next time you ac- cess your webmail it will scan your browser's database for un- sent messages. The email will be delivered and cancer will be cured. Huzzah! Microdata In an act of planetary revenge, an asteroid has knocked Pluto out of orbit and onto a deadly path towards Earth. Our only hope of survival lies in the hands of Bruce Willis who in 1998 proved that Earth could be saved from such disasters with nu- clearbombs,Hollywoodmagic,andthesacrificeofBruceWillis. Conveniently, Jack Bauer has a spare bomb he just found in Pittsburgh,sonowwejustneedtogiveMr.Willisacall.Justone problem: nobody has Bruce's number. Finding somebody on the Web used to be difficult. If you were looking for a Susan Smith living in Seattle, searching for “Susan Smith Seattle” would return pages for people named HTML5 is soon to be the new standard for building Web pages. Although the specification isn't finalized yet, many Web browsers al- ready support parts of this next generation of HTML. To demonstrate its power, here are some hypothetical examples of how HTML5 could save the world. Video (Without Flash) Imagine your name is Jack Bauer and you've just learned HTML5 SAVES THE WORLD - HUZZAH! BY MICHAEL RIGHI, FIELD EXPERT, INC. MICHAEL.RIGHI@FIELDEXPERT.COM continued on pg. 34
  • 20. eteq.pghtech.org 21 KEEPING PUBLICITY REVVED FOR PRODUCT LAUNCH FYOUWANTTOLEARNHOWTOGENER- ATE PUBLICITY FOR YOUR STARTUP, THERE’S NO SHORTAGE OF EXPERTS PROFFERING ADVICE ON THE INTER- NET. GOOGLE THE WORDS “PUBLICITY” AND“STARTUP,”ANDUPPOPTHOU- SANDSOFLINKSTHATPROMISETO MAKE YOU A MEDIA STAR IN A FEW EASY STEPS. Assuming the advice is sound and your execution is flawless, you’ll quickly be flush with customer, media and investor inquiries.Success.You’resettosell. But what happens when the media blitzrollsoutbeforeyourproductorservice is ready to follow suit? What happens if Murphy’s Law proves true and the launch that was sup- posedtohappenyesterdaygetsdelayedaweek,amonth…or longer?Orwhatdoyoudoonthoserare,seeminglyheaven- sent occasions when the media machine appears without everevenbeingsummoned? Whatcanseemlikeawindfall ofacclaimandattentioncanturnintoanightmarishmissed opportunityifthepublicisreadyforyourproduct,butyour product’snotreadyforthepublic. Asitis,these“whatifs”happenfairlyoften.Mostpub- licity occurs in short spikes, with a news event or a hot re- view of your product setting off a loud bang before dissi- patingintomediasilence. Part of the solution to this problem is averaging out thesharpdropbetweenpublicityhighsandlowsbycreating a media buzz that you manage. A judi- ciousflowofsubstantivepressreleases, blog posts and tweets can generate a steadyhumaboutyourbusiness.When unexpected media attention hits, you can funnel the news through the com- municationschannelsyou’vealreadyes- tablished,creatingarippleeffectthatyou cancapitalizeonovertimeratherthana disruptive splash that comes and goes with no gain. RebeccaGaynierisFounderandCEOofiTwixie,aB2B company that helps ’tween-girl-focused organizations and companies to develop better products and messaging for their target consumer. Her background as a Madison Avenueadvertisingexecutivetaughthertheimportanceof bothgeneratingpublicityandmaximizingitsusefulnessby increasingitslongevity. “Publicitynotonlycreatesanawarenessofyourcom- pany, but just as importantly, establishes your credibility andvalidatestheintegrityofyourproduct.It’sanobjective, thirdpartyendorsementyoucanleveragetogenerateleads, attractbusinesspartnersandinciteinterestfrominvestors,” saysGaynier. Recently, Gaynier’s iTwixie Web site, which is tagged “the ultimate hangout for ‘tween girls,” was named one of Disney’s FamilyFun Magazine's top 10 Web sites for kids. Whenshereceivedthenewsshedidtwoverysavvythings. Firstshedelayeddroppingthepressreleaseforthree weeks after Disney published the news. She did this to spawnasecond,moretargetedPRcampaigntoconnectdi- rectlywiththekid-orientedmediaoutletsthatreachheres- tablishedandpotentialcustomers,partnersandadvocates. Second,shefollowedupwithasteadystreamoftweets and Facebook posts, creating a viral effect that cascaded throughhernetworkofcontactsandtookonalifeofitsown. Gaynier believes that harnessing that initial media spark is an opportunity to “warm up the world to who you are as a company and what you have to offer. It allows you to fine-tune your message and engage inquiring minds in waysthatpulltheminandkeepthemcomingback.” Whileyoumightnotbeabletocontrolwhenpublicity strikes, with some planning, prep work and patience, you canbuytimeanddetermineyourselfwhentostepuptothe podium with product in hand.I I BY MIKE MATESIC, CEO, IDEA FOUNDRY ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... START Me Up
  • 21. 22 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL ECorner .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... HOW DOES THIS SOUND TO YOU ...? • He was fired from the Kansas City Star newspaper because his work “lacked creativity.” •Helosthisfirstbusinessandallofhisemployeesbecause he neglected to read the fine print in his contract. • Only two of his employees stayed with him through the tough times -- two employees and his brother, that is -- the rest were hired away by a competitor because he failed to legally arrest their movement. •Afterenjoyingsomesmalldegreeofsuccess,herewarded his parents with a new home. Unfortunately, the home he purchased had a defective heating and ventilation system, causing him to lose his dear mother to carbon monoxide poisoning. He went to his own grave feeling personally responsible for this tragedy. GO LEFT, YOUNG MANBY RON MORRIS, CONTRIBUTING WRITER For those of you (like me) who study the great entrepreneurs, you may have already figured out that the individual I’m describing here is WalterEliasDisney,quitepossiblythegreatest non-scientistentrepreneurinthehistoryofthis great country. Why Disney? Simple. Because I’m writing this column while with my family at Disney World; his “touch” is everywhere. You can hardly not think of him. Moreover,Waltwouldhavebeenproudof the fact that my family is with me while I’m workingonthisarticlebecauseitwashisbelief that “family is everything.” In his own words, “The most important thing is the family. After all, family is the backbone of our whole busi- ness.” IknewverylittleaboutW.E.Disneywhen my family and I recently traveled from Pittsburgh for a four-day mini-vacation to the Magic Kingdom. Oh, I knew that he was the driving force behind the magnificent Walt Disney Corporation (magnificent then, not necessarily now, unfortunately), but I never reallystudiedthemanhimself.And,neitherdid I study the events in his life that propelled him to the great successes he achieved. Entrepreneursareatough-mindedbunch. And here, I’m talking about the real ones –not the,“Lookatme,I’manentrepreneur,too”–as theyacceptandthenburnmillionsofdollarsin start-up capital – kind. Mydefinitionofanentrepreneurissome- one who lights out armed with nothing more than his or her wits and courage. I’m talking abouttheindividualswho,andwhentheymeet adversity,instead“findaway”tosucceed.Lose all your employees? This too shall pass. Get cheated out of your trademarked character? Re-invent another, better one. All these things and more happened to Walt Disney. I Finish reading and comment on this article atRonMorris’Website:TAEradio.com/TEQ. © Copyright, Ron Morris 2010, All Rights Re- served
  • 22. eteq.pghtech.org 23 obodywantstobesoldto.Instead, they want to buy from us if we solve their problems. In order to truly understand a prospective customer'sproblems,we’ve gottotalktothem.Well,not talk “to” them, but talk “with” them...openly. Side note: One of my fa- voritesalesrules:“Remember, you have two ears and one mouth; spend twice as much time listening as talking.” (Frankly, 10-to-1 would be even better, but how much of this behavior can you really expect from extroverts?) The goal of the conversation is to discover yourprospect's“pain.”Beforetheywillsharethat, you will have to establish rapport. With rapport, you have the opportunity to build trust. With trust, you have the opportunity to make a sale. Social media helps you establish rapport in so many ways; just pick your favorite. Rapport building idea #1: Before meeting with any new prospect, review their LinkedIn profile to identify potential connection points. Look for a shared college, hobby, sport, past em- ployer, industry association, professional ac- quaintance, or almost anything else (avoiding, say, shared for- mer spouses and the like). I was speaking to a CEO group in Baltimore this sum- mer when one CEO asked to share his story. His company had been trying to crack a key account, making no headway over many years. Finally, the CEO reviewed the decision maker's LinkedIn profile and discovered that he’d played lacrosse in college. Using email, he asked his sales staff if any of them had played college lacrosse. Ka-Ching! It took a few weeks for that salesperson to connect live with the prospect. Yet, in a “surpris- ing” twist, the topic of college lacrosse surfaced less than 30 seconds into the call; imagine that. It broke the ice, established rapport, and after lots more hard work led to the ultimate sale. Rapport building idea #2: When communicating morebroadly,aculturaltouchstonecanprovideanequally effective connection point. In his “Randy’s Journal” blog, Boeing(specificallyRandy)cleverlyriffedonthe20than- niversaryofthemovie“BacktotheFuture”toexplorethe past and future of the airline industry. Like Michael J. Fox (a.k.a.MartyMcFly),Randytraveledbackintimebytrack- ingdownBoeing’s20-yearforecastforpassengerairmiles from 1952. Then he went back to the future, showing Boe- ing's latest 20-year forecast. I call this framing. If airline industry insiders start to seethatsamefuture,it’sasafebetthatthey’remorelikely to favor Boeing planes over Airbus. Rapportbuildingidea#3:Currentevents,especially anythingthat’scaughtyourtargetaudience’simagination, can provide another powerful connection point. In January of this year, a hiker on Yosemite Bear Mountainhappenedupona"fullondoublerainbowallthe way across the sky." We could hear but not see this guy as he trained his camera on the rainbow and moved to a vista to better capture the entire view. To say that he was incrediblyenthusiasticorunbelievablystoned...orboth...is an understatement. ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... INTERActive N INCREASE REVENUES BY ESTABLISHING RAPPORT – SOCIAL MEDIA CAN HELP [continued on pg. 34] BY DAVE NELSEN, CONTRIBUTING WRITER
  • 23. 24 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................COMMUNITY Cause The mission of the Refresh Kittan- ning Project is to ignite and advo- cate economic growth amongst businesses in Kittanning, Pa. The group created a Web site, www.re- freshkittanning.com, in which peo- ple can share ideas on how to make the community better. Each month there will be a new featured topic that focuses on economic develop- ment. The group hopes to use the collective power and talents of the community to improve upon and promote the advantages of their community to the world. Theinitialtopicaskswhattypeof businesses community members would like to see in town. The group expects to see a wide array of ideas, rangingfrommassiveundertakingsto simple suggestions. They can then take that feedback and ask local busi- nessesaboutexpandingintothatarea. They also hope entrepreneurs who visit the site will see a need and be in- spired to invest in the community. While they assume the majority of people would like to see a large inno- vative company such as Apple or Google open up a local office, the grouphasnoproblemstartingsmall— as one job created is better than none. The concept is pretty simple and is hoped to work as follows. They expect the site to receive a lot of ideas on each topic, but hope to find reoccurring trends or needs within the responses. For exam- ple, if many people in the community would like to see a coffee shop open, the group will take that feedback to current local businessesandseeiftheywouldbein- terested opening one. They could also use the data to target a national chain or ask a similar existing shop in the region to consider opening another branch. Another option that group hopes for is that someone reading the site with entrepreneurial ambitions may see a clear need and consider investing in the community. The Web site has a few other featuresforbusinesses,whichinclude a free directory listing and a commer- cial property listing. Local businesses can also submit news or announce- ments to the site. This site is not only about attracting new businesses, it’s alsoabouthelpingcurrentbusinesses succeed. Kittanning is a very scenic town located on the banks of the Allegheny River. Residents are able to enjoy the best of both worlds. The town is sur- rounded by many outdoor activities, but is only a short commute from the centerofPittsburgh.Inaddition,there are many universities and technical schools of all distinctions within an hour’sdrivefromtown.Beingacounty seat also helps create traffic in town. The low cost of living and low cost of doing business is very advantageous for businesses. You don’t have to be a resident to share your ideas—all ideas are welcomed.Anyonewithentrepreneur aspirations is strongly encouraged to regularly check the site as they might find a great opportunity. I REFRESH KITTANNING AIMS TO INSPIRE GROWTH AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN SWPA TOWNTAKE ACTION! This quaint town is looking for ideas: www.refreshkittanning.com!
  • 24. eteq.pghtech.org 25 Your logo is not your brand. Neither is your slogan, product name(s) or company name. However, these elements are a part of your brand and branding itself (the term) has caused quite a bit of confusion in many businesscircles. Keepthisarticlehandy if you ever need clarification. Clearing up the confusion: Branding 101 After working with technology companies forover15years,wesee“branding”isalltoo often confused with a number of business elementsthatareapartofthebrandbutnot “thebrand.” What is not a brand? To understand what a brand is, let us first establish what it is not. Your logo, trade- mark,companyname,productname,serv- icename,mark,sound,etc.areallelements ofthebrand–notthebranditself. Let’sset these aside and consider them “brand ele- ments.” What is a brand? Branding incorporates the brand elements thatworktogethertoformabrandconcept. Brands are managed as a part of a brand strategy and their value depicted by the phrase “brand equity.” Next, brand posi- tioning and leveraging are branding man- agement approaches. Finally, the identity, image,personality,essenceorsoul,charac- terandculturearethebrandcomponents. Allofthebrandelementswetypically find people confused by normally fit into one of these components. Essentially, brandingistheresultofthecombinationof all elements that create the brand, brand perception,andbrandawareness. In plain English, please? Try to see branding as a “prejudice” for or againstsomething. Wikipedia says: “Abrand is the personality that identifies a product, service or company (name, term, sign, symbol, or design, or combination of them)andhowitrelatestokeyconstituen- cies: Customers, Staff, Partners, Investors, etc.” When asked to define Apple’s brand, Steve Jobs said their brand answers this question:“WhoisAppleandwhatwestand for in the world?” and that their brand needstohelpthemstandoutinaverynoisy world. He went on to define their brand as their “core value” which all of their brand componentssupport:“Appleatthecore,its core value, is that we believe that people with passion can change the world for the better.” Everything they create supports thatidea. When asked to define Nike’s brand it still shocks me how many people say “It’s the Swoosh!” or “Just Do It!” In reality, Nike’s brand is much simpler. It is “athlet- ics.” WhenyouthinkNike,theywantyouto think “athletics.” When you put those shoes on or those basketball shorts on – yougofromJohnDoe(orJane)toJohn(or Jane) Athlete. It is an instant metamor- phosis that occurs simply by veiling your- self in the company’s brand. The brand aspirationissostrongthattheyexpectyou toplayharder,runfasterandthrowfurther simply because of what you feel when you wearthisname. Building your brand Again,brandingbeginswithastrategy. For moreinformationonabrandstrategy,stay tunedtofutureWhyItWorksarticles.I RickCancelliere(rick@ivegotnerve.com)is PresidentofNerveMarketing,Pittsburgh’s marketing specialist for the medical and technology sectors. Nerve develops and implements marketing strategies, campaigns, Web sites and hosted applications for medical and other technologycompanies. BRANDING 101By Rick Cancelliere, President, Nerve Marketing ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ WHY IT Works
  • 25. Translation by Echo International [www.echointernational.com]26 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL s a region, as a city, we continue to hear from the tech community, par- ticularly startups, that we are not an entrepreneurial place to create or grow a tech business. We hear that it is difficult to attract investors of varying levels of need. We also hear that there is a need for talent in areas of technical expertise, as well as seasoned leadership, which are required to rapidly position and grow amazing ideas and solutions into vital (and viable) companies. Now I could tell you, in detail, all the companies who are thriving (you recall, we did have Tech 50 in October, which demonstrated all the com- panies who ARE growing and have received in- vestment). Instead, I propose that what we need as a region is to embrace the practice of tolerance and inclusion. Giving birth to a business is not a one-person job. As one colleague reminds me, “It takes a vil- lage to start a company.” It does. It takes a ton of time to ensure community engagement on the part of the new CEO and their team. It requires the abil- ity of a new CEO to push against the odds of deliv- ering or designing their product or service while working to understand the inner workings of op- erations while simultaneously selling. Selling to customers, pitching to investors, selecting em- ployees, figuring out leases, realizing the need for insurance, making payroll, working with an ac- countant, finding legal support, protecting I.P., dis- covering partnerships, reviewing contracts, solving people issues, and keeping abreast with the competitive market are just some of the variables of launching a business. This work is NOT for the faint-hearted! This work is grueling as well as ex- hilarating. This work consumes one’s life. This work is not to be taken lightly. There is no such thing as work-life balance for a very long time. Today, 85 percent of all jobs in the U.S. are in small businesses. This is our future. We actually have no choice but to embrace small businesses! So what can we do to help these companies, in par- ticular, tech companies, to thrive? 1. If you know someone who is taking an idea and bringing it to fruition, ask how you can help. Perhaps you can collaborate on an idea or with a customer. 2. Our region’s multinational corporations with headquarters here in SWPA – open your procure- ment to these newly launched businesses. Let them beta test in areas that would provide value and limit business risk. Be an ambassador for their business. REBRANDING PITTSBURGH [PART 7] A FROMTHEPRESIDENT BY AUDREY RUSSO, PRESIDENT AND CEO, PITTSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL
  • 26. eteq.pghtech.org 27 CHANGING OUR ENTREPRENEURIAL CULTURE 3. When you discover a business has not taken hold and the CEO has dissolved the business only to start another one – celebrate their resiliency and realize they are driven and will learn from their previous business. (In other re- gions of the country, entrepreneurs are revered for taking these risks and venture capitalists often look at this process as talent development.) 4. Pittsburgh has finally been able to hold a positive net migration, with some data pointing to our increase of young (25-34) people who are highly educated (college degree). Remembering that small businesses provide 85 percent of all jobs nationally, Pittsburgh HAS to ensure the creation of small businesses to ensure our talent remains here, the retention will attract others of like minds and interests. 5. We have the best and brightest people studying at our universities. Students in science and technology are more likely to leave the region after graduation than any other discipline. People who obtain secondary degrees are even more likely to leave the region. Our universities attract diverse populations, which does not mirror SWPA’s popu- lation. If we can keep the educated population, our edu- cated workforce will also reflect more diversity. (CORO 2001) 6. Encouraging attraction of diverse populations means we have to be inclusive, and tolerant of differences. People who start new businesses, particularly tech companies, seek access to the best and brightest talent. This is a cir- cuitous process that only accelerates when there is growth. 7. Angels, I know you are out there. In order to have a thriving entrepreneurial culture, we need to have healthy, robust angel networks. We need more of you to understand what these companies are working on, in addition to your wisdom and investment. So Pittsburgh, what do you say? At the Council, we work hard for our members to make sure they are connected with business opportunities across the regional, national and international ecosystem. We know that the next ren- aissance has begun, as tech companies forge the path. We also know that this will not happen without the region look- ing ahead not behind. We are not a gray, dirty region any- more. That’s a memory. We are NOW paving the road, where few, if any, U.S. cities, have traveled. Keep Pittsburgh entrepreneurial. I TODAY, 85 PERCENT OF ALL JOBS IN THE U.S. ARE IN SMALL BUSINESSES. THIS IS OUR FUTURE. WE ACTUALLY HAVE NO CHOICE BUT TO EMBRACE SMALL BUSINESSES! SO WHAT CAN WE DO TO HELP THESE COMPANIES, IN PAR- TICULAR, TECH COMPANIES, TO THRIVE? FROMTHEPRESIDENT
  • 27. 28 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL PUBLICPOLICY CAN GOVERNOR-ELECT CORBETT TRANSFORM STATE GOVERNMENT? B Y B R I A N K E N N E D Y, V P O F G O V E R N M E N T A F F A I R S , P I T T S B U R G H T E C H N O L O G Y C O U N C I L SHORTLY AFTER PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA’S ELECTION TO THE PRESI- DENCY, HIS NEWLY APPOINTED CHIEF OF STAFF, RAHM EMANUEL WAS QUOTED AS SAYING “RULE NUMBER ONE: NEVER ALLOW A CRISIS TO GO TO WASTE...THEY ARE OPPORTUNITIES TO DO BIG THINGS.” In Pennsylvania, where our budget deficit easily may exceed $5 billion in the coming months, and with Governor-Elect Tom Corbett who has made an iron clad promise to avert any form of a tax increase, Pennsylvania will be hard pressed to go on doing business as usual. In- deed, now is the time for us to require “big things” from our policymakers. The opportunity, both from a political and circumstantial perspec- tive, has never been greater. To be sure, in the next couple of months, leaders from the General Assembly will try to maneuver according to their historical roles. A large group of legislators will call for higher busi- ness taxes in order to avert what they will declare “draconian” reductions in key services. Other leg- islators - emboldened by public outrage over government spending - will enthusiastically sup- port reductions in government services as a means of avoiding higher taxes and future deficits. But eventually, even the most emboldened of fiscal hawks will find them self lamenting the loss of a particular government investment. After all, governments do exist to perform cer- tain key functions. With a budget deficit that is approaching 20 percent of the state’s overall budget, even the most core government services will be imperiled. Writing about this topic, David Brooks re- cently published an insightful op-ed in The New York Times (Paralysis of the State) that lamented the inability of governments to meet their obli- gations and to do what he labeled as “big things.” He placed the blame for this squarely at the feet of public sector unions and their patron law- makers who have purposefully blunted the abil- ity of governments to be innovative and nimble. In a state like Pennsylvania that has done absolutely nothing transformative during the past 20 years, the need for innovation and gov- ernment reinvention calls out like an American auto company for a government bailout. In Pennsylvania, some legislators know that they support government spending for key serv- ices, but I suspect that some have forgotten why: for their constituents who use the services, or for the benefit of the public sector unions that deliver the services? For legislators that fancy themselves as champions for particular government services, this is a key question that must be answered dur- ing the coming debates. If we are innovative, and if there are no sacred cows, service reductions are not inevitable. What is needed in Pennsylvania is a com- plete reinvention of government, where leaders of both parties reach consensus on what services are “core” and then set-out to identify the most effective means of delivering those services. Obviously, this sounds like a simple concept. But in Pennsylvania, we often prioritize the de- livery mechanism of government services over the actual delivery of the service. The good news for Corbett is that there are millions of Pennsylvanians that will support his efforts to reinvent state government from the ground up. In the technology industry, this is ex- actly the type of challenge that excites entrepre- neurs and innovators. In addition to the obvious technological innovations that members of the Pittsburgh Technology Council can offer, they also live in our communities and have a vested interest in the success of the state. Hopefully, and with the assistance of the Pittsburgh Technology Council, these entrepre- neurs will look at the current crisis as an oppor- tunity to reinvest in Pennsylvania’s future. Our organization looks forward to working with Cor- bett’s transition team and towards connecting his organization with our region’s best and brightest. We all look forward to having a more nim- ble and effective government. I THE GOOD NEWS FOR CORBETT IS THAT THERE ARE MILLIONS OF PENNSYLVANIANS THAT WILL SUPPORT HIS EFFORTS TO REINVENT STATE GOVERN- MENT FROM THE GROUND UP. IN THE TECHNOLOGY INDUS- TRY, THIS IS EXACTLY THE TYPE OF CHALLENGE THAT EXCITES ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS. IN ADDITION TO THE OBVIOUS TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS THAT MEMBERS OF THE PITTSBURGH TECH- NOLOGY COUNCIL CAN OFFER, THEY ALSO LIVE IN OUR COMMUNITIES AND HAVE A VESTED INTEREST IN THE SUCCESS OF THE STATE.
  • 28. eteq.pghtech.org 29
  • 29. 30 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL STEMTALENT By Justin Driscoll, Director, STEM Talent Acquisition [jdriscoll@pghtech.org] THE PITTSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUN- CIL IS WORKING HARD ON BEHALF OF OUR MEMBER COMPANIES TO FIND TOP TECHNOLOGY TALENT FROM ACROSS THE NATION TO WORK IN LOCAL TECH- NOLOGY COMPANIES. Over the past several weeks,Ihavespentalotoftimetravelingthecoun- try visiting job fairs at leading computer science and engineering universities looking for great tal- ent to relocate to Pittsburgh. During the month of September, I was on 12 different flights visiting 10 differentcollegesanduniversities. Attheseevents wecameacrosssomegreattalentfromuniversities likeGeorgiaTech,Duke,MIT,PennState,andmany more who are looking for internships or full-time jobs. Manyofthesestudentswerenotawareofthe technology opportunities that are available in the Pittsburgh region. I spent the most of my time ed- ucating these students about how Pittsburgh has changed and pontificating the virtues of the great companies that exist in our region and finally why they need to come here to work, play and live! I was encouraging candidates to visit the Council’s Career Connector Web site (www.pgh- careerconnector.com) since it averages well over 1,000 open opportunities. About 500 of our mem- ber companies use the site on a yearly basis. Over the last 12 months, the site has been visited about 500,000 times. It is a great resource for any com- pany looking to find top technology talent to relo- cate here to Pittsburgh Ifyourcompanyisintheprocessofrecruiting talent,wehaveabout500resumesfromacrossthe country and across the Pittsburgh region that you might be interested in perusing. If you would like access to them, send me an email with “Out-of- town resumes” in the subject line, jdriscoll@pghtech.org. I will be happy to provide. As 2010 winds down and 2011 cranks up, the Council will continue to ensure that our member companies have access to the best computer sci- ence and engineering talent by visiting pockets of the country where these pools of candidates cur- rentlyexist. Wewillalsocontinuetoformpartner- ships with other economic development organizations that are interested in bringing the best talent the nation has to offer to our three rivers. I CONNECT WITH THE BEST TECH TALENT THROUGH THE PITTSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL DURING THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER, I WAS ON 12 DIFFERENT FLIGHTS VISITING 10 DIFFERENT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES. AT THESE EVENTS WE CAME ACROSS SOME GREAT TALENT FROM UNIVERSITIES LIKE GEORGIA TECH, DUKE, MIT, PENN STATE, AND MANY MORE WHO ARE LOOKING FOR INTERNSHIPS OR FULL TIME JOBS. MANY OF THESE STUDENTS WERE NOT AWARE OF THE TECHNOLOGY OPPORTUNITIES THAT ARE AVAIL- ABLE IN THE PITTSBURGH REGION.
  • 30. eteq.pghtech.org 31 COUNCILBIZ-DEV One of the most difficult tasks I am charged with as a member of the member services team here at the Council is finding creative new ways to encourage business-to-business interaction with a hopeful result of business growth. For manufacturers, this task is espe- cially daunting, mainly because these individ- uals are often highly sought-after at networking events. This is perhaps the most difficult hurdle to overcome when planning a networkingopportunity- convincingamanu- facturer who doesn’t want to be “sold to” to come out and network. In an attempt to create something that man- ufacturers would not only find valuable, but also wouldbeabletousetomakethosecoveted“busi- ness-to-business”connections,AMNcreatedthe ExploretheFloorseries,atourofamanufacturing company - with teeth. How does it differ from every other site tour? Prior to the excursion, the host company provides attendees with an overview of a particular aspect of their business, their process and/or their company philosophy and here’s the kicker: it’s only open to manufac- turing firms. By limiting attendance to manufac- turers only, the threat of being targeted as the sought-after“redmeat”iseliminated.Itallowsat- tendees to let their hair down, network with their peers and, most importantly, get inside the doors of another plant to potentially learn something new. What’s the best thing that has come out of the series? The companies in attendance often connect with other companies and create busi- nessrelationshipswithoneanotherthatoftenre- sult in utilizing each other’s networks down the road to connect with a highly sought-after client. “I try to attend every Explore the Floor that my schedule permits,” says Dave Spehar, Direc- tor of Operations for the California-based Penna- tronics. “Manufacturing products always presentschallenges,andsomeofthosechallenges are universal regardless of industry. Seeing how othermanufacturershandlethosechallenges,in- novate solutions, and create value for their cus- tomersisveryhelpfultomeandourorganization. Also, I’ve connected with other companies who havehelpedopendoorsforuswithpotentialnew customers.” The AMN has sold out nearly all of the re- gionallyheldExploretheFloors,mostrecentlyon November 16 at United States Steel Corporation. The next Explore the Floor is planned for Mine Safety Appliances in March. Over the lifespan of the series, the AMN has taken the show on the road, transporting a group of 30 manufacturers on a charter plane to Cater- pillar in Peoria, Illinois, in April as well as Lincoln Electric in Cleveland, Ohio in [September]. An- otherout-of-stateExploretheFloorisplannedfor the spring of 2011, and it’s one you won’t want to miss. (Hint: this one also includes a chartered plane ride!) For more information regarding the ExploretheFloorseries,contactJenniferYoung at jyoung@pghtech.org. I EXPLORE THE FLOOR: B2B Business Development for Manufacturers Only By Jennifer Young, Managing Director, Advanced Manufacturing Network & Green Technology Network [jyoung@pghtech.org]
  • 31. 32 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL MEMBERS LIST INCLUDES NEW AND RENEWED MEMBERS THROUGH 10/31/10. COMPANIES THAT JOINED OR RENEWED AFTER THIS DATE WILL BE INCLUDED IN THE NEXT ISSUE. 3 Rivers IT Solutions, LLC 3 Park St Charleroi, PA 15022 www.3riversitsolutions.com 412-217-7330 Adecco 2 Gateway Center, Ste A Pittsburgh, PA 15222 www.adeccousa.com 412-261-0304 Allegheny Investment Strategies LLC 5539 Raleigh St Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-422-7435 Allsteel, Inc. 346 Tampa Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15228 www.allsteeloffice.com 412-715-5108 Applied Sciences Group 4455 Genesee St Buffalo, NY 14225 www.appliedsciencesgroup.com 716-626-5100 Bike Pittsburgh, Inc. 3410 Penn Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15201 www.bike-pgh.org 412-726-5872 Bravo Group, Inc. 8162 Brittany Pl Pittsburgh, PA 15237 www.thegravogroup.com 412-288-5142 Compass Business Solutions Inc. 8963 Seneca Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15237 www.compass-resources.com 412-366-7881 Concept Development Group 2305 Smallman St Pittsburgh, PA 15222 www.conceptdevgroup.com 425-890-9183 Consolidated Power Supply, Engineered Products Divison 241 Center St McKeesport, PA 15132 www.consolidatedpower.com 412-678-1010 Cook MyoSite, Inc. 105 Delta Dr Pittsburgh, PA 15238 www.cookmyosite.com 412-963-7380 Data Networks 400 Lytham Ct Moon Township, PA 15108 www.datanetworks.com 412-491-3953 Doug Owen Consulting 101 Washington St, Ste 1 Pittsburgh, PA 15218 412-580-3351 Dynamic Manufacturing, Inc. 156 Armstrong Dr Freeport, PA 16229 www.dynamic- manufacturing.com 724-295-4200 ePlus Technology, Inc. 323 North Shore Dr Ste 350 Pittsburgh, PA 15212 www.eplus.com 412-258-1694 Ethical Intruder, LP dbaEthical Intruder 1213 Galveston Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15233 www.ethicalintruder.com 412-720-8542 Fifth Third Private Bank 707 Grant St Gulf Tower, Ste 2000 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 www.53.com 412-291-5555 Flying Cork Media, LLC. 320 Fort Duquesne Blvd Ste 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 www.flyingcorkmedia.com 412-897-6623 Frances Harpst 49 Wilson Dr Pittsburgh, PA 15202 412-983-8192 Group 16 PO Box 782 Monroeville, PA 15146 www.group-16.com 412-980-1955 Growth Consulting & Interim Executive Management 219 5th Ave Carnegie, PA 15106 412-418-5399 Intuo Tech 300 Hidden Ridge Ct Ste 102 South Park, PA 15129 www.intuotech.com 508-308-1220 Louis Plung & Co. Four Gateway Center, Ninth Fl Pittsburgh, PA 15222 www.louisplung.com 412-281-8771 Megha Technologies 1061 Parkview Blvd Pittsburgh, PA 15217 www.meghatechnologies.com 412-203-3117 MGM Automation 1665 Washington Rd Pittsburgh, PA 15228 www.mgmautomation.com 412-833-0101 MYRIAD Communications PO Box 578 Ligonier, PA 15658 www.myriadcommunications.com 800-698-1038 PGH Marketing PO Box 125 Oakmont, PA 15139 www.pghmarketing.com 412-225-7478 Plum Borough School District 900 Elicker Rd Plum, PA 15239 www.pbsd.k12.pa.us 412-795-0100 Ripple Rock, LLC 1621 Blackburn Heights Dr Sewickley, PA 15143 www.ripple-rock.com 412-719-9204 Sandler Training 2593 Wexford Bayne Rd Ste 104 Sewickley, PA 15143 www.dan.sandler.com 724-940-2388 Seegrid Corporation 216 Parkwest Dr Pittsburgh, PA 15275 www.seegrid.com 412-621-4305 The Search Monitor 117 Nottingham Dr Pittsburgh, PA 15205 www.thesearchmonitor.com 321-206-9705 Valdez International Corp. 795 Pine Valley Dr Ste 22 Pittsburgh, PA 15239 www.valdezicorp.com 412-205-5776 Xerox Corporation 8 Penn Center West Pittsburgh, PA 15276 www.xerox.com 412-506-4858 NEW MEMBERS 32 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL COUNCIL BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS James E. Cashman III ANSYS, Inc. Chairman David P. Klasnick PNC Financial Services Group Treasurer Peter M. DeComo ALung Technologies, Inc. Lynette A. Horrell Ernst & Young LLP James W. Liken J.W. Liken Holdings Marlee S. Myers, Esq. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Audrey Russo Pittsburgh Technology Council DIRECTORS Anthony R. Bridge United States Steel Corporation W.S. (Rick) Brown IV Lucas Systems, Inc./ Lightfoot Inc. Thomas G. Buchanan Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney, PC Eric G. Close RedZone Robotics, Inc. Giorgio Coraluppi, Ph.D. Compunetix, Inc. Patrick Daly Cohera Medical, Inc. Ilana Diamond Sima Products Corp. Sanford Ferguson, Esq. K&L Gates Theodore G. Glyptis, CPA PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Michelle Heying DynaVox Technologies John Houston Bayer MaterialScience, LLC Jay Katarincic, Jr. Draper Triangle Ventures Pradeep Khosla, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University CIT Dean’s Office Eric Koger ModCloth Mark Jay Kurtzrock Metis Secure Systems Frank E. Livorio Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania Richard R. Lunak Innovation Works Marc Malandro, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh John W. Manzetti Pittsburgh Life Sciences Greenhouse Sean C. McDonald Precision Therapeutics, Inc. Robert M. Moorehead First Niagara Bank Keith Schaefer BPL Global, LTD. Chris Simchick SDLC Partners Jim Spencer EverPower Wind Holdings, Inc. Raul Valdes-Perez Vivisimo, Inc. Robert E. Wohlford Ericsson Data Networks EMERITUS BOARD MEMBERS Jay D. Aldridge JDA Associates Glen F. Chatfield OPTIMUM Power Technology James Colker CEO Venture Fund Mark S. Evans Confluence Chairman Emeritus John P. Friel Medrad, Inc. Donald H. Jones Draper Triangle Ventures AngelG.Jordan,Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University William R. Newlin, Esq. Newlin Investment Company Frank Brooks Robinson, Sr. Regional Industrial Development Corporation of Southwestern Pennsylvania (RIDC) Jack Roseman Roseman Institute John R. Thorne* Donald H. Jones Center for Entrepreneurship James Williams, Jr. Seagate Technologies *Deceased
  • 32. eteq.pghtech.org 33 All Water Systems Inc. Allegheny Conference on Community Development and Affiliates Allegheny County Parks Foundation Belcan TechServices Corporation Bossa Nova Robotics Bradley Brown Design Group Bridge Semiconductor Corporation BxVideo Solutions, LLC Carnegie Speech Company CIBER, Inc. Citrin Consulting Clark Testing Group Communifx Community College of Allegheny County Compu-Fix, Inc. Computational Diagnostics, Inc. Concurrent Technologies Corporation Consulting Professional Resources, Inc. Cowden Associates, Inc. Crossroads Development Group, LTD Daedalus Inc. Datavibes, Inc. Deborah Shapiro Diane C. Wuycheck Public Relations/Marketing/ Communications Consultant Ernst & Young LLP Executives Associates of Pittsburgh Finneran & Associates, LLC Foerster Instruments Inc. Frank E. Sparr & Co. Gateway Financial Group, Inc. Generation Technologies, L.P. GigaHertz, LLC Hamiltonian Systems Inc. Health Monitoring Systems Icebreaker Resources LLC ICON Consultants Idea Foundry IQity Solutions, LLC Kurt J. Lesker Co. Lang Patent Law LLC Life'sWork of Western PA Manpower Professional MARC USA Mastech Inc. Michael Baker Corporation Mizrahi Inc. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Mt. Lebanon Office Equipment Co., Inc. NanoLambda, Inc. Nerve Marketing Nokomis Inc. Oakland Real Estate Omnyx Open Minds LLC Panasas Inc. PEAL Center PESTCO, Inc./AIR-SCENT International Pipitone Group Pittsburgh Penguins Pittsburgh Transportation Group Preservation Technologies, L.P. Presidio Networked Solutions Quest Analytics Raeder Landree, Inc. Regency Group Rhiza Labs Right Management Scalable Solutions, Inc. Schneider Downs & Company, Inc. SDLC Partners L.P. Semantic Compaction Systems Sherrard German & Kelly, P.C. SomnoTech, L.L.C. South Hills Movers Sprint Nextel Staffing Direct Business Solutions, LP Strategic Development Sucevic, Piccolomini & Kuchar Engineering, Inc. Synergy Staffing Inc. Systems Imaging, Inc. TCG Solutions, Inc. Technology Blue, Inc. The DBA Zone, Inc. TriMech Solutions Trinity Energy Corporation University of Pittsburgh, Office of Human Resources University of Pittsburgh, Office of Technology Management Verizon Pennsylvania, Inc. Warner Telecomm Westinghouse Electric Company Wombat Security Technologies Youngstown State University YouthPlaces, A Tides Center Project RENEWED MEMBERS The Pittsburgh Technology Council programs and products are made possible through the generous financial support of our partners and members like you. For more information about how you can become a partner with the Council, please contact brian lang at (412) 918-4249. MEMBERS C O U N C I L P A R T N E R S I I I I DON’T MISS THE DECEMBER BREAKFAST BRIEF- ING ENTITLED “THE BUSINESS OF HEALTH” WITH CHRISTOPHER T. OLIVIA, M.D., PRESIDENT AND CEO, WEST PENN ALLEGHENY HEALTH SYSTEM When: December 2, 2010, 7:00 AM - 9:15 AM Where: Rivers Club, 301 Grant St #411, 15219 With more than 13,000 employees, 700 physicians and 500 residents, West Penn Allegheny Health System is the second-largest private employer in western Pennsylvania. West Penn Allegheny is a five hospital, academic health system with two major teaching facilities and $1.7 billion in revenue. Olivia has been leading the System since 2008. To date, he has: reorganized the System’s leadership structure and devised operational performance improvement assessment and implementation plans; negotiated an improved cotract with the region’s dominant payor; secured gains in public funding; established the mission and long term vision for the business; put forth a major hospital consolidation plan; and improved operations by more than $140 million. And Olivia has just begun! Come see how Olivia is addressing the current challenges and opportunities facing West Penn Allegheny and how he plans to lead the System to success. Register for this event and other Council events at: www.pghtech.org/events CLICK HERE TO SEE HOW TECH COMPANIES FIND VALUE WITH THE PTC.
  • 33. Process Capability: Information Management Managing and controlling the quality, access, and use of infor- mation assets is an essential part of supporting effective deci- sion-making.Informationmanagementguidesstrategicthinking around governance and compliance, data quality, and presenta- tion and analytics. BI Competency: Technology Technology plays an important role in supporting the BI Value Chain. This competency focuses on the systems infrastructure side of BI. Technology Capability: Systems Planning BIrequirestherighttechnologyinfrastructuretosupporttheor- ganization’s vision for BI adoption and use. Systems planning guides strategic thinking around software, network servers and storage, and security. Technology Capability: Data Management Smart organizations implement best practices to control, pro- tect, enhance and deliver timely, accurate and relevant informa- tion. Data management guides strategic thinking around databasemanagement,integrationandtransformation,andmas- ter data management. InthenextissueofTEQ,I’lldiscussBIcompetenciesandtheir related capabilities through the lens of Delivery. I Greg Steffine has been helping organizations use information to sell more, spend less, and work smarter for more than two decades now. His client experience represents a broad cross- sectionofindustryandcompanysize,frommid-marketgrowth organizations to the Fortune 500. Greg has held management positions in sales, marketing, product development, and infor- mationtechnologyandhasbeeninvolvedinnearlyeveryaspect of systems development. As a business intelligence and in- formationmanagementstrategist,hehelpsclientseffectivelyin- tegrate people, process, and technology in order to support value creation. Mr. Steffine currently serves as the BI Practice DirectorforSDLCPartners,L.P. YoucanlearnmoreaboutGreg through his online profiles at www.linkedin.com/in/steffine and www.visualcv.com/steffine. You can also reach him through email at TEQBI@sdlcpartners.com. [continued from pg. 19] [continued from pg. 23] [continued from pg. 20] Susan Seattle living in Fort Smith, or a Chicago barista at Seattle's Best Coffee named Susan Smith. The traditional Web just wasn't very good at providing context. Microdata adds context to HTML, allowing comput- erstounderstandWebpagesaseasilyaspeoplecan.Bruce Willis could make it easy for search engines to find him by adding this HTML5 syntax to his MySpace page: <span class="given-name">Bruce</span> <span class="family-name">Willis</span> <div class="tel">310-555-1234</div> Microdata formats exist for geographic coordinates, re- sumes, calendars, and even recipes. Search engines that support Microdata (such as Google) can provide more ac- curate search results thanks to the added context. Web browsers can use Microdata to extract meaning from pages, which opens the doors to many cool features. For example,imagineifFirefoxautomaticallyaddedaneventto your calendar when you accept an Evite invitation. Thanks to HTML5, cancer will be cured, Pittsburgh and Earth will remain out of harm's way, and we'll never have to watch another Bruce Willis film again. Huzzah! I Almost 15 million views later, Microsoft realized that this scenario (the double rainbow part) would beautifully illustrate the need for one of their products. In early September, Microsoft did a humorous sendupoftheoriginal,showingustheCrazyDoubleRain- bowGuy(brilliantmove#1–andhelooksprettymuchlike he sounds) to promote its Windows Live Photo Gallery product. They had their buttoned-down corporate voiceover guy exactly parrot the language of the original (brilliant move #2 – very funny and surprisingly endear- ing). Payoff:Imagineonemillionpeoplevoluntarilyview- ing your commercial and then recommending it to their friends.Brilliant!!!(…toquoteanothercommercial–Guin- ness). So next time you venture into social marketing (say this afternoon), try using this technique to start the con- versation. I .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................CONTINUED... 34 PIT TSBURGH TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL CREATING VALUE STARTS WITH STRATEGIC THINKING HTML5 SAVES THE WORLD - HUZZAH! INCREASE REVENUES BY ESTABLISHING RAPPORT