IT Leadership in Building a Successful Collaborative Business Environment

  • 217 views
Uploaded on

White paper on IT leadership skills necessary to build a successful collaborative environment to support business development.

White paper on IT leadership skills necessary to build a successful collaborative environment to support business development.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
217
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2

Actions

Shares
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. SAMIS – ACollaboration ofFlorida SpecialTaxing Districts Patricia K. Gehant, M.A. The Children’s Service’s Council’s in Florida have been collaborating on the use of a grants management SaaS software solution since 2001 which offers both transparencies of operations and accountably for $1.7 billion in public funds. This paper describes the product, the successes, and the leadership strategies employed during JWB Children’s Service’s Council of Pinellas County the 10 years of operation. 14155 58th Street N, Clearwater, Florida33760 727-742-5144 Mentor – Jennifer Fisch, CCIO, Children’s Board of Hillsborough County. 6/20/2011 Page 37
  • 2. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationTable of ContentsProject Summary........................................................................................................................................... 3 The Partners .......................................................................................................................................... 4 Realized Advantages ............................................................................................................................. 4 SaaS or Cloud ........................................................................................................................................ 5 The Motivation ...................................................................................................................................... 5The Role of Leadership in a Collaboration .................................................................................................... 5The Collaborative Business Model ................................................................................................................ 7Why a Collaborative is Successful? ............................................................................................................... 8What is SAMIS? .............................................................................................................................................. 9 The History of SAMIS .............................................................................................................................. 11 Reason for SAMIS .................................................................................................................................... 12 The Operational Structure ...................................................................................................................... 14 The Fee Structure .................................................................................................................................... 16 Fee Model ........................................................................................................................................... 18 The Funding Formula .............................................................................................................................. 19 The SAMIS Environment ......................................................................................................................... 19 Definitions of Cloud vs. SaaS solution .................................................................................................... 20 SaaS Defined ....................................................................................................................................... 21 Cloud Defined ..................................................................................................................................... 21 SAMIS as a Cloud and SaaS Defined .................................................................................................... 21Delivering Quality Service to the Customer ................................................................................................ 22 Enhancement Team Process ................................................................................................................... 22 The Enhancement Review Process ......................................................................................................... 23 SDLC Framework ..................................................................................................................................... 25 Collaborative Technology ....................................................................................................................... 25The Partner Commitment to Accountability............................................................................................... 26 Implementation of New Partners ........................................................................................................... 27Future Projects of the Collaborative ........................................................................................................... 27 Business Intelligence ............................................................................................................................... 27 Online Learning ....................................................................................................................................... 28 SAMIS Operations at the State Level ...................................................................................................... 28Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 1
  • 3. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration Expansion of Partnerships....................................................................................................................... 28Attachment 1 – SAMIS Organizational Chart .............................................................................................. 30Attachment 2 – SAMIS Feature List ............................................................................................................ 33Attachment 3 – SAMIS Analysis of Costs Over the Life of Collaborative .......................................................... 35Attachment 4 – Team Learning Scenario .................................................................................................... 38Attachment 5 – SAMIS Business Intelligence Proposed Structure and Governance .................................. 40Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 2
  • 4. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationProject Summary – The goal ofthe paper is to describe how seven SAMIS – Collaboration of Special DistrictsChildren’s Services Council (CSC’s), specialtaxing districts in Florida, and one county Throughout the report the reader will find examples ofgovernment, shared the cost of how innovation was born from collaboration and howdeveloping a custom software application technology, if effectively implemented, will expandthat resulted in increased accountability knowledge with a high return on investment.of over $1.7 billion dollars in public funds,and demonstrated the effectiveness ofthe services delivered to over 800,000 children and adults in Florida. Decision makers have access tocounty specific and real time information, are able to make informed decisions based on the data,impacting the quality of life of children and families by using the SAMIS Grants ManagementApplication. The counties participating in this collaborative represent approximately 48% of the Statepopulation.The paper will discuss the organizational and operational structure, the ability to replicate the project,and the leadership style required to manage a collaborative. The SAMIS Collaborative has operated since2001 and has added new members over the years. This success was not without challenges for whichthe leadership negotiated changes in the operational structure. Today, the Collaborative continues tonegotiate with potential new partners from around the State.This paper outlines how a collaborative was formed and structured to take advantage of sharedknowledge and reduce the overall cost of development and ongoing operations. Thepaper will also address the following factors: SAMIS, a collaboration of • The history and description of the SAMIS Software Collaboration governmental • The evolution and decision making process of the collaborative operations agencies, can be • The participant benefits and challenges with the partnership replicated in other • The underlying technology that supports the collaborative model counties in Florida.The replication of this model in other counties statewide is possible and the paper will discuss thevarious operational changes undertaken in response to the evolving needs of the partners and lessonslearned for others considering a similar solution.The SAMIS Collaborative leadership is currently evaluating the feasibility of operating through theFlorida Children’s Services Council, the state association of CSC’s, rather than through the JuvenileWelfare Board of Pinellas with the goal of expanding the opportunities to other entities for additionalrevenue. See Attachment 1.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 3
  • 5. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationThroughout the report the reader will find examples of how innovation was born from collaboration andhow technology, if effectively implemented, expands knowledge and action with a high return oninvestment.The Partners - The collaborative is managed by the SAMIS Management Committee consisting of arepresentative from each participating CSCs: Juvenile Welfare Board of Pinellas County, Children’sServices Councils of Broward, Palm Beach, and Martin, The Children’s Commission of Jacksonville andthe newest members (2010/11) The Children’s Trust of Miami and the Children’s Board ofHillsborough. Pending membership includes St. Lucie CSC’s. Palm Beach County Department ofCommunity Services has joined the collaborative as a partner of the Children’s Services Council of PalmBeach County. SAMIS is an example of howFuture customers that can benefit include county and city innovation was born fromgovernments, and community funding organizations that collaboration and how technology, ifdistribute funds to community organizations and require effectively implemented, expandsaccountability for their expended funds, such as local United knowledge and action with a highWays. Community programs currently utilizing SAMIS return on investment.include: child care providers, mental health counseling andresidential programs, recreational, tutoring, and/or family therapy providers, etc.Realized Advantages - The model has been continuously refined over the last 10 years of operation inresponse to the partner’s needs and lessons learned. Below is a list of the realized advantages. – Provides a transparent and timely process of accountability for public funds – Answers the question - Did the CSC/Agency make a difference in the individuals served by the program funded with tax dollars? – Low cost to users - No added software or infrastructure for CSC or funded agencies – Provides a high level of business continuity, security, and user access – ROI is continuous from start of participation – High rate of user satisfaction – Leadership that supports the ideals of collaborationInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 4
  • 6. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationThe SAMIS software suite provides a cost effective solution for the collection and analysis of informationfrom community service providers with various level of technology resources. The cost of operation isshared among the eight members at a rate that is far less than anyone CSC can operate a comparablenetwork. The host CSC, JWB, benefited from shared costs of operations including such standard costs asinternet service, data center occupancy, security, redundancy, network costs and shared database staff,and the cost of IT leadership.SaaS or Cloud - SAMIS operates as a hybrid Cloud solution and also as a SaaS for other pending customers.Gartner defines the Cloud as a business function through the internet (email, storage, etc.) and a SaaS asthe delivery of a custom application that uses a single set of code that is shared across many users(SalesForce.com, Google Apps, etc.) 1What makes SAMIS stand apart is the collaborative management approach that responds to ITleadership hesitancy to move into a business model that moves resources outside the walls of IT control.SAMIS business model addresses the fear “If I cannot see it, how can I manage it?” IT leadership hasinput into the operations and software change process.The Motivation for the development of the product arose out of efforts by JWB to solve a commonproblem shared by all the CSC’s – the production of timely and accurate data that reflected the trueimpact of CSC funds on the community. The genesis of the formation of the Collaborative was the needof other CSC’s to meet the same objective responsibly with public funds.The Role of Leadership in a CollaborationSAMIS was originally not based on a model used by othersand in 2001 there were no standards for operating aSaaS by one governmental entity (JWB) for fourother entities. SAMIS Collaborative developmentwas an example of an adaptive leadership challenge Did we make a difference in the lives(Heifetz, 2002). SAMIS required experimenting and of children and families?developing new ways to standardize a businessprocess across multiple governmental entities andto design an effective operational model.Each participating CSC arrived to the SAMIScollaborative from a CSC with a well-establishedsystem with defined structures, patterns ofinterrelationship along with individually held set ofbeliefs reflecting both their organizations and local1 Gartner PresentationInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 5
  • 7. SAMIS-A Software Collaborationcommunities. The success of a new initiative was dependent upon the ability of the individuals toappreciate and understand the dynamics necessary to form a learning community that was able toefficiently deliver results, learn, innovate, and to conform to a new shared set of norms and behaviors.The successful establishment of a new system of thinking must be future oriented. SAMIS has hadconsistent leadership over the ten years of operation in both the Operational staff as well as the corethrough leaders from the original five partners. It is this group that has perpetuated the original purposethrough all phases of change. It is also this group that has to maintain an open mind and accept aplurality of voices to collaborate on new ideas that identified opportunities that lead to innovation.Between 2001 and 2010 the members of the team remained stable, building positive relationships,establishing patterns of behavior and SAMIS system structures that would provide the desiredoutcomes. The SAMIS Management Group (SMG) became the team that designed the operations of theCollaborative. Each member brought individual learning experiences and past knowledge to theconversation in an environment with team norms of acceptable creative tension, trust, inquiry, andability to transition from the current reality to the future desired reality.2The main behavioral change that is necessary for successful participation in a collaborative partnership,such as SAMIS, is the ability to share control over all aspects of the operations. According to Heifetzand Linsky (Heifetz, 2002, p. 13) “without learning new ways – changing attitudes, values, and behaviors– people cannot make the adaptive leap necessary to thrive in a new environment.” The SMG exhibitedthe adaptive skills when new members joined the team after 10 years of operations.The new partners that joined the Collaborative in 2010 entered initially viewing SAMIS as a technicalsolution and accepted the structure and behavioralpatterns that currently existed. Members were Successful Teams …..oriented to the current SAMIS structures and patterns – • Build trust to enable collaboration andfee structures, enhancement process, help desk learningsupport, infrastructure operations, etc. However, since • Accept levels of creative tension • Visualizeall partners have an equal voice in the conversation, • Inquireregardless of length of membership, the pool of • Transition from current state to futureexperience and knowledge of the new partners hasexpanded the pool of new ideas as well as the process of establishing new relationships that support theprinciples of successful teams.Over the 10 years of the partnership, leadership has proposed several new operational strategies tomeet the customer where they are at that point in time. To maintain a healthy adaptive team,leadership must support a community of learning where all members feel comfortable offering ideasand fully participating in the discussions and decisions. The success of a collaborative is the healthydiscussion of ideas and meeting the needs of all members. The learning community is best emphasizedin the ability of the SAMIS leadership to adapt to change.2 Module II, Understanding the Enterprise, Florida Institute of Government, October, 25, 2011Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 6
  • 8. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationThe Collaborative Business ModelSAMIS operates as a business collaborative with a defined decision making structure. The model hasbeen designed to provide all partners equal access to the application and equal input into definedmanagement decisions. The model was developed based on the conversational leadership style andconcept of learning organizations. Peter Senge, the Director of the Center for Organizational Learning atMIT Sloan School of Management, posts that as the worldaround us becomes more complex and dynamic, work must The team that became great didn’tbecome more “learningful” and that it is no longer sufficient start off great – it learned how toto have one person learning for the organization. 3 SAMIS produce extraordinary results.Collaborative was designed to benefit from the shared (Senge, 1990, revised 2006)p. 29learning experiences of all the members to respond to anincreasingly complex world. Learning organizations arepossible because we are all learners and it is our nature to learn.4The SAMIS Collaborative has demonstrated the application of the principles of the learning organizationthrough the business operational and governance changes implemented to accommodate the changingtechnology and needs of the partners throughout the 10 years of operations. Below is a summary of thekey changes negotiated by the partners. 1. 2007 - Created the Operations Manager and Fiscal Agent roles to distribute the cost of the effort and to increase accountability by separating fiscal from operational functions. 2. 2007 - Modified the enhancement process from one cycle per year with all partners agreeing to the change to implementing multiple release cycles a year and providing a process for individual CSC changes. 3. 2008 - Established, as a of FY 09-10, a SAMIS Base Version, requiring agreement of all partners to any changes to the Base, thus reducing the impact of changes on individual Counties or agencies. The same code base is maintained but the functionality is not activated. However, the functionality can be made available at a later date. 4. 2008 - Changed the fee structure from all partners pay a share of all Group enhancements regardless of usage, to two fee groups for enhancement – Program/Fiscal and Measurable Objectives (MO) – billed based on usage. MO enhancements have traditionally been the highest cost features and have traditionally pull funds from either Fiscal or Program enhancements. Since not by all CSCs use MOs, it was decided to change the fee structure to accommodate this business process.3 (Senge, 1990, revised 2006) p. 284 (Senge, 1990, revised 2006) p. 29Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 7
  • 9. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration 5. 2009 - The Hardware fee, previously a separate fee assessed annually, will now be taken from the SAMIS Reserve Fund rather than directly billed to the CSCs. This was implemented to address the changing economic conditions. 6. 2010 - The Licensing fee was eliminated for new members and an Implementation fee was developed. New partners are assessed $50,000 for implementation and enhancements costs. However, members entering the Collaborative after 2005 do not have rights to the reserve fund generated by past Licensing fees should the collaborative dissolve. All participating partners benefit from the use of the reserve fund and the hardware purchased. 7. 2010 - The contract was revised to allow partners to leave the Collaborative and still have access to the software with limitations on resale or profiting. 8. 2010 - The formula for distributing the costs was revised for FY 10-11 to remove the county population as a factor in determining portion of the fees. 9. 2011 – A new business model is being proposed which includes the Operating Agent being transferred to the Florida Children’s Services Council, (the state level association of the CSC’s) from the CSC level with management being moved to another CSC due to a change in priorities at the CSC level.Why a Collaborative is Successful? Why is Collaborative Successful? The SAMIS Collaborative has been successful because a 1. Shared mission – all partners needcore value has been to engage the collective the services and cannot afford tointelligence to solve problems. As the SAMIS create or purchase independentlyEnhancement Flow chart demonstrates, conversation 2. Long term stability in CSCtakes place on many levels and in a variety of membership, management andenvironments. SAMIS Collaborative members are development staffencouraged to obtain feedback from constituents in 3. Technology that is flexible andtheir SAMIS user communities and peers to create an scalable 4. Infrastructure that supports theopportunity to connect and discover new information, processthat can lead to innovation. 5. High Return of Investment (ROI)The benefits of collaboration are dependent on thereason two or more groups come together. The SAMISInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 8
  • 10. SAMIS-A Software Collaborationpartners founded the collaborative to meet a specific set of goals outlined below. 1. Stabilized costs due to unspent funds being rolled forward and used by the group 2. Reduced costs of group enhancements 3. Reduced costs of combined operations 4. Reduced costs of hardware and software purchases 5. Reduced infrastructure cost to the end user 6. Reduced support costs 7. Share synergy of ideas and functionalityThe original team of partners recognized the potential of a joint venture that would provide both benefitand efficiency of operation. The team came together because of the trust that existed between theindividuals and that trust was respected throughout all changes. A system must make changes to remainrelevant; the leadership group had that vision.What is SAMIS? - SAMIS is a web based grants management suite that allows communityorganizations to report to local governmental agencies how public funds have been expended. The datacollected includes client level demographics, outcomes, and agency specific financial information. TheSAMIS software application is delivered through a private Cloud/SaaS configuration to over 2,800 usersin 785 locations in Florida. The cost of utilizing SAMIS by special taxing districts is based on the numberof contracted programs entering data and the amount of contracted funds accounted for in SAMIS. Theaccess fees are born by the governmental agencies, not user agencies, i.e., access to the application is provided at no cost to community programs required to SAMIS by the numbers…. enter data. In 2011 2,800 users $300 million managed annually The system currently manages $300 million annually in $1.7 billion in public funds public funds, with over $1.7 billion since its 785 locations in Florida implementation in 2001. The project is currently 800,000 client records implementing two new partners with one partner beginning in July5. Negotiations are currently underway with three additional partners which will increaseutilization to potentially $375 million annually with over 3,400 users at approximately 1,000 locations inthe State.In general SAMIS offers the Agency user the ability to: • Transfer client data electronically into SAMIS (EDI) • Retrieve all data entered - (reverse EDI) • Create custom queries to meet agency needs5 Currently in the implementation stage are The Children’s Trust of Miami and the Community ServicesDepartment of Palm Beach County. The Children’s Board of Hillsborough County will start in October 2011.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 9
  • 11. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration • Customized Outcomes by the CSC and assigned to the program at the individual and group level • Paperless Budgeting Process – Budgeting – Reimbursement – Budget amendments – Electronic transfer of funds • Workflow accountability in the Budget, Reimbursement and Budget amendment process SAMIS Value Proposition – • Generate CSC specific agency contracts Provide users timely access to – Contract with over 120 pages is generated in 5 information with ease of entry and seconds and includes the approved budget and retrieval with ability to manage all custom special contract conditions set forth quality. by the CSC. – Contracts include all measurable outcomes agreed on between the agency and CSC. • Offers replicated database services to allow CSCs to pull any data out of the system and conduct individual analysis outside of SAMIS. This feature is the source of the development of the Business Intelligence strategy underway at the State level. • Consolidated Reporting provides real time results from a single screen to all Program and Fiscal reports generated in SAMIS. This approach provides access to management information without needing detailed knowledge of or access to all modules in SAMIS. Report consolidation also allows for targeted access to reports, which protects the database from unauthorized changes and the unauthorized dissemination of information. • The Security model provides granularity based on roles in the organization. The SAMIS Operations team sets up each partner site providing access to the CSC Help Desk Administrator. Each partner controls access to their site (CSC), setting up permissions by agency, program, modules, and for reporting groups. The Password security forces the use of strong passwords and uses current password security standards of a regular reset and a “no sharing” policy. Only the SAMIS Operations team has access to all partner databases in order to provide technical support. A SAMIS replication database is made available to a limited number of staff at each CSC for setting up ODBC connections to pull data from SAMIS to integrate with other data systems. • SAMIS has been designed to allow users to view the broadest range of data entered. The Consolidated Reports Module features an array of reports that are generated based on the various criteria such as Children’s Services Council (CSC), Agency, Program, Program Site, and Classifications of Programs; reports are rendered differently based on criteria. The defined report groups include Budget, Reimbursements, Adjustments, CDG, Attendance, Measurable Objectives, Workflow, Funding, Waiting List, Group Activity, Position Management and Utility.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 10
  • 12. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration User access can be assigned at the report group or individual report level. See Attachment 2 SAMIS Features List.The History of SAMISFive independent taxing authorities formed a data collaborative in2001 under F.S. 163.62 which allows local governments toorganize a data collaborative for the purpose of sharinginformation. F.S. Title XI, Chapter 125.901 was amended to support collaborative research activities byexempting CSC’s from F.S. 119.07.(1) “Personal identifying information of a child or the parent or guardianof the child, held by a council on children’s services, juvenile welfare board, or other similar entitycreated under this section or by special law, or held by a service provider or researcher under contractwith such entity.”Over the past ten years of operation, SAMIS has had several business model revisions as the partners grew andas the team generated new ideas. As a result, the learning community responded to new ideas and changing needs.Change does not require a threat that must be addressed6. Change can occur in teams that havecreated an opportunity to discuss ideas resulting in a better way – even if the current way works! Therevisions in the governance of SAMIS provide insight into the life cycle of a collaborative team, andwhich if not addressed, would have ended the SAMIS Collaborative.There are no published examples of governments collaborating for over 10 years on the delivery of asoftware application where all partners have equal input on the design and functionality of the system.There are examples of government “sharing” resources (storage, internet connectivity, BC/DR,infrastructure, etc.), but these generally do not include shared decision making, e.g. The Lambda Rail,which has twelve (12) equity members consisting of public and private universities and colleges inFlorida. The growth and development of SAMIS, includes challenges and successes, evolving the SAMIScollaborative to its current state.An increase in access to the internet and technology has lead SAMIS to be innovative in theaccomplishment of common business tasks of governments. SAMIS has been a SaaS solution since itsbirth in 2001; when SaaS was defined as an ASP (Application Service Provider). JWB was fortunate towork with a team of professionals from the various CSC’s that embraced collaboration and helped shapethe design with new ideas and focus. In addition, the process has benefited from the softwaredevelopment firm, Tribridge that understands the nature and value of collaboration and has beenworking with our team throughout the life of the project. The shared vision by the developers andpartners, combined with the consistency of the membership, has been a critical factor in the methodicalenhancement of the application that has led to the current design.6 (Senge, 1990, revised 2006) p. 423Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 11
  • 13. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationReason for SAMISFourteen years ago, JWB became motivated to change after an Information Systems Review wasconducted to determine how to improve the business processes of JWB. The RISC UNIX based serverand “dumb terminals” in use were 10 years old and out of warranty. The data system used was a UNIXcustom application for which no one employed at JWB could find manuals. Documentation was basedon folklore passed down from staff to staff along with hand written notes. The staff was using an arrayof desktops, thin clients, and a mix of Microsoft, Uniplex,and other custom applications based on needs at the time.Eventually the Unix custom application was moth balled SAMIS is built with public fundsunofficially and 146 Excel spreadsheets were used to and our developer shares thegenerate contract performance data. Some staff refused to same respect for the tax payer;use any technology at all because it was “too complicated.” we build what we need to be effective, efficient, and economical.In FY 97-98, at the time of the study, JWB distributed $42million to community programs with all financial andperformance information gathered in paper format. Therequests for reimbursements were hand delivered toexisting staff and consisted of 1-2” thick paper support documentation. Two JWB Fiscal staff took about2 weeks to audit the documentation, request clarifications, submit for payment, and then an additional1 - 2 weeks to process the payment in the accounting system, depending on questions, timely re-submission, and corrections. Checks were either mailed to the program or as many would do, drive overto pick it up to meet their payroll. To assist providers, JWB had a practice of providing a cash advancethat allowed cash strapped agencies to request up to 1/10th of their annual allocation at the start of the fiscalyear to provide cash flow until the first reimbursement was received at the end ofOctober or mid-November.Performance data was provided in summary to the Board annually containingdata that was 10-12 months old. Programs reported quarterly by responding to aseries of summary questions that were printed and mailed to each agency by JWB– 144 program - on continuous feed carbon sheets from a dot matrix printer.Printouts, some 5-6 feet long, were mailed to each program in November, March,June and September for a response by the 15th of the following month. Once thereports arrived at JWB, one secretary spent a week separating the two remaining copies (one for dataentry and one for the record) and entered the data into a custom application on a UNIX operatingsystem. The secretary ran the quarterly summaries with the results distributed to 5 contract mangers toreview the results with Agencies being called for clarification on any discrepancies discovered by thecontract manager. While there were established norms for the review, not all staff applied the samerigor to the quarterly review. When the data was “confirmed”, the summary information was enteredonto a MultiPlan spreadsheet (later Excel) for a different analysis. This was repeated each quarter withthe year-end data reviewed by the contract managers.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 12
  • 14. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationThe year-end program level reports were produced in paper format, which took a minimum of sixmonths to analyze and then re-confirmed by the Contract Managers whoprovided corrections to the data entry clerk. The year-end report – Contract ManagersPerformance Analysis – required considerable labor to prepare and would read the reportspublish. The analysis and report preparation, along with any extended each quarter.analysis, took another 6 months before the Board would see thepreliminary data. Because of this process, funding decisions for the new fiscal year were made based on10-12 month old data, best case.JWB decided in September of 1997 to release an RFP to seek assistance in defining technology needsand determine the best strategy for solving the data analysis lag time. The process resulted in arecommendation to build a custom application, since there were no products on the market that metour needs. Between April 1998 and December 2000, JWB implemented SAMIS in over 150 programs.During this time the kinks were worked out of the application through a series of plannedenhancements for which $ 554,191 was expended.SAMIS was introduced to other CSC’s in 2001 who inquired on the use of SAMIS and the discussionbegan to determine if there could be cost savings if a collaborative was formed. The primary goals ofparticipation was to increase the information available to the CSC, reduce the time necessary to analyzeand respond to the service trends, and reduce the cost of implementation. In addition, there was also anearly recognition of the potential to share data across CSC’s to determine effective programmodels across Counties.JWB agreed to lead the formation of the Collaboration with five CSC’s in 2001. A key factor in thedecision to form the collaborative was because a solid relationship of trust existed among the fivepartners which was developed through the many joint activites of the Florida Children’s ServicesCouncils, a state association of CSC’s. In addition, the JWB executive leadership believed there was valueadded to both JWB and other CSCs around the State through the sharing of ideas and intellectual capitalof staff. As a result of the partnership, the fees from participating counties supported an average of 85%of the cost of operation of SAMIS for JWB. Concurrently, the partnering CSC’s could not haveimplemented a similar system for an amount equal or less than their fees to participate in theCollaborative. See Attachment 3 for SAMIS Analysis of Costs Over Life of Collaborative.The chart below provides a summary of the total investment in SAMIS by each partner since October2001.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 13
  • 15. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration Total Contribution By CSC (includes hardware and capital fees now funded through SAMIS reserve fund) $140,000 $120,000 $100,000 $80,000 $60,000 Pinellas $40,000 $20,000 Broward $0 FY 01-02 FY 02-03 FY 03-04 FY 04-05 FY 05-06 FY 06-07 FY07-08 FY08-09 FY 09-10 FY 10-11 Duval Pinellas $101,510 $98,627 $108,212 $96,171 $87,720 $91,720 $85,968 $65,254 $37,590 $32,799 Martin Broward $109,265 $119,105 $127,610 $117,978 $127,469 $133,282 $131,835 $99,727 $59,699 $46,385 PalmBeach Duval $70,276 $69,920 $76,981 $75,048 $66,682 $69,723 $71,101 $53,969 $24,892 $21,434 Miami Martin $17,132 $15,925 $19,357 $19,767 $20,453 $21,386 $25,162 $19,099 $11,723 $15,560 PalmBeach $101,404 $101,013 $112,254 $119,947 $115,614 $120,887 $101,407 $76,973 $35,335 $54,370 Miami $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $68,433The Children’s Board of Hillsborough County will begin participating in the SAMIS in July 2011.The Operational Structure SAMIS is currently organized under F.S. 163.62 which allows local governmental entities to shareresearch data (SAMIS and others) without the confidentiality concerns of a public records request. Inaddition, F.S.125.901(a)(11) also protects confidentiality by stipulating that client identifying informationcannot be distributed. The operational structure of the collaborative has changed over the past threeyears as the needs and desires of the partners have changed. The relationship of the members is setforth in the three-year contract that is amended annually to reflect any changes in the fees. The elements ofthe collaborative management arrangement are summarized below.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 14
  • 16. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration 1. The governing boards of each of the participating CSCs approve the three year contract outlining the partnership, which is amended annually to include the current year’s annual fee assessment. Approves Contract CSC Boards SAMIS Approves Budget Management Committee (SMC) Recommends SAMIS Management Budget Group (SMG) Enhancement Infrastructure County Level Teams Team Partner 2. The SAMIS Management Committee (SMC), which consists of the Executive Directors of the each participating CSC, approves the annual budget submitted by the SAMIS Management Group (SMG). This budget is the basis for determining the funds required to operate and modify or enhance the application. The annual budget is the basis upon which the fee distribution rates are calculated. 3. The SMG consists of two members from each participating CSC (a lead and an alternate) that recommends an annual budget to the SMC. This group also decides on the priorities for group enhancements. 4. The agreement allows a CSC to bring in a local funding partner (i.e., a County, United Way, other local entities that distribute dollars in the community) to operate through the CSC. Palm Beach Community Services Department, a division of Palm Beach County is a current partner and operates through the Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County. 5. The SMG identifies and approves enhancements to the application. The SMG typically expands participation to SMEs when discussing enhancements or special projects such as an infrastructure review and design. For example, fiscal staff attends when enhancements to the Fiscal module are discussed, or research staff participates in Outcome/Performance Measures, and IT staff participates when discussing the infrastructure design. 6. Each CSC can enter into an agreement with the software developer for CSC specific enhancements for which the individual CSC Boards must approve. The enhancement cannot change the functionality of the base SAMIS code.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 15
  • 17. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration 7. The collaborative contract provides for the segregation of operations and fiscal administration providing checks and balances. Currently, JWB provides the daily operations management by providing the network access & management along with Help Desk support to each of the CSCs help desk staff. Palm Beach County CSC is the Fiscal agent billing the partners for assessed fee and contract management with the developer agency. 8. The Director of SAMIS, a staff member of the Operations Agent, JWB, manages all activities of the collaborative including SMG meetings, enhancement process, implementation of new partners, solicitation of new partners, and interfaces with the developer and therefore approves all invoices. JWB, the Operating Agent, requests reimbursement from Palm Beach CSC, the fiscal agent, for allowable expenses based on the approved operations budget. 9. The current operating budget includes the cost of .80 FTE in FY 10-11 (.50 SAMIS Systems Administrator and .30 help desk support). The staffing pattern will change as of October 1, 2011 increasing to 2 FTE’s to support the expanded number of partners and the implementation of Business Intelligence and the move of the Operating Agent to the State level. 10. JWB and the Collaborative share a network infrastructure including bandwidth, security features and storage in order to create economies of scale. These costs are reflected in the budget. SAMIS supports between 20 – 40% of the cost of shared network resources.The Fee StructureThe SAMIS partners sign a three year agreement, with the feesupdated annually through an amendment. SAMIS fees are The formula for assessing fees is theassessed to each partner based on a formula that is agreed to in percent of each partner’s share ofApril of each fiscal year. The formula was designed to measure the total of:the impact a partner will have on network resources, i.e. the • The amount of public fundsmore funds to distribute, the greater the number of programs managed in SAMISand users entering data, thus the need to consume a greater • The number of programsshare of the network resources. In 2012 a storage fee will be entering budgetsincluded in the fee structure to allow partners to maintain • The number of programsmultiple databases and data older than 10 years. Community- entering client databased agency users are provided access to SAMIS for free withall fees being assessed at the participating CSC level.The fee schedule consists of three parts – Operations, Enhancements (Fiscal and Program/client leveldemographics), Performance Measures Enhancements, and a Hardware/Software Replacement fee. Thehardware fee is assessed annually based with unexpended funds rolling over to the reserve fund andmade available for future use. Below is a description of each fee type.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 16
  • 18. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration • Implementation fees have replaced the practice of charging a licensing fee, and began in FY 10-11. The fee is assessed to all new partners and supports the set-up costs and provides for the customization of SAMIS to meet the unique needs of the new collaborative partner. The fee includes operating staff travel and time to train and assist in the new implementation. New partners have 12 months to complete the “new implementation.” Any unused funds roll over to the fund balance of the SAMIS Collaborative that enables operational enhancements for all partners. Customization needs that exceed the original agreement are paid for by the partner. • On-going operation fees are assessed annually to partners based on “system impact”; ad valorem tax revenue collection and the number of programs funded annually. Smaller CSC’s are able to participate in SAMIS at a considerably reduced cost. All partners participate at a fraction of what it would cost to independently operate. There are three classifications of fees: – Enhancements – Modifications made to SAMIS that are agreed upon by all members. The amount budgeted is based on discretionary funds available to the CSC’s and is determine in April for the upcoming fiscal year. CSCs are only billed if enhancements are undertaken. In addition, a recent change in the model created three classes of Enhancement fees – Program/Fiscal, Performance Measures, and Partner Specific. Operations – The cost to support SAMIS from the PEAK 10 data center, the infrastructure costs, and staffing for technical assistance and training to partners and users. The in-kind infrastructure support has been important to maintain a low cost of operations. The new business model will continue to negotiate a level of in-kind support from members to maintain the cost effectiveness of the model. – Hardware/Software replacement – These fees are to support the continuous improvement of the infrastructure to providing a secure, efficient, user-friendly experience. The funds unexpended rollover to the next fiscal year to support a fluctuation in capital expenditures and provide stabilized fees assessed to each of the CSCs.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 17
  • 19. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationFee Model Implementation Annual Fees • Enhancements • Operating • Set up activities • Enhancement • Hardware/Software Replacement Metered Rate Funds Distributed in SAMIS # Program Budgets # Program entering client Reserve Fund data 09-10The reserve fund had grown substantially as a result of the original cost structure of license fees andcost savings over the first eight years of operation, which has provided an opportunity to cut back onexpenditures as CSC revenues declined. The SAMIS partners decided for FY 10-11 and beyond to fundthe Hardware fees from the reserve fund therefore reducing the overall cost of operation. The reservefund has been designated for capital expenditures only.While traditional SaaS fees are assessed based on a per-user, per month utilization basis, the SAMIScustomer base would not allow for the acceptance of this model. The community agencies that enterthe required CSC data have a high rate of turnover in staff and despite efforts to educate users to NOTshare user accounts, there is both sharing along with an average of 15-20% of the accounts inactive. Theper-user metrics would therefore be skewed. The CSC is the actual client of the SAMIS Collaborative sothe fees are assessed based on metrics that relate to the use or impact a CSC has on the systemresources.The impact on the operating cost is the amount of storage required for the database(s) and the number ofpotential support calls incurred annually. It was decided at the onset of the project to select pre-definedindicators that would reflect growth and impact on the operations.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 18
  • 20. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationThe Funding FormulaThe SAMIS formula, or Base Rate, considers the impact the partner will have on the system or load. Thevariables include: 1. The total funds allocated to programs 2. The number of programs entering Budgets 3. The number of Programs entering into CDG (client level demographics)The formula is used to determine the portion each CSC partner will be assessed for: • Enhancements o Program/Fiscal o Performance Measures o Partner Specific • Operations • Hardware Replacement See the formula break down in attachment.The SAMIS EnvironmentThe SAMIS network is located at PEAK 10, a fortified data center in Tampa, providing 24/7 access tousers with a guaranteed uptime of 99.9%. SAMIS was moved to a data center from the JWB offices in2005 following a series of hurricanes in 2004 that required the turn down of the network to protect itfrom storm damage. SAMIS was moved at the same time the JWB network moved allowing for considerablecost savings all around.The network consists of three separate environments – Production, Training and Testing – one a singledomain that currently contains 16 separate SQL Server 2008 databases across the 7 partners. The webservers are virtualized using VMware and Hyper V Server 2008 R2 on physical hosts with a single physicalSQL 2008 server with multiple NAS storage devices attached to it. The web application is written in .NETusing IIS 6.All users have access to all three environments that provide opportunities for training and testingscenarios and report generation. Each environment has identical features and functions to ease thetransition between the sites with the training site being available year round to provide localizedtraining to users.CSC level users have access to a replicated environment and can choose to set up an ODBC connectionfrom other reporting applications, e.g. Crystal, SQL Reporting, Targit, etc., that at allows for the customanalysis of their data. In this environment, tables are read-only but allow the user to extract SAMIS datato their network for customized reporting.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 19
  • 21. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationAll users are provided access to a library of Microsoft Access queries to create custom analysis at thecommunity or agency level. MS Access is generally a more affordable tool for community basedorganizations than Crystal or other enterprise level applications. In addition to this, there are numerousstandard reports available in the SAMIS application that allows users to run the reports with filters for acustomized view of the data.Definitions of Cloud vs. SaaS solutionSAMIS operates as a SaaS model, using Cloud technology to provide reliable access using a single set of code.SAMIS resources are delivered to the user from PEAK 10 Data Center sharing rack space with the JuvenileWelfare Board. It is the co-location with JWB that reduces the cost of operation for both JWB and SAMISwith both entities receiving the benefits of 99.9% availability at a reduced cost for both.The definition of a Cloud and SaaS solution or strategy varies slightly based on the sources. Gartner andForesters provide a definition that are mostly vendor agnostic. However, vendors are flooding theinternet with free “Download Now” White papers that define SaaS and Cloud to heightenawareness for their product solution offered in the cloud or delivered as a SaaS. Microsoft, Dell,Sun, Brocade, HP, etc. are all distributing White papers that extoll the virtues of Cloud and applicationsthat use the vendor’s solution.Gartner defines the Cloud as a business function through the internet (email, storage, etc.) and a SaaS asthe delivery of a custom application that uses a single set of code that is shared across many users(SalesForce.com, Google Apps, etc.) 7 From a management and staff perspective, I would add to thedefinition that with the cloud solution, the customer can maintain somemanagement, monitoring and upgrade decisions, while with a SaaS thecustomer is a subscriber to a service and has no managementresponsibilities. Gartner defines the Cloud as a business function throughSAMIS initially began as a single tenant web based application deliver to the internet (email, storage,community programs funded by the JWB. SAMIS was initially designed etc.) and a SaaS as thefor agility and expansion in Pinellas County. However, the first delivery of a customopportunity was presented in 2001 when five other CSC’s requested to application that uses a singleparticipate to create a multi-tenant application to other Children’sServices Councils in Florida arose. The Collaborative has grown along with set of code that is sharedtechnological advancements that have made development affordable. across many usersSaaS and Cloud are definitions that can be applied to a growing number (SalesForce.com, Googleof business processes and evolving technology. SAMIS has been managed Apps, etc.) 1as both a Cloud solution and SaaS because of the unique relationshipbetween the partners.7 Gartner PresentationInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 20
  • 22. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationSaaS DefinedSaaS is both a business model and an application delivery model (Software, 2008). SaaS provides thefollowing benefits to the customer: 1. Use of the application on a pay-as-you-go basis. 2. Offers a subscription based fee structure. 3. Generally a repeatable revenue stream. 4. Eliminates the need to install and run the application on the customer’s hardware. 5. Access to the application is through the Web, which allows anywhere access. 6. Ongoing support and maintenance, and upgrades are provided by the provider. 7. Custom functionality developed for one customer can be offered to all customers. 8. Protection of the intellectual property for the provider. 9. Stronger control of the operational control of the application environment. 10. Typically supports a multi-tenancy model - many unique customers using a single instance of the code.SaaS is an emerging and maturing business model with experts suggesting that there are four waves tothe evolutionary model. Cloud DefinedGartner defines cloud computing as "a style of computing where scalable and elastic IT-relatedcapabilities are provided as a service to customers using Internet technologies".8 Gartner suggests thatthere are five attributes that support the definition: 1. Services based – Consumer concerns are abstracted from the provider concerns through a service interface 2. Scalable and elastic – Services scale on demand to add or remove resources as needed 3. Shared – Services share a pool of resources to build economies of scale 4. Metered by Use - Services are tracked with usage metrics to enable multiple payment models. 5. Internet technologies – Services are delivered through use of the internet identifiers, formats and protocols (Plummer, 2011)SAMIS as a Cloud and SaaS DefinedSAMIS operates as a private Cloud which restrict use to only similar businesses; in this case Children’s ServicesCouncils special taxing districts. In addition, one partner is delivering SAMIS as a SaaS since they are apay-as-you go and do not have any decision making authority on the management of the Collaborative;but do participate in the enhancement process. Future SAMIS partners will be delivered the applicationas a SaaS solution without any management input with the enhancements defined by the CollaborativePartners offered as an option.8 Webinar presented May 5, 2011, Daryl Plummer, Gartner, Cloud Computing Strategies to Optimize Your ITInitiativesInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 21
  • 23. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationDelivering Quality Service to the CustomerThe ability to continuously deliver a quality internet based software application that addresses thebusiness needs of the customers requires continual quality review comparing technology innovations tochanging user business processes. The key to ongoing customer satisfaction with the product is theprocess used for responding to the need for changes.The SAMIS application is continually being enhanced in response to user defined needs and diversity ofbusiness processes. The Enhancement process is an ongoing activity of the SAMIS Collaborative thatidentifies ideas with the principles of team learning and using the Software Development Life Cycle(SDLC) process.Enhancement Team ProcessThe key to the success of any software application is the ability to provide the user a positive experienceincluding both ease of use and relevance of feedback and to manage the speed of technologicalchanges with a return on investment. The SMG have been challenged over the years with balancingfunction over form and assuring the effective use of tax dollars.The system structures that regulate the process have changed overtime to improve the effectiveness ofthe team and to reduce the cost of design and development. Many changes revolved aroundcommunication to ensure that all partners are satisfied with the final product. The Enhancement processis an excellent example of communities of learning that produces quality change. The Flow Chart inAttachment 4 describes the use of the conversational leadership style which allows for both group (allpartners) and individual (one partner) to process the pending enhancement or system change. Theprocess in place provides for understanding, acceptance and fidelity to the decision.The process allows for group discussions where all partners Collaboration generates ideas;identify software enhancements that will improve theefficiency of their processes at the CSC as well as at the ideas generate opportunity;community agency locations. These discussions include key opportunity generatesstake holders, the developer and the SAMIS innovation; innovation generatesmanagement team. Two of the most important factors in success! PKGsuccessfully processing enhancement are the quality of theestablished relationships and the threshold for creative tension. The ability to translate the existing state ofthe software to the desired future state while maintaining the quality, is the final success factor. The Shared Learning approach to leading the enhancement process provides synergy of the shared experiences. The SAMIS Enhancement Team practices the four core goals of team learning: • Finding innovative approaches to problems by identifying joint solutions • Increasing efficiency over time by reducing the cycle time for enhancement decision makingInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 22
  • 24. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration • Acquiring new skills and understanding best practices in data management and collection • The ability to change norms and procedures over ten years and continue to successfully operate a collaborative While there have been modifications to the review process over the years, the leadership style has embraced the core values of learning team principles, which include: • All partners are equal regardless of tax revenues or fees paid. • Creating a meeting that encourages input for all members and an environment where members are free to give an opinion without fear of reprisal. • Conduct two face-to-face meetings per year allowing for relationship building. Every meeting will start with a “catch up” discussion of what notable activities have happened since our last meeting. • Inquiry is encouraged. • Open and respectful conversation is expected from all. • Shared learning improves the operations and functioning of the software A good leader will hear andThe enhancement process has been successful over the past 10 react to the needs of theyears due to the longevity of the membership representing the team as they move throughpartners, the SAMIS Operations leadership, and the developer team. each enhancement processThe historical knowledge provides continuity for why things were and work with the team todone and at the same time creating a trusting environment open tohearing new ideas from newer members of the process. There is make changes.always the potential, with a group process, for the creation of“stew” (just a mass of food) when the menu calls for “shish-kabob”(nice structured array). The SAMIS Collaboration Enhancementprocess has been successful in creating a software application thatimproves the business process for almost 800 programs in Florida while increasing the accountability ofpublic funds.Parameters for prioritizing the request are established in advance of the meetings. The Enhancementprocess provides for three levels of activities – Independent, Team, and Vendor processing. TheCollaborative leadership must nurture and encourage full participation in each level or interaction.The Enhancement Review ProcessVisualization is a major component of identifying enhancements along with the provision of detaildesign documents provided to all users on the SharePoint Site. White boarding is used during the face toface meetings when we discuss the enhancements and design the requirements.Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 23
  • 25. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationThe review process currently in use is based on several previous modifications to allow for thecontinuous improvement in the efficiency of the process, supports independent processing by eachpartner, and effective participatory discussions and inquiry activities.Each partner is asked to independently rate the enhancements with their team based on need: • Required for implementation ( the requesting CSC can purchase this with their own funds, if the group does not select it as a funding priority) • Must Have = 3 • Nice to have = 1 • Do not need or want = 0Using the results of the individual ratings, the group discussion focuses on reviewing the items that hadthe most interest (Required and Must Have). During the daylong meeting items are removed from thelist because of information provided by other members, including better methods to complete thebusiness process. One member removed an item from the list because another member offered a nocost solution. The newest members were able to learn from the challenges of older members of theteam and accept the solutions. The team leader should invite members who have had similarchallenges, to discuss the solutions used to solve the issue; offering a new perspective. With over 100enhancement ideas posted each year, it is critical to create an environment of trust and communicationto provide an environment where ideas are shared. Only approximately 25% of the enhancements arefunded each year as Group Enhancements.After the day long discussion, the developers are asked to review the final list and provide high leveldesign and development cost estimates. In the past, the group would have come together for an onsitemeeting to discuss the remaining enhancements on the list and attempt to create a consensus forwhich items to fund. Now the team is asked to individually rank the items remaining on the SharePointlist from 1 to xx. It is during this process that partners can remove a request from the list because thecost exceeds the efficiency desired.The leader then provides an analysis of the funding options of all items on the list to the membersidentifying which items fall below the funding line. Partners have several options: 1. Support the ranking and funding strategy. 2. Move an item from above the funding line, to below the funding line. 3. Choose to fund an item independently or with a partner. 4. Negotiate with the team a change in the rankings.Partners are asked to review and sign off on the design document from the developer stating thatthey have read and agreed with the specifications. This document will be used to remediate anyconfusion on who meant what during the discussions.Once the list is approved, the rollout schedule is confirmed, and development begins. The developerrolls out the code to the SAMIS Test site first, where the Developer and the SAMIS Operations team willtest. All partners are asked to participate in testing as the code is rolled from the SAMIS TestInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 24
  • 26. SAMIS-A Software Collaborationenvironment to SAMIS Training and then to the SAMIS Production environment. The developer will makeadjustments as necessary. The SAMIS Operations team works with the developer to identify scope creepverse “bugs”, and issues that need to be fixed prior to rollout to the production environment. The trainingdocumentation is drafted during the testing phase and completed either before or shortly after a GoLive date.SDLC FrameworkSDLC is a framework that describes the activities performed at each stage of a software developmentproject. 9 The SDLC model, used by SAMIS, is a waterfall model which is a sequential design process inwhich progress is seen as flowing steadily downwards (like a waterfall) through the phases ofConception, Initiation, Analysis, Design, Construction, Testing, Production/Implementation andMaintenance. The waterfall development model originates in the manufacturing and constructionindustries: highly structured physical environments in which after-the-fact changes are prohibitivelycostly, if not impossible.10The SAMIS Model is outlined below and is followed for each enhancement resulting in rollout of newfunctionality with very few incidents over the life of the project. The SAMIS SDLC model is outlinedbelow.SAMIS SDLC Requirements High Level Design Detailed Design Development Testing Training/Documentation Production MaintenanceCollaborative Technology The developer set up read only access to a SAMIS SharePoint site in 2005 to facilitate communication between all partners. In addition, final requirements documents, dating back to 2001, are also available and represent the history of the decisionmaking. Members are able to log in and access the written requirement specifications for all enhancements. Prior to this site, JWB had to email the materials to all members requiring multiple emails with large attachments. In 20079 Waterfall- Software Development Life Cycle(SDLC) condor.depaul.edu/jpetlick/extra/394/sesssion2.ppt10 Wikipedia, Waterfall Model, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterfall_modelInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 25
  • 27. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration a list was added to the site allowing users to communicate enhancement ideas, bugs and fixes. In 2009 a JWB SharePoint site was established to manage the meeting notes, project calendar, training requests, implementation activities, and technical support requests to the SAMIS Help Desk. To increase learning opportunities webinars are held for the team to demonstrate what is available on each site and provideA recent survey of Collaborative overview of the features and information available on the sites.members found that: The goal is to increase member awareness of the history of theThe enhancement process was clearly changes and to gain a perspective on the opportunities of thecommunicated – 73% group through continuous learning.Emails summarizing actions wereclearly written – 63% The Partner Commitment to AccountabilityConference calls were productive – 82% SAMIS provides partners the ability to report on theCoordinator was respectful to the needs expenditure of public funds in real time and account for theof callers – 92% impact of funds in the community. SAMIS enables the partnersParticipants were given an opportunity to analyze how expended funds have improved the lives ofto provide input – 100% children and families within their communities. The system is designed for easy data entry and retrieval by a wide range ofThe environment allowed for all skilled and non-skilled workers, e.g. social workers, data entryopinions to be expressed – 92% clerks, executives. Data integrity is a key objective of theNew ideas were solicited – application which makes an extensive use of field validations,100% of Participants felt their ideas were including look-up tables, data-type restrictions, formulas, etc.heard by all participants – 73% The integrity in data provides for more accurate data therefore confidence in fiscal decision making. The reduced cost of operations provides each participating partner with more capability than they could have if they operated independently. JWB expended over $450,000 on system enhancements in the first three years of sole ownership and $456,000 over the next 10 years as a member of the SAMIS Collaborative.11 Of the $3.7 million expended on the system since 1998, JWB only invested $1.2 million. In addition, the co-location of the SAMIS and JWB infrastructures at PEAK 10 data center allows JWB to offset 20-40% of the cost of operation, maintenance and communication costs. 11 Based on the contracted fees listed in the Three Year Statewide SAMIS Agreement, Base Rate Fee schedule, as amended annually. Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 26
  • 28. SAMIS-A Software CollaborationImplementation of New PartnersThe Implementation process for new partners is enhanced by the learning that occurred prior to thispoint including sharing business processes and roles.The pre-implementation support model was revised from a demonstration of the application, i.e. jumpingright in, to setting an implementation schedule, followed by classroom training for users to a moresupportive and learning model involving two key learning and discovery opportunities. • The SANDBOX concept was created to allow interested parties to “play” with SAMIS using a fake set of records. SAMIS staff then offer online meetings to demonstrate the functionality and provide insight as to how other partners implemented similar features in SAMIS. In this environment the new partner can learn the various features using their business practices rather than being forced to test a system using a set of unfamiliar practices. During this process the partner is encouraged to ask and try new and old processes to create the correct environment. • Once the decision is made to move forward, a BOOT CAMP is held at which point the SAMIS team, along with the developer, engage with the partner to review critical decision points related to SAMIS set-up. Partners are invited to discuss their implementation and discuss lessons learned and strategies to avoid. For example, we will bring in a Ph.D. researcher to discuss best practices in setting up client level performance measures.Future Projects of the CollaborativeBusiness IntelligenceIn FY 2011-12, a business intelligence solution will be introduced using SharePoint 2010, as a sharedresource by all partners that will leverage the SAMIS databases and create a state level performancedashboard. See Attachment 5.Business Intelligence is defined as a set of technologies and processes that allow people at all levels ofthe organization to access and analyze data. Without people to interpret the information and act on it,business intelligence achieves nothing.12SAMIS has a rich repository of data captured over 12 years that can be exported to any number of business intelligence solutions and transformed into information that will lead to innovation. Regardless of The delivery of data needs to be the tools selected business intelligence is about the current and in a format that creativity in producing data that is valued by the culture decisions makers can absorb. of the organization and utilized effectively to make12 (Howson, 2008) p 1Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 27
  • 29. SAMIS-A Software Collaborationdecisions. The initiative is proposed to operate at the state level with the executive leadership fromeach partnership supporting staff efforts to create an effective and agile solution. Technology allows foreach partner to operate an independent BI solution, while creating a data warehouse that will offer theability to create insight on a problem when multiple data set aremashed up.Business intelligence reveals the performance, operational “Just as the eyes are theefficiencies, and untapped opportunities.13 The SAMIS Collaborative windows to the soul, businessis a natural environment to develop a BI focus because the business intelligence is a window tois to provide effective services (Performance), in a manner that the dynamics of a business.efficiently uses taxes dollars (operational efficiencies), and look for (Howson, 2008)”new ways of creating a healthy community (untappedopportunities).A business intelligence solution will fail if too much focus is on thetechnology rather than identifying the outputs and audience correctly. Business intelligence is 80%planning and 20% doing. The proposed idea for SAMIS BI is to develop “push boards” or dashboards thatpush information to audiences based on interest or need. For example, legislators can have deliveredperformance metric that reflect their districts, served by a CSC, while your retired neighbor willhave delivered outcomes of local crime prevention programs.Online LearningAn online training strategy will be refined over the next year to include greater use of webinarsproviding generic SAMIS trainings. Partners will be provided access to Citrix Online Go To Meeting, Go ToTraining, and Go To Webinar licenses, to offer local training online trainings. The SAMIS operations teamwill increase the number of training materials available to the partners in the provision of local training.Online learning management systems were explored, but the staff resources required to develop coursesexceeded the cost benefit; and training is local.SAMIS Operations at the State LevelThe negotiations are under way to move SAMIS operations to the State level and potentially move theoperations management to the Children’s Board of Hillsborough County CSC. The new arrangement willelevate the discussion to a higher level allowing for the successful implementation of a businessintelligence strategy.Expansion of PartnershipsSAMIS is being reviewed by several local funders and community-based organizations that see SAMIS as adatabase to provide the needed intelligence to make decisions, request funds, and market theoutcomes of services provided.13 Howson, Cindi ,”Successful Business Intelligence”, page 1Innovation is born from collaboration! Page 28
  • 30. SAMIS-A Software Collaboration For more information on this project contact Patricia K. Gehant, M.A., CCIO Director of SAMIS Collaborative 727-647-0941 pgehant@jwbpinellas.org pgehant@gmail.orgInnovation is born from collaboration! Page 29
  • 31. SAMIS Organizational Structure Tuesday, August 09, 2011 FCSC Executive Director of Business FCSC Chair Director Technology SolutionsThe Children’s Children’s JWB Childrens Board Palm Beach Martin Broward St. Lucie Trust Commission Office Space Operations Fiscal Manager Manager SAMIS Business Information Analyst SAMIS Management Committee – includes all participating CSC Ex. Directors SAMIS Management Groups – includes a representative from each participating CSC The Children’s Children’s Broward Palm Beach Martin JWB Childrens Board St. Lucie Trust Commission Enhancement Process – Palm Beach includes SMG plus subject Community matter experts. Services Dept.Prepared by P. Gehant May 17, 2011 Page 1
  • 32. Tuesday, August 09, 2011 FCSC Vendor payment Executive Director Director ofMonthly invoice Business Palm Beach CSC Technology Solutions Requests reimbursementTribridgePeak 10Go To Mtg SAMIS BusinessCommunications InformationMaintenance Agreement AnalystsTravel SAMIS Team SAMIS Staff are the employees of the CSC but work for the FCSC Requests reimbursement CSC- Staffing AgentPrepared by: Patricia K. Gehant Page 2
  • 33. SAMIS Staffing Tuesday, August 09, 2011 Pays bills Palm Beach FCSC Fiscal Agent SAMIS Operating AgentPay SAMIS Fees Monthly Operating Reimburses invoice Requests payment SAMIS Collaborative Members Requests Director of Review/ Approve Payment Business and Technology CSC Staff are employees of the CSC as a grant or enterprise activity. SAMIS Business Staff to FCSC Information Analysts SAMIS Team Page 2
  • 34. SAMIS A Grants Management SuiteSAMIS - A grants management suite that tracks communityprograms use of funds distributed by governmental agencies.SAMIS is ... a software application used by local and special taxing districts to capture information from agencies that receive public funds. …accessed through a private Cloud providing 24/7access List of Partners from any location with an internet connection. … a SaaS (Software as a Service) model. located at PEAK 10 Data Center in Tampa as SSAE 16 certified facility with ISO 17799 security standards. Additional benefits of a SaaS include:: • Consistent network access • Rapid scalability • Elasticity of storage ... a Collaboration of governments sharing the cost of operation and system upgrades providing a high return on investment to the community. Software developed by Tribridge. ... a Grant Management Suite that collects demographic .information on how funds are spent by the program. ... is able to record the outcomes of the clients in programs and report trends and service patterns of the population served. ... a source of Business Intelligence, and integrates with other data sources and tools.. Contact: Patricia K. Gehant, M.A., Director of SAMIS JWB Children’s Services Council of Pinellas County 14155 58th Street North Clearwater, Florida 33760 727-547-5678, or 727-647-0491 pgehant@jwbpinellas.org
  • 35. SAMIS is managed as a DataCollaboration under Florida State Statute, Results OutcomeSection 163.62, which provides that Outcome Generatoragencies of local governments may establish Outcome Viewera collaborative client information system in Outcome Setupwhich state, local, and private agencies may Reportsshare information.Members benefit by: Reducing the time to manage an Fiscal Modules individual system. Allocations Budgets Sharing cost between government Reimbursements of shared mission. Budget Amendments Program Units of Service Stabilization of costs over time. Position Management Request New Position Sharing ideas for better results. Slot Reimbursement Manual Payments Information is protected from Program Funders Administrative Modules disclosure under the Public Records Audit Work Papers Service Contract laws. Budget to Actual User Management Reports CSC CustomizationSAMIS accounts for: • Settings • Over 1 billion in public funds since Program Modules • Fields 2001, 350 million managed annually Client Data Fiscal Customization Attendance Group Activities • GL Accounts • 850 ,000 client records • GL Overages Group Units of Service Volunteer Activities • Reimbursement Overages • 3,500 users • Fiscal Years Analysis of Outcomes EDI Imports/Exports CDG Customization • Providing service in counties Data Cleansing • Client Identifying Fields representing 48% of state population Quarterly Commentary • Outcome Measures Results Outcome • Settings • 1,000 program sites entering data Reports • Fields Contact: Patricia K. Gehant, M.A., Director of SAMIS JWB Children’s Services Council of Pinellas County 14155 58th Street North Clearwater, Florida 33760 727-547-5678, or 727-647-0491 pgehant@jwbpinellas.org
  • 36. https://share.jwbpinellas.org/Departments/IT/NeedsAssessment/Shared Documents/SAMIS savings_over_lifeJune2011 Page 1 SAMIS Analysis of Costs Over Life of ColaborativeTotal Annual Fees (Includes Hard Replacement fees)Fiscal Year Pinellas Broward Duval Martin PalmBeach Miami Total FYFY 97/98 $61,278 $61,278FY 98/99 $200,000 $200,000FY 99-00 $148,000 $148,000FY 00-01 $144,913 $126,913 $126,913 $398,739Fiscal Year Pinellas Broward Duval Martin PalmBeach Miami Total FYFY 01-02 $101,510 $109,265 $70,276 $17,132 $101,404 $0 $399,587FY 02-03 $98,627 $119,105 $69,920 $15,925 $101,013 $0 $404,590FY 03-04 $108,212 $127,610 $76,981 $19,357 $112,254 $0 $444,414FY 04-05 $96,171 $117,978 $75,048 $19,767 $119,947 $0 $428,911FY 05-06 $87,720 $127,469 $66,682 $20,453 $115,614 $0 $ 417,938FY 06-07 $91,720 $133,282 $69,723 $21,386 $120,887 $0 $ 436,998FY07-08 $85,968 $131,835 $71,101 $25,162 $101,407 $0 $ 415,473FY08-09 $65,254 $99,727 $53,969 $19,099 $76,973 $0 $ 315,022FY 09-10 $37,590 $59,699 $24,892 $11,723 $35,335 $0 $ 169,239FY 10-11 $ 32,799 $ 46,385 $ 21,434 $ 15,560 $ 54,370 $ 68,433 $ 238,981Total CSC $ 805,571 $ 1,072,355 $ 600,026 $ 185,564 $ 939,204 $ 68,433 $ 3,671,153% Pinellas 22% 29% 16% 5% 26% 2% 100%Average Annualcost $ 80,557 $ 107,236 $ 60,003 $ 18,556 $ 93,920 $ - $ 367,115 $ 2,865,582
  • 37. https://share.jwbpinellas.org/Departments/IT/NeedsAssessment/Shared Documents/SAMIS savings_over_lifeJune2011 Page 2Total EnhancementsFiscal Year Pinellas Broward Duval Martin PalmBeach Miami Total FYFY 97/98 $ 61,278 $ 61,278FY 98/99 $ 200,000 $ 200,000FY 99-00 $ 148,000 $ 148,000FY 00-01 $ 144,913 $ 144,913Collaboartive $ 554,191FY 01-02 $ 57,158 61525 39571 $ 9,647.00 $ 57,099.00 $ 225,000FY 02-03 $ 56,067 $ 67,709 $ 39,748 $ 9,053 $ 57,423 $ 230,000FY 03-04 $ 60,873 $ 71,786 $ 43,305 $ 10,889 $ 63,147 $ 250,000FY 04-05 $ 56,055 $ 68,766 $ 43,743 $ 11,522 $ 69,914 $ 250,000FY 05-06 $ 52,472 76,249.0 39,888.0 12,235.0 69,157.0 $ 250,001FY 06-07 $52,472 $76,249 $39,888 $12,235 $69,157 $ 250,001FY07-08 $ 51,785 $ 79,143 $ 42,830 $ 15,157 $ 61,085 $ 250,000FY08-09 $ 31,071 $ 47,486 $ 25,698 $ 9,094 $ 36,651 $ 150,000FY 09-10 $ 23,390 $ 37,763 $ 12,946 $ 7,530 $ 18,376 $ 100,005FY 10-11 $ 15,535 $ 21,802 $ 8,729 $ 7,643 $ 14,936 $ 31,355 $ 100,000Total CSC $ 456,878 $ 608,478 $ 336,346 $ 105,005 $ 516,945 $ 31,355 $ 2,055,007% Pinellas 22% 30% 16% 5% 25% 2% 100%Average Annual cost 45,688 $ $ 60,848 $ 33,635 $ 10,501 $ 51,695 $ 205,501Average before $ 138,548 22%
  • 38. https://share.jwbpinellas.org/Departments/IT/NeedsAssessment/Shared Documents/SAMIS savings_over_lifeJune2011 Page 3OperationsFiscal Year Pinellas Broward Duval Martin PalmBeach Miami Total FYFY 97/98 $ -FY 98/99 $ -FY 99-00 $ - Pinellas Broward Duval Martin PalmBeach Miami $ -FY 01-02 $ 36,306 39079 25135 $ 6,128.00 $ 36,268.00 $ 142,916FY 02-03 $ 34,838 $ 42,072 $ 24,698 $ 5,625 $ 35,681 $ 142,915FY 03-04 $ 39,626 46729 $ 28,190 $ 7,088 $ 41,106 $ 162,739FY 04-05 $ 36,483 $ 44,756 $ 28,470 $ 7,498 $ 45,503 $ 162,710FY 05-06 $ 31,859 46,295.0 24,218.0 7,428.0 41,989.0 $ 151,789FY 06-07 $35,859 $52,108 $27,259 $8,361 $47,262 $ 170,849FY07-08 $ 26,933 $ 41,162 $ 22,275 $ 7,883 $ 31,770 $ 130,023FY08-09 $ 26,933 $ 41,162 $ 22,275 $ 7,883 $ 31,770 $ 130,023FY 09-10* $ 14,201 $ 21,931 $ 11,946 $ 4,194 $ 16,958 $ 69,230FY 10-11** $ 17,264 $ 24,583 $ 12,705 $ 7,917 $ 39,434 $ 37,078 $ 138,981Total CSC $ 300,302 $ 399,877 $ 227,171 $ 70,005 $ 367,741 $ 37,078 $ 1,402,175% Pinellas 21% 29% 16% 5% 26% 3% 100%* Reduced staffing to reflect increase knowledgebase/skill set at each CSC** Expanded consutling fees and operating costs to accommodate Miami joining collaborativeLifetime Pinellas *** Broward Duval Martin PalmBeach MiamiEnahancements $ 456,878 $ 608,478 $ 336,346 $ 105,005 $ 516,945 $ 31,355Operations $ 300,302 $ 399,877 $ 227,171 $ 70,005 $ 367,741 $ 37,078Total $ 805,571 $ 1,072,355 $ 600,026 $ 185,564 $ 939,204 $ 68,433Annual Average for$ 80,557.10 10 yrs $ 107,235.50 $ 60,002.60 $ 18,556.40 $ 93,920.40***Includes 10 yrs of collaborative only
  • 39. Team Learning Scenario GOAL – To identify methods to improve processing data in SAMIS Suite SAMIS Enhancement Team SAMIS Enhancement Vendor Independent Processing Team Inquiry & Independent Process Post Discussion Each CSC posts (Learning to produce enhancement request to Tribridge SharePoint List results) 10/08/10 Rating Each CSC rates all items on the list using the 5=Implementation request 3=Can’t live withoutConversational Leadership 1= Nice to have 0=No interest 10/15/10 SAMIS Enhancement Mtg. discussion based on scores starting with the highest. During day long meeting group members add value by suggesting solutions High level design and Prioritize other than code changes. development cost estimates SAMIS Management tallies Items removed from list that are prepared by Tribridge scores and sort list. are no longer viewed as (Developer) based on outcome Results posted to needed by the original of meetings. The estimates SharePoint list on Tribridge requesting member. includes shared cost of rollout site. 10/28/10 and training. Order of scores is used to List is posted on the Tribridge set agenda for SharePoint Site for review by Enhancement mtg. team members. discussion. 10/22/10 Conference Call - Rank Order Discussion of the design Each CSC ranks requests estimates compared to the and confirm continued budget. Members interest in request based on determine expected RIO the estimated price and adjust the list. 11/08/10 Keep Discard Analysis of Results Conference Call SAMIS Director provides an Discuss and approve final Prepare Detailed Design analysis of rankings with a list of enhancements. documentation comparison to the budget Determine Fund source: Documents will define the with recommendations for Group, Implementation, functionality of the funding source. CSC specific, or Fund enhancement requests. 11/24/10 Balance. Documents posted to Tribridge Confirm the list for SharePoint site for team review. development 12/6/10 Next Page
  • 40. SAMIS Enhancement SAMIS Enhancement Team Vendor Team Independent Inquiry & Discussion Independent ProcessingFrom page 1 Processing Review and discuss timetable Consider date when SAMIS Management and enhancement is required to be in Developer proposes design, production then the availability of development, and rollout team to test and train users. and training schedule. (Includes both user training materials and interactive 12/20/10 sessions.) Begin Development December 2010 No Changes can be made without change request process. Confirm Final Design January 2011 Detail Design Review Documents Review final design docs Conference call to provide FINAL based on expressed needs. opportunity for discussion of January 2011 specifications. Team restates approval to initiate development. Finalize the timetable. Roll to Testing Site January 2011 Conversational Leadership Roll to Training Site Roll to Production Site Testing SAMIS HelpDesk staff at each CSC conducts testing based on script provided by Testing SAMIS Management. CSC Conference call to confirm specific enhancements are outcome of testing Remediation tested by sponsoring member. SAMIS team at JWB and Tribridge conduct preliminary testing Training Training provided to each SAMIS Ongoing Support CSC Help Desk Rollout Help Desk train users in county. May or June Training frequently offered after rollout to Training site Shared Learning SAMIS Management Group (SMG) Meetings Quarterly meetings or as needed to review 1. Determine next enhancement cycle 2. Review the process 3. Identify new options/areas of innovation (SMG consists of a representative from each participating CSC)
  • 41. FCSC Business Intelligence Model Sunday, July 24, 2011 FCSC Dash Boards SharePoint Transform Data Transform Data FCSC Data warehouse Child and Juvenile School SAMIS Maternal Census Data at the county level and Justice Health client level Send data to FCSC Send data to FCSC Dashboard Dashboard Send data to FCSC Send data to FCSC Data warehouse for Data warehouse for integration Other Data CSC Data integration warehouses warehousesPrepared by – Patricia K. Gehant, MA, CCIO Page 1
  • 42. FCSC Business Intelligence Governance Structure Tuesday, August 09, 2011 FCSC Chair Leadership, funding, and policy The Children’s Children’s JWB Childrens Board Palm Beach Broward Martin St. Lucie Trust Commission Office Space Operations Fiscal Manager Manager FCSC Leadership Team FCSC Executive Director BI Strategy SMG Research Team & Director of Business Infrastructure Technology Solutionsr FCSC BI Coordinator Director of Research, Broward CSC Communication/ The Firm Research Group CHair Marketing Technology Coordination Audience Technology Opportunities Define framework, Policy Group Opportunities research questions, data Delivery sources, message, advocacy Business Information Systems Team (BIST) Business Intelligence Strategy TeamPrepared by P. Gehant, July 2010 Page 1