How do YOU Measure    Student Learning? SAILS,     ILCC, & RGR at GVSU                  MLA Annual ConferenceLiaison Libra...
Discussion questions• What are your institutions curricular goals and objectives?  How does your librarys work dovetail wi...
SAILS:Standardized Assessment ofInformation Literacy SkillsDebbie MorrowLiaison Librarian: Engineering, Computing &Informa...
Why do Librarians Assess?  1. Direct application of assessment data     to increase student learning  2. Respond to calls ...
How do Librarians Assess?  Options include ...    surveys      interviews         focus groups            portfolios      ...
Choosing an Assessment Approach"Guiding Questions for Assessing Information Literacy inHigher Education" (Oakleaf & Kaske,...
• Developed at Kent State University, beginning in 2002• Funding from IMLS, Ohio Board of Regents  Technology Initiative G...
Are we ready to conduct an information                                            literacy assessment?• Two necessary elem...
Why are we conducting this assessment?                                   and is our purpose formative,                    ...
What are the stakeholder needs? (and who                                           are the stakeholders?)• GVSU stakeholde...
Will the assessment tell us what we                                                   want to know?"What do we want to kno...
What are the costs of this assessment? --                                     time, financial, personnel?                 ...
What are the institutional implications of                                                 this assessment?What does SAILS...
Our conclusions regarding SAILS:• Doing SAILS isnt enough. More SAILS isnt the right  answer.• Administering SAILS has bee...
Information Literacy CoreCompetencies (ILCC) documentEmily FrigoLiaison Librarian: Art & Design, Italian,Writing 098 & 150...
Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) document-Emily FrigoIntended to be a multifaceted tool inclusive of the libr...
Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) documentFaculty focus groups chosen to get feedback   o   awareness of infor...
Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) documentFocus group findings:   o   many ways to describe information literacy
Definition of Information Literacy
Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) documentMore findings:   o   clarification of language in document   o   des...
Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) document  Where are we at now?  • Changes to General Education Program are c...
The Research Guidance Rubric (RGR)Pete CocoLiaison Librarian: English,Environmental Studies, Writing&Hazel McClureLiaison ...
What is the Research Guidance Rubric?                           [link]* • an assessment tool for research assignment promp...
What skills does the RGR integrate into thecurriculum?• GVSUs Information Literacy Core Competencies  o Skills Goals are c...
How does the RGR integrate these skills into thecurriculum?• reaching faculty through:   o campus partners   o library lia...
ReferencesOakleaf, M., & Kaske, N. (2009). Guiding Questions for AssessingInformation Literacy in Higher Education. portal...
Discussion & Conclusion• What are your institutions curricular goals and objectives?  How does your librarys work dovetail...
How do you_measure_student_learning_mla_an
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

How do you_measure_student_learning_mla_an

229

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
229
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Emily introduces speakers and format.  Real brief. The Principle:  Information Literacy   [Open: hand out 3x5 cards, ask participants to respond to the question: " .... ?" -- We will offer some of our thoughts and activities related to this question.]       Assessing students: benchmarks         SAILS --debbie     Assessing our work (ILCC): reflection and developing a vocabulary [Emily] Multifaceted tool (internal and external) discuss background/impetus Created a tool- how do we ascertain whether we crafted an inclusive document-> focus groups Scope and purpose of focus groups Brief overview of findings-> revised iteration of ILCC document     Assessing assignments: a tool to guide assignment-building RGR --hazel & pete In conclusion: What could the role of the Libraries become in a wider move to  collaborate with classroom faculty?     Discussion with participants     [Process orientation--?] End- pass out customized survey on future programming/collaboration
  • The Principle:  Information Literacy   [Open: hand out 3x5 cards, ask participants to respond to the question: " .... ?" -- We will offer some of our thoughts and activities related to this question.]       Assessing students: benchmarks         SAILS --debbie     Assessing our work (ILCC): reflection and developing a vocabulary [Emily] Multifaceted tool (internal and external) discuss background/impetus Created a tool- how do we ascertain whether we crafted an inclusive document-> focus groups Scope and purpose of focus groups Brief overview of findings-> revised iteration of ILCC document     Assessing assignments: a tool to guide assignment-building RGR --hazel & pete In conclusion: What could the role of the Libraries become in a wider move to  collaborate with classroom faculty?     Discussion with participants     [Process orientation--?] End- pass out customized survey on future programming/collaboration
  • This article and the 6-question framework it presents would have been really useful for us five years ago, when we undertook our first major attempt at broadly assessing and benchmarking student information literacy at Grand Valley. Even after the fact, the framework provides a useful way to look back at that assessment attempt, and add some dimension to what we've learned from it.
  •   The attempt in question is our two administrations of SAILS, the Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills.   ACRL standard:  delineates 5 IL standards, each with multiple performance indicators and outcomes. SAILS test questions are derived from the outcomes and also from objectives included in a companion ACRL document.    Participating students respond to 40 multiple choice questions presented to them randomly from a question bank of some 150 items; it takes about 45 minutes to work through the test.
  • Since 2005, 1st Dean of Libraries has been growing and restructuring the Univ. Libraries and its programs -- not able to do much beyond initial benchmarking until structures and people are in place to develop and carry out programs
  • Some risk of 'survey fatigue' among student participants Limited information to report to colleagues and administrators
  • [after Debbie is done here, Emily continues with ILCC document]
  • Saw advantage of using existing university curriculum as means to advocate for IL Ground work needed to be laid internally--> needed more formal framework to begin standardizing library instruction Document- facilitate conversation by focusing conversation on standards we embrace professionally as librarians Standards provide common ground to base discussion of pedagogy and teaching methodologies both within and beyond the library What does this document look like?
  • Total of 6 skills goals: 1) Construct a question or problem statement 2) locate and gather information 3)Evaluate sources 4)Manage Information and Communicate Knowledge 5)Use information ethically 6)Develop subject knowledge Shows breadth of IL across students academic career from general education- major program- graduate program Uses a scaffolding hierarchy Use little jargon as possible Use langauge inclusive of any academic discipline  Emphasis that IL is a process
  • Along with my colleagues MO and JT, we applied for internal grant to fund 2 faculty focus groups.  ($1800 Pew Scholar Teacher Grant)
  • Should come as no surprise that there was no one shared definition of IL
  • Clarification of language:  RSS--> Current awareness tools *Seminal- foundational *Proto-thesis New objectives: added information overload and another about disciplinary ethical guidelines Changed Skills Goal #6: Develop Subject Knowledge to Communicate Knowledge Supporting documents: use as lens through which their existing curricular materials could be viewed Assessment- concern over number of skills goals and objectives, but agreed document could be used to inform larger university assessment process (further exploration was outside the scope of this project)
  • Transcript of "How do you_measure_student_learning_mla_an"

    1. 1. How do YOU Measure Student Learning? SAILS, ILCC, & RGR at GVSU MLA Annual ConferenceLiaison Librarians, GVSU University LibrariesPete CocoEmily FrigoHazel McClureDebbie Morrow Wednesday, 26 October 2011, 9-10 am
    2. 2. Discussion questions• What are your institutions curricular goals and objectives? How does your librarys work dovetail with those goals?• What skills would you like to see further integrated into the curriculum?• How would you advocate for that integration amongst your colleagues?• What kind of tools could you use in that effort?
    3. 3. SAILS:Standardized Assessment ofInformation Literacy SkillsDebbie MorrowLiaison Librarian: Engineering, Computing &Information Systems, Mathematics, Statistics
    4. 4. Why do Librarians Assess? 1. Direct application of assessment data to increase student learning 2. Respond to calls for accountability 3. Improve library instruction programs
    5. 5. How do Librarians Assess? Options include ... surveys interviews focus groups portfolios concept maps classroom assessment techniques tests performance assessments rubrics more ... How to choose??
    6. 6. Choosing an Assessment Approach"Guiding Questions for Assessing Information Literacy inHigher Education" (Oakleaf & Kaske, 2009)Six questions can aid librarians in selecting a best assessmentapproach for a given context:• Are we ready to conduct an information literacy assessment?• Why are we conducting this assessment?• What are the stakeholder needs?• Will the assessment tell us what we want to know?• What are the costs of this assessment?• What are the institutional implications of this assessment?
    7. 7. • Developed at Kent State University, beginning in 2002• Funding from IMLS, Ohio Board of Regents Technology Initiative Grant, & ARL partnership• Based on ACRLs Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (2000)• Pilot project included 6-7 ARLs, 2002-2005• Valid and reliable, considered standardized• Used by at least 96 institutions, AA through Doctoral• Conducted twice so far at Grand Valley: o 2006-07: 304 First-Year, 102 Fourth-Year o 2009-10: 204 First-Year, 283 Fourth-Year
    8. 8. Are we ready to conduct an information literacy assessment?• Two necessary elements for grounding assessment: o Desired learning outcomes are defined o Opportunity for implementing improvement exists• 2005: First GVSU Dean of University Libraries, re- conceiving the mission and vision of GVSUs library services• Ready? maybe not, but ...
    9. 9. Why are we conducting this assessment? and is our purpose formative, or summative?• Institution has adopted assessment and continuous improvement as a university-wide expectation• By 2006-07 the Provosts Office was strongly encouraging the Libraries to begin benchmarking with a nationally standardized tool such as SAILS• Libraries use of SAILS could be formative for the Library Faculty in designing an information literacy program for the future
    10. 10. What are the stakeholder needs? (and who are the stakeholders?)• GVSU stakeholders in regard to IL: o Dean of University Libraries o Library Faculty o GVSU Faculty o GVSU General Education Program o GVSU students• Using SAILS we could o demonstrate participation in assessment of the units impact on student learning o benchmark our students externally and internally o feed into a larger unit conversation about the shape and nature of library contributions to student learning in a changing future
    11. 11. Will the assessment tell us what we want to know?"What do we want to know?" -- perhaps THE key question thatwe didnt ask before we administered SAILS.What we were able to learn:• how GVSU students compare in IL skills to college students nationwide (baseline, external comparison): as well as, or better than, most comparable participating institutions• if GVSU students improve their IL skills during the course of their college education (longitudinal, internal comparison): YES, somewhat• if UL information literacy programs contribute to student learning and information literacy: by indirect inference, we could be more effective ...
    12. 12. What are the costs of this assessment? -- time, financial, personnel? initial and continuing?• participation cost for one year -- $2000• marketing to participants, including incentives -- $500?• staff time -- primarily, small committee work to analyze and report• conduct perhaps every 3rd or 4th year• TOTAL: ~$2000-$3000, pretty modest cost, really
    13. 13. What are the institutional implications of this assessment?What does SAILS really measure?• What does it tell us? What DIDNT it tell us?• Does information gleaned from this assessment help inform campus discussions about the impact of the University Libraries on student learning at GVSU? or do we need to explore other tools and avenues of assessment?Results and reports from the 2006-07 and 2008-09 iterationsof SAILS at Grand Valley: • On the About page on the GVSU Libraries web site (www.gvsu.edu/library/about-188.htm)
    14. 14. Our conclusions regarding SAILS:• Doing SAILS isnt enough. More SAILS isnt the right answer.• Administering SAILS has been valuable: o GVSU students are competitive with their peers at other institutions in IL skills; o Conducting SAILS and analyzing the data has been a great "conversation starter" among the Library faculty about what it is that we really want to measure, and how we can attempt to do it.
    15. 15. Information Literacy CoreCompetencies (ILCC) documentEmily FrigoLiaison Librarian: Art & Design, Italian,Writing 098 & 150 Library Coordinator
    16. 16. Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) document-Emily FrigoIntended to be a multifaceted tool inclusive of the library,General Education program, and broader academic communityWithin the library: o undergird our Instruction Program o define standards we embrace professionally as librarians o provide a tool and shared language for outreachLarger University: o information literacy is a component of every general education class o create a shared understanding of the breadth of skills information literacy encompasses
    17. 17. Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) documentFaculty focus groups chosen to get feedback o awareness of information literacy o gauge receptivity to document o whether there was a need for the document o language in document was inclusive of various disciplines o if more supporting practice documents or related tools were needed
    18. 18. Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) documentFocus group findings: o many ways to describe information literacy
    19. 19. Definition of Information Literacy
    20. 20. Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) documentMore findings: o clarification of language in document o desire for supporting documentation o addition of new objectives o ASSESSMENTResults: o new iteration of the document  (www.gvsu.edu/library/ilcc) o addition of preamble o creation of supporting documentation
    21. 21. Information Literacy Core Competencies (ILCC) document Where are we at now? • Changes to General Education Program are coming • We are creating an information literacy assessment document and updating the ILCC document accordingly • Growth of our Instruction Program and upcoming new library = New opportunities and renewed focus on the University Libraries!
    22. 22. The Research Guidance Rubric (RGR)Pete CocoLiaison Librarian: English,Environmental Studies, Writing&Hazel McClureLiaison Librarian: Health Administration,Public & Nonprofit Administration, Social Work
    23. 23. What is the Research Guidance Rubric? [link]* • an assessment tool for research assignment prompts • a tool for collaboration“Assigning Inquiry: How Handouts for Research Assignments Guide TodaysCollege Students,” Alison J. Head and Michael B. Eisenberg, Project InformationLiteracy Progress Report, University of Washingtons Information School, July 13, 2010*http://gvsu.edu/library/research-guidance-rubric-for-assignment-design-175.htm
    24. 24. What skills does the RGR integrate into thecurriculum?• GVSUs Information Literacy Core Competencies o Skills Goals are complimented & supported by guided research assignments o Ex: Skills Goal II: Locating & Gathering Info• AACUs Information Literacy VALUE Rubrics
    25. 25. How does the RGR integrate these skills into thecurriculum?• reaching faculty through: o campus partners o library liaisons
    26. 26. ReferencesOakleaf, M., & Kaske, N. (2009). Guiding Questions for AssessingInformation Literacy in Higher Education. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 9(2),273-286.Tyron, J., Frigo, E., & OKelly, M. (2010). Using Faculty Focus Groupsto Assess Information Literacy Core Competencies at a University Level. Journalof Information Literacy, 4(2), 62-77.
    27. 27. Discussion & Conclusion• What are your institutions curricular goals and objectives? How does your librarys work dovetail with those goals?• What skills would you like to see further integrated into the curriculum?• How would you advocate for that integration amongst your colleagues?• What kind of tools could you use in that effort?

    ×