Bugs, Bats, Bees and Beasts by Arthur Beeken
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Bugs, Bats, Bees and Beasts by Arthur Beeken

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Arthur Beeken's ACI 2011 Presentation about infestations and their implications for building performance.

Arthur Beeken's ACI 2011 Presentation about infestations and their implications for building performance.

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Bugs, Bats, Bees and Beasts by Arthur Beeken Bugs, Bats, Bees and Beasts by Arthur Beeken Presentation Transcript

  • Bee, Wasp, Bat & BirdInfestation Avoidance Certified Proctor © Hybrid Home Performance
  • Bee, Wasp, Bat & Bird Infestation AvoidancePresentation Objectives:• You realize the important roll of our little pollen-aters• You can identify hives in the wild• You can recognize a swarm in transition verses an established hive• You can recognize bees scouting verses an established hive•You know how to approach a hive and what to do if attacked• You realize the potential negative impacts of bees on weather barriers, thermalboundaries, pressure boundaries, and combustion safety.• You can manage a typical (Huh?) extraction through repair process• You can move through the repair process quickly without sacrificing quality orperformance• You can avoid the “recall Bee-call”• You can create opportunities for additional work with building perimeter “Bee-sealing” © Hybrid Home Performance2
  • • Managed hives in Central California Almond Country •Beekeepers are feeding hives diluted corn syrup protein product similar to that in a Power Bar • A Beekeeper can gross over $500K in a month moving 3700 hives from Florida. • Today, systemic pesticides threaten both wild and domestic hivesTypical Commercial Bee Hive Location © Hybrid Home Performance3
  • • Bees in the wild •1 to 3 months old • Healthy colony • Wind/Weather exposed •APPROACH WITH CAUTION!Hanging Thriving Bee Colony © Hybrid Home Performance4
  • • A solid mass of bees protecting the Queen • Could stay and build • Could move on after resting • Minutes to hours old • Generally not aggressiveHanging Swarm Viewed Though Kitchen Window © Hybrid Home Performance5
  • • Minutes to hours old • Bees will likely move on within hours • Generally not aggressiveSwarm Resting On Stucco Wall © Hybrid Home Performance6
  • •Bees are infesters of opportunity • They do not discriminateSwimming Pool Cover Locker © Hybrid Home Performance7
  • •This locker is permanently “tagged” with pheromone scentA Closer Look © Hybrid Home Performance8
  • • Very gentle Italian bees • Small field force • An easily accessible live removalTwo or Three Week Old Colony © Hybrid Home Performance9
  • • Very young colony • Little comb productionCardboard Travel Closet—Alternative Use © Hybrid Home Performance10
  • •Contents of cardboard closet from previous slide • Gentle Italian beesJacket From Cardboard Travel Closet © Hybrid Home Performance11
  • • Hours old comb • Another easy live removalJacket From Cardboard Travel Closet © Hybrid Home Performance12
  • • Cars had just been inventedEarly Major Removal © Hybrid Home Performance13
  • •Established hive •Beekeeper preparing for live removalVery Large Eve Colony © Hybrid Home Performance14
  • • A closer look • Note honey flow under the hive •Probably cooler dayVery Large Eve Colony © Hybrid Home Performance15
  • •Time to relocate the beesLarge Perinea Colony Contoured with Eve Trim © Hybrid Home Performance16
  • • Chaos following extraction team entry of attic • Honey Bee hive least 6 months oldLarge Established Colony © Hybrid Home Performance17
  • • Hive awaits live removal • Notice roof slope on left • Skip sheathing provides opportunity for bees to traverse from joist bay to joist bay. • Notice honey flow at left.Colony From Previous Slide—Attic view © Hybrid Home Performance18
  • • Notice open cells • Notice wax connection to rafter • Notice honey flow on chimney •Unattended (exterminated) hives can collapse within days, sometimes hoursTypical Attic Colony At Chimney © Hybrid Home Performance19
  • •Large field force out • Lots of new fresh honey comb • Notice comb construction at vertical 2x4 edgeTypical Larger Attic Colony– Shake Roof © Hybrid Home Performance20
  • •Difficult access from attic • Clear blown insulation • Plank ceiling joists • Evacuate hive • Air seal and bee seal • Reset insulation • Notice shinersAttic Hallow Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance21
  • • Note entry pointTypical Roof Cavity Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance22
  • • Single season age • Unusual solid sheathing under shakes • Note lip at plywood edge connection to fascia edge • Note tracking at entryTypical Roof Cavity Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance23
  • • Is the colony in the wall below? • Note void below rafter tailTypical Roof Cavity Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance24
  • • Finished repair • Two hives in similar locations • One likely swarmed from otherTypical Roof Cavity Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance25
  • • Bees accessed at edge of chimney and traveled to center behind chimneyTypical Roof Cavity Infestation At Chimney © Hybrid Home Performance26
  • •Cooler day • Clustered colonyTypical Roof Cavity Infestation At Chimney © Hybrid Home Performance27
  • • Notice the mined insulation under bee hive location on sheathingTypical Roof Cavity Infestation At Chimney © Hybrid Home Performance28
  • • Tops of support pillars are generally protected from weather but not bees or waspsTypical Pillar Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance29
  • • Selective deconstruction yields a much simpler job.Typical Pillar Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance30
  • • Hive somewhat in distress • Very little brood comb • Possibly a queen-less hive • Possible hive collapseTypical Pillar Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance31
  • • Nozzle placement traps returning field forceTypical Pillar Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance32
  • • Clean interior of hallow • Expanding foam followed by dense packed fiberglass • Reassemble air tightTypical Pillar Repair © Hybrid Home Performance33
  • • Downspout PenetrationsTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance34
  • • Between layers of fiber insulation • Voids created by Simpson style hangers.Typical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance35
  • • Gas pipe penetrations • Oversized hole provides easy accessTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance36
  • •Caution tape barrier • Deconstruct fence to facilitate scaffold placementTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance37
  • • Two hive locations • Rented scaffold • Notice intermediate plankTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance38
  • •Bees generally prefer altitudeTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance39
  • •Cavity full—likely source hive for infestation belowTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance40
  • •Live extraction half completedTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance41
  • •Extracting bees from abandoned brood combTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance42
  • • Seam Between Abandoned Brood and Honey Comb • Worker Bees Cleaning HoneyTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance43
  • • Lower hive •numerous entry pointsTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance44
  • • Initial glass deterrent followed gun foam caulking • Complete fiberglass install filling voids at each interior surface of the cavityTypical Shaker Town/Cedar Shingle Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance45
  • • Calistoga HillsTypical Comp Roof Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance46
  • • Safety rails on scaffold • A lot of prep work for a one day jobTypical Comp Roof Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance47
  • • The suit magnifies the effects of the sun • Take it slow. Stay in the shadeTypical Comp Roof Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance48
  • •Safe perspective for home owners observationsTypical Comp Roof Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance49
  • •Cleaned cavity • Ready for bee sealTypical Comp Roof Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance50
  • •Beginning the bee seal • Gun foam at all seams from the inside where ever accessible. • Tight packed fiberglass batts in contact with all internal surfaces • Clear caulk exterior seams or use blending color. Minimum 25 year caulkingTypical Comp Roof Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance51
  • • Re-weave old roof shingles • Apply new roof adhesive (Henrys 208 or Equivalent)Typical Comp Roof Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance52
  • • Complete project • Our Motto: “You Can’t Tell We’ve Been Here” • Very typical entry point. • Honey flow will be collected by “robbers”Typical Comp Roof Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance53
  • •Pure honey comb recovered from local hive removal • Holistic treatment for hay fever, and allergic cough. • Honey comb was a principal ingredient in early chewing gum • Both honey and comb are principally carbohydrate and completely edible • Honey does not naturally spoil.Enjoying the Fruits of our Labors © Hybrid Home Performance54
  • • Health & Safety • Attractive nuisance • Affects conditioned space • Disrupted flight • Door opening • Interior traffic • Stair trafficEstablished Colony in Entry floor © Hybrid Home Performance55
  • •“Bee Line” flight pattern • Notice entry point • Retrofit gas line terminates in living space.Established Colony in Primary Entry Floor © Hybrid Home Performance56
  • • Boot print • Familiar traditional construction design • Typical re-infestation pattern • Notice entry pointEstablished Colony Over Entry Door © Hybrid Home Performance57
  • • New construction • Badly miter or un- sealed V-Rustic siding (used as roof decking) connection to wallTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance58
  • • SF Seminary in Marin County • Unreinforced stone building • Many entry pointsHow Much Damage Can Infestation Cause? © Hybrid Home Performance59
  • • Many entry points • Incomplete flashing details • Deferred maintenance • Incomplete repairsTypical Honey Damage © Hybrid Home Performance60
  • • • Honey flow below windows • Piles of dead bees on the floorTypical Honey Damage © Hybrid Home Performance61
  • • Plaster damage from moisture and fungus •Honey & water is a damaging blend. • Notice standing honey on horizontal window barrier and hardwood floor belowTypical Honey Damage © Hybrid Home Performance62
  • • Moisture damage to plaster • Honey flow on glass • Bees entering at mason’s mortar pointing round window arched areaTypical Honey Damage © Hybrid Home Performance63
  • • Capillary action works for honey as well. • Internal honey flow from previously exterminated hive above windows, driving through exterior cement plaster finish to daylight • Results in fungus, mold and mildew inside and out.Typical Honey Damage © Hybrid Home Performance64
  • •Note adjacent un- affected chimney liner • A similar infestation in adjacent liner could be deadly backing up combustion gasses • Bees would be well established before CO levels became a problemPerennial Colony in Chimney © Hybrid Home Performance65
  • •Selective de- construction of chimney • Years of condensing combustion gasses depositing acid on masonry surfaces has destroyed the bond and adhesion of the mortar. • This makes our job , cleaning the brick, that much easier.Perennial Colony in Chimney © Hybrid Home Performance66
  • • Delicate live removal • Note alternative use of ladder • Completely blocked chimney would have a dramatic effect on IAQPerennial Colony in Chimney © Hybrid Home Performance67
  • • Zero exhaust flow • Dramatic reduction in dryer efficiency •What if this were a combustion gas ventDryer Vent infestation © Hybrid Home Performance68
  • • Removed Colony. • Follow With Foam Caulk at all seams then dense pack Fiberglass completely filling cavityTypical Floor Cavity Completed Extraction © Hybrid Home Performance69
  • • Proper Insulation Techniques for Adequate Barrier • Notice Lip in Plywood Edge for Backing Install • Hold blocking under and against subfloor. • Pull tight by through screwing with drywall screws • Reset previously cut out section of sub-floorTypical Floor Cavity Deterrent Application © Hybrid Home Performance70
  • • Job complete •A scuba tank has a 125 PSI secondary air stage • It shoots small caliber fasteners all day long on one air fill • A bit easier than a compressor to carry up three flights of stairs.Typical Floor Cavity Repair © Hybrid Home Performance71
  • • •Not down wall on leftTypical Floor/Ceiling Hallow Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance72
  • • Wall and Ceiling Location • Notice chimney section inside the wallTypical Floor/Ceiling Hallow Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance73
  • • Bees take advantage of poor IIQ • Notice mining of craft paper and insulation • Smaller darker brand of honey bee • A recent import?Typical Floor/Ceiling Hallow Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance74
  • • Deterioration in thin wall metal traverse pipe • No interior water staining yet bees were entering here.Unusual Entry in Top of Scupper Roof Drain © Hybrid Home Performance75
  • • Lath & plaster wall • Variable wall surface thickness • Variable wall surface condition • Fur out wall frame to a flat plane, shy of adjacent edges • Spray prime bare lath and exposed cement plaster brown coat • Depending on depth of patch, fill in with 5/8 or ½ inch GypsumTypical Interior Lath & Plaster Wall Repair © Hybrid Home Performance76
  • Spot prime any non-sheet rock surface • Fill in larger voids with Quick Rock filler • Prime Quick Rock • Float with 20 Minute Mud • Skip trowel with 45 or 90 Min Mud •Flash dry with breeze box type fan or heat gun. •Prime all new work • Feather in owners finish paint • Owner complained because we finished in one day..”Too Expensive”Typical Interior Lath & Plaster Wall Repair © Hybrid Home Performance77
  • •Install metal nosing over plywood shear applied over skip sheath • Infill all uneven areas or areas where plywood and sheathing are separatingTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance78
  • •Through grooves in vertical siding • Through ¼ inch vent screen at gable ventTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance79
  • •At the bottom of valleys • Under overhangs at roof/wall transitionsTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance80
  • • Under low clearance or inaccessible overhangsTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance81
  • • Under eve overhang • At transition to trim • Note equipment (vacuum) delivery systemTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance82
  • •Either side of chimney • Note incomplete paint on trimTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance83
  • •Entry at chimney flashTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance84
  • • Chimney separations • Chimney flash • Shed to wall flash • Edge of roof— Especially at outside corners.Typical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance85
  • • Often with new construction • Nearly always with re- roof or remodel.Typical Chimney Transition © Hybrid Home Performance86
  • • Weather barrier must be as tight as others. • Typical clearance found transitioning form one structural element to another.A Closer Look at typical assemblies. © Hybrid Home Performance87
  • • Bumble Bees are nectar gatherers • They will Land and walk to their hive….sometimes 20 feet or more • Very territorial and aggressiveTypical Bumble Bee Colony © Hybrid Home Performance88
  • • Around air conditionersTypical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance89
  • • Use expanding foam or dense foam tape.Typical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance90
  • •Entry at pipe penetrations or cavities created by pipe runs.Typical, Common, Entry Points © Hybrid Home Performance91
  • • Physically Fill Entry PointsSealing Techniques © Hybrid Home Performance92
  • • Double layer felt • Double check gutter wall connections and downspout connections • Voids are often foundSealing Techniques © Hybrid Home Performance93
  • •Metal flash Better • More solar resistant product would be a better choice at base of tileSealing Techniques © Hybrid Home Performance94
  • • Undisturbed • Small Entry in DirtTypical Yellow Jacket (Wasp) Nest © Hybrid Home Performance95
  • • Probing for CavityTypical Yellow Jacket (Wasp) Nest © Hybrid Home Performance96
  • • Water Mellon Sized • Large Enough to Be Perennial HiveTypical Yellow Jacket (Wasp) Nest © Hybrid Home Performance97
  • • Vacuum Nozzle Trapping Returning Field Force.Typical Yellow Jacket (Wasp) Nest © Hybrid Home Performance98
  • •Very dangerous locationTypical Yellow Jacket (Wasp) Nest © Hybrid Home Performance99
  • •Trapping scouting queens keeps hives from occurring • Place jacket traps after studying flight patternsYellow Jacket Countermeasures © Hybrid Home Performance100
  • • Split Bait Between Two Traps to Economize • Always Wear Heavy latex gloves when baiting traps • Pheromones will bring the wasps to the traps or to you.Yellow Jacket Trap Production © Hybrid Home Performance101
  • • Rodents/raccoons or pigeons can remove seal. •Seal face nailing with a dab of Henry’s 208 or equiv.Sealing Techniques © Hybrid Home Performance102
  • • Take heavier Measures • Field bent medium aluminum. • The seal will last longer than the roof.Sealing Techniques © Hybrid Home Performance103
  • •Pigeon barrierSealing Techniques © Hybrid Home Performance104
  • • Random droppings • In open space • No trail or patternMice, Rats, or Bats? © Hybrid Home Performance105
  • • Random droppings • In open space • No trail or patternMice, Rats, or Bats? © Hybrid Home Performance106
  • • Concentrated deposit of droppings • Near a break in vertical elevation • Focused pattern • RESPERATORS ONMice, Rats, or Bats? © Hybrid Home Performance107
  • • Typical native bat • Catching up on beauty sleep • Treat job as though you’re doing lead or asbestosBat Infestation—Re-occurring Problem © Hybrid Home Performance108
  • • PCO (Pest Control Operator was unable to resolve • Initial job was a bee removal/repair • Established customer trust • Two day job became a three month jobBat Infestation—Re-occurring Infestation © Hybrid Home Performance109
  • • In California we presume all bats are rabid • If you see a bat in the daylight it is certainBat Infestation—Re-occurring Problem © Hybrid Home Performance110
  • •In California we presume all bats are rabid • If you see a bat in the daylight it is certainBat Infestation—Re-occurring Problem © Hybrid Home Performance111
  • • Usually take the high ground.Bat Infestation—Re-occurring Problem © Hybrid Home Performance112
  • • Open cell foam • Application underwayBat Infestation—Permanent Solution © Hybrid Home Performance113
  • • Moving air and thermal barrier from ceiling to roofBat Infestation—Re-occurring Problem © Hybrid Home Performance114
  • • Completed application • 8 inches of open cell foamBat Infestation—No Longer a Problem © Hybrid Home Performance115
  • • Treated DormerBat Infestation—No Longer a Problem © Hybrid Home Performance116
  • • Effective air and thermal barrier • Lid to staircase was missed • We’ll follow with blown callousKnee Wall Above Stair Case Lid © Hybrid Home Performance117
  • • Detailing air seal to followPrecautionary Elevated Planking © Hybrid Home Performance118
  • •` No more tramping through our insulationFollow with Air Sealing then R-30 with Hi IIQ © Hybrid Home Performance119
  • Bee, Wasp, Bat & Bird Infestation AvoidancePresentation Objectives: (Did I miss anything?)• Realize the important roll of our little pollen-aters √• Identify hives in the wild √• Recognize a swarm in transition verses an established hive √• Recognize bees scouting verses an established hive √• Precisely locate hives at interior walls ceilings or floors √• How to approach a hive and what to do if attacked √• Realize the potential negative impacts of bees on weather barrier, thermal boundary,pressure boundary, and combustion safety. √• Manage a typical (Huh?) extraction through repair process √• Move through the repair process quickly without sacrificing quality or performance• Avoid the “recall Bee-call” √• Create opportunities for additional work with building perimeter “Bee-sealing” √ © Hybrid Home Performance120
  • •` Getting the Job Done Thank You!!!Highly Recommended Movie: The Disappearing Bees © Hybrid Home Performance121
  • • Life is good • Stop and smell the honey comb!Enjoying the Fruits of our Labors © Hybrid Home Performance122
  • Bee, Wasp, Bat & BirdInfestation Avoidance Certified Proctor © Hybrid Home Performance