Online participatory projects and exhibitions
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Online participatory projects and exhibitions

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Using creative competitions as a technique for audience outreach for museums and galleries. Case studies from Outside In, My East End and Snapshot Brighton. By Peter Pavement of Surface Impression, ...

Using creative competitions as a technique for audience outreach for museums and galleries. Case studies from Outside In, My East End and Snapshot Brighton. By Peter Pavement of Surface Impression, www.surfaceimpression.com

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Online participatory projects and exhibitions Online participatory projects and exhibitions Presentation Transcript

  • Online participatory projects and exhibitions Peter Pavement Surface Impression www.surfaceimpression.com Engaging with a creative audience
  • Outside In Pallant House Gallery, Chichester My East End Bishopsgate Institute Four Corners Geoffrye Museum Birkbeck College Snapshot Brighton Brighton Photo Fringe White Night Nuit Blanche Brighton & Hove City Council
    • User generated content (UGC), especially creative content (art, photographs, video, creative writing) can be used to:
      • create an all new show
      • make a connection between audience and a collection, a place or a theme.
      • reach new audiences, who might not be aware of your organisation or what it has to offer
    however… View slide
    • There are a lot of competitors out there, hungry for your audience's contributions
    • The big ones, Facebook, Twitter, Wordpress etc have the lion’s share of UGC
    • And there are layers of competition within those services
    • So submissions to your project can be slow or embarrassingly absent altogether
    So what can you do to attract contributions… View slide
  • Answer: run a competition
    • A competition ignites interest. People focus on:
      • The prize If it's relevant to the art form, all the better
      • The judge(s) They like the chance to validate their work against the opinions of the judges, especially when you have famous names as judges
      • The deadline The well intended don't keep putting off putting something on your site, they know there's a cut off point
      • The exposure Being published or exhibited means a lot to most creative people
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    • Curating the submissions
    • As an extension to the brief of the Outside In exhibition we created an online selection process
    • The aim of this was to
      • make selection faster,
      • fairer for submitting artists
      • and scalable if there was a large number of applicants
    • If you’ve ever been on a selection panel, you'll know that:
      • you assess work very differently at the start than at the end of the day
      • you can waste a lot of time arguing with other judges
      • and it takes ages to get through all the submissions
  • The judges came up with selection criteria and entered them online
  • Then they rated each piece in turn against that criteria
  • By making the criteria the only way to assess a piece of work, the judge rates all contributions more fairly The judge can pause the process and pick it up again at a later hour or day So the process doesn't have to be so arduous.
  • The results are displayed as a ranked gallery
  • The entries and contact information for contributors is all nicely stored and sorted in an online database So galleries can instantly be created as part of the website. People can be kept informed of events, exhibition progress and other opportunities by email newsletter
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  • What we've learned No two competitions are the same, you have to adapt techniques and support for each one Community groups who submit work for lots of people often need the most support Live workshops in the space of a museum or gallery generates loads of excellent material Becoming part of a project like Outside In can make a big difference to people's lives Audiences respond really favourably to the organisations involved