slides and resources: http://tinyurl.com/CTDClickers1CTD WEEKLY WORKSHOPS:CLICKERS 1:INTRODUCTION TO PEERINSTRUCTION WITH ...
We know How People Learn    …and what that means for teaching [1]:    1. Teachers must draw out and work with the pre-    ...
traditional lecture                                     student-centered instruction3   Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer I...
peer instruction w clickers     worksheets     videos     interactive demonstrations     surveys of opinions     reading q...
Typical Peer Instruction Episode    Alternating with 10-15 minute mini-lectures,     1. Instructor poses a conceptually-ch...
Let’s try it…     Don’t get (too) distracted by the content of the      questions: this is not a test of your knowledge! ...
Biology class    It’s Intro Biology and we’re about to start a new section    on photosynthesis…7   Clickers 1: Introducti...
Clicker question    The molecules making up the dry mass of wood that    forms during the growth of a tree largely come fr...
Astronomy class    We’re in an astronomy service course. We’ve just    finished a worksheet on the phases of the Moon.9   ...
Clicker question     If this is the phase of the Moon when it rises:     what is the phase of the Moon 12 hours later?    ...
Clicker choreography     To be effective, the instructor needs to run the peer     instruction in a way that gives student...
Clicker choreography     1. Present the question. Don’t read it aloud.                       Reasons for not reading the q...
Clicker choreography     2. “Please answer this on your own.”           Goals of the first, solo vote:              • get ...
Clicker choreography     2. “Please answer this on your own.”                       Students may be reluctant to quietly t...
Clicker choreography     3. Don’t start the i>clicker poll. Instead give the        students sufficient time to make a cho...
Clicker choreography     4. When you have made a choice or when you see the        class getting restless, ask the student...
Clicker choreography     6. Open the poll, “Please vote.”                      If you’ve given them sufficient time to com...
Clicker choreography     7. Prepare to close the poll                      When almost all the votes are in, say, “Final v...
Clicker choreography     8. Initiate small group discussions: “Please turn to your        neighbors and convince them you’...
Clicker choreography     9. Wander around the room, listening to the        conversations.                      o Avoid jo...
Clicker choreography     10. When it starts to get quiet and/or you notice         students starting to disengage or talk ...
Clicker choreography     11. Now you can display the histogram – this is the         signal to the students that a discuss...
Clicker choreography     11. Right answer is the clear winner.            Ok, well done, B is correct but…            why ...
Clicker choreography     11. No clear winner.            Ok, this was a harder one, we            need to look at all the ...
Clicker choreography     11. If you’re not sure what to do, you’re never wrong         asking,            What did your gr...
Clicker choreography     12. At the end, confirm the answer(s) and continue with         the class.                       ...
In effective peer instruction      students teach each other while they                       students learn       may st...
Effective peer instruction requiresnextweek identifying key concepts, misconceptions     1.     2. creating multiple-choic...
Resources     1.     National Research Council. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and            School: Expanded...
slides and resources: http://tinyurl.com/CTDClickers1CTD WEEKLY WORKSHOPS:CLICKERS 1:INTRODUCTION TO PEERINSTRUCTION WITH ...
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Wi13 Workshop - Clickers 1: Intro to Peer Instruction with Clickers

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Center for Teaching Development (UCSD)
Weekly Workshop: Clickers 1: Intro to Peer Instruction with Clickers
January 24, 2013
ctd.ucsd.edu

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Wi13 Workshop - Clickers 1: Intro to Peer Instruction with Clickers

  1. 1. slides and resources: http://tinyurl.com/CTDClickers1CTD WEEKLY WORKSHOPS:CLICKERS 1:INTRODUCTION TO PEERINSTRUCTION WITH CLICKERS Peter Newbury Center for Teaching Development, University of California, San Diego pnewbury@ucsd.edu @polarisdotca ctd.ucsd.edu #ctducsd Thursday, January 24, 2013 12:30 – 1:30 pm Center Hall, Room 316
  2. 2. We know How People Learn …and what that means for teaching [1]: 1. Teachers must draw out and work with the pre- existing understanding that their students bring with them. Classrooms must be learner centered. 2. Teachers must teach some subject matter in depth, providing many examples in which the same concept is at work and providing a firm foundation of factual knowledge. 3. The teaching of metacognitive (“thinking about thinking”) skills should be integrated into the curriculum in a variety of subject areas.2 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  3. 3. traditional lecture student-centered instruction3 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  4. 4. peer instruction w clickers worksheets videos interactive demonstrations surveys of opinions reading quizzes discussions student-centered instruction4 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  5. 5. Typical Peer Instruction Episode Alternating with 10-15 minute mini-lectures, 1. Instructor poses a conceptually-challenging multiple-choice question. 2. Students think about question on their own. 3. Students vote for an answer using clickers, colored/ABCD voting cards,... 4. The instructor reacts, based on the distribution of votes.5 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  6. 6. Let’s try it…  Don’t get (too) distracted by the content of the questions: this is not a test of your knowledge!  Try to be aware of how the peer instruction is “choreographed” – we’ll talk lots about it afterwards6 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  7. 7. Biology class It’s Intro Biology and we’re about to start a new section on photosynthesis…7 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  8. 8. Clicker question The molecules making up the dry mass of wood that forms during the growth of a tree largely come from a) sunlight. b) the air. c) the seed. d) the soil. Question credit: Bill Wood8 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  9. 9. Astronomy class We’re in an astronomy service course. We’ve just finished a worksheet on the phases of the Moon.9 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  10. 10. Clicker question If this is the phase of the Moon when it rises: what is the phase of the Moon 12 hours later? A B C D E (Adapted from Ed Prather)10 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  11. 11. Clicker choreography To be effective, the instructor needs to run the peer instruction in a way that gives students sufficient time to think about, discuss and resolve the concepts. We want students to participate without ever having to stop and think, “What am I supposed to do now?”11 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  12. 12. Clicker choreography 1. Present the question. Don’t read it aloud. Reasons for not reading the question aloud: • your voice may give away key features or even the answer • you might read the question you hoped to ask, not the words that are actually there • the students are not listening anyway – they’re trying to read it themselves and your voice may, in fact, distract them12 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  13. 13. Clicker choreography 2. “Please answer this on your own.” Goals of the first, solo vote: • get the students to commit to a choice in their own minds • get the students to commit to a choice so they’ll be curious about the answer • get the students prepared to have a discussion with their peers If they discuss the question right away: • students are making choices based on someone else’s reasoning • those students cannot contribute to the peer instruction as they have no ideas of their own13 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  14. 14. Clicker choreography 2. “Please answer this on your own.” Students may be reluctant to quietly think on their own. After all, they have a better chance of picking the right choice after talking to their friends. If you’re going to impose a certain behaviour on the students, getting their “buy-in” is critical. Explain to them why the solo vote is so important. Explain it to them early in the term and remind them when they start drifting to immediate discussions. www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/SEI_video.html14 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  15. 15. Clicker choreography 3. Don’t start the i>clicker poll. Instead give the students sufficient time to make a choice. What is sufficient? • Turn to the screen, read and answer the question as if you are one of your students. • Another possibility: keep facing the class, watching for confused stares and/or and satisfied smiles. • Another possibility: model how to think about the question by “acting it out.” • When you notice students picking up their clickers and getting restless, they are prepared to vote.15 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  16. 16. Clicker choreography 4. When you have made a choice or when you see the class getting restless, ask the students, “Do you need more time?” If many students are not ready to vote, they will not have committed to a choice and will be unprepared to discuss the question. Some students may be uncomfortable asking for more time. Make it clear, from the first class, that you’ll honour the request with no repercussions. 5. “Yes!” Give them a few more seconds. “[silence]” Ask them to prepare to vote.16 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  17. 17. Clicker choreography 6. Open the poll, “Please vote.” If you’ve given them sufficient time to commit to a choice, the voting should take very little time.17 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  18. 18. Clicker choreography 7. Prepare to close the poll When almost all the votes are in, say, “Final votes, please, in 5…4…3…2…1…Thank-you!” and close the poll. Don’t wait for every last student to vote. Some may be choosing not to vote.18 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  19. 19. Clicker choreography 8. Initiate small group discussions: “Please turn to your neighbors and convince them you’re right.” Students may not know how to “discuss” the question so give them direction: “…convince them you’re right.” Don’t display the histogram: if the students see it, they tend to pick the popular choice on the 2nd vote even if it’s not the answer they feel is correct: “lemming effect”19 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  20. 20. Clicker choreography 9. Wander around the room, listening to the conversations. o Avoid joining conversations – this is their time to talk, not yours. o Listen for misconceptions, places where students get stuck – these nuggets of student thinking are your source for improving the questions, clarifying the questions, etc.20 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  21. 21. Clicker choreography 10. When it starts to get quiet and/or you notice students starting to disengage or talk about other things, collect the 2nd vote: “Group vote, please!” Start the poll. “Last call on the group vote [pause 10 seconds] in 5…4…3…2…1…thank-you!” Stop the poll.21 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  22. 22. Clicker choreography 11. Now you can display the histogram – this is the signal to the students that a discussion is about to begin. Depending on their votes, you have several choices for sparking the discussion…22 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  23. 23. Clicker choreography 11. Right answer is the clear winner. Ok, well done, B is correct but… why might A be tempting? why might someone think it could be E? could someone explain why D is wrong? (possible follow-up question) How would be change the question so that A is right?23 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  24. 24. Clicker choreography 11. No clear winner. Ok, this was a harder one, we need to look at all the options… what reasoning would someone use for A (repeat for all popular choices) if you changed your vote, what did you discuss in your group?24 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  25. 25. Clicker choreography 11. If you’re not sure what to do, you’re never wrong asking, What did your group talk about?25 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  26. 26. Clicker choreography 12. At the end, confirm the answer(s) and continue with the class. Even if more than 80–90% of the students have picked the correct choice, some students may still not sure why that choice is correct. Briefly confirm the correct choice: • explain why the right answer is right • explain why wrong answers are wrong • allows students who chose the right answer to make sure they had the correct reasoning26 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  27. 27. In effective peer instruction  students teach each other while they students learn may still hold or remember their novice and practice misconceptions how to think,  students discuss the concepts in their communicate own language like experts  the instructor finds out what the students know (and don’t know) and reacts27 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  28. 28. Effective peer instruction requiresnextweek identifying key concepts, misconceptions 1. 2. creating multiple-choice questions that before require deeper thinking and learning class today 3. facilitating peer instruction episodes that spark student discussion during class 4. resolving the misconceptions 28 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  29. 29. Resources 1. National Research Council. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. J.D. Bransford, A.L Brown & R.R. Cocking (Eds.),Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2000. http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9853&page=1 2. Peer instruction resources from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the Univ. of British Columbia : http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/clickers.htm 3. Videos by the Science Education Initiative at the Univ. of Colorado (Boulder) provide excellent background for using clickers: http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/SEI_video.html 4. Peer Instruction network blog.peerinstruction.net29 Clickers 1: Introduction to Peer Instruction with Clickers
  30. 30. slides and resources: http://tinyurl.com/CTDClickers1CTD WEEKLY WORKSHOPS:CLICKERS 1:INTRODUCTION TO PEERINSTRUCTION WITH CLICKERS Peter Newbury Center for Teaching Development, University of California, San Diego pnewbury@ucsd.edu @polarisdotca ctd.ucsd.edu #ctducsd Thursday, January 24, 2013 12:30 – 1:30 pm Center Hall, Room 316
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