Wi13 Workshop - Alternatives to Lecture

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Center for Teaching Development (UCSD)
Weekly Workshop: Alternatives to Lecture
January 10, 2013
ctd.ucsd.edu

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Wi13 Workshop - Alternatives to Lecture

  1. 1. slides and resources: http://tinyurl.com/AlternativesToLecture CTD WEEKLY WORKSHOPS: ALTERNATIVES TO LECTURE Peter Newbury Center for Teaching Development, University of California, San Diego pnewbury@ucsd.edu @polarisdotca ctd.ucsd.edu #ctducsd Thursday, January 10, 2013 12:30 – 1:30 pm Center Hall, Room 316
  2. 2. traditional lecture student-centered instruction2 Alternatives to Lecture
  3. 3. how much of that you learned by the end of the course <g> = how much you didn’t know at the beginning of the course3 Alternatives to Lecture
  4. 4. peer instruction w clickers worksheets videos interactive demonstrations surveys of opinions reading quizzes discussions student-centered instruction4 Alternatives to Lecture
  5. 5. Clicker question A pitching machine throws baseballs at a batter taking batting practice. Here are test pitches A B from 4 different machines. Which one would you buy? Daniel L. Schwartz & Taylor Martin (2004): Inventing to Prepare for Future Learning: The Hidden Efficiency of Encouraging Original C D Student Production in Statistics Instruction, Cognition and Instruction, 22:2, 129-1845 Alternatives to Lecture
  6. 6. Typical peer instruction episode 1. Instructor poses a conceptually-challenging multiple-choice question. 2. Students think about question on their own. 3. Students vote for an answer using clickers, coloured cards, ABCD voting cards,... 4. The instructor reacts, based on the distribution of votes.6 Alternatives to Lecture
  7. 7. In effective peer instruction  students teach each other immediately, students learn while they may still hold or remember and practice their novice misconceptions how to think,  students discuss the concepts in their communicate own language like experts  the instructor finds out what the students know (and don’t know) and reacts7 Alternatives to Lecture
  8. 8. Effective peer instruction requires 1. identifying key concepts, misconceptions before 2. creating multiple-choice questions that class require deeper thinking and learning 3. facilitating peer instruction episodes that spark student discussion during class 4. resolving the misconceptions Watch for our series of peer instruction workshops: Jan 21: Intro to peer instruction Jan 28: Writing clicker questions Feb 7: Click it up a level8 Alternatives to Lecture
  9. 9. In-class worksheets Looking at Distant Objects Recall that a light-year (ly) is a distance, the distance light travels in one year. In groups of 2 or 3, work on the worksheet. Make sure everyone in your group agrees on the answer to each question before you write it down.9 Alternatives to Lecture
  10. 10. Clicker question Imagine that you simultaneously receive the satellite transmission of two pictures of two people that live on planets orbiting two different stars. Each image shows the people at their 21st birthday parties. Consider the following possible interpretations that could be made from your observations. Which do you think is the most plausible interpretation? A) Both people are the same age but at different distances from you. B) The people are actually different ages but at the same distance from you. C) The person that is closer to you is actually the older of the two people. D) The person that is farther from you is actually the older of the two people.10 Alternatives to Lecture
  11. 11. In-class worksheets  Worksheets guide students through a concept  they can learn from the worksheet, not just practice a skill  Do not “go over” the worksheet afterwards  encourages students to not do the work and just wait for the answers  Assess their work by, for example, asking a follow-up clicker question  successful on worksheet successful on clicker question (not successful on clicker q not successful on worksheet)11 Alternatives to Lecture
  12. 12. In-class worksheets: structure  Worksheet is “stand-alone” and complete.  students can complete it later, do it again when studying  easier to integrate into lessons  First questions are “trivial”  check that student read intro  gives them confidence to proceed  Last question is the “zinger”  questions build towards the deep question, each one building the skill needed to answer next question  Plenty of opportunity for formative feedback12 Alternatives to Lecture
  13. 13. In-class worksheet: resources Washington Tutorials (physics) www.phys.washington.edu/groups/peg/tut.html Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/teachingstrategies/teachingdetails/?StrategyID=9 Format and structure can be adapted to other fields: use the astronomy LT’s as a template13 Alternatives to Lecture
  14. 14. In-class video There are times when a video is the perfect resource. Paul Hewitt demonstrates Archimedes’ Principle: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6aErhwFXsg14 Alternatives to Lecture
  15. 15. In-class video Was the Paul Hewitt demo  engaging?  entertaining?  interactive?  deep or surface learning?15 Alternatives to Lecture
  16. 16. In-class video Our expert eyes know  what details or events to look for  when to start watching carefully – we can anticipate the key event  what to ignore Students don’t know what to look for. Before showing a video, prime them, prepare them: “In this video, pay particular attention to the…” “I want you to count how many times she says…”16 Alternatives to Lecture
  17. 17. In-class demonstrations In most demos, the instructor sets up the equipment, flicks a switch, “Taa-daaa!”  students don’t know where to look, don’t see important event amongst too many distractions To engage students and focus their attention on the key event, get students to make a prediction. (Get the full story of Interactive Lecture Demos (ILDs) at serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/demonstrations/index.html)17 Alternatives to Lecture
  18. 18. Clicker question A ball is rolling around C B D the inside of a circular A E track. The ball leaves the track at point P. P Which path does the ball follow? (Mazur)18 Alternatives to Lecture
  19. 19. student-centered instruction peer instruction w clickers worksheets videos interactive demonstrations surveys of opinions reading quizzes discussions19 Alternatives to Lecture
  20. 20. slides and resources: http://tinyurl.com/AlternativesToLecture CTD WEEKLY WORKSHOPS: ALTERNATIVES TO LECTURE Peter Newbury Center for Teaching Development, University of California, San Diego pnewbury@ucsd.edu @polarisdotca ctd.ucsd.edu #ctducsd Thursday, January 10, 2013 12:30 – 1:30 pm

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