Preparing to Teach 3: Assessment

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Summer Graduate Teaching Scholars Program …

Summer Graduate Teaching Scholars Program
sgts.ucsd.edu
University of Californina, San Diego
Peter Newbury
5/22/2014

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  • 1. Summer Graduate Teaching Scholars Preparing toTeach 4: Assessment May 20 and 22 1sgts.ucsd.edu
  • 2. Course Design sgts.ucsd.edu 2 What should students learn? What are students learning? What instructional approaches help students learn? CarlWieman Science Education Initiative cwsei.ubc.ca
  • 3. Vocabulary check: assessment is that which gives a final judgment of evaluation of proficiency, such as grades or scores. (How LearningWorks, p. 139) explicitly communicates to students about some specific aspects of their performance relative to specific target criteria, and … provides information that helps students progress toward meeting those criteria…[It] informs students’ subsequent learning. (How LearningWorks, p. 139) sgts.ucsd.edu 3 summative assessment formative assessment
  • 4. Grading Scheme What grading scheme are you thinking about for your course? How many marks for each? midterm exam(s) peer instruction quizzes / participation homework every week day final exam / project / essay final presentation ( see poster session!) other? sgts.ucsd.edu 4
  • 5. Grading mindset Which of these best describes your approach to points / marks / grades? A) students earn points for work completed B) I give students points for work they complete C) students start at 100 and loose points D) I grade on a curve E) other sgts.ucsd.edu 5
  • 6. Warm-up: Multiple-choice Write a multiple-choice question for one of the learning outcomes you’ve drafted. sgts.ucsd.edu 6 clarity Students waste no effort trying to figure out what’s being asked. context Is this topic currently being covered in class? learning outcome Does the question make students do the right things to demonstrate they grasp the concept? distractors What do the “wrong” answers tell you about students’ thinking? difficulty Is the question too easy? too hard? stimulates thoughtful discussion Will the question engage the students and spark thoughtful discussions? Are there openings for you to continue the discussion?
  • 7. Feedback and Practice that Enhance Learning Goal-directed practice coupled with targeted feedback are critical to learning. Goals can direct the nature of focused practice, provide the basis for evaluating observed performance, and shape the targeted feedback that guides students’ future efforts. (How LearningWorks, p. 127) Targeted feedback gives students prioritized information about how their performance does or does not meet the criteria so they can understand how to improve their future performance. (How LearningWorks, p. 141) sgts.ucsd.edu 7
  • 8. Assessment Strategies… sgts.ucsd.edu 8  addressing the need for goal-directed practice  addressing the need for targeted feedback Look over the How Learning Works hand-out, thinking about what you’ve experienced or what you want to do in your course.
  • 9. sgts.ucsd.edu 9
  • 10. sgts.ucsd.edu 10
  • 11. sgts.ucsd.edu Robert Talbert tinyurl.com/RobertTalbertRubric Mathematics Poster and Presentation Rubric 11
  • 12. Rubrics  support growth mindsets  shows the path to improvement  goal-directed Goals can direct the nature of focused practice, provide the basis for evaluating observed performance, and shape the targeted feedback that guides students’ future efforts.  targeted feedback Targeted feedback gives students prioritized information about how their performance does or does not meet the criteria so they can understand how to improve their future performance. sgts.ucsd.edu 12
  • 13. sgts.ucsd.edu 13
  • 14. Short-answer question sgts.ucsd.edu 14 Write an assessment question for your course based on the learning outcome(s) you’ve drafted.  It doesn’t have to be a summative, exam question.  make a rubric to grade it AND provide feedback to students  be creative
  • 15. Student presentations  gives each student an opportunity to show their knowledge  presentations take a lot of time Instead, consider Poster Day  students prepare poster in groups of 3  all present simultaneously on Poster Day in public space – make it an event!  one person gives elevator speech while others evaluate peers’ posters using rubric (cycle thru partners).You and colleagues evaluate each poster, too, using rubric  requires ongoing scaffolding & support See Talbert, R. Getting students involved with linear algebra through poster projects. Retrieved May 9, 2013, from http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/2013/04/25/g etting-students-involved-with-linear-algebra-through-poster- projects/ sgts.ucsd.edu 15
  • 16. Next week Teaching-as-research projects sgts.ucsd.edu 16