Advanced Energy Transfer Systems   Thermoset Molding
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Advanced Energy Transfer Systems Thermoset Molding

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Heating injection thermoset molds in a uniform manner to achieve near isothermal mold face conditions is a critical requirement for dimensionally sensitive engineered products. ...

Heating injection thermoset molds in a uniform manner to achieve near isothermal mold face conditions is a critical requirement for dimensionally sensitive engineered products.
This presentation will highlight a case study that will address a technologically advanced heating system which provides near isothermal mold face conditions in conjunction with rapid thermal energy throughput.
This system offers faster overall molding cycles,more consistent product performance outcomes,
simplified maintenance and reduced downtime.

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  • For over 40 years, Acrolab has worked with OEM's and tier suppliers in many business verticals to optimize the thermal profile of tooling. Considering that energy transfer is one of the most critical components of the molding process, Acrolab works together with the molder and mold maker to optimize energy flow, cooling and heating. - By doing so, -- cycle time is improved, scrap rate is reduced and overall product quality is heightened.
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Advanced Energy Transfer Systems   Thermoset Molding Advanced Energy Transfer Systems Thermoset Molding Presentation Transcript

  • Acrolab Energy Transfer Systems for Thermoset Injection Molds Joe Ouellette Chief Technology Officer Acrolab Ltd. Advanced Thermal Engineering Research & Development Products and Services1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 1
  • Overview Heating injection thermoset molds in a uniform manner to achieve near isothermal mold face conditions is a critical requirement for dimensionally sensitive engineered products. This presentation will highlight a case study that will address a technologically advanced heating system which provides near isothermal mold face conditions in conjunction with rapid thermal energy throughput. This system offers faster overall molding cycles, more consistent product performance outcomes, simplified maintenance and reduced down time. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 2
  • Case Study #1: Headlight Housing  Automotive headlight reflector housings present a particular challenge in injection thermoset mold processing.  The following presentation will specifically deal with these types of molds. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 3
  • Thermoset headlight reflector bodies/ headlight assembly 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 4
  • Acrolab - Advanced heating system methodology The heating system consists of a matrix of heatpipes embedded in the mold inserts incorporating the working faces of the mold. The mass energy input for the mold is provided through a series of distributed watt density cartridge heaters located remote from the mold face. These heaters interact with the heatpipe matrix to provide a uniform thermal energy transfer to the mold face. Thermocouples mounted proximate to the mold face control power to the heaters. A unique heated mold component provides heat to the sprue cone to decrease the cure time of the sprue. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 5
  • Acrolab – Advanced energy transfer system Integrally Heated Heaters Sprue Spreader Pin Thermocouples Heatpipes Sprue Spreader extension 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 6
  • System ComponentsDistributed watt density cartridge heatersType J adjustable bayonet thermocouplesIntegrally heated Sprue Spreader c/w thermocouple Isoball® heat pipes 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 7
  • Component Features and Benefits Distributed Watt Density Cartridge Heaters Cartridge heaters are of a swaged construction to permit the most efficient transfer of heat to the O.D. of the heater The pitch of the winding within the element is increased at each end to provide a linear thermal output over the length of the heater. Uniform Temperature Temp Length Cartridge Heater 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 8
  • Component Features and Benefits Standard Heater Linear pitched winding with the standard cartridge results in a nonlinear heat output with 50% of the energy of the heater being generated in the center 33% of the heater length. Temp DT Length Cartridge Heater 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 9
  • Component Features and Benefits Distributed Watt Density Distributed wattage pitched windings Cartridge Heaters Normal pitch windings 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 10
  • Component Features and Benefits Type J adjustable bayonet thermocouples Adjustable thermocouples (TCs) are installed in proximity to the mold face. TCs are installed in pairs to provide an on board replacement in the event of TC failure. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 11
  • Component Features and Benefits Type J adjustable bayonet thermocouples Spring Loaded Type J Ungrounded Thermocouple 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 12
  • Component Features and Benefits – Isosprue™ Spreader Integrally heated Sprue Spreader and onboard thermocouple Using a proprietary process, the Heated Sprue Spreader Pin is constructed as a swaged distributed wattage heater integrally heated and controlled with its own on board replaceable TC. The heated sprue pin now actively cures the sprue while directing the resin to the runners and gates. Typically the resin sprue is the thickest cross section and takes the longest time to cure. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 13
  • Component Features and Benefits – Isosprue™ Spreader 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 14
  • Component Features and Benefits – The Isoball™ Ball Radiused HeatpipesHeatpipes are super thermal conductors whichtransfer energy at rates in excess of 10,000time the speed of metals.Heatpipes are isothermal devices that do notrequire electrical power.Ball radiused heatpipes are designed to beinstalled in holes with matching ball radii. Theradii prevent stress cracks from forming.A matrix of heatpipes draw energy from aremote bank of heating elements and uniformlytransfer that energy to the mold face. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 15
  • Component Features and Benefits – The Isoball™ Heatpipe Function Schematic 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 16
  • Heating System Methodology  The next graph shows the time to steady state and the magnitude of that thermal steady state for one inch diameter by six inch long bars of various materials as well as an Isoball™ heatpipe of the same geometry.  All bars were uninsulated and oriented vertically on a temperature controlled hot plate maintained at 350º F. Thermal bridging compound of the type used in installing the heating system was used to bridge the gap between the hot plate and the end of the bars. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 17
  • Isoball™ heatpipe vs. various metal bars of common geometriesThermal Transients to Steady State 230 220 210 200 190 180 170 Temp. (deg. F) Temp° F 160 150 140 Isobar-Top 130 120 Copper rod-Top 110 Steel rod-Top 100 90 Alu. Rod-Top 80 70 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 Time (minute ) Time [min] 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 18
  • Heating System Methodology  Historically each of these materials have, at one time or another, been installed in hardened inserts to promote rapid heat transfer.  The heatpipe achieved the highest level of thermal steady state after the shortest interval.1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 19
  • Heating System Methodology  Of particular note, all of the metal bars with the exception of the heatpipe demonstrated a significant delta T from end to end both during the transient to steady state and at steady state.  The heatpipe remained Isothermal during both the transient and at steady state.  The difference between the steady state temperature of the heatpipe and the temperature of the hot plate is due to losses to the atmosphere.1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 20
  • System Design Core and Cavity Left and Right hand – “theoretical headlamp reflector mold” 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 21
  • Heating System Methodology  Every heating system is custom engineered to insure the matrix of heatpipes is optimally developed to provide heat energy uniformly to the mold working faces based on the geometry of the part being molded.  A remotely located heater bank is situated either within the mold inserts, within the holder block or within the holder block backing plate.  In all instances these heaters are positioned to thermally integrate with the heatpipe array so that all the energy generated is redistributed at high speed by the heatpipes. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 22
  • Heating System Methodology  When design considerations require that the heaters are not integral with the inserts, heatpipes are designed with lengths to bridge the thermal break which occurs at the mating surfaces of the inserts. Heatpipe lengths extend to permit close proximity with the remote heaters.  Heatpipes incorporate a spherical radiused end to mate with a spherical radius at the bottom of all installation holes. This assures no stress cracking and places the thermodynamic action for the heatpipe closest to the mold face. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 23
  • Heating System Methodology  When heaters are installed within the inserts, their length is defined by the insert. Spacers are installed at either end of through holes that line up with the insert heater holes. These spacers position the heater within the insert.  In all cases, heaters are installed in through-holes to permit extraction via push rods if necessary.  All heaters are wired to local terminal blocks mounted in the wire channel. The wiring harness is attached to these terminal blocks and resides permanently in the mold. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 24
  • Heating System Methodology  Thermocouples are mounted through the back plate of the tool and are wired to local terminal blocks. All control zones have both an active thermocouple and a spare, both wired to the wire harness.  The terminations for the thermocouples can be found in the terminal box for each half of the mold.  If a thermocouple fails, its spare can be connected to the control system by jumpering to the spare terminals. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 25
  • Example: Heatpipe Matrix in a cavity insert [prior to insertion] 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 26
  • System Design Core insert Isoball™ heatpipe array 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 27
  • System Design Cavity insert Isoball™ heatpipe array 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 28
  • Heating System Methodology  The isoball™ heatpipe matrix is custom engineered to assure that the whole insert is dynamically responsive to temperature changes and reactive to thermal throughput demands.  The next slide shows an acceptable and unacceptable array configuration. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 29
  • System Design Detailed view: Heatpipe Matrix ARRAY DESIGN FOR Ø5/8 3.875 1.875 1.875 3xØ 3xØ 1.875 1.624 3.875 2.6xØ 3xØ 1.875 1.875 3xØ 3xØ 2.652 2.652 6.8xØ 6.8xØ Additional Cooling Required Non reactive heated areas 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 30
  • System Design Type J adjustable Ball radiused thermocouples heatpipes ElectricalDistributed wattage Terminal Boxes cartridge heaters 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 31
  • System Design – 4 configurations 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 32
  • System Design Heatpipes remain within the inserts to integrate with heaters also within the inserts. Guard heaters in the holder block 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 33
  • System Design Heatpipes within the inserts. Heaters located in the holder block 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 34
  • System Design Heatpipes extending from the inserts through the holder block to integrate with heaters in the holder block. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 35
  • System Design Heatpipes extending from the inserts through the holder block to integrate with heaters in the holder block clamp plates 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 36
  • Isosprue ™Spreader System Design sprue bushing Sprue Spreader installed to core out the sprue cone and cure the cone independentlySprue spreader extension cut to size and madefrom a core sleeve section Local terminal block for the Sprue Spreader and thermocouple 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 37
  • Isosprue spreader animation Isosprue spreader animation is located on this disk in a separate AVI file. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 38
  • System Assembly 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 39
  • System Assembly The system is electrically installed using locally mounted terminal blocks located in wiring troughs adjacent to the exits of the heaters and thermocouples. Each thermocouple and heaters are independently wired to its individual terminal block. A wiring harness is permanently set into the wiring trough to bring the connections to the main terminal box for the core and cavity. Multipinreceptacles mounted on the box ends provide interface with a multizone control system. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 40
  • System Assembly Termination box showing the wiring harness, terminal strips and multipin receptacles 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 41
  • System Assembly Heating System Multipin Receptacle Multipin receptacles are used for both power and thermocouple connections on both the cavity and core halves of the mold. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 42
  • System Schematic Methodology  The covers of the main termination boxes on the mold are placarded with both physical location schematics of the heater and thermocouple exit points.  An electrical schematic of the heater wiring and thermocouple wiring scheme from the terminal strips to the multipin receptacles on the box ends is also mounted. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 43
  • WF HTR#7, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#1, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#8, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#2, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W TC#3A TC#3S TC#1S TC#1A ZONE#1 HTR#9, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#3, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W ZONE#3 HTR#10, Ø5/8 x 13.00", 1500W HTR#4, Ø5/8 x 13.00", 1500W 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 TC#4A TC#4S TC#2S TC#2A HTR#11, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#5, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W ZONE#2 ZONE#4 HTR#12, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#6, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#24, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#18, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W ZONE#8 HTR#23, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#17, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W ZONE#6 TC#8A TC#8S TC#6S TC#6A DCX 09DS H/L REFL HTR#22, Ø5/8 x 13.00", 1500W HTR#16, Ø5/8 x 13.00", 1500W HTR#21, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#15, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W CAVITY HALF (STATIONARY) TC#7A TC#7S TC#5S TC#5A ZONE#7 HTR#20, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#14, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W ZONE#5 HTR#19, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W HTR#13, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 1500W System Schematic Methodology HTR#31, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#25, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W TC#11S TC#11A TC#9A TC#9S HTR#32, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#26, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#33, Ø5/8 x 11.00", 2000W HTR#27, Ø5/8 x 11.00", 2000W ZONE#9 ZONE#11 TC#12A TC#10A TC#12S TC#10S HTR#34, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#28, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#35, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#29, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W ZONE#10 ZONE#12 HTR#36, Ø5/8 x 11.00", 2000W HTR#30, Ø5/8 x 11.00", 2000W HTR#48, Ø5/8 x 11.00", 2000W HTR#42, Ø5/8 x 11.00", 2000W HTR#47, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#41, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W ZONE#16 HTR#46, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#40, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W ZONE#14 TC#16S TC#14S DCX 09DS H/L REFL TC#16A TC#14A HTR#45, Ø5/8 x 11.00", 2000W HTR#39, Ø5/8 x 11.00", 2000W CORE HALF (MOVEABLE) ZONE#15 HTR#44, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#38, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W TC#15S TC#15A TC#13A TC#13S ZONE#13 HTR#43, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W HTR#37, Ø5/8 x 15.75", 2000W WF Location schematics for heaters & thermocouples grouped by zone44
  • System Schematic Electrical schematics showing wiring connections for heaters and thermocouples grouped by zone POWER CAVITY HALF (STATIONARY) MULTI-PIN CONNECTOR 1 1A THERMOCOUPLE ZONE 1 ZONE 2 ZONE 3 ZONE 4 ZONE 5 ZONE 6 ZONE 7 ZONE 8 2 1B MULTI-PIN 3 1C CONNECTOR 4 2A 1A 1B 1C 2A 2B 2C 3A 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 6A 6B 6C 7A 7B 7C 8A 8B 8C 5 2B 1 WHITE IR + 1 6 2C TERMINAL NUMBER 9 RED CO - 2 WHITE IR + 7 3A 10 RED CO - 2 Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 13.00" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 13.00" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 13.00" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 13.00" 8 3B PIN NUMBER 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 9 3C PIN NUMBER 3 WHITE IR + 3 ZONE NUMBER 11 RED CO - Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" 10 4A 2 5 8 11 14 17 20 23 11 4B 4 WHITE IR + 4 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 12 RED CO - 12 4C Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" Ø5/8 x 15.75" 5 WHITE IR + 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 13 5A 13 RED CO - 5 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 1500W,230V 14 5B 6 WHITE IR + 15 5C 6 DCX 09DS H/L REFL 14 RED CO - 16 6A 7 WHITE IR + 17 6B 15 RED CO - 7 18 6C 8 WHITE IR + 19 7A 16 RED CO - 8 20 7B ZONE 1 ZONE 1 ZONE 2 ZONE 2 ZONE 3 ZONE 3 ZONE 4 ZONE 4 ZONE 5 ZONE 5 ZONE 6 ZONE 6 ZONE 7 ZONE 7 ZONE 8 ZONE 8 21 7C (ACTIVE) (SPARE) (ACTIVE) (SPARE) (ACTIVE) (SPARE) (ACTIVE) (SPARE) (ACTIVE) (SPARE) (ACTIVE) (SPARE) (ACTIVE) (SPARE) (ACTIVE) (SPARE) 22 8A 23 8B IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO IR CO 8C 24 1 9 2 10 3 11 4 12 5 13 6 14 7 15 8 16 CAVITY HALF (STATIONARY) ZONE 1 ZONE 2 ZONE 3 ZONE 4 ZONE 5 ZONE 6 ZONE 7 ZONE 8 WATTS WATTS WATTS WATTS WATTS WATTS WATTS WATTS TOTAL RE RE RE RE RE RE RE RE (WATTS) AB 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 12000 AC 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 12000 BC 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.5 12000 TOTAL 11.4 11.4 11.4 11.4 11.4 11.4 11.4 11.4 AMPS DCX 09DS H/L REFL TOTAL WATTAGE FOR STATIONARY HALF = 36,000W 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 45
  • Case Study # 2: Breaker HousingSubject to confidentiality, specific mold designs, system layouts or detailed molding parameters will not be presented. The photos above are only a general representation. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 46
  • Case Study # 2: Breaker Housing  Square D Corporation molds commercial, industrial and residential switch gear and electrical breakers.  A six cavity residential breaker housing mold was built for operation in a 200T Bucher injection thermoset molding machine.  The material being molded was a polyester BMC. Injection thermoset was chosen over a manually loaded vertical press in order to reduce scrap and increase production and part uniformity. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 47
  • Case Study # 2: Breaker Housing  This complex mold incorporated slide actions and was constructed using mold face inserts.  These inserts presented intrinsic thermal gaps at their contact surfaces. The mold was electrically heated by positioning cartridge heaters in locations that were as close as possible to the contact surfaces of the inserts.  When heated, the mold indicated temperature variations from random point to point on the working faces from 300º F to 350º F, a 50º F delta T. The resultant cycle time for the mold was unacceptable. The mold part exhibited heat stress and blistering. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 48
  • Case Study # 2: Breaker Housing The mold was modified to accept a matrix of over 150 heatpipes in various diameters to bridge the inserts with the heater array. The mold was machined to accept the retrofit by the mold maker, Artag Plastics Corp of Chicago. The heatpipe matrix and associated components were installed. The mold was then installed in the same press and operated using the same parameters loaded into the PLC as in the first instance. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 49
  • Case Study # 2: Breaker Housing Major improvements were noted immediately. 1) The mold face delta T random point to point dropped from 50º F to 10º F. 2) The cure time was reduced by 13 seconds. 3) The overall cycle time was reduced by 22 – 23%. 4) The surface appearance of the housings were improved and now met Square D standards. As a result of the uniform temperature and rapid energy throughput provided by the heating system, Square D was able to reduce the process temperature by over 40º F with a corresponding reduction in energy costs. 1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 50
  • Thank You Advanced Heatpipe Energy Transfer Systems for Thermoset Injection Molds Joe Ouellette Chief Technology Officer Acrolab Ltd. Advanced Thermal Engineering Research & Development Products and Services1/31/2011 © Acrolab 2011 51