the              S CHOOLS I NSTITUTE                     data services you can count on                                   ...
!   !        School Planning Information for        Lake Cowichan Secondary        •   Ten-year Trends in Examination Resu...
Table of    Contents                       SCHOOL EXAMINATION TRENDS                       1    Introduction and Definition...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsIntroductionOverview of              This binder presents provincial...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsIntroduction (continued)Interpreting             Tabs 25 and 26 cont...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsIntroduction (continued)Suggested                For Satisfaction Su...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitionsA’ Rate                          Proportion of students w...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co              ontinued)Course Mark                   ...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co              ontinued)Facility Type                 ...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co              ontinued)Grade Point                   ...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co              ontinued)Participation Ratio           ...
Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co              ontinued)Percentile                    ...
Applications of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley                                                                             ...
Applications of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley                                                                             ...
Applications of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley                                                                             ...
Applications of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley                                                                             ...
English 10Cowichan Valley                                                                                                 ...
English 10Cowichan Valley                                                                                                 ...
English 10Cowichan Valley                                                                                                 ...
English 10Cowichan Valley                                                                                                 ...
Essentials of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley                                                                               ...
Essentials of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley                                                                               ...
79 lake cowichan sec 2010 set
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79 lake cowichan sec 2010 set

  1. 1. the S CHOOLS I NSTITUTE data services you can count on ADMINFO Resources Inc. 4490 Copsewood Place Victoria, B.C. V8X 4S5 Tel and fax: (250) 658-0366 Email: adminfo@pacificcoast.net June 6 , 2011 Dear Principal, I am in receipt of an order for the 2009/10 School Examination Trends binder for your school. This year, the binder contains Provincial Exam results, GPA and Honours Graduation results, Grade-to-Grade Transition, Graduation rates and Satisfaction Survey results for secondary schools. GPA has returned to the binder after several years, and Honours Graduates is a new measure. Satisfaction Survey results are now also presented as percentiles. Delivery of this year’s binder has again been delayed by very late delivery of Ministry data files. I received the last provincial exam data files from the Ministry on April 27, 2011, five months after the Ministry had agreed to provide the files. I also found that key records were missing from the data, leading to some missing totals for subjects with optional provincial exams. Miss- ing values are shown as “•••” in the binder. The Ministry has been unresponsive to my attempts to encourage more timely delivery of data, and has refused to provide these totals. I recognize that many secondary schools use the School Examination Trends binder for school planning, and rely upon a timely delivery of a complete binder. Late data delivery of data for the binder is an ongoing problem with the Ministry. Since my attempts at resolution to date have been unsuccessful, this year I have decided to seek the help of principals and superintendents with the two issues of late data, and incomplete data. If you wish to help resolve these issues with Ministry data, you can do so by sending me a testimonial letter of support (either by mail, or as an email or email attachment to adminfo@pacificcoast.net), addressing the following: •! Which Adminfo binders and/or reports do you use, and for how many years? Who uses them and for what purpose? •! Why do you choose to use the Adminfo binders and/or reports? What advantages do they have over Ministry reports? What disadvantages? Consider graphics, trends, and contextual results for interpretation. •! When would you prefer to receive the Adminfo binders and/or reports? If the binders or reports arrive too late in the school year, what is the effect on the processes used by yourself and your colleagues? •! Please feel free to include other items at your discretion. I have provided more details in an Open Letter to School and District Administrators, which has been included with the PDF file of this binder. If you cannot find your Open Letter, please contact me by email at the above address and I will send a copy. I regret being placed in a position that I cannot provide the complete School Examination Trends binder in a timely manner. I would appreciate whatever help you can give to resolve these two issues. Please feel free to contact me as shown above if you have any questions or if I can be of further assistance. Yours sincerely, John Taylor for ADMINFO Resources Inc.Supporting your planning for improved student achievement www.theschoolsinstitute.com
  2. 2. ! ! School Planning Information for Lake Cowichan Secondary • Ten-year Trends in Examination Results • School Marks and Final Marks • Gender and Aboriginal/First Nations Results • Grade-to-Grade Transitions • Graduation Rates • Satisfaction Survey Results and Trends 2009/10
  3. 3. Table of Contents SCHOOL EXAMINATION TRENDS 1 Introduction and Definitions Grade 10 Courses 2 Applications of Mathematics 10 3 English 10 4 Essentials of Mathematics 10 5 Principals of Mathematics 10 Grade 11 Courses 6 Science 10 7 Civic Studies 11 8 Social Studies 11 Grade 12 Courses 9 Applications of Mathematics 12 10 BC First Nations Studies 12 11 Biology 12 12 Chemistry 12 13 Communications 12 14 English 12 15 English 12: First Peoples 16 English Literature 12 17 Français Langue Seconde-Immersion 18 French 12 19 Geography 12 20 Geology 12 21 History 12 22 Physics 12 23 Principles of Mathematics 12 24 Second Languages - Other (German, Japanese, Mandarin, Punjabi, Spanish)Graduates’ Measures 25 Average GPA of Graduates of Excellence 26 Percentage of Graduates With Honours Standing Student Transitions 27 Grade-to-Grade Transition 28 Graduates as a Percentage of Eligible Grade 12 StudentsSatisfaction Surveys 29 Satisfaction Survey, 2010 (Ministry of Education) 30 Satisfaction Survey Trends, 2006 to 2010 (Ministry of Education) 31
  4. 4. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsIntroductionOverview of This binder presents provincial exam results for Grade 10, Grade 11 and Grade 12this binder students. An important change beginning 2007 in the reporting of results is that the August exam session is included in the year that follows it (August to June) rather than in the year preceding it (November to August). This change means that the previous definition of participation rates would produce inappropriate results, so the Ministry of Education has discontinued providing them. Instead, this binder contains a new measure, called Participation Ratio. Another important change is that since 2004/05, many subjects have optional provincial exams. For each of these subjects, the percentages of students opting to write the exam are reported. In addition, results of students who opt out of exams are reported separately from the results of students who choose to write the exams. Further, in recognition of the different roles played by different types of schools, each school is compared with all schools of the same facility type (Standard, Continuing Education, Alternate, etc.).Definitions The reader is referred to the Definitions on pages 1.4 to 1.9 below, particularly to become familiar with the definitional changes that have taken place with a number of measures. In most cases, the definitions have been copied or paraphrased from various Ministry of Education reports. Comments have been added by ADMINFO Resources Inc. for clarification purposes. Participation Ratio is also defined, and calculated in the binder by ADMINFO Resources Inc.Interpreting Rather than looking at examination results on a year-to-year basis, it is important forthe results schools and districts to analyze results over a longer time period to determine whether or not there are significant trends or patterns. Schools and districts should also look for relationships between different measures such as exam marks, school marks and participation ratio, taking into account the students who opt out of exams. These relationships are more easily identified if results are separated for different students and converted to standardized scores which use the same scale, such as the percentiles used in this binder. The percentiles (see pages 1 and 2 for each subject) are based on the Facility Type of the institution for which this binder has been prepared. Facility Type is defined on pages 1.5 and 1.6. For a Standard public school, the percentiles are based on the distributions of scores for all Standard public schools. Non-Standard public schools and independent schools are excluded. This ensures that the comparisons are more valid and meaningful. Similarly, for a Standard independent school, the percentiles are based on the distributions of scores for all Standard schools (public and independent). Non-Standard schools are excluded. For a Continuing Education Centre, the percentiles are based on the distributions of scores for all Continuing Education Centres. For an Alternate school, the percentiles are based on the distributions of scores for all Alternate schools. In the Diagnostics Tables (pages 3 and 4 for each subject), comparison groups have been chosen to ensure meaningful comparisons. Thus, Standard Public Schools in the district can be compared with Standard Public Schools in the province. Further, a Standard school (whether public or independent) is not compared with any larger group of schools containing Continuing Education Centres.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.1
  5. 5. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsIntroduction (continued)Interpreting Tabs 25 and 26 contain two measures of excellence for graduates. The Average GPAthe results of Graduates at Tab 25 measures how well they performed in the best 52 credits which(continued) satisfy the requirements for graduation (most of which are based on non-examinable courses). The Percentage of Graduates Awarded Provincial Scholarships at Tab 26 is based on examination results only. Tabs 27 and 28 present two measures which allow some tracking of students as they pass through the school system. A school may perform well with provincial examinations, but if it is because only the better students reach Grade 12, the school may choose to re-evaluate its priorities in its School Plan. Tabs 29 and 30 present the results of the Ministry’s Satisfaction Survey. Satisfaction is based partly on results, and partly on expectations. Some survey items are considered important, and some are not. Those items that are considered important, and with which many people are not satisfied, are ready candidates for school planning for improvement. For the first time this year, percentages from the Satisfaction Survey have been converted to percentiles, to give more meaningful results.Suggested For academic achievement (Tabs 2 to 24):questionsto ask • Are the percentiles generally high or low, or mostly around the middle? • Is there a general trend up or down over the last 6 to 10 years? • Are there too many students opting out of exams where they are optional? • Are exam results influenced by the students who opt out of exams? Hint: compare the school marks of students who write exams versus those who are not examined. They are included in the Diagnostics Tables. • Are there any subjects we should consider adding to, or removing from the range of subjects offered by the school? • Are School Marks reasonably close in percentile terms to exam marks? If not, do school marking policies need to be revised? Hint: they are shown in the second graph on page 1 for each subject. • Are there balanced numbers of students taking Communications and English? • Are enough students passing? • Is there a reasonable gender balance and Aboriginal balance? • Is the school moving toward meeting its goals, and do they need refining? For graduates measures of excellence (Tabs 25 and 26): • Is the GPA percentile generally high or low? • Is there a general trend up or down over the last 6 to 10 years? • How do the provincial scholarships compare with district and provincial results? For Student Transitions (Tabs 27 and 28): • Are the percentages generally high or low? • Is there a general trend up or down over the last 6 to 10 years? • Is the school losing students at any particular grade level? • Is the school losing an unreasonable proportion of boys, girls, or Aboriginals? • Of the Grade 12 students eligible to graduate, is there an unreasonable proportion of boys, girls, or Aboriginal students not graduating?© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.2
  6. 6. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsIntroduction (continued)Suggested For Satisfaction Survey results (Tabs 29 and 30):questionsto ask • Which surveyed populations should we interpret with caution due to low(continued) participation rates (e.g., Secondary Parents, or Staff)? • Which survey items have satisfaction results with which we are not comfortable? How important are they? Hint: use the percentiles to determine the relative rank of the school among all other schools. • Which survey items have satisfaction results which are very different from the district’s results or the province’s results? How important are they? • For the survey items that are considered important, are they part of our school plan, and are we making progress? • Are the satisfaction levels based on good information reaching the people who are responding to the survey? Are they well informed? • Do we need to change any of our goals based on issues that are showing up in the Satisfaction Survey results?Conclusion Data-based decision making takes the guesswork out of planning for improving student achievement. Collecting and organizing the data for data-based decision making should not be the main focus of school planning. This binder is designed to reduce the workload of data collection, organizing and distribution, freeing up your time to focus on processes, strategies and structures to improve student achievement. Please direct questions/comments to: Definitions John Taylor ADMINFO Resources Inc. 4490 Copsewood Place Victoria B.C. V8X 4S5 overleaf ! Ph/fax: (250) 658-0366 Email: adminfo@pacificcoast.net© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.3
  7. 7. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitionsA’ Rate Proportion of students who received a letter grade of A (86% or better) as their best mark in the school year. Includes students from all grade levels who obtained marks in the subject. Comment: A Rate is used in this binder as a measure of excellence (see also, Mean Score and Pass Rate for other measures of student achievement). From 2006/07, the Ministry of Education has been using new criteria for provincial scholarships. They are called Grade 12 Graduation Program Examinations Scholarships, and one requirement is that students need to obtain a letter-grade of A in his or her best three Grade 12 provincial examinations. The A Rate in this binder is used for all three grade levels as a measure of excellence. It is used for scholarships only for relevant Grade 12 subjects. A Rate is presented in the Diagnostics Table (see pages 3 and 4 for each subject) as an Exam A Rate, a School A Rate and a Final A Rate.Aboriginal Beginning in the 2003/04 school year, a student is considered Aboriginal if s/he self- identified on Form 1701 September 30 enrolment any time in the period 2003/04 and forward. Before 2003/04, students were considered Aboriginal in any given year only if they self-declared in the September 30 enrolment of that year. Comment: This will have the effect of reducing undercounting of Aboriginal students and may change some historical Aboriginal statistics.Aegrotat A pass standing based on certification that the student was unable to write the examination owing to illness or special circumstances. The students school percentage is then considered to be the final percentage for the course. Comment: Aegrotats are normally omitted from reported summary examination results.Attribution Students may be instructed in multiple schools in a year. However, for summaryof Results reporting purposes, school level data are attributed to only one of these schools (and its district). The reported school or district to which the students results are attributed may not be the last school or district in which the student was instructed. Attribution is based on a hierarchy of rules which first chooses the September authority enrolment as the School (or District) of Attribution, or then chooses a later school of enrolment (up to and including the school or district in which the student wrote the exam, if there is no September enrolment record) as the School (or District) of Attribution of results. This differs from previous reports before 2004/05, which were based on attribution of results to the school at which the student wrote the exam, which was in general (but not always) the school in which the student was last instructed. Comment: This hierarchy of rules attributes each students results to the school and district of September enrolment, unless there is no record of September enrolment. This means that if a student changed schools during the year, or took a Continuing Education course because the school of enrolment did not offer the course, the students results will still be attributed to the school and district of September enrolment. As a result, some schools or districts may notice results showing in this binder (e.g., for Applications of Mathematics 10) for small numbers of students, even if the course was not offered by the school or district. If there are less than 10 students, the results will be masked.Challenge A process whereby a student who has not taken a given provincially examinable course writes the provincial exam in order to compete for a scholarship. The student does not receive credit for the course. Comment: Challenges are normally omitted from reported summary examination results.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.4
  8. 8. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co ontinued)Course Mark This is a relatively new term, used by the Ministry. See School Mark below. Comment: Before 2004/05, the Ministry of Education called this the School Mark. This name is still used in TRAX reports. The older terminology has been retained in this binder so the term Course Mark will not be confused with the Final Mark for the Course.Deferral A process whereby a principal grants a student permission to write a Provincial Exam at a future examination session. Comment: Deferrals are normally omitted from reported summary examination results.Disqualification Results from a student cheating. A mark of zero is given for the examination. Comment: Disqualifications are normally omitted from reported summary examination results.Eligible A Grade 12 student is eligible to graduate if the student is in a position to graduate byGrade 12 Student passing all courses in which the student has enrolled in September of the school year. Comment: This number is used as the denominator for Eligible Graduation Rate (see below).Eligible Eligible Graduation Rate is the proportion of Eligible Grade 12 students (see above)Graduation Rate who graduate. Comment: The Eligible Graduation Rate does not take into account the students who do not reach Grade 12. The Six-Year Dogwood Completion Rate (not included in this binder) takes these students into account (as well as taking out-migration into account) but it is not available at school level. The First Time Grade 12 Graduation Rate is available at school level, but it is not reported in this binder because of the unknown number of students not graduating because they are not eligible to graduate.Exam A Rate See A Rate. Refers to the A Rate calculated from the Exam Mark.Exam Pass Rate See Pass Rate. Refers to the Pass Rate calculated from the Exam Mark.Exam Mark Best mark of a student in a school year on one or more writes of a particular Provincial Examination subject in that school year. Comment: Before 2004/05, if a student wrote a provincial exam more than once, all exam results were used for that student to report summary results. From 2004/05 onwards, only the best mark is used in all historical data.Exam Mean Score See Mean Score. Refers to the Mean Score calculated from the Exam Mark.Facility Type The Facility Type is a way of describing the different types of education facilities designed to meet the education needs of different types of students. Most students are enrolled in Standard schools, which offer most of the regular subjects. Some students are enrolled in other education facilities to meet needs which cannot be met in Standard schools. In B.C., there are currently eight different types of education facilities. The Facility Types are: Standard Schools; Continuing Education; Distance Education; Alternate Schools; Youth Custody/Residential Attendance Centres; Short Term Provincial Resource Programs; Long Term Provincial Resource Programs; and District Distance Education.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.5
  9. 9. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co ontinued)Facility Type Since the types of programs and types of students are different in different Facility(continued) Types, comparisons of results between different Facility Types can be misleading. For example, some districts have a large Continuing Education Centre, and some have none. A comparison between a Standard school on the one hand, and a district with a large Continuing Education Centre on the other hand, can lead to incorrect interpretations of the schools performance, compared with the district. Comment: In this binder, the potentially misleading influence of different Facility Types has been kept to a minimum by selecting groups of schools with the same Facility Type for comparison purposes. For example, percentiles on pages 1 and 2 of each subject are restricted to the same Facility Type, and the Diagnostic Table on pages 3 and 4 of each subject contains at least one row restricted to a larger group of schools with the same Facility Type as the schools of comparison.Final A Rate See A Rate. Refers to the A Rate calculated from the Final Mark.Final Mark Final marks are based on the blend of a students best school (course) mark and best exam mark. These best marks may have been earned in different school years. Final marks may be greater than either the best exam results or best school marks observed in the reported year. Comment: For all examinable subjects in grades 10 and 11 and for BC First Nations Studies 12, eighty percent of the Final Mark is allocated to the best school mark and twenty percent is allocated to the best exam mark. For all remaining examinable grade 12 subjects, sixty percent of the Final Mark is allocated to the best school mark and forty percent is allocated to the best exam mark.Final Mean Score See Mean Score. Refers to the Mean Score calculated from the Final MarkFinal Pass Rate See Pass Rate. Refers to the Pass Rate calculated from the Final Mark.Full Year A full year of exam results refers to results beginning in August and ending the following June. This includes all exam sessions from August to June. Comment: This definition has been in place since 2006/07, and now applies to all years shown in this binder. Before 2006/07, a full year referred to the period beginning in September and ending the following August.Grade 12 From 2006/07, Provincial Scholarships are called Grade 12 Graduation ProgramGraduation Program Examinations Scholarships. One requirement is that students will to need to obtain atExaminations least 86% (a lettergrade of A) on their best three Grade 12 provincial examinationsScholarship (excluding Communications 12). They also need to be Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents, and fulfill graduation requirements.Grade Point This is a way of summarizing several letter grades in a single measure.Average (GPA) In BC, letter grades and letter grade points are allocated on the following basis: Letter Grade Percent Range Letter Grade Points A 86% to 100% 4 B 73% to 85% 3 C+ 67% to 72% 2.5 C 60% to 66% 2 C– 50% to 59% 1 F 0% to 49% Not included© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.6
  10. 10. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co ontinued)Grade Point The letter grade points are used to calculate the Grade Point Average (GPA). ForAverage (GPA) each graduate, the GPA is based on the average letter grade points for the best(continued) credits which satisfy the requirements for graduation. Courses completed for fewer than 4 credits are weighted. Graduates who graduate with a GPA higher than 3.0 are awarded Honours Standing. Comment: The average GPA of graduates was presented in this binder from its inception in 1993 until the binder published in 2004. An error was found by the Ministry of Education in January 2006 relating to the GPA of students who return to take a course after they have graduated. It introduced a small anomaly in the graduate GPA data. The Ministry appears to have corrected this error for the 2009/10 binder.Grade-to-Grade Grade-to-Grade Transition Rate is the proportion of students in a given grade level forTransition Rate the first time, who make the transition to a higher grade level anywhere in the province the following year. This measure does not compensate for out-migration from BC. If a student leaves the province, s/he reduces the Grade-to-Grade Transition Rate of the school and district from which s/he left. Comment: Grade Progression Rate (not included in this binder) compensates for out-migration, but it is not available at school level.Honours Standing A student graduates with Honours Standing if the student has a Grade Point Average (GPA) higher than 3.0 (a better than B average). GPA, and the points for each letter grade, are defined above. Comment: The percentage of graduates who graduate with Honours Standing is a measure of graduates’ excellence. However, it should be kept in mind that most courses which satisfy the requirements for graduation are not examinable - marks are based on teacher assessment only, allowing for non-standardized criteria to affect interpretation of results.Letter Grades See Grade Point Average for the corresponding Percent Range.Mask Mask in the cell of a table indicates that the result in the cell is based on between one and nine students. It has been masked to comply with the privacy provisions of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Comment: This masking criterion is in accordance with the Ministrys policy on reporting small populations. It was increased from less than 5 students to less than 10 students in November 2009.Mean Score Average best percent mark (exam or school) of students in the school year (including August exams). The final mean score is the average of the final marks, which are based on the best exam mark and best school mark (see above). Aegrotats, deferrals, challenges and disqualifications are excluded. Comment: Before 2004/05, all percent marks of each student who wrote multiple exams were included in the average of exam marks. Since only the best mark of each student is now included for all years reported, most schools and districts will find that their historical mean scores will have increased slightly in this binder compared with some earlier historical mean scores. Mean Score is used in this binder as a measure of overall performance (see also, Pass Rate and A Rate). It is presented in the Diagnostics Table (pages 3 and 4 for each subject) as an Exam Mean Score, a School Mean Score and a Final Mean Score.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.7
  11. 11. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co ontinued)Participation Ratio Participation Ratio for a provincially examinable subject is calculated by dividing the(previously called number of students who have final marks for the subject in the school year by theParticipation Rate) total number of students who were enrolled in the same grade level as the indicated subject. For example, the 2009/10 Participation Ratio for Biology 12 is the number of students with final marks in 2009/10 Biology 12 divided by the 2009/10 Grade 12 enrolment. Comment: This is not the same as a Participation Rate. For a Participation Rate, the students in the numerator should be a subset of the students in the denominator. The Participation Ratio fails this criterion in at least two cases (see below). Case 1 The school year now includes the August exam session as the first session of the school year, for which most students are from the previous school year. Hence (as an example), the 2009/10 Participation Ratio overestimates the 2009/10 Participation Rate by the number of students writing exams in August 2009. It also underestimates the 2009/10 Participation Rate by the number of students writing exams in August 2010. Case 2 Some students take subjects outside their grade level. Hence (as another example), the 2009/10 Participation Ratio for Biology 12 overestimates the 2009/10 Participation Rate by the number of 2009/10 students with final marks in Biology 12 who are not enrolled in Grade 12. It also underestimates the 2009/10 Participation Rate by the number of 2009/10 Grade 12 students with final marks in Biology 12 who took Biology 12 in other school years when they were not enrolled in Grade 12. Both of these cases contain an overestimate and an underestimate of similar proportions. Hence, it may be seen that Participation Ratio may be used as a reasonable approximation of Participation Rate.Pass Rate Proportion of students who received a letter grade of C– or better (50% or better) as their best mark in the school year. Includes students from all grade levels who obtained marks in the subject. Aegrotats, deferrals, challenges and disqualifications are excluded. Comment: Pass Rate is used in this binder as a measure of basic competence (see also, Mean Score and A Rate). It is presented in the Diagnostics Table as an Exam Pass Rate, a School Pass Rate and a Final Pass Rate.Percentile The percentile of a school is a way of identifying the performance of that school relative to other schools of the same Facility Type. In simplified terms, if the exam mean score of each school in a given subject for a given year is placed on a scale from lowest to highest (to form a ladder of mean scores), the percentile of a given school is approximately how far up the ladder the school is placed. If the school is 3/4 of the way up the ladder, it is at the 75th percentile. In more technical terms, for each subject each year, the collection of exam mean scores (one for each school) is used to calculate the mean and standard deviation of the collection, which are then used to convert each schools exam mean score to a z- score (in a distribution where the mean is zero and standard deviation is 1). The z- score is then used to calculate the percentile of the school, assuming the collection of scores are distributed as a normal distribution. Not all distributions are normal, which affects the accuracy of the percentile. However, in each year, all schools are treated the same way, so it still provides a good measure of relative standing of each schools results each year.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.8
  12. 12. Provincial Exam Results – Introduction and DefinitionsDefinitions (co ontinued)Percentile Comment: On pages 1 and 2 for each subject, a number of measures are converted(continued) to percentiles and presented graphically. This allows for valid comparisons over time, and valid comparisons between different measures. In particular, they compensate for different difficulty levels of exams from year to year, and allow easy identification of extreme resultsScholarship See Grade 12 Graduation Program Examinations Scholarship.School A Rate See A Rate. Refers to the A Rate calculated from the School Mark.School Mark This is the best mark of a student in a school year assigned by the classroom teacher as a result of the students work in class. Comment: From 2004/05 onward, the Ministry of Education has used the term Course Mark in its public reports, but retained the term School Mark in its TRAX reports. The older terminology (School Mark) has been retained in this binder so the term Course Mark will not be confused with the Final Mark for the Course.School Mean Score See Mean Score. Refers to the Mean Score calculated from the School Mark.School Pass Rate See Pass Rate. Refers to the Pass Rate calculated from the School Mark.Subject All subjects in this binder include both French and English variants of equivalent curricula, in combination. For example, Chemistry 12 contains results for the English Chemistry 12 and the French Chemie 12 for all years reported. Comment: Before 2004/05, English and French variants were reported separately.Three Year This is the average of three successive years of results, ending at the specified year.Moving Average For example, the three year moving average for 2009/10 is the average of all scores for students with valid marks for 2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/10. Comment: This measure was introduced in 2005/06, and had been included in this binder to allow schools and districts with small numbers of students (which are normally masked) to use their results for planning purposes, as well as to provide all schools and districts with a more stable baseline against which to measure year-to- year performance. Unfortunately, the Ministry of Education changed the way it provided year-by-year data to ADMINFO Resources for this year’s edition of the binder, and Three Year Moving Averages are not available at the present time. Please direct questions/comments to: John Taylor ADMINFO Resources Inc. 4490 Copsewood Place Victoria B.C. V8X 4S5 Ph/fax: (250) 658-0366 Email: adminfo@pacificcoast.net© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 1.9
  13. 13. Applications of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary This course not offered by this school, 2000/01 to 2009/10© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 2.1
  14. 14. Applications of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary This course not offered by this school, 2000/01 to 2009/10© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 2.2
  15. 15. Applications of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary This course not offered by this school, 2000/01 to 2009/10© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 2.3
  16. 16. Applications of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary This course not offered by this school, 2000/01 to 2009/10© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 2.4
  17. 17. English 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary THIS PAGE FOR ALL STUDENTS EXAM MEAN SCORE and PERCENTAGE WRITING EXAM* Expressed as Percentiles 100 Exam Mean Percentile 50 Percent Writing Exam (as percentile) 0 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Exam Mean Score (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 68% 69% 65% 69% 68% Exam Mean Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 25 46 11 41 50 No. of schools used (standard public schools) 0 0 0 0 233 255 255 258 259 258 Percent Writing Exams N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Percent Writing Exams (percentile 1) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A No. of schools with non-zero percent writing1 0 0 0 0 233 255 255 258 259 258 No. of schools with zero percent writing 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Number of students writing exam (all grade levels) 0 0 0 0 Mask 67 39 48 55 54 EXAM MEAN SCORE and SCHOOL MEAN SCORE* Expressed as Percentiles 100 Exam Mean Percentile 50 School Mean Percentile 0 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Exam Mean Score (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 68% 69% 65% 69% 68% Exam Mean Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 25 46 11 41 50 School Mean Score (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 71% 73% 67% 72% 67% School Mean Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 51 77 12 61 16 No. of schools used (standard public schools) 0 0 0 0 233 255 255 258 259 258 Number of students writing exam (all grade levels) 0 0 0 0 Mask 67 39 48 55 541. If percentages for all schools in a given year are 100%, the percentiles cannot be calculated. Percentiles for Percent Writing Exams are based ONLY on schools with non-zero percentages. The percentiles shown above assume the data are from a normal distribution (bell curve) of Standard Public school scores. See Tab 1 for definitions of terms.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 3.1
  18. 18. English 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary THIS PAGE FOR ALL STUDENTS FINAL MEAN SCORE and PARTICIPATION RATIO Expressed as Percentiles 100 Final Mean Percentile 50 Participation Ratio Percentile 0 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Final Mean Score (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 70% 73% 66% 72% 67% Final Mean Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 45 72 10 57 21 Participation Ratio (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 79% 51% 87% 87% 95% Participation Ratio Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 21 0 28 22 42 Number of students with final marks (all grade levels) 0 0 0 0 Mask 67 39 48 55 54 No. of schools used (standard public schools) 0 0 0 0 233 255 255 258 259 258 FINAL PASS RATES FOR SELECTED STUDENTS (%) Expressed as Percentages 100% 98% 96% 94% All Students 92% Males 90% Females 88% Aboriginals/FN 86% 84% 82% 80% 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Final Pass Rates 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Percentages All Students N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 97% 97% 96% 100% 91% for school Males N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 98% 96% 96% 100% 88% Females N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 96% 100% 96% 100% 93% Aboriginals/FN N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask Mask Mask Mask Number of students with All Students 0 0 0 0 Mask 67 39 48 55 54 final marks (all grade levels) Males 0 0 0 0 0 42 23 24 29 24 Females 0 0 0 0 Mask 25 16 24 26 30 Aboriginals/FN 0 0 0 0 0 Mask Mask Mask Mask Mask B.C. Final Pass Rates All Students N/A N/A N/A N/A 96% 96% 96% 96% 96% 96% (public standard schools only) Males N/A N/A N/A N/A 94% 94% 94% 95% 95% 94% Females N/A N/A N/A N/A 97% 97% 97% 97% 98% 97% Aboriginals/FN N/A N/A N/A N/A 87% 90% 89% 90% 90% 89%NOTES.In the tables above, N/A indicates that either no students were involved or no data are currently available. Mask indicates that results have been suppressed (masked) to comply with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. This applies if there is less than 10 students with Final Marks.All data refer to Standard schools only. Continuing Education, Distance Education, Alternate schools, Electronic Schooling, etc. are excluded.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 3.2
  19. 19. English 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary DIAGNOSTICS TABLE Compulsory exam for this Subject (all years)EXAMINED STUDENTS ONLY 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Number of students writing examination School 0 0 0 0 Mask 67 39 48 55 54 (all grades) District 0 0 0 0 598 742 676 654 635 623 All Public 0 0 0 0 36,574 44,390 45,815 46,518 45,710 46,159 Exam Mark Exam Mean Score (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 67.8% 69.1% 64.7% 68.6% 68.2% (all grades) (average for the year) District N/A N/A N/A N/A 68.6% 71.6% 71.8% 72.3% 72.8% 70.7% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 69.4% 71.1% 70.4% 71.0% 70.5% 69.1% Exam Pass Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 91.0% 87.2% 81.3% 90.9% 94.4% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 88.3% 92.6% 92.2% 92.5% 93.1% 92.5% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 92.0% 93.6% 92.7% 92.1% 91.9% 91.4% Exam A Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 7.5% 25.6% 10.4% 12.7% 11.1% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 15.2% 19.8% 24.0% 24.0% 25.7% 17.5% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 12.5% 15.7% 15.6% 17.9% 18.0% 13.4% School Mark School Mean Score (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 70.7% 73.3% 66.6% 72.2% 66.9% (all grades) (average for the year) District N/A N/A N/A N/A 75.1% 75.3% 74.9% 74.6% 76.4% 72.6% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 71.5% 71.0% 71.0% 71.2% 71.6% 72.0% School Pass Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 97.0% 97.4% 97.9% 100.0% 88.9% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 98.5% 98.8% 99.7% 99.8% 99.8% 95.5% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 94.9% 94.4% 94.4% 95.1% 95.2% 95.4% School A Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 17.9% 28.2% 4.2% 12.7% 9.3% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 27.1% 27.4% 25.3% 25.8% 30.4% 22.0% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 19.0% 19.1% 19.0% 19.0% 19.8% 19.9% Final Mark Final Mean Score (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 70.1% 72.5% 66.2% 71.5% 67.1% (blended) (average for the year) District N/A N/A N/A N/A 73.8% 74.5% 74.3% 74.1% 75.7% 72.2% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 71.1% 71.0% 70.9% 71.2% 71.4% 71.4% Final Pass Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 97.0% 97.4% 95.8% 100.0% 90.7% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 97.8% 98.7% 98.7% 99.1% 99.2% 96.6% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 95.9% 95.8% 95.7% 96.2% 96.0% 95.6% Final A Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 9.0% 17.9% 4.2% 9.1% 7.4% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 20.4% 22.0% 21.4% 22.0% 24.9% 16.9% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 14.3% 15.4% 15.2% 15.7% 16.0% 15.3%NON-EXAMINED STUDENTS ONLY 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Number of students not writing examination School 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (all grades) District 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 All Public 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 School Mark School/Final Mean Score (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A & Final Mark (average for the year) District N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A (all grades) All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A School/Final Pass Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A District N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A School/Final A Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A District N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/ANOTES1. See Tab 1 for definitions of terms.2. Some statistics may differ very slightly from Ministry Reports due to differences in timing of extracts from the Ministrys data warehouse.3. For comparability, District and All Public statistics include only Standard Public Schools. Excluded are Continuing Education, Distance Education, Alternate Schools, Youth custody/residential attendance centres, Provincial Resource Programs, Electronic Education and independent schools.4. All statistics from 2006/07 onwards exclude students in the old graduation program for which provincial examinations are required. This corresponds with Ministry reporting conventions.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 3.3
  20. 20. English 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary DIAGNOSTICS TABLE Compulsory exam for this Subject (all years)EXAMINED AND NON EXAMINED STUDENTS 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Number of students in Grade 10 School 75 80 64 83 66 85 76 55 63 57 (grade level enrolment of Subject) District 811 826 817 906 822 909 839 777 758 711 All Public 49,978 46,799 47,605 48,492 47,948 49,357 48,619 48,854 47,602 47,629 Number of students with Final Mark School 0 0 0 0 Mask 67 39 48 55 54 (all grades) District 0 0 0 0 598 742 676 654 635 623 All Public 0 0 0 0 36,574 44,390 45,815 46,518 45,710 46,159 Percent of students with Final Marks School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% who wrote the Exam (see above) District N/A N/A N/A N/A 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Participation Ratio School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 78.8% 51.3% 87.3% 87.3% 94.7% 1 (new in 2008/09 ) District N/A N/A N/A N/A 72.7% 81.6% 80.6% 84.2% 83.8% 87.6% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 76.3% 89.9% 94.2% 95.2% 96.0% 96.9% School Mark School Mean Score (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 70.7% 73.3% 66.6% 72.2% 66.9% (all grades) (average for the year) District N/A N/A N/A N/A 75.1% 75.3% 74.9% 74.6% 76.4% 72.6% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 71.5% 71.0% 71.0% 71.2% 71.6% 72.0% School Pass Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 97.0% 97.4% 97.9% 100.0% 88.9% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 98.5% 98.8% 99.7% 99.8% 99.8% 95.5% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 94.9% 94.4% 94.4% 95.1% 95.2% 95.4% School A Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 17.9% 28.2% 4.2% 12.7% 9.3% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 27.1% 27.4% 25.3% 25.8% 30.4% 22.0% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 19.0% 19.1% 19.0% 19.0% 19.8% 19.9% Final Mark Final Mean Score (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 70.1% 72.5% 66.2% 71.5% 67.1% (all grades) (average for the year) District N/A N/A N/A N/A 73.8% 74.5% 74.3% 74.1% 75.7% 72.2% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 71.1% 71.0% 70.9% 71.2% 71.4% 71.4% Final Pass Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 97.0% 97.4% 95.8% 100.0% 90.7% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 97.8% 98.7% 98.7% 99.1% 99.2% 96.6% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 95.9% 95.8% 95.7% 96.2% 96.0% 95.6% Final A Rate (%) School N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 9.0% 17.9% 4.2% 9.1% 7.4% District N/A N/A N/A N/A 20.4% 22.0% 25.3% 25.8% 30.4% 22.0% All Public N/A N/A N/A N/A 14.3% 15.4% 15.2% 15.7% 16.0% 15.3%NOTES1. See Tab 1 for definitions of terms.2. Some statistics may differ very slightly from Ministry Reports due to differences in timing of extracts from the Ministrys data warehouse.3. For comparability, District and All Public statistics include only Standard Public Schools. Excluded are Continuing Education, Distance Education, Alternate Schools, Youth custody/residential attendance centres, Provincial Resource Programs, Electronic Education and independent schools.4. All statistics from 2006/07 onwards exclude students in the old graduation program for which provincial examinations are required. This corresponds with Ministry reporting conventions.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 3.4
  21. 21. Essentials of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary THIS PAGE FOR ALL STUDENTS EXAM MEAN SCORE and PERCENTAGE WRITING EXAM* Expressed as Percentiles 100 Exam Mean Percentile 50 Percent Writing Exam (as percentile) 0 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Exam Mean Score (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask 57% 59% 62% Exam Mean Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 24 37 70 No. of schools used (standard public schools) 0 0 0 0 185 211 223 225 217 220 Percent Writing Exams N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask 100% 100% 100% Percent Writing Exams (percentile 1) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask N/A N/A N/A No. of schools with non-zero percent writing1 0 0 0 0 185 211 223 224 217 220 No. of schools with zero percent writing 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 Number of students writing exam (all grade levels) 0 0 0 0 0 Mask Mask 14 23 22 EXAM MEAN SCORE and SCHOOL MEAN SCORE* Expressed as Percentiles 100 Exam Mean Percentile 50 School Mean Percentile 0 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Exam Mean Score (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask 57% 59% 62% Exam Mean Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 24 37 70 School Mean Score (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask 71% 64% 69% School Mean Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 85 35 70 No. of schools used (standard public schools) 0 0 0 0 185 211 223 225 217 220 Number of students writing exam (all grade levels) 0 0 0 0 0 Mask Mask 14 23 221. If percentages for all schools in a given year are 100%, the percentiles cannot be calculated. Percentiles for Percent Writing Exams are based ONLY on schools with non-zero percentages. The percentiles shown above assume the data are from a normal distribution (bell curve) of Standard Public school scores. See Tab 1 for definitions of terms.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 4.1
  22. 22. Essentials of Mathematics 10Cowichan Valley Lake Cowichan Secondary THIS PAGE FOR ALL STUDENTS FINAL MEAN SCORE and PARTICIPATION RATIO Expressed as Percentiles 100 Final Mean Percentile 50 Participation Ratio Percentile 0 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Final Mean Score (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask 68% 63% 67% Final Mean Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 78 32 74 Participation Ratio (%) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask 25% 37% 39% Participation Ratio Percentile N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask 69 90 93 Number of students with final marks (all grade levels) 0 0 0 0 0 Mask Mask 14 23 22 No. of schools used (standard public schools) 0 0 0 0 185 211 223 225 217 220 FINAL PASS RATES FOR SELECTED STUDENTS (%) Expressed as Percentages 100% 98% 96% All Students Males 94% Females 92% Aboriginals/FN 90% 88% 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Final Pass Rates 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 05/06 06/07 07/08 08/09 09/10 Percentages All Students N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask 93% 100% 100% for school Males N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask Mask 100% 100% Females N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask Mask Mask Mask Mask Aboriginals/FN N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Mask N/A N/A Mask Mask Number of students with All Students 0 0 0 0 0 Mask Mask 14 23 22 final marks (all grade levels) Males 0 0 0 0 0 Mask Mask Mask 16 15 Females 0 0 0 0 0 Mask Mask Mask Mask Mask Aboriginals/FN 0 0 0 0 0 Mask 0 0 Mask Mask B.C. Final Pass Rates All Students N/A N/A N/A N/A 91% 92% 93% 93% 93% 92% (public standard schools only) Males N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 91% 93% 93% 92% 92% Females N/A N/A N/A N/A 92% 93% 94% 93% 93% 92% Aboriginals/FN N/A N/A N/A N/A 88% 90% 90% 90% 90% 90%NOTES.In the tables above, N/A indicates that either no students were involved or no data are currently available. Mask indicates that results have been suppressed (masked) to comply with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. This applies if there is less than 10 students with Final Marks.All data refer to Standard schools only. Continuing Education, Distance Education, Alternate schools, Electronic Schooling, etc. are excluded.© 1994 to 2010 ADMINFO Resources Inc. This page may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes. Page 4.2

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