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Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy
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Salt Reduction and the AWASH Strategy

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  • The UK FSA salt levels were developed through an on-going consultation with relevant players in the food industry and independent food technologists. They were established with a view to achieving an average population intake of 6grams based on what was deemed feasible both in terms of the technical aspects of foods and consumer acceptability. There are now 80 targets (revised in 2009) which the food industry has agreed to try and reach by 2012. The existence of such targets guides food companies and puts them on a level playing field in terms of what they are required to achieve. It also provides a clear benchmark from which to monitor progress in relation to the different product categories.
  • Just a visual representation of companies with some kind of salt reduction commitment/action
  • 18 companies with some kind of salt reduction commitment 9 with action plans 22 provided sodium information * Indicates incomplete sodium information provided
  • Smith’s Snackfood Company have signed up to AWASH’s commitment of 25% salt reduction in their products over a 5 year period. This shows an example of reductions they have achieved in the first 2 years of the program It’s important to note that Smith’s do not publicise these reductions – the aim is not to increase sales or profit, but for the public health benefit.
  • Next step was to categorise foods further into appropriate sub-categories – a number of models were used as a guide for this; generally speaking FSANZ categories used for food labelling were used as a starting point and were further sub-categorised based on the UK FSA target categories, as well as the Retail World Grocery Guide categories.
  • Data was collected in three ways; the top-selling brand/companies initially identified were contacted directly by the authors and asked to provide sodium information for each of their products available for purchase in Australian supermarkets. Where such data was unavailable, three research assistants collected sodium information directly from each product’s Nutrition Information Panel from one of two major Australian supermarkets (Coles Broadway and Woolworths Town Hall). Data collection was from November to December in 2008. Collected data included the brand, product title, serving size, sodium per serve and sodium per 100g. All entered data were re-checked for accuracy against the original data recording sheets, and any discrepancies were checked with the product manufacturer.
  • Market share data from the Retail World’s Australasian Grocery Guide was used to ensure we included products representing a large proportion of market share. For example, in the bread category, we made sure to collect sodium data for all available products under the brands listed above to ensure the data we collected was representative of what consumers are actually purchasing.
  • Updated 2009 analysis shows that 43% of bacon products now meet FSA targets, still 5% sliced meat and 3% sausages/hotdogs. Also zero salami products, 5% of frozen meat products, 30% of meat burgers and 14% of canned meat products
  • Here we showed not only the high levels of salt in foods commonly eaten at a BBQ, but also the wide variation in salt levels, indicating there is room for further reductions. For example, per 100g BBQ sauce contained between 1.4g and 2.9g of salt, sausages between 1g and 3.3g of salt etc etc
  • As part of Salt Awareness Week 2009 AWASH hosted the Salt and the City event. To coincide with this we issued a media release on salt levels in fast food meals. Media coverage included over 100 press clippings, television coverage on channels 7, 9 and 10 As a result of the negative press, Oporto contacted AWASH and has since submitted a company action plan to reduce salt in many of their sauces
  • The UK FSA salt levels were developed through an on-going consultation with relevant players in the food industry and independent food technologists. They were established with a view to achieving an average population intake of 6grams based on what was deemed feasible both in terms of the technical aspects of foods and consumer acceptability. There are now 80 targets (revised in 2009) which the food industry has agreed to try and reach by 2012. The existence of such targets guides food companies and puts them on a level playing field in terms of what they are required to achieve. It also provides a clear benchmark from which to monitor progress in relation to the different product categories.
  • The UK FSA salt levels were developed through an on-going consultation with relevant players in the food industry and independent food technologists. They were established with a view to achieving an average population intake of 6grams based on what was deemed feasible both in terms of the technical aspects of foods and consumer acceptability. There are now 80 targets (revised in 2009) which the food industry has agreed to try and reach by 2012. The existence of such targets guides food companies and puts them on a level playing field in terms of what they are required to achieve. It also provides a clear benchmark from which to monitor progress in relation to the different product categories.
  • The UK FSA salt levels were developed through an on-going consultation with relevant players in the food industry and independent food technologists. They were established with a view to achieving an average population intake of 6grams based on what was deemed feasible both in terms of the technical aspects of foods and consumer acceptability. There are now 80 targets (revised in 2009) which the food industry has agreed to try and reach by 2012. The existence of such targets guides food companies and puts them on a level playing field in terms of what they are required to achieve. It also provides a clear benchmark from which to monitor progress in relation to the different product categories.
  • The UK FSA salt levels were developed through an on-going consultation with relevant players in the food industry and independent food technologists. They were established with a view to achieving an average population intake of 6grams based on what was deemed feasible both in terms of the technical aspects of foods and consumer acceptability. There are now 80 targets (revised in 2009) which the food industry has agreed to try and reach by 2012. The existence of such targets guides food companies and puts them on a level playing field in terms of what they are required to achieve. It also provides a clear benchmark from which to monitor progress in relation to the different product categories.
  • The UK FSA salt levels were developed through an on-going consultation with relevant players in the food industry and independent food technologists. They were established with a view to achieving an average population intake of 6grams based on what was deemed feasible both in terms of the technical aspects of foods and consumer acceptability. There are now 80 targets (revised in 2009) which the food industry has agreed to try and reach by 2012. The existence of such targets guides food companies and puts them on a level playing field in terms of what they are required to achieve. It also provides a clear benchmark from which to monitor progress in relation to the different product categories.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Affiliated with the University of Sydney Salt reduction and the AWASH Strategy Elizabeth Dunford Australian Society of Baking Conference 20 th October 2010
    • 2. Why is salt so important?
      • Required daily salt consumption about 1g/day
      • Recommended maximum 6g/day (2,300mg Na) and Suggested Dietary Target 4g (1,600mg Na)
      • Salt causes blood pressure to rise and greatly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease
      • Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disease burden in Australia
      • Blood pressure is the leading cause of chronic disease worldwide
    • 3. Effects of salt
      • Salt
    • 4. Effects of salt
      • Salt
      • Blood Pressure
    • 5. Effects of salt
      • Salt
      • Blood Pressure
      • Cardiovascular disease
    • 6. Outstanding scientific credibility
      • Recent 2007 Australian National Children’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey
      • Boys: 4.2 – 9.2 g salt / day
      • Girls: 4.1 – 6.6 g salt / day
      • No recent measurements for adults
      • Estimates 5 - 13 g salt / day
      • Likely greater intake than children
      Australian Salt Intakes
    • 7. Salt in the Australian diet Food Category Percent contribution to salt intake from processed foods Cereal and cereal products 32 Cereal-based products and dishes 17 Meat, poultry and game products and dishes 21 Milk products and dishes 5 Savoury sauces and condiments 8 All other foods 17
    • 8. How do we get salt out of the diet?
      • Get individuals to make healthier choices
      • or
      • Change the environment that people live in (so they can’t help but make healthier choices)
    • 9. Outstanding scientific credibility AWASH Australian Division of World Action on Salt and Health
    • 10.  
    • 11. Outstanding scientific credibility
      • Primary goal is to reduce the average amount of salt consumed by Australians to 6g per day within the next 5 years (by 2012) through:
      • An average 25% reduction in the salt content of processed foods
      • Increased population knowledge of the benefits of low salt diets
      • Clear labelling of foods that makes the salt content immediately apparent
      AWASH Goals and Objectives
    • 12. Outstanding scientific credibility Food Industry Support
    • 13. Outstanding scientific credibility
      • Main objective was to examine food industry action to date as well as obtain information on future plans with regards to salt reduction.
      • In March 2009, AWASH requested information from 20 major Australian food companies about their previous salt reduction efforts and any planned future actions for salt reduction.
      • A standardised format for response was provided and the support of the Australian Food and Grocery Council was utilised to maximise cooperation.
      Request for Salt Reduction Action Plans
    • 14. Food Industry Commitment Company Commitment to salt reduction Action plan provided Sodium information Bakers Delight √ √ √ Coles √ √ √ * Compass Group √ Domino’s Pizza √ √ Freedom Foods √ √ Heinz Australia √ √ * George Weston Foods √ √ √ * Goodman Fielder √ √ Kellogg √ Lowan Whole Foods √ √ McDonald’s Australia √ √ Monster Muesli √ √ Oporto √ √ Sanitarium √ √ Smith’s Snackfood Company √ √ √ Subway Systems Australia √ √ Unilever Australasia √ √ √ Yum! Restaurants √ √
    • 15. Outstanding scientific credibility Food Industry Action – Example Smith’s Snackfood Company Salt Reduction Program Year 1 Smith's Crinkle Cut Potato Chips – Chicken flavour 29% Smith's Crinkle Cut Potato Chips – Original flavour 17% Parker’s Pretzels – Minis 23% Nobby’s – peanuts, cashews, beer nuts, mixed nuts 13% Year 2 Smith's Crinkle Cut Potato Chips – Salt & Vinegar 15% Smith’s Selections Thinly Cut Potato Chips – Sour Cream Onion 18% Red Rock Deli - Lime Black Pepper 23% Doritos - Sweet Chilli Sour Cream 15%
    • 16. Outstanding scientific credibility
      • We need to know whether there has been an actual reduction in salt levels in foods, both within individual food categories and across the whole spectrum
      What does this add up to?
    • 17. Outstanding scientific credibility AWASH Sodium Database - Approach
      • Identify food categories that contribute most to salt in the Australian diet
      • Collect sodium data on packaged foods sold in Australian supermarkets from selected sources
      • Assign foods to relevant major, minor and sub-categories
      • Collect relevant additional data (other nutrients where possible) for each food item
      • Monitor changes over time
    • 18. Salt in the Australian diet Reference: Food Standards Australia New Zealand. P230: Consideration of Mandatory Fortification with Iodine, 2007. Food Category Percent contribution to salt intake from processed foods Cereal and cereal products 32 Cereal-based products and dishes 17 Meat, poultry and game products and dishes 21 Milk products and dishes 5 Savoury sauces and condiments 8 All other foods 17
    • 19. Outstanding scientific credibility Example – bread & bakery products Minor food category Sub-category Description Bread White bread Pre-packed white sliced bread Wholemeal bread Pre-packed wholemeal sliced bread Mixed grain bread Pre-packed mixed grain or seed sliced bread Fruit bread Pre-packed fruit bread and fruit-based muffins/rolls Others Pre-packed Turkish pide, wraps, flatbread, tortillas, bagels, English-style muffins, crumpets, rotis, pizza bases and other plain bread-based products
    • 20. Outstanding scientific credibility Data Collection
      • Direct from manufacturer
        • A number of major companies provided nutrition information directly
      • Company websites
        • Data from websites was used only when advised by the food company
      • In-store visits
        • 2 major Australian supermarkets
        • Information taken directly from product NIPs
    • 21. Outstanding scientific credibility Example of market share data AWASH Category Retail World Category Brand % volume Bread Bread loaf Private label 27.8 Helga's 7.9 Wonder White 8 Tip Top Up 6.9 Mighty Soft 7 Tip Top Sunblest 7.1 Noble Rise 3.3 Burgen 2.6 Country Split 1.6 Vogel's 0.6 TOTAL 72.2
    • 22. Mean sodium levels by major food category Category Mean sodium (mg/100g) Bread and bakery products 467 Cereal and cereal products 206 Meat and meat products 846 Dairy 353 Edible oils 419 Fish and fish products 512 Fruit and vegetables 211 Snackfoods 797 Convenience foods 301 Sauces and spreads 1283
    • 23. Products with <50% meeting FSA targets Category No. products compared Mean sodium (mg/100g) % meeting target White bread 51 461 14 Wholemeal bread 25 449 16 Savoury biscuits 187 771 24 Flavoured rice 31 537 13 Bacon 47 1243 30 Sliced meat 123 1042 5 Sausages/hotdogs 96 825 3 Processed cheese 29 1402 14 Canned veg 332 227 18 Soup 265 304 41 Tomato sauce 27 834 30 Pasta sauce 135 499 24
    • 24. Outstanding scientific credibility Salt warning on sausage sizzles!
      • AWASH sodium database used to determine salt content of foods traditionally eaten at an Aussie BBQ
      • One sausage sandwich could contain up to 6g of salt
      • Highlights need for food industry action
    • 25. Outstanding scientific credibility Salt overdose for city workers Fast food pushes salt consumption to unsafe levels Thursday 5 February 2009
      • Results showed that many fast food meals contain far more salt than the government’s recommended daily maximum.
      • As a result of this release, Oporto contacted AWASH and provided a salt reduction action plan
    • 26. Outstanding scientific credibility Development of Salt Targets for Industry
      • Development of product-specific targets for salt levels in key food categories
      • The UK and US have developed salt reduction targets for >80 food categories
      • Developed in consultation with industry
      • Such targets for Australia could draw on these targets as well as build on existing Australian criteria (e.g. NHF)
      • Government’s Food and Health Dialogue has negotiated salt targets for bread and breakfast cereals; next focus will be processed meat and simmer/stir-fry sauces
    • 27. Bread
    • 28. Outstanding scientific credibility Current Situation
      • 5 major players
        • George Weston Foods
        • Goodman Fielder
        • Coles
        • Woolworths
        • Bakers Delight
      • 4/5 involved in the Food and Health Dialogue
      • Dialogue set target for bread of 400mg/100g sodium by 2013
        • George Weston Foods and Woolworths have already met this target
    • 29. Outstanding scientific credibility Update – George Weston Foods
      • Tip Top® UP®, Tip Top® 9 Grain®, Tip Top® Gold Max®, Tip Top® Gold Split® and Tip Top® Sunblest® now have 400mg/100g of sodium.This represents a total reduction of over 20% on average since 1997.
      • Golden® Crumpets and Crumpet Toast® have been reformulated from 650mg/100g of sodium (Crumpets) and 820mg/100g of sodium (Crumpet Toast). This represents a total sodium reduction of 8% and 28% respectively.
    • 30. Outstanding scientific credibility Company Update Report – White Bread Sodium levels in white bread products from major market players
    • 31. Outstanding scientific credibility Company Update Report – White Bread Sodium levels in white bread products from major market players GWF lowest
    • 32. Outstanding scientific credibility Update – Goodman Fielder Brand Number Mean Na/100g Range Na/100g Country Life 11 495 250-810 Helga’s 14 450 380-580 Lawson’s 4 421 402-450 Mighty Soft 4 423 420-430 Wonderwhite 4 493 470-500
    • 33. Outstanding scientific credibility Update – Goodman Fielder
    • 34. Outstanding scientific credibility Update – Bakers Delight
      • Absence from Dialogue
      • Chia bread marketed for heart health – 476mg/100g
      • White spelt stick highest sodium 634mg/100g
      • No change in sodium over past year
    • 35. Outstanding scientific credibility Update – Coles and Woolworths COLES In January 2008, Coles made a commitment of an average 25% reduction in salt over five years in its Housebrand foods. Since then, Coles has been working in partnership with its suppliers to work towards their commitment, ensuring product safety, quality, value and taste are not compromised by the salt reductions. WOOLWORTHS No commitment to action to date (with AWASH) Part of the Food and Health Dialogue Already low salt levels in bread
    • 36. Outstanding scientific credibility Update – Coles 1 product ↓ in sodium, 2 products ↑ sodium from 2009-10, 8/9 products >400mg/100g Subcategory Brand name Product title Na2010 Na2009 Na2008 Na2007 Mixed grain Coles Soy & Linseed Bread 505 505 460 Mixed grain Coles Bakery Fresh Soy & Linseed Batard 665 Mixed grain Coles Bakery Multigrain Bread 425 425 425 Mixed grain Coles Smart Buy Multigrain Bread 420 400 Mixed grain You'll Love Coles Multigrain Bread 450 410 White Coles Sliced White Bread 523 516 White Coles Bakery White 420 420 White Coles Smart Buy Cottage-Style Split White Bread 400 400 520 White Coles Smart Buy White Bread Sandwich Slice 450 523 523 523 White Coles Smart Buy White Bread Toast Slice 450 450 White You'll Love Coles White Bread 420 450 420 Wholemeal Coles In-store Wholemeal Bread 489 Wholemeal Coles Bakery Wholemeal & High in Fibre 470 470 Wholemeal Coles Smart Buy Wholemeal Bread 430 400 489 Wholemeal You'll Love Coles Wholemeal Bread 470 470 470
    • 37. Outstanding scientific credibility Update – Woolworths 3 products decreased sodium from 2009-10 All products <=400mg/100g sodium Subcategory Brand name Product title Na2010 Na2009 Na2008 Na2007 Mixed grain Home Brand Multigrain Sandwich Bread Sliced 377 400 492 500 Mixed grain Woolworths Bakehouse Multigrain Sandwich Bread 400 440 440 White Home Brand White Sandwich Sliced Bread 400 400 515 500 White Home Brand White Toast Sliced Bread 383 515 515 500 White Woolworths Bakehouse White Sandwich Bread 400 400 462 460 White Woolworths Bakehouse White Toast Bread 400 400 462 452 Wholemeal Home Brand Wholemeal Sandwich Sliced Bread 389 400 451 500 Wholemeal Woolworths Bakehouse Wholemeal Sandwich Bread 400 400 468 468
    • 38. Outstanding scientific credibility Next steps…..
    • 39. Outstanding scientific credibility Global Branded Food Composition Database
      • Aim
      • To bring together data about the composition of processed foods that can be used to drive national and international improvements in the food supply
      • Design
        • Collect nutrient information for processed food products in each country (direct from manufacturer, through analysis or from product labels)
        • Enter data into either a standardised Microsoft Excel spreadsheet OR the online data entry system
        • Compare levels of adverse nutrients by product/category/manufacturer/country
      • Australia
      • New Zealand
      • Fiji
      • Argentina
      • China
      • UK
      • Costa Rica
      • France
      • South Africa
      • USA
      • Canada
      • Brazil
      Countries involved
    • 40. Outstanding scientific credibility Global Collaborating Organisations
      • Consumer Goods Council – South Africa
      • C-POND – Fiji
      • CWASH – China
      • French Food Safety Agency (AFSSA) – France
      • LATINFOODS – Latin America
      • Medical Research Council – UK
      • Medical Research Council – South Africa
      • National Institute of Nutrition – India
      • National Public Health Institute – Mexico
      • New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene – USA
      • University of Auckland – New Zealand
      • University of Calgary – Canada
      • University of Oslo – Norway
      • University of Paris - France
      • World Action on Salt and Health (WASH) – UK
    • 41. Outstanding scientific credibility Fast Food Database
      • Nutrient content data for products served by six leading fast food chains in Australia, USA, UK, New Zealand, France and Canada were collected in April 2010
      • Mean (and range) sodium content per 100g and per serve for breakfast items, burgers, pizzas, salads, sandwiches and side items was determined
      • Results were compared between countries
    • 42. Outstanding scientific credibility Conclusions
      • Database has been set up to monitor changes in product formulation over time
        • Transparent
        • Brand/company-specific information
        • Results used to drive policy and push industry
      • Food and Health Dialogue targets not challenging enough
        • Bread already meeting targets
        • UK and US have targets for >80 categories; Australia should have the same
        • Independent monitoring essential
    • 43. Outstanding scientific credibility World Salt Awareness Week 2011 Salt and Men’s Health March 21 – 27 2011
    • 44. The George Institute Contact Details Elizabeth Dunford Email: [email_address] Phone: (02) 8507 2529 Jacqui Webster Email: jwebster@ georgeinstitute.org.au Phone: (02) 9993 4520 Bruce Neal Email: bneal@ georgeinstitute.org.au

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