the power of sport
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watch full screen (there are some compression hiccups mr. slideshare), no music so make your own soundtrack, click at your own pace. your comments appreciated peterhac@yahoo.com

watch full screen (there are some compression hiccups mr. slideshare), no music so make your own soundtrack, click at your own pace. your comments appreciated peterhac@yahoo.com

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • I thought it was a well told story about the power and importance that sport plays in people’s lives and the benefits that can be derived from leveraging that power. Not only is it important for brands and corporations to realise that power, but also to appreciate it and leverage it in a relevant and mutually beneficial way. That way, even the most opposed fans to corporate involvement in sport will come around when the product both on and off the field reaps the rewards.
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  • dannyboy69
    sorry you didn't like it. not for everyone.
    Mr Taylor was dealt with professionally, and we stand behind our decision. My positions on cheerleaders is clear: nothing against spandex-clad people dancing in general, it is just that the cheerleaders were the only presence women had at our games and didn't that was the right context for women.

    Not sure what you think are the alternative models for funding Rugby League, and ours is certainly only one way to go. Each to their own. P
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  • Sorry but that was a load of rubbish. Told me nothing.

    If sport is about inclusion and second chances - what about Jason Taylor. If it's good enough to have Reggie Rabbit, why not the cheer girls? And don't talk for those people peering over the fence at the trial game. they just refuse to partake in your money grab - it was a trial!!!!

    Peter, you and Crowe need to stop trying to brainwash fans and sponsors into supporting your model. It stinks and we don't want a bar of it.
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  • note: watch full screen (there are some compression hiccups mr. slideshare), no music so make your own soundtrack, click at your own pace. your comments appreciated peterhac@yahoo.com
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  • And when I talk about ‘the power’, I am talking not about the box office clout, the TV ratings or the size of our asset base which even in a small country of Australia we estimate having a replacement value of over A$100 billion.I am talking about the power to change our society.
  • We are still very much a 101 year old start upWe have make lots of progress, changing our business model to reduce our reliance on poker machine revenue,
  • Lifting sponsorship and membership as the most important part of our business
  • Both mac and pc

the power of sport Presentation Transcript

  • 1. the business of sport
    peter holmes à courtseptember 9, 2009
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 2. the business of sport is using the
    the power of sport
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 3. the power of sport
    live
    human
    professional
    games
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 4. *
    the power of sport
    *
    not the box office clout, the tv ratings or the value of our assets
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 5. the power of sport
    to build
    to transform
    - people
    - communities
    - ideas
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 6. the power of sport in Australia
    there are global similarities, but like doing any business in another country, the cultural differences create a unique environment
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 7. the power of sport in Australia
    uniquely ours
    community grounded
    indigenous relevance
    we develop world champions from swimming to pole vault, we play four codes of football (including one we made up ourselves) and we staged the best Olympics ever (so they told us).
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 8. the power of sport in Australia
    uniquely ours
    community grounded
    indigenous relevance
    our structure makes us very different:
    the US has 60 cities with a catchment of more than 1 million inhabitants, we have 4, and an average of 10 major professional teams in each of those.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 9. the power of sport in Australia
    uniquely ours
    community grounded
    indigenous relevance
    our structure makes us very different:
    in the US there are 2.5 million people per major professional sports team, we have less than 400,000 for every team.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 10. the power of sport in Australia
    uniquely ours
    community grounded
    indigenous relevance
    our structure makes us very different:
    the US has 100 million homes with pay TV, Australia has 1.3 million.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 11. the power of sport in Australia
    uniquely ours
    community grounded
    indigenous relevance
    our structure makes us very different:
    the average contracted NFL footballer player earn 50x the average American worker, MLB baseballer 70x, NBA basketballer higher still.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 12. the power of sport in Australia
    uniquely ours
    community grounded
    indigenous relevance
    our structure makes us very different:
    the average contracted NFL footballer player earn 50x the average American worker, MLB baseballer 70x, NBA basketballer higher still.
    the average rugby league player here earns 2.2x the average Australian wage, a soccer player in A-League a bit less, an Aussie rules player a bit more.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 13. the power of sport in Australia
    uniquely ours
    community grounded
    indigenous relevance
    our structure makes us very different:
    as a result our elite athletes are elite in their performance, but not segregated from our society.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 14. the power of sport in Australia
    uniquely ours
    community grounded
    indigenous relevance
    and we touch the significant issues of the nation: and no more importantly than our indigenous relevance and ability to make an impact there.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 15. from 2006 to 2008 I led a small,
    dedicated team that turned around
    the Rabbitohs. What we stated
    has continued...
  • 16. ...thanks to the commitment of management, an independent board, coaching staff and players and of course the unstoppable energy and incredible creativity of co-owner, Russell Crowe
  • 17. the Rabbitohs play rugby league, and have won a record 20 first-grade premierships since their foundation in 1908
    photograph of the 1908 premiership winning team
  • 18. unfortunately, they are all in black and white.
  • 19. in 1999, after nearly 3 decades of underperformance, the National Rugby League excluded the Rabbitohs from the competition. They did not play in the 2000 or 2001 seasons.
  • 20. in two marches through the streets of Sydney 100,000 people protested the decision
    in July 2001, a federal court decision found that the Rabbitohs were wrongfully excluded, and the club was reinstated in 2002.
  • 21. however by 2006 the team was running last and was financially fragile and club’s voting members were asked to approve a proposal to sell control of the club to Russell Crowe and I:
    date of EGM:
    location:
    number of speeches:
    number of eligible voters:
    votes required:
    march 19 2006
    Sydney Olympic Stadium
    42 over 5 hours
    3942
    2957 to carry motion (75%)
  • 22. however by 2006 the team was running last and was financially fragile and club’s voting members were asked to approve a proposal to sell control of the club to Russell Crowe and I:
    date of EGM:
    location:
    number of speeches:
    number of eligible voters:
    votes required:
    votes received:
    march 19 2006
    Sydney Olympic Stadium
    42 over 5 hours
    3942
    2957 to carry motion (75%)
    2988 (75.8%)
  • 23. In 2007, the Rabbitohs qualified for the semi finals for the first time in 18 years
  • 24. In 2007, the Rabbitohs qualified for the semi finals for the first time in 18 years
    Membership has risen from 8,000 to 15,000
  • 25. In 2007, the Rabbitohs qualified for the semi finals for the first time in 18 years
    Membership has risen from 8,000 to 15,000
    In 2009, the Rabbitohs will, for the first time, make a small profit
  • 26. in 2006 the Rabbitohs, they had the worst training facilities in professional sport in Australia, and they were locked out of their spiritual home, Redfern Oval.
    Redfern Oval 2006
    worse, the run down oval and grandstand was a nest for crime in the surrounding area
  • 27. in partnership with the City of Sydney, Redfern Oval is today a vibrant community asset with a state-of-the-art training facility, a playground for kids, skate ramp, basketball hoops, open from sunrise to sunset in the shared custody of the community and the Rabbitohs.
    Redfern Oval 2008
  • 28. a physical manifestation of an open, transparent business, inviting rich participation appropriate for an increasingly digital age
  • 29. sure there are times when the gates are closed for a ticketed event, such as this trial game earlier this year
  • 30. The
    but even when you close the gates, we remain transparent
  • 31. The
    the days of building walled gardens are over
  • 32. The
    he has our merchandise on
    she has a members cap on
  • 33. The
    businesses can give away a taste for free, and encourage greater interaction
  • 34. The
    businesses can give away a taste for free, and encourage greater interaction
    established customersconsidering greater interaction
  • 35. The
    businesses can give away a taste for free, and encourage greater interaction
    potential customers
    sampling the product
  • 36. The
    businesses can give away a taste for free, and encourage greater interaction and if your product is good enough, they will want to get closer
  • 37. “sports don’t have to fear competition from other sports; we have to fear people sitting in a dark room
    listening to an ipod.“
    Me, 2006
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 38. “sports don’t have to fear competition from other sports; we have to fear people sitting in a dark room
    listening to an ipod.“
    Me, 2006 I was wrong.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 39. “sports don’t have to fear competition from other sports; we have to fear people sitting in a dark room
    listening to an ipod.“
    Me, 2006 I was wrong.
    Those benign ipods have morphed into dynamic, connected and networked audio visual devices, enabling incredible interaction
    with sports.
    Digital is our friend. Our new bff.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 40. “sports don’t have to fear competition from other sports; we have to fear people sitting in a dark room
    listening to an ipod.“
    Me, 2006 I was wrong.
    Those benign ipods have morphed into dynamic, connected and networked audio visual devices, enabling incredible interaction
    with sports.
    Digital is our friend. Our new bff.
    Because we have something digital can never have:
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 41. we have live events that just happen.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 42. we have live events that just happen.
    the more we have a digital life
    the more people crave
    human gatherings
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 43. and digital gives fans a multitude of new ways to interact with their game of choice
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 44. and digital gives fans a multitude of new ways to interact with their game of choice
    all team announce-ments emailed to fans at same time as media
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 45. and digital gives fans a multitude of new ways to interact with their game of choice
    all tickets (gate, train, parking) and concession offers on mobile screen
    all team announce-ments emailed to fans at same time as media
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 46. and digital gives fans a multitude of new ways to interact with their game of choice
    interact with big screen at the game, share experience w/ friends
    all tickets (gate, train, parking) and concession offers on mobile screen
    all team announce-ments emailed to fans at same time as media
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 47. and digital gives fans a multitude of new ways to interact with their game of choice
    interact with big screen at the game, share experience w/ friends
    video highlights sent to you because you were there to see it live
    all tickets (gate, train, parking) and concession offers on mobile screen
    all team announce-ments emailed to fans at same time as media
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 48. and digital gives fans a multitude of new ways to interact with their game of choice
    interact with big screen at the game, share experience w/ friends
    video highlights sent to you because you were there to see it live
    all tickets (gate, train, parking) and concession offers on mobile screen
    all team announce-ments emailed to fans at same time as media
    It works for big sports. (but is even more powerful for niche sports, who can’t get mainstream media coverage.)
  • 49. the power of sport is that it is
    both/and
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 50. both/and
    both tough and kind
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 51. both/and
    both tough and kind
    both community focused and business-like
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 52. both/and
    both tough and kind
    both community focused and business-like
    Both elite and inclusive
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 53. both/and
    both tough and kind
    both community focused and business-like
    Both elite and inclusive
    both heritage and fresh
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 54. both/and
    both tough and kind
    both community focused and business-like
    Both elite and inclusive
    both heritage and fresh
    both well planned and highly unpredictable
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 55. to win, you need big guys like this
  • 56. capable of doing jobs like this
  • 57. and you also need guys like this
  • 58. to do jobs like this
  • 59. and when kids can see this, in their school, in their community
    capable of doing jobs like this
  • 60. and when kids can do this, in their school, in their community
    capable of doing jobs like this
    and then get on a train to go see this:
  • 61. that is the power of sport.
  • 62. wearing the ribbon of our major sponsor’s charity our players...
  • 63. wearing the ribbon of our major sponsor’s charity our players...
    Beau Champion
    indigenous
    local junior
  • 64. wearing the ribbon of our major sponsor’s charity our players...
    Beau Champion
    indigenous
    local junior
    Issac Luke
    kiwi international
  • 65. wearing the ribbon of our major sponsor’s charity our players...
    Beau Champion
    indigenous
    local junior
    Issac Luke
    kiwi international
    Jamie Simpson
    twice recovered from
    lymphatic cancer
  • 66. wearing the ribbon of our major sponsor’s charity our players...
    Beau Champion
    indigenous
    local junior
    Issac Luke
    kiwi international
    Jamie Simpson
    twice recovered from
    lymphatic cancer
    partner with the Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation off-field
  • 67. and deliver with extraordinary feats on-field
  • 68. that is the power of sport.
  • 69. the power of sport in Australia
    bloody hard work
    incredibly important
    worth fighting for
    a lot of fun
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 70. the power of sport in Australia
    bloody hard work
    incredibly important
    worth fighting for
    a lot of fun.
    the end. thank you.
    ©9/09 www.ISFM.com.au
  • 71. dedicated to Mike Wrublewski 1946 – 2009
    Michael Wrublewski was a pioneer of professional basketball in Sydney, a former director of ISFM and the founder of the Sydney Kings. Mike’s funeral was being held as I gave a version of this speech for the first time. This quotes is from one of his players, and speaks for itself:
    “...we did over 660 school visits a year when Mike was in charge...
    and when the Kings folded two years ago they did just 20 school visits.”
    The Sydney Kings went out of business in 2007, the year they had won their third consecutive national championship. Who said winning is everything in sport in Australia.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 72. also dedicated to last weekend’s game...
    the biggest winning margin over the Dragons since 1921.
  • 73. peter holmes à court
    Peter is the Executive Chairman of ISFM, a specialist sports industry consultancy, a director of Viocorp International, Australia’s leading internet video technology company, a director of Queensland Rail and the Barangaroo Delivery Authority, and since 2006 he has been the co-owner with Russell Crowe of the South Sydney Rabbitohs. Peter was Executive Chairman of the Club from mid-2006 to mid-2008.
    Previously Peter was CEO of the Australian Agricultural company, today the country’s largest cattle company. Peter took the 185 year old company public in 2001. Prior to that Peter founded and ran Back Row Productions, an international producer of theatrical productions, touring shows such as Australia’s highest grossing live theatrical show Tap Dogs, UK comic Eddie Izzard and Jerry Seinfeld, amongst a total of over 20 different productions in 300 cities and 20 countries.
    Peter was born in Perth, lived 14 years in the US and UK, and moved with his wife Divonne and two sets of twins to live in Sydney in 2000.
    Peter rides a bike and does the odd triathlon, both of which he does slowly.
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au
  • 74. examples of new ways – physical and digital – sport is reaching its customers:
    www.isfm.com.au/projects_redfernoval.html
    A summary ISFM’s work on the redevelopment of Redfern Oval and adjacent commercial properties in conjunction with the major stakeholders including the City of Sydney Council, South Sydney Rabbitohs, South Sydney Leagues Club, and property developers Trivest. The completed project, and the adjoining park is considered a benchmark in community and elite sports integration.
    www.cyclingmasters.tv
    Viocorp developed this site to create a broadcast model for the track cycling masters championship. The model demonstrated how high quality multi-camera coverage, produced efficiently (i.e., cheaply) could create multiple new revenue streams (organiser, participants, sponsors, syndication) and enable a small participation sport to reach its geographically diverse fan base.
    www.rabbitohs.com.au/news/club-news/rabbitohs-2009-squad-announcemend.html
    The Rabbitohs broadcast “members-first” videos and release team news to their members at the same time (or before) the major media receives press releases. Importantly, while the quality of some videos is very high, some low cost videos of breaking news that is very relevant to hard core fans (not interesting at all to non fans and therefore the mainstream media) are the highest watched videos.
    this presentation with audio at: www.viocorp.com/peterhac
    ©9/09 www.isfm.com.au