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Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
Australian curriculum english presentation   feb 2012 final version
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Australian curriculum english presentation feb 2012 final version

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Staff PD presentation, Aust Curric.

Staff PD presentation, Aust Curric.

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  • This power point can be used as is or if required use these headings to link to the relevant sections in the power point.
  • For Semester 1 2012 teachers are expected to become familiar with these materials. This may include identifying aspects of the curriculum that are different and reviewing plans and programs Resources to support the teaching of the Australian Curriculum are beginning to be placed online and will complement existing state and territory curriculum resources. Throughout 2012 these resources will be expanded. In line with other states and the territories, WA will apply the current assessment and reporting approach. The work samples (portfolio) are to assist in arriving at a nationally consistent interpretation of the achievement standards. Familiarisation Strategies/Focus Questions: Consider: Ways to engage your teachers in the Australian Curriculum content to develop an understanding of what they will need to omit, modify or add to their teaching and learning programs Activities you could use to support familiarisation and implementation: - Current curriculum audit and review of learning areas against the Australian Curriculum content - Use of the Curriculum Mapping to support with audit Any professional learning your teachers may need
  • Schools should continue working towards developing school plans to prepare for formal implementation of the Australian Curriculum . States and territories worked with ACARA during 2011 to refine the Phase 1 curriculum – this included: developing a national approach to the use of Achievement Standards and reporting developing material to support implementation making the necessary adjustments to meet the needs of students with special education needs. ACARA have indicated that the NAPLAN tests will draw directly from the Australian Curriculum from 2014. At this point in time, ACARA has indicated that the national population testing program will not be extended beyond the areas of literacy and numeracy. Science, Civics and Citizenship and ICT will continue to have sample testing conducted nationally every three years.
  • It is the through the study of English that individuals learn to analyse, understand, communicate with and build relationships with others and the world around them. Meaning is central The Australian Curriculum: English helps students to engage imaginatively and critically with literature.
  • Strand structure The Australian Curriculum: English Foundation to Year 10 is organised in three interrelated strands that support students' growing understanding and use of English. Together the three strands focus on developing students ’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. The three strands are: Language – Knowing about the English language and how it works (eg: grammar at whole text, sentence and word levels, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, sound-letter knowledge). Literature – Understanding, appreciating, responding to, analysing and creating literature both classical and contemporary including novels, plays, film, poetry and short stories (with special focus on Asian, Aboriginal and Torres strait islander texts). Literacy – understanding and producing the English language accurately, fluently, creatively, critically, confidently and effectively (comprehension, analysis, writing, speaking, participation in discussion, handwriting, editing) and creating and responding to digital and multimodal texts. Scope and sequence Foundation to Year 10 Content in each strand is grouped in sub-strands that show a clear sequence of learning from Foundation to Year 10. An alternative view of the content that focuses on the processes or language modes of speaking and listening, reading (including viewing) and writing is available on the website. This view includes no repetition of the content. It will be possible to use the filter function to identify the content descriptions that show which descriptions relate to more than one mode.
  • This activity is designed to engage participants with their particular year level content. Develop awareness of the focus of the three English strands. Identify possible starting points for reviewing the content of teachers current English teaching and learning program. Identify possible starting points for action learning or determining a whole or phase of schooling focus.
  • Literature includes a broad range of forms such as novels, poetry, short stories and plays; fiction for young adults and children, multimodal texts such as film, and a variety of non-fiction. Literary texts also include excerpts from longer texts. The literature strand is aimed at encouraging teachers working at all year levels not only to use texts conventionally understood as ‘literary’, but also to engage students in examining, evaluating and discussing texts in increasingly sophisticated and informed ‘literary’ ways.
  • The language modes To acknowledge the interrelationship of the language modes, content descriptions in each strand of the Australian Curriculum: English incorporate the processes of listening, speaking, reading, viewing and writing in an integrated and interdependent way. Classroom teaching and learning experiences will necessarily draw from more than one of these processes in order to support students ’ effective learning. Content descriptions can also be viewed by these processes or language mode. Year Level Descriptions They describe differences in the texts that students create. In the early years development in reading and writing is rapid and clear distinctions can be made so descriptions are written for each year level F-2. In Years 3-10 the two year description provides for greater flexibility. Content descriptions The content descriptions have been written to ensure that learning is appropriately ordered and that unnecessary repetition is avoided. However a concept or skill introduced at one year level may be revisited, strengthened and extended at later year levels as needed. Content elaborations Assist teachers to develop a common understanding of the content descriptions.
  • Students in Years F-7 are still required to read/view, write, listen and speak with increasing sophistication and with a greater range and variety of Australian and Asian texts, but with higher expectations in all years. In Years F-7 there is a much more explicit requirement to understand and respond to digital and multimodal texts. The Australian Curriculum requires understanding of the features of online texts that enhance navigation ( ie that multimodal texts are organised through layout, framing) and the use of navigational tools (such as icons and menus bars) with digital texts.
  • Concepts in reading such as intertextuality and representation, and use of metalanguage for understanding print, digital and multimodal texts is introduced earlier (Years 8 and 9) than in the K-10 English Syllabus . In Years 8-10 there are new understandings required about the English language, its varieties, dialects, development, change and use in various contexts. These understandings build on those introduced in Years F-7. There is more focus on responding to the aesthetic elements of literature texts and developing understandings about how and why certain literary texts are valued in society in different ages. There are more specific requirements for students to understand and use grammar in the context of their reading and writing.
  • The Australian Curriculum has a more explicit focus on grammar in context in all years of the curriculum. It should be noted that grammar points introduced in a particular year are not repeated in subsequent years. In F-7 the Australian Curriculum places much more emphasis on reading, responding to and creating literature where previously literature has been use to teach students how to read. English has always required the study of a range and variety of texts and the reading practices associated with making meaning. This has not changed but the emphasis has shifted to an explicit focus on Australian (including Aboriginal) and Asian texts. In each year of schooling there are new understandings required about the English language, its varieties, dialects, development, change and use in various contexts.
  • The standards are broad comprehensive statements to be read in conjunction with the content descriptions. They represent the essential understandings and skills of the curriculum content. The achievement standards for each year level are aligned with the content for that year. The achievement standards together with the content descriptors facilitate planning and assessment of student learning. Student work samples play a key role in communicating expectations described in the achievement standards.
  • The alternative mode structure is accessed by using the modes view of the online curriculum.
  • Teachers use the achievement standard at the end of a period of teaching to make on-balanced judgments about the quality of the learning demonstrated by the students. Teachers draw on assessment data they have collected as evidence during the course of the teaching period. If the teacher judges that a student ’s achievement is below the expected standard, this suggests that the teaching programs and practice should be reviewed. It also suggests that further data may need to be gathered about the student’s progress and additional support and targeted teaching provided.
  • A key function of the Teacher Development Schools is to support teachers to become familiar with the Australian Curriculum through professional learning and sharing resources, school experiences and information. TDSs will support teachers by developing and delivering a range of professional learning, supporting networks by sharing curriculum expertise and identifying and sharing strategies and resources. TDSs provide support to teachers across the state through the Institute of Professional Learning, networks and groups of schools. Access to professional learning being offered by TDSs is available through the Institute of Professional Learning ’s calendar of events at: det.wa.edu.au/professionallearning Enquiries regarding TDS support are to be directed to the relevant TDS Principal Consultant: Louise Nielsen – Primary Teacher Development [email_address] Wendy Hewitt – Secondary Teacher Development [email_address] The online provision of resources through the portal will be expanded during 2012. Familiarisation Strategies/Focus Questions: Consider: Ways to engage all teachers to become familiar with using the digital resources Processes to map current resources against Australian Curriculum content and cross curriculum priorities
  • Familiarisation Strategies/Focus Questions: Consider: Ways to engage all teachers to become familiar with using the digital resources Processes to map current resources against Australian Curriculum content and cross curriculum priorities
  • Link to HO Determining a focus area for your phase of schooling Key Considerations Determining a focus area Select a strand. What new learning is involved with this strand? What aspects of this strand are you already teaching? Identify which sub-strand/s you want to focus on. Some sub-strands are more demanding than others. Consider this when you are deciding whether to take on one or two sub-strands. Review content descriptions. Become familiar with the relevant content descriptions. Discuss the related learning intentions. Ensure common understanding across year levels. Consider relevant elaborations. Identify elaborations that enhance understanding of the content descriptions and assist with planning suitable learning experiences. Examine the scope and sequence of the content descriptors. Develop a clear understanding of the scope and sequence of each content descriptions across each year level. Consider integration with other strands. This may occur as a natural part of planning and implementation. Not all lessons will encompass all strands. Consider integration with other learning areas. Some content will be taught explicitly in English lessons while other may be best taught as part of teaching and learning experiences in other learning areas. Identify opportunities for practice and consolidation.
  • The K-12 Resources website provides a gateway to 30 000 resources that teachers can use to assist them with planning and teaching across all learning areas and year groups.
  • Select the resource, download or link the resource to a class. Once linked to a class students will be able to access it via the student portal
  • Transcript

    • 1. February 2012 Phase 1 Australian Curriculum: English A curriculum for all young Australians Semester 1 2012
    • 2. Australian Curriculum Purpose • Presentation and clarification of key messages about the Australian Curriculum: English • Discussion of strategies to prepare for future implementation of the Australian Curriculum: English.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 3. Australian Curriculum Australian Curriculum: English • Key messages (slides 4-6) • Shape of the Curriculum (slides 7-10) • Curriculum Content (slides 11-16) • Resources and support (slides17-21)Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 4. Australian Curriculum Key Messages • For Semester 1, 2012 it is expected that teachers will continue to prepare for implementation of Phase 1 subjects of the Australian Curriculum • Schools will not use the Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards to make a summative assessment or report student achievement during 2012. • The Department’s Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Policy is current at this point in time. • For most teachers, this means that what they teach and how they teach it will remain largely unchanged in 2012.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 5. Australian Curriculum Key Messages • The three year formal implementation period will commence in July 2012 as the total curriculum package, comprising Curriculum Content, Achievement Standards and Resources, including annotated work samples for the first phase of the Australian Curriculum, is now available. • ACARA have indicated that NAPLAN tests will draw from the Australian Curriculum from 2014. • Implementation timelines for the Year 11 and 12 courses are still being negotiated.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 6. Australian Curriculum Australian Curriculum: English Aims to ensure that students: • learn to listen to, read, view, speak, write, create and reflect; • appreciate, enjoy and use the English language in all its variations; • understand how Standard Australian English works in spoken and written forms; and • develop interest and skills in inquiring into the aesthetic aspects of texts and develop an informed appreciation of literature. back to content slideAustralian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 7. Australian Curriculum Strands and sub-strands Each strand is grouped into sub-strands Language Literature Literacy Language variation Literature and context Texts in context and change Language for Responding to Interacting with others interaction literature Text structure and Examining literature Interpreting, analysing organisation and evaluating Expressing and Creating literature Creating texts developing ideas Sound and letter knowledgeAustralian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 8. Australian Curriculum Strand Activity • Each group to select a year level and focus on one of the strands. • Each participant to read through the content descriptions for their strand and highlight any part of the text that they may not be addressing in their current teaching and learning program. • Share individual responses within their group • Collate group feedback and record on a large post it. • Each group to present an overview of their strand and identify possible new or different teaching foci.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 9. Australian Curriculum Texts • Texts provide the means for communication. • Can be written, spoken or multimodal, and in print or digital/online forms. • Students are involved in understanding and producing imaginative, informative and persuasive texts, media texts, everyday texts and workplace texts. • Literature refers to past and present texts across a range of cultural contexts that are valued for their form and style and recognised as having enduring or artistic value.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 10. Australian Curriculum Key Information The language modes • Interrelated • The learning of one often supports and extends learning of the others Year level descriptions (Three functions) • Emphasise the interrelated nature of the three strands • Provide information about learning contexts that are appropriate for each year level • Provide an overview of the range, complexity and key features of the texts to be studied Content descriptions ( Do not prescribe approaches to teaching) • Describe the knowledge, skills and processes that teachers are expected to teach and students expected to learn Content elaborations (Are not intended as content points that all students need to be taught) • Illustrate and exemplify content back to content slide Glossary • Supports a common understanding of key termsAustralian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 11. Australian Curriculum Primary English – Content Overview • In reading, writing, listening and speaking there is a clear alignment between the K-10 English Syllabus and the Australian Curriculum but with increased expectations in some areas. • Viewing has been combined with reading and includes creating and responding to digital and multimodal texts in Years F-7. • Increased emphasis on reading, experiencing, responding to and creating literature. • New content about English and its dialects, systems of communication and language change. • Increased emphasis on knowledge about language and language use.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 12. Australian Curriculum Secondary English – Content Overview • In reading, writing, listening and speaking and viewing the Australian Curriculum aligns with the K-10 English Syllabus. • Explicit introduction of reading practices (such as intertextuality, and representation) in Years 8 and 9. • New content about English and its dialects, systems of communication and language change. • Specific content detail about understanding and use of grammar in context. • Stronger emphasis on the analysis and evaluation of literature texts in Years 8-10 (including metalanguage for appreciating literature). • Specific focus on reading and responding to digital technology.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 13. Australian Curriculum Some differences • Strong and explicit reference to grammar. • Focus on creation of and response to digital and multimodal texts. • A stronger emphasis on specific ways of analysing, evaluating and developing an informed appreciation of literary texts. • The range of literary texts comprises world, Australian, Aboriginal (including inscriptional and oral narratives), and texts from and about Asia. • New content about English and its dialects, systems of communication and language variation and change.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 14. Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards F-Year 10 Achievement standards: • indicate the quality of learning students should typically demonstrate by a particular point in their schooling; • describe the extent of knowledge, the depth of understanding, and sophistication of skills indicative of a student who is well placed to commence the learning required at the next level of achievement; • describe the sequential progress in the learning area across F-10; and • provide a framework of growth and development in the learning area.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 15. Australian Curriculum Achievement standards - structure The structure is based on: Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing) • understanding • skills Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating) • understanding • skills The alternative structure is based on: Reading and viewing Writing Speaking and listeningAustralian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 16. Australian Curriculum Making judgments • Ongoing formative assessment within the classroom. • Making on-balanced judgements about the quality of the learning demonstrated by the students (whether they have achieved below at or above the standard). • Drawing on assessment data collected as evidence during the course of the teaching period. • Summative assessment for the purpose of twice yearly reporting. back to content slideAustralian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 17. Australian Curriculum Support for schools • 62 Teacher Development Schools provide targeted support to schools and school networks. • The Institute for Professional learning plays a key role in brokering and co-ordinating support for teachers and administrators. • Teachers have access to digital resources through the K-12 Resources website and Resources Online.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 18. Australian Curriculum Support for schools • Schools will have an additional professional development day on 24 April 2012 to support the implementation of the Australian Curriculum. • A series of PowerPoint presentations available – an overview and learning area specific • Australian Curriculum Mapping Documents available on the Curriculum Support website.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 19. Australian Curriculum Getting Started • Developing a whole school implementation plan. • Carrying out an audit of current content at a strand level. • Determining a focus area ie language mode, strand and sub-strand. • Identifying relevant resources and professional learning. • Engaging in action learning.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 20. Australian Curriculum Workshop activities • Scope and sequence document – select a thread - work in small groups to identify what changes across different phases of schooling (eg F-2, 3-5, 6-9) • Read HO Determining a focus area for your phase of schooling. Follow up from the earlier strand activity and identify a focus for action learning. Identify useful resources. Develop a plan of action.Australian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 21. Australian CurriculumAustralian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012
    • 22. Australian CurriculumAustralian Curriculum implementation© Department of Education WA 2011Revised May 2012

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