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    Program Review Program Review Document Transcript

    • MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM REVIEW TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: Grades 5-12 BS Department of Industrial Education and Technology Ahmad Zargari, Ph.D., Chair College of Science and Technology Gerald DeMoss, Ph.D., Dean Prepared and Revised by Ron Spangler, Associate Professor of Industrial Education & Technology December 11, 2002 CONTENTS 1. Conceptual Framework................................................................................................3
    • Overview.................................................................................................................3 Program Relationship to Conceptual Framework..................................................3 Goals of the Department and Conceptual Framework ............................. 5 Kentucky New Teacher Standards ........................................................... 5 Professional Education Core Relationship to Conceptual Framework..................6 Sequence of Components .........................................................................6 2. Program Experiences...................................................................................................7 Matrix 1: Relationship between the Program & New Teacher Standards.............7 Matrix 2: Relationship between the Professional Courses & New Teacher Standards..................................................................................7 Matrix 3: Relationship between the Program & ITEA/CTTE Standards................8 Clinical and Field Experience Descriptions .............................................11 3. A. NCATE Themes and KERA Initiatives ..................................................................13 3. B. Professional Education Core Links.........................................................................13 4. Assessment ................................................................................................................14 Candidate Assessment .......................................................................................14 Transition Points (Milestones).............................................................................15 Program Assessment..........................................................................................15 5. Professional Education Faculty....................................................................................17 6. Program Checksheet...................................................................................................18 Sequence of Courses...........................................................................................20 Appendices A. 2002 Annual Program Assessment Report...........................................22 B. Cooperating Teacher Survey Form......................................................31 C. Vision of the Future Document ...........................................................34 D. Copy of Catalog Page on Bachelor Degree in Industrial Education...41 E. Course Descriptions ...........................................................................43 I. Conceptual Framework A. Statement of Conceptual Framework The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education is intended to prepare teachers to facilitate learning. In doing so, students take courses related to design and planning; teaching, learning, and curriculum development; instructional technology; skill development in particular areas; implementation, management, and evaluation of instruction. For Option I—Orientation/Exploration (grades 5-12) certification in technology education, students must also have the equivalency of 1,000 clock hours of 2
    • industrially related work experience. Because teachers of Technology Education must facilitate learning where the solutions of practical problems are paramount and in many cases require some level of creativity, the program allows students to develop creative and higher-order thinking skills grounded in authentic scenarios. While many requirements in the field of industrial technology require students to follow certain processes and procedures, many other problems can be encountered where the solutions to these problems may require new approaches. In lieu of this paradigm, the program uses behavioral, cognitive, and constructive epistemologies to prepare teachers to engage their own students in creative, authentic, real-world experiences, and assignments. Because technology is indeed a global phenomenon and the solution of problems in this area are seldom isolated cases, the program allows students to develop social, psychological, and managerial skills inherent in Kentucky’s 14 career clusters which link postsecondary degrees, diplomas, and occupations that enhance success when working in groups. Group dynamics in problem-solving scenarios are especially important; therefore many of the classes that students take require students to work on projects in group settings. Finally, students must continually learn in order to stay abreast of technological innovations that are occurring at a rapid rate. The program allows for opportunities in learning for life through required courses, self-interest courses, electives, and practical living. B. Relationship to the Conceptual Framework This program is integrated into the conceptual schema provided by the College of Education’s overarching framework of the Educator as Architect: Designing environments where students construct knowledge and develop skills (http://www.msucoe.org/). The conceptual framework helps to formulate the vision of a program and clarifies how that vision is manifested in 1) the goals of the unit, 2) the foundation of knowledge, skills, and dispositions that underlie student learning, 3) and the methods and systems created to implement and assess all aspects of each program. The conceptual framework for the teacher education program in Industrial Education (IE) is expressed in section A above. The remainder of this section will show the relationship between the goals, foundations, and assessments and the conceptual framework of the IE program as it relates to the College of Education’s overarching framework of the educator as architect. The following specific examples of changes for this year’s NCATE Review are expressed by the College of Education. • We have more clearly articulated how the “educator as architect” theme expresses a constructivist theory of learning and how that theory is integrated throughout the program. • Student dispositions have been articulated and a system for monitoring and assessing these has been approved. NCATE 2000 mandates the articulation and the assessment of dispositions. • There has been an initiative to integrate modern technologies into teacher/educator programs. Technology has been infused across the curriculum to prepare faculty and pre- professional students to effectively implement technology to improve teaching and learning and to prepare students to fulfill Kentucky Education Reform and standards. • There has been a campus-wide initiative to incorporate best instructional practices in all courses. Our global community is in a time of accelerating interdependence of technology and modern life. We have a corresponding desire and need to understand technology systems and how they impact individuals and society. The Department of Industrial Education and Technology (IET) has a vision to satisfy that desire and need - to be an educational leader in Technology Education committed to the lifelong learning and professional needs of MSU constituents within its 22 county service region. The department adopts and extends the work of the College of Education through the revised conceptual framework statement: 3
    • Conceptual Framework Theme--Educators as Architects: Designing environments where students construct knowledge and develop skills. Faculty in the Department of Industrial Education and Technology believe that students learn best when presented with environments that allow them to use their preferred styles to acquire knowledge, skills, and problem-solving abilities. In addition, faculty also believe that behaviorist, cognitivist, and constructivist epistemologies all play important roles in facilitating this multi- approach to optimizing such an environment. The focus of the department is to prepare teachers who will use multiple approaches to transfer knowledge to their students who can then function in the classroom or enter higher education with the abilities to become successful. We engage our diverse Industrial Education and Technology department in the study of technology to cultivate and expand students’ potential. Through collaborative efforts, we strive to develop teachers and professional leaders who are technically competent, innovative in problem solving, and skillful in management of personnel and facilities. C. Goals of the Department • To prepare exemplary problem-solvers for professional leadership roles through academic and field-based experiences; Conceptual Framework experiences: Providing students with direct experiences; so that they can use and process information while seeking solutions Placing students in authentic or “real” world settings so that learning has the potential to be meaningful Encouraging faculty and public school practitioners to fulfill the role of facilitators of learning by constructing experiences in environments that stimulate students and provoke thought, action, and reflection • To provide and support an environment conducive to research and development and the dissemination of technological knowledge and innovation; Conceptual Framework experiences: Monitoring the extent to which each educator preparation program fulfills its goals and commitment to preparing graduates to demonstrate performance standards, as well as the system each uses to produce positive change Encouraging faculty and students to note and apply scientific thinking to real life problems that exist in education in order to increase instructional productivity and to produce information to disseminate to others to inform their practice Assessing students and faculty using a variety of quantitative and qualitative measures, including authentic performance-based projects and action research • To provide professional development and service opportunities to meet society's ever changing technological needs; Conceptual Framework experiences: 4
    • The preparation of pre-professionals and faculty who are able to effectively integrate technology into all aspects of the educational process in order to improve communication, teaching, learning, and assessment Encouraging faculty and students to note and apply scientific thinking to real life problems that exist in education in order to increase instructional productivity and to produce information to disseminate to others to inform their practice We believe that the mission and goals will provide the guidance necessary for our curriculum, outreach, and growth initiatives in the department. The IET Department will continue to improve and grow in order to accomplish its primary mission of serving citizens of the University's service region through developing competent teachers and industrial technologists that are the key to economic development and effective use of resources in MSU's service region. D. Kentucky New Teacher Standards Central to the developmental process is mastery of the Kentucky New Teacher Standards that call on teachers to proficiently: (1) design and plan instruction; (2) create and maintain a learning climate; (3) implement and manage instruction; (4) assess and communicate learning results; (5) reflect on and evaluate teaching and learning; (6) collaborate with colleague, parents and others; (7) engage in on-going professional development; 8) posses knowledge of content; 9) Demonstrates the Implementation of Technology. (http://www.kde.state.ky.us/otec/epsb/standards/new_teach_stds.asp). To perform these complex, interrelated functions, a range of knowledge and experiences are required. These have been grouped in the following five domains: 1. General education, providing a broad background in general and liberal arts; 2. Academic specialties, developing an in-depth understanding of one or more specialty areas including the structure of the discipline; 3. Psychological, philosophical, and social foundations, understanding of the foundations of education; 4. Pedagogical knowledge and skills; integration of the knowledge base on validated best practices in education, and utilization of this knowledge to day-to-day classroom situations; and 5. Clinical experiences, application and refinement of effective pedagogical skills in a variety of instructional settings. E. Professional Education Core Relationship to the Conceptual Framework The professional education core is required for all Technology Education 5-12 candidates. The content, course experiences, and external experiences are linked to the conceptual framework and its theme “Educators as Architects: Designing Environments Where Students Construct Knowledge and Develop Skills” in several scenarios. The core courses are designed to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are essential for new teachers. At every opportunity students are engaged in authentic learning experiences where problem solving, application, and practice are important goals of the program. The use of technology to enhance learning is integrated throughout the Professional 5
    • Development Core. The intent is to challenge candidates to use a variety of technological resources effectively as part of the planning, teaching, assessment, and communication aspects of teaching. Students need to reflect upon their philosophies, knowledge, and skill to enhance their readiness to enter the filed. This is in line with constructing their own knowledge—a major belief of the constructivist movement. This skill is introduced in the Professional Core, crystallized in the academic discipline, and embedded in the student teaching semester. MSU student teacher supervisors, as well as teachers from the public school, add to the candidates’ ability to identify meaningful professional activities. Collaboration is an important component for success as a teacher. The concept of collaboration is introduced early in the Professional Development Core and the ability to effectively collaborate is required during the student teaching experience. Sequence of Components in the Program Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior General Education CAPSTONE Academic Specialties Foundations of Education Pedagogical Knowledge & Skills Clinical Experiences II. Program Experiences Graduates of this program will demonstrate mastery of the Kentucky New Teacher Standards and meet the NCATE standards incorporated in the Standards for Career and Technical Education. Graduates of this program will need to teach orientation to and exploration of the various occupations represented by the program. Therefore, the relationship between Teacher Education Standards and Professional Courses in Industrial Education are shown below. Matrix 2 outlines the program's continuum of skill development on each standard in relationship to the courses required in this program. Matrix 3 outlines the relationships of the Technology Education ITEA/CTTE Content Standards and Matrix 4 depicts courses that reflect the incorporation of KERA initiatives and NCATE themes to courses in the Orientation/Exploration Option. MATRIX 1: RELATIONSHIP OF TEACHER EDUCATION STANDARDS TO PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN OPTION I ORIENTATION/EXPLORATION GRADES 5-12 Industrial Education IET IET EDE EDS VOC EDF EDF IET IET 388 470 M P 207 211 311 392 478 TEACHER 330 332 STANDARDS Professional I K K,I K,S K,S Program Planning, K,I K,I I I I K Development & Management 6
    • Curriculum, Instruction, I K,I K K I K,S K,S K,S & Assessment Student Organizations K,I I S Work-Based Learning K,I K I K Life-Long Learning I K,I K Special Populations K,I K I I I I I,K K Courses cover the indicated competency areas at the following levels: I Information, establish initial level of awareness, K Knowledge, gain intellectual control over relevant content and skill S Skill, transfers information to demonstrated consistent performance MATRIX 2: Courses and New Teacher Standards for Certification in Technology Education Grades 5-12 NEW TEACHER STANDARDS: COURSES I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX I K S I K S I K S I K S I K S I K S I K S I K S I K S VOC 207 V V V V V I I I I I I I IET 388 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IET 392 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I IET 470 I I I I I IET 478 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I EDEM 330 E E E E E E E EDF 211 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E EDF 311 E E E E E E E E E E E E E EDSP 332 E E E E E E E E E E E E E Courses cover the indicated competency areas at the following levels: I Information, establish initial level of awareness, K Knowledge, gain intellectual control over relevant content and skill S Skill, transfers information to demonstrated consistent performance (Kentucky) New Teacher Standards 1. Designs/Plans Instruction 2. Creates and Maintains Learning Climates 3. Implements/Manages Instruction 4. Assesses and Communicates Learning Results 5. Reflects/Evaluates Teaching/Learning 6. Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others 7. Engages in Professional Development 8. Knowledge of Content 9. Demonstrates Implementation of Technology MATRIX 3: Relationship of Career/Technical (ITEA/CTTE) Teacher Education 7
    • Content Standards to Courses in the Industrial Education Orientation/Exploration Program Option I Grades 5-12 International Technology Education Association/ Council on Technology Teacher Education Evidence: Performance Data, Program Standards Experiences, and Courses. 1.0 Develop a philosophy informed by current research findings in technology education, curriculum and instructional design, assessment, and professional development. 1.1 Design programs based on a sound See Vision Statement Appendix D mission statement with stated goals and See University catalog page 158 (2002-2003) objectives that reflect the definition and IET 388 intent of technology education. 1.2 Use an organized set of concepts, IET 388, 392, 470, 478 processes and systems that are technological when designing course outlines, instructional strategies, and evaluations of student work. 2.0 Possess the necessary depth and breadth in MATH 152 mathematics, science, and related disciplines to be able to successfully teach technology education. 3.0 Master teaching and technical skills appropriate to successfully teach the study of technology. 3.1 Possess knowledge about the IET 120, 300 development of technology, its effects on people, the environment and culture; and industry, its organization, personnel systems, techniques resources and products; and their impact on society and culture. 3.2 Use instructional content from the content organizers of: 3.2.1 Communication: efficient use of ENG 100, 200, CMSP 108, CIS 101, IET 499c resources to transfer information to extend human potential. 3.2.2 Construction: efficient use of CON 101, IET 111, PHYS 201, MFT 186, 286 resources to build structures or construct on site structures. 3.2.3 Manufacturing: efficient use of MFT 186, 286, CON 111, IET 111 resources to extract and convert raw/recycled materials into industrial and consumer goods. 8
    • Evidence: Performance Data, Program Standards Experiences, and Courses. 3.2.4 Transportation: efficiently using IET 120, 160 resources to obtain time and to attain and maintain direct physical contact and exchange among individuals and societal units through the movement of material/goods and people. 3.3 Identify and incorporate safe and efficient IET 422, 496, 470 use of contemporary technological tools, instruments, and machines into a program of study. 3.4 Incorporate insight, knowledge, and IET 120, 300, 496, 470 applications of technological concepts, processes and systems into a teaching program. 3.5 Use skills, creative abilities, positive self- IET 470, 478 concepts, and individual potentials in teaching technology. 3.6 Apply problem-solving and creative IET 120, 499c, 478 abilities involving human and material resources, processes, and technological systems. 3.7 Use activity-oriented laboratory Of the 26 courses listed in the catalog for this instruction that reinforces abstract program, all but 3 or 4 of the technology courses concepts through concrete experiences. require lab. 3.8 Apply technology to the design and IET 392, 388, 470, 478 production of activities for student use. 3.9 Develop technology education programs IET 120, 300 that advance student attitudes, knowledge, and skills regarding how technological systems function. 3.10 Develop the ability of the students to Technical courses in the dept, including IET 120, apply technological knowledge and skills, 300, 499c and to assess new or different past- present-future technology systems. 4.0 Perform the following tasks in developing, managing, and evaluating a technology program in schools. 4.1 Display a philosophy and understanding VOC 207, IET 388, 478, 470 of technology education. 4.2 Develop a strategic program plan that IET 388 includes a mission statement, rationale for change, goals and objectives, action steps, as well as a program evaluation strategy. 9
    • Evidence: Performance Data, Program Standards Experiences, and Courses. 4.3 Select content based on the goals and IET 388 objectives appropriate to the content organizers (construction, manufacturing, communication, bio-related, transportation, or other organizers) of technology. 4.4 Structure an educational environment in IET 470, 478, 496 the classroom and laboratory to advance the instructional process. 4.5 Select appropriate instructional IET 392, 470, 478 technologies to effectively teach all student populations. 4.6 Provide for laboratory management (i.e., IET 422, 496 safety, inventory, filing, requisitioning equipment and materials, maintenance, budgeting). 4.7 Develop lesson plans, organize material, IET 470, 478 and select appropriate instructional strategies to effectively teach in the psychomotor, affective, and cognitive domains of learning. 4.8 Establish clear expectations for student IET 470, 478 conduct and develop and implement a behavior management policy program. 4.9 Be able to establish a technology student The Industrial Education & Technical Department association within the technology (IET) has helped establish the Eastern Ky. Tech. education program, in a public school or Educ. Assoc. (EKTEA) and is affiliated with the in a university, to include organization, Kentucky Applied Technology Education Assoc. establishing a chapter, assisting in its (KATEA). The dept. also supports the Tech, management and evaluation. Student Assoc. (TSA) by holding a regional review each year. 4.10 Promote and articulate technology EKTEA, TSA, IET Advisory Board education to internal and external public audiences. 4.11 Be able to develop and coordinate an The dept. has established an advisory board and external advisory committee for a has a representative from the state dept. AND Technology Education program. has placed a listserv online for communication improvement at ietadvisoryboard@moreheadstate.edu 4.12 Design a professional development plan The dept. has used a PDP for years. for continued personal and professional growth. 4.13 Use standards to evaluate and revise a International Technical Education Association technology education program. Identify (ITEA)/Council on Technology Teacher Education standards for the program, establish a (CTTE) standards, National Association of process for using the standards, and Industrial Technology (NAIT) standards, Kentucky utilize findings for subsequent program New Teacher Standards revisions. 10
    • Evidence: Performance Data, Program Standards Experiences, and Courses. 5.0 Develop attitudes, knowledge, and skills needed for success as a teacher in technology education. 5.1 Possess knowledge to organize IET 496, 470, 478 classroom and laboratory experiences for the study of technology. 5.2 Manage technological activities in both an Many of the courses within the dept. use both individual and group setting. group and individual activities to accomplish intended outcomes 5.3 Apply multicultural and global IET 120, 300 perspectives as they relate to the study of technology. 5.4 Apply values and ethics as they relate to IET 300 content issues in the study of technology. Clinical And Field Experiences Field experiences are designed to provide candidates with opportunities to develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions in real life settings to help them become effective professionals in education. From the epistemology of a constructivist paradigm, what better experiences could a student have that uses a practical, real-life setting? During these experiences, candidates may observe, analyze, and practice a variety of planning/teaching/learning techniques, as well as locate and use essential professional resources: 1) Learner Goals and Academic Expectations; 2) Appropriate Programs of Studies; and 3) Core Content for Assessment. Most courses have students reflect upon these experiences as part of their regular course requirements. The student’s professional semester is the culminating field experience. A department faculty member works closely with a cooperating teacher in a public school to ensure that each candidate is progressing at an acceptable level. Observations, dialogue, and portfolio artifacts are used to evaluate student performance. FIELD AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCES Level Courses Hours Expected Outcomes Hour Required Breakdown I CTE (VOC) 16 General Observation 12 207 Participation 4 I EDF 211 16 Diversity 4 Exceptionality 12 I EDF 311 16 Support Roles 12 Management, Grading, etc. 4 Individual Tutoring Total 48 II EDEM 330 15 Observation 10 Participation 5 II EDSP 332 10 Observations Exceptionality 5 11
    • One-on-one 5 Total 25 III IET 392 20 Observations 8 Teaching 12 III IET 388 20 Observations 12 Planning 8 III IET 496 20 Observations 12 Planning 8 Total 60 IV IET 470 10 Observations 10 Total 16 12
    • III. A. NCATE THEMES AND KERA INITIATIVES MATRIX 4: Relationship of Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) Initiatives and National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) Themes to Courses in the Industrial Education Orientation/Exploration Program Technology Education Grades 5-12 Option I IET IET EDEM EDSP VOC EDF EDF IET IET 388 470 330 332 207 211 311 392 478 KERA 1,2 1,3 1 1,2 1 1 1 1,2,3 Initiatives NCATE 1,2,3 1,2,3 1,2,3 1,2,3, 1,2,3 1,2,3 1,2,3 1,2,3 1,2,3 Themes 4,5,6 4,5,6, 4 4 4,5,6 7 7 7 NCATE Themes 1. Conceptual Framework 2. Diversity 3. Intellectual Vitality 4. Technology 5. Professional Community 6. Performance Assessment 7. Evaluation KERA Initiatives 1. Learner Goals 2. Program of Studies, P-12 3. Core Content for Assessment/CATS III. B. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION COURSE LINKS TO NCATE THEMES Course Conceptua Diversity Intellectua Technolog Professiona Evaluatio Performance s l l y l n Assessment Framework Vitality Community EDF 211 I D I I I I I EDF 311 D D D D D D D EDSP 332 D D I I D I D EDEM D D S D I D D 330 13
    • IV. Assessment Assessment is an integral part of the Industrial Education program. Each semester the members of the department assess students, faculty, and the program to help determine: 1) student competencies to become effective teachers; 2) faculty effectiveness as architects in this effort; 3) whether feedback is necessary to develop professional needs; and 4) feedback needed for program refinement. The Annual Unit Plan and Assessment Report has three major sections—I. Annual Planning Report for Academic Year 2001-2002; II. Review of the Unit Plan; and III. Annual Assessment Record. Section III can be viewed in its entirety in Appendix A. This section of this report contains highlights from student and program assessment respectively and shows how assessment is linked to the theme “Educators as Architects”. A. Candidate Assessment. This program continually assesses both the knowledge base in the field of Industrial Education and the New Teacher Performance Standards. This program ties practical experience in diverse settings to a strong knowledge base in Industrial Technology. Most of the courses beyond the general education requirements include a field/clinical experience that enables the instructors to use varied assessment techniques in addition to the traditional classroom procedures. The chart of on-going assessment indicates the varied methods used to implement authentic assessment with students in the Industrial Education program. In addition, students in Option I must take the Praxis exam and the graduate exit exam administered by the department. Even though most courses have field/clinical experiences, the culminating events will occur in two courses: Seminar and Student Teaching Practicum. Both of these courses will provide major components of the portfolio. The combination of classroom and field experience provides a valuable opportunity to conduct authentic assessment of the student's mastery of program objectives. Specifically, as they progress through the program, students are required to develop a set of interrelated portfolios that will culminate in the New Teacher Portfolio developed during student teaching. As part of their course work, students will produce the following portfolios documenting their developing mastery of the New Teacher Standards: 1. Professional Portfolio Development 2. Curriculum and Instructional Design 3. Teacher Education Program Portfolio 4. Preservice Teacher Portfolio 5. Digital Portfolio as Evidence of Effective Integration of Technology An additional assessment operating on a “trial” basis at this time is the assessment of a student’s disposition for a career in teaching. Disposition, as used in this context, includes the attitudes and values that may cause a teacher candidate to act in a certain way. Recently the Teacher Education Council approved a process for encouraging and continuously assessing eight specific dispositions: 1) passionate about learning; 2) enthusiastic about teaching; 3) committed to teaching responsibilities; 4) self-reflective; 5) hard working; 6) resourceful problem solvers; 7) sensitive to individual differences; and 8) able to establish rapport. Students must also complete certain requirements as they progress through their professional career. The following table depicts those milestones through these points of transition. UNDERGRADUATE TEACHER EDUCATION CANDIDATE TRANSITION POINTS 14
    • Transition Point Assessment Data Decision Maker(s) Outcome 1) Admission to • ACT, PPST, or GRE • Teacher • Department/Program TEP Score(s) Education Committee recommends students • Writing Sample Score Council for admission to Program. • Recommendation Forms • Director of Educational Service Initial Dispositions Unit compiles lists from each • Overall GPA (2.5) program and presents whole list to • Successful completion Teacher Education Council ENG 100, 200, PSY 154, • Teacher Education Council CMAP 1018, EDF 207, approves or does not approve and EDF 211 recommendation made and • Department Interview students informed in writing of Results admission recommendation 2) Prior to • GPA (2.5), in all areas • Director of • Eligible or not eligible for Student • Completion of Required Educational Enrollment in Student Teaching Coursework Services Unit Teaching and Placement in • Completion of required (DESU) Public School PRAXIS Exam(s) (Candidates informed in writing, by DESU. When ineligible, deficiencies described in writing) 3) Student • KTIP or Other • MSU Supervisor • Successful completion of Teaching Observation Feedback • Cooperating Student Teaching and Evaluation • Portfolio documents Teacher Capstone which address each New Teacher Standard 4) Program • Fulfilled all program • Office of the • Eligible for graduation, diploma, Completion requirements Transcript Registrar informed in writing if ineligible • Fulfilled all certification • Certification for graduation. eligibility requirements Officer (ESU) • Notified, in writing, (at last tracks meeting of 499c classes) of any and deficiencies that need to be recommends to state handled to be recommended for • State certification. • Letter of eligibility stating certification area(s) B. Program Assessment. Program quality is monitored annually through a university-designed system that uses Nichol’s Five Column Method of Program Evaluation. The Industrial Education assessment plan: 1) identifies explicit links with the university’s vision, mission, and goals; 2) states explicit links to program goals; 3) articulates assessment measures and criteria for acceptable levels of performance; 4) includes actual performance data used to determine if performance fulfills the stated criteria; and 5) addresses needs and methods for change, where appropriate, to improve performance. In an effort to insure quality teachers in the area of Technology Education, it is essential to obtain feedback from the students, professors, and professionals in the 15
    • field. The focus on students as part of program assessment is consistent with the constructivist paradigm. Through involving students in real learning scenarios and following up with interviews, observations, reflections, and questionnaires, members can decide what work most accurately reflects program success. Data used to document student performance is included in the annual report. This report is submitted to the Dean of the college and the Provost of the University. In addition, all cooperating teachers with student teachers assigned to them will be asked to complete the evaluation instrument found in Appendix B. This mechanism allows faculty to quickly identify areas of program weakness. Program assessment procedures include: Exit examinations Survey of graduating seniors Randomly administered survey of alumni. 16
    • V. Professional Education Faculty Name High- Area of Responsibilities Full-time MSU Full-time MSU Part-time MSU est Specialization In the program Full-time Part-time Part-time Degree Program Program Program Jane Ellington M.S. Voc. Ed.—Home Ec. 185, 207, 394, 393, 497 X 388, 364, 185, 478, 470 William Grise Ph.D. Electronics Technical courses in IET X Dennis Karwatka M.S. Mechanical Technical courses in IET X Beverly Klecker Ed.D. Leadership & Sec. Ed. EDF 311 X Edith Lombardo Ed.D. Elem. Read. & Spec. Ed. EDSP 332 X Paul McGhee Ed.D Elem. Educ. EDF 311 X Timothy Miller Ed.D. Reading EDEM 330 X Wayne Morella Ph.D. Industrial Education 185, 207, 320, 394, 393, X 497 496, 388, 364, 185, 478, 470 Edward Nass M.S. Graphic Comm. 185, 207, 394, 393, 497 X 496, 364, 185, 478, 470 Charles Patrick Ph.D. Construction Technical courses in IET X Mary Ann Ph.D. Reading EDEM 330 X Pollock Dreama Price A.M. Reading EDEM 330 X Ronald Skidmore Ed.D. Psychology & Sec. Ed. EDF 211 X Ronald Spangler Ed.D. Industrial Education 320, 372, 392, 388, 393 X Rodney Stanley Ed.D. Vocational Education 207, 372, 392, 394, 393, X 497 388, 185, 422 Ahmad Zargari Ph.D. Electronics & Technical Courses in IET X Supervision 17
    • VI. Program Checksheet and Sequence of Courses CHECKSHEET MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION & TECHNOLOGY PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATION FOR TEACHING STUDENTS IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION ORIENTATION/EXPLORATION LEVEL OPTION I (GRADES 5-12) AREA OF CONCENTRATION STUDENT: _______________________, ____________________________, _________________ Last First Middle SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER: STUDENT ID NUMBER: ____________ HOME ADDRESS: PHONE NUMBER: CATALOG YEAR: _______________ GENERAL EDUCATION (42) # COMMUNICATIONS AND HUMANITIES (15) CENG 100 COMPOSITION I (3) ( ENG 200 TECH COMPOSITION (3) ( HUMANITIES ELECTIVE (6) ( SPCH 370 BUS & PROF SPEECH (3) # NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH (12) NPHYS 201 ELEM PHYSICS I (3) ( NATURAL SCIENCE AND MATH ELECTIVE (3) ( MATH 152 COLLEGE ALGEBRA (3) ( CIS 101 COMPUTERS FOR LEARNING (3) # SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12) S ELECTIVE (3) ( PSY 154 INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY (3) ( ELECTIVE (3) ( SOC ___ ADDITIONAL SOC AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (3) # HEALTH HHLTH SCHOOL HEALTH (2) PHED ___ PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY (1) PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS (33) ( EDEM 330 FOUNDATIONS OF READING (3) ( EDMG 332 READING STRATEGIES FOR MIDDLE GRADES (3) ( EDF 211 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3) ( EDF 311 LEARNING THEORIES IN THE CLASSROOM (3) ( EDSP 332 TEACHING THE EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT (3) ( VOC 207 FOUNDATIONS OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (3) ( IET 388 METHODS OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (3) IET 470 METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (3) ( IET 392 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (3) 18
    • IET 478 STUDENT TEACH PRACTICUM AREA OF CONCENTRATION (48) GCT 103 FUNDAMENTALS OF TECHNICAL GRAPHICS (3) ( GCT 203 TECHNICAL DRAWING II (3) OR ) GCT 215 COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING EET 140 BASIC ELECTRICITY (3) ( EET 240 RESIDENTIAL WIRING (3) OR EET 245 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS GCT 102 GRAPHIC ARTS I (3) ( GCT 202 GRAPHIC ARTS II (3) ( MFT 186 MANUFACTURING & FABRICATION (3) ( MFT 286 MACHINE TOOL PROCESS (3) OR RROB 170 FUND OF ROBOTIC (3) ( IET 160 INTRO POWER & FLUID (3) ( IET 260 HYDRAULICS & PNEUM (3) ( IET 111 BASIC WOODS TECH (3) ( CON 101 INTRO TO CONSTRUCTION TECH (3) OR OCON 303 MATERIAL PROP & TESTING (3) ( IET 371 SEMINAR FOR INDUSTRIAL ED (1) ( IET 496 ORG & MNGT OF THE LAB (2) ( IET 100 WORLD OF TECHNOLOGY (3) OR RIET 300 TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY (3) A GPA of 2.50 on a 4-point scale in all courses is required for admission to the Teacher Education Program and to qualify for student teaching. 320 clock hours of Supervised Work Experience (IET 398) OR 1000 hours of work experience required for Teaching Certificate. Verification due in certification office before graduation. PRAXIS Test Requirements Technology Education TEST 10050 Date: Score: (600 Passing) PLT Exam (Middle or Secondary ) Date: _______ Score: ________ Departmental Exit Exam taken the last week of classes. The digital portfolio and hardcopy is due the last week of classes. SIGNATURES STUDENT SIGNATURE: DATE: _____________ ADVISOR: DATE: _____________ DEPARTMENT CHAIR: DATE: _____________ DEAN: DATE: _____________ Suggested Course Sequence 19
    • MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION GRADES 5-12 OPTION I Year 1 Fall 16 Spring 15 IET 110 Computer Applications 3 CTE 207 Found. of Career and 3 Tech. Ed. IET 120 Technology Systems 3 CTE 210 Assessment Techniques 3 ENG 100 Writing I 3 EDF 211 Human Grow. & Dev. 3 MATH 141+ 3 HLTH 151 Wellness: Theory to 3 Action Elective 3 CMSP 108 Fund. of Speech 3 Comm. MSU 101 Discovering University 1 Life Year 2 Fall 15 Spring 15 IET 300 Technology and Society 3 ECON 101 Introduction to 3 American Econ. ENG 200 Writing II 3 Social and Behavioral Sci. Gen. 3 Ed. Humanities Gen.Ed. 3 BIOL 155 Introduction to 3 Environmental Science MATH 152+ 3 EDEM 330 Foundations of 3 Reading Elective 3 Elective 3 Year 3 Fall 1 Spring 15 5 EDSP 332 Teaching the 3 CTE 388 Methods of Curriculum 3 Exceptional Student Development EDF 311 Learning Theories in the 3 Natural and Mathematical Science 3 Classroom Gen. Ed. Humanities Gen.Ed. 3 Humanities Gen.Ed. 3 IET 320 Supervisory Practices 3 IET 422 Industrial Safety 3 CTE 392 Methods of Instructional 3 Elective 3 Technology Year 4 Fall 1 Spring 15 5 CTE 470 Methods of Instruction 3 CTE 478 Student Teaching 1 20
    • Practicum 2 CTE 496 Organization and 2 IET 499C Senior Project 3 Management of the Lab IET 371 Seminar for Industrial 1 Education Natural and Mathematical Science 3 Gen. Ed. Elective 3 Elective 3 Summer Students in this program must Additional courses: document 1000 clock hours of approved work experience. IET 385 Staff Exchange 3 IET 398 Supervised Work 1- Experience 9 Co-op 12 21
    • APPENDIX A 2002 PROGRAM ASSESSMENT Report Section Taken from The Departmental Annual Unit Plan [Section III. ASSESSMENT REPORT For Industrial Education and Technology] 22
    • Fall 2001 – Spring 2002 10-7-2002___ Includes Assessment Reports for the following: Industrial Technology (not included) AAS Industrial Technology (not included) BS Industrial Education BS Career & Technical Education MS Industrial Technology (not included) MS First Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: Form C3 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION BACHELORS DEGREE Expanded State of Institutional Purpose Linkage: Institutional Mission Reference: Morehead State University shall serve as a comprehensive, regionally focused university providing high-quality instruction at the undergraduate and master's degree levels. College/University Goal(s) Supported: 23
    • The Department of Industrial Education and Technology is to offer high quality programs that prepare students for employment in teaching at the exploration or preparatory levels. The Department will focus on the achievement of excellence in student achievement in and outside the classroom. 1. Teach technology courses in one of the following clusters: Construction/mining, electrical/electronics, graphics communication, manufacturing and robotics. 2. Demonstrate specific technical skills in the specific teaching area. 3. Teach problem-solving skills required for performing and maintaining certification in the teaching profession. FORM B INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION BACHELORS DEGREE Intended Educational (Student) Outcome: 1. Teach technology courses in one of the following clusters: Construction/mining, electrical/electronics, graphics communication, manufacturing and robotics. First Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 1a. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Students must complete all requirements in order to be accepted to the TEP program. 1a. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: All industrial education students met the teacher education program’s entrance requirements. 1a. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: Teacher education requirements are shared with faculty in order to improve content for education students to be more successful. Second Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 1b. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Completion of teacher preparatory courses with minimum of 2.5 GPA, and successful submission of course notebooks including instructional materials. 1b. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Result: All industrial education students met this requirement. 1b. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: Results will be used to revise teaching and enhance mentoring. Third Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 24
    • 1c. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Industrial Education students successfully completed the Praxis Exam by meeting or exceeding those standards. 1c. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: Results of Praxis exam are tabulated and distributed to the department. All industrial education students passed the praxis. 1c. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: Industrial Education met its requirements. Results used to modify content and revise teaching methods. Form C1 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION BACHELORS DEGREE Intended Educational (Student) Outcome: 2. Demonstrate specific technical skills in the specific teaching area. First Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 2a. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Maintain a 2.5 GPA in all Departmental Technical courses and develop an electronic portfolio that is evaluated by an instructor. 2a. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: Assessment of student portfolios indicated that all IET students met the criteria. 2a. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: IET continues to monitor the results to review the content. Second Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 2b. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Administer the Departmental Exit Exam to graduating seniors. Students should score 75% or better. 2b. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Result: Departmental Senior Exit Exam is given each semester. The exam is composed of questions reflective of the core content. The average score was around 70%. 2b. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: Results used to revise content delivery by faculty for improved student knowledge. Form C2 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 25
    • BACHELORS DEGREE Intended Educational (Student) Outcome: 3. Teach problem-solving skills required for performing and maintaining career in a professional field. First Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 3a. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: 1000 clock hours for Orientation/Exploration and 2000 clock hours for Preparatory Level. 100% of students must meet this requirement for certification. 3a. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: IET continues to monitor the results to improve the program. 3a. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: No modifications needed. Second Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 3b. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: 100% of students participating in the student teaching experience must demonstrate satisfactory performance. 3b. Description of Data Collection and Assessment: The University supervising teacher visited all student teachers and evaluated their performance in the classroom and results were reported to the department. 3b. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: The performance evaluation from the supervising teacher is used to upgrade the program. Third Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 3c. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Successful completion of teaching internship. 3c. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: KTIP supervisors evaluated the performance of first year teachers and the results were satisfactory. 3b. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: The results were satisfactory, however, we monitor the result to improve the teacher education program. Form C3 CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION MASTER OF SCIENCE Expanded State of Institutional Purpose Linkage: 26
    • Institutional Mission Reference: Morehead State University shall serve as a comprehensive, regionally focused university providing high-quality instruction at the master's degree levels. College/University Goal(s) Supported: The Department of Industrial Education and Technology offers graduate programs in Industrial Technology and Career & Technical Education in order to prepare students for employment in technical and/or technical management as well as teaching- training and leadership positions in business, industry and government. Intended Educational (Student) Outcomes 1. Knowledge of the development, objectives, philosophy, and administration of career and technical education. 2. The ability to analyze and understand the correct trends and status of career and technical education. 3. The ability to understand the principles of and the knowledge and skill necessary to understand and implement technical preparation education. FORM B CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE Intended Educational (Student) Outcome: 1. Knowledge of the development, objectives, philosophy, and administration of career and technical education. First Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 1a. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Surveys and telephone interviews of supervisors must indicate a rating of “3” or more on the performance evaluation of graduates. 1a. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: Results indicate that all respondents had an average rating of 4.0 out of 5.0 on the performance evaluation of their employees. 1a. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: Results were satisfactory, however, IET used the data to develop courses such as total quality control, quality assurance, and research methods. Second Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 27
    • 1b. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: A survey of alumni must indicate that eighty percent of students must be an occupation related to their field of study. 1b. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Result: All graduates have employment in the field of career and technical education and three students have been accepted into doctoral programs at Bowling Green State University, North Carolina A&T, and University of Kentucky. 1b. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: Criteria was satisfactory. Results will be used to update the content. Third Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 1c. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Internship Rating Form completed by the on-site supervisor. Students participating in the Internship program are expected to achieve a total rating of “3” on a 5-point scale. 1c. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: All student interns received an average rating of 3.5 on the evaluation rating forms. 1c. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: The criteria for success was met, however, IET will use the results to strengthen the weak areas. Form C1 CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE Intended Educational (Student) Outcome: 2. The ability to analyze and understand the current trends and status of career and technical education. First Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 2a. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Students successfully complete a written comprehensive exam for non-thesis option. The criteria for success are achieving an average of seventy percent on the exam. 2a. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: All candidates for the MS earned seventy percent or higher on the comprehensive exam. 2a. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: The criteria were met. The graduate faculty to improve the content shares results. Second Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 2b. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Candidates for the degree must successfully pass the oral comprehensive exam by the graduate committee. 28
    • 2b. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Result: All candidates successfully presented their view of current trends and status of career and technical education to the graduate committee members. 2b. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: The criteria were met. Results used to enhance student’s presentation skills. Form C2 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE) MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE Intended Educational (Student) Outcome: 3. The ability to understand the principles of and the knowledge and skill necessary to understand and implement technical preparation education. First Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 3a. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Students successfully complete a thesis. 3a. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Results: In this review period, three theses on applied technical subjects have been submitted to the graduate faculty. 3a. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: The criteria was met, however, the results were used to implement the course IET 698: Research Methods. Second Means of Assessment for Outcome Identified Above: 3b. Means of Program Assessment and Criteria for Success: Students successfully conduct an applied directed research or directed study (IET 670 and IET 676). 3b. Description of Data Collection and Assessment Result: In this review period, ten projects including CISCO Training, A+ Certification, and SPC related projects have been submitted to the graduate faculty. The graduate committee evaluated all projects as successful. 3b. Use of Results to Improve Instructional Program: The criteria were met. Results used to modify the content and process of research courses. 29
    • APPENDIX B 30
    • MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY College of Science and Technology Department of Industrial Education & Technology Program for Preparation of Teachers for Students in Industrial Technology COOPERATING TEACHER SURVEY FORM In an effort to assure the quality of our programs of teacher preparation we need to regularly receive feedback from teachers working in the field. Please take a few minutes to complete this form assessing the level of preparation of the student(s) placed in your classroom during the last semester. The effort here is not to evaluate the individual student as a teacher, that is done separately, but to assist the university faculty to identify the strengths and weaknesses in our program and make needed corrections. In completing this form please keep in mind the level of preparation of the student(s). Please use the following scale to evaluate how well prepared you feel the students in our program are on each of the critical dimensions of teaching students in Technology Education. c 1 c 2 c 3 c 4 c 5 Inadequate Significant Adequate Shows Well Weakness Strength Prepared 1. Knowledge of best practices in education of students in Technology Education- K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 2. Formal assessment strategies- F 1 F 2 F 3 F 4 F 5 3. Informal assessment strategies- I 1 I 2 I 3 I 4 I 5 4. Processing and interpreting assessment results- P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 5. Communication with families- C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 6. Working collaboratively with other professionals- W1 W2 W3 W4 W5 7. Establishing instructional priorities- E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 8. Observing behavior- O1 O2 O3 O4 O5 9. Designing classroom behavior management plans- D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 10. Dealing with problem behavior- D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 11. Designing systematic instructional programs- 31
    • 1 2 3 4 5 12. Implementing systematic instructional programs- I 1 I 2 I 3 I 4 I 5 13. Collecting student performance data- C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 14. Effectively managing classroom- E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 15. Effective oral communication- E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 16. Effective written communication- E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 17. Use of technology- U1 U2 U3 U4 U5 18. Knowledge of resources to support instruction- K1 K2 K3 K4 K5 19. Maintaining and managing student records- M1 M2 M3 M4 M5 20. Using a variety of instructional arrangements- U1 U2 U3 U4 U5 21. Positive interaction with students- P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 22. Development of self-direction and choice making skills in students- D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 32
    • APPENDIX C 33
    • Department of Industrial Education and Technology VISION FOR THE FUTURE Morehead State University Our global community is in a time of accelerating interdependence of technology and modern life. We have a corresponding desire and need to understand technology systems and how they impact individuals and society. The Department of Industrial Education and Technology (IET) have been provided a golden opportunity not only to satisfy that desire and need, but also to be an educational leader in industrial technology and industrial education. We engage our diversity of academic programs within the Department in the study of technology to cultivate and expand the potential of students, businesses, and industries. Through collaborative efforts, we strive to develop professionals and leaders who are technically competent, innovative in problem solving, and skillful in management of personnel and facilities. The goals of the IET Department are to: • prepare competent technical management personnel for professional leadership roles through academic and field-based experiences; • prepare technical-vocational and technology education teachers and administrators for KCTCS and area schools; • provide and maintain an environment conducive to pursue applied research and development in order to disseminate and transfer technological knowledge and innovation; • provide professional development and service opportunities to meet ever-changing technological needs of local, regional and national industries; and, • proactively influence economic development of MSU’s service region and beyond. We believe that our mission and goals, coupled with input from the IET Advisory Board and alumni, will provide the guidance necessary for curriculum, outreach, and growth initiatives in the department. The IET Department will continue to improve and develop in order to accomplish its primary mission of serving the citizens of Kentucky through the development of competent industrial technologists to play a key role in the economic development and effective use of resources in MSU’s service region. The IET faculty has a vision of increasing growth in the IET department based on the University’s support to: 34
    • • focus resources on the undergraduate curriculum while expanding the graduate curriculum; • maintain degree program accreditation with both NAIT (National Association of Industrial Technology and NCATE (National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education); • revise curriculum to reflect the use of contemporary technology in industry; • replace outdated equipment with contemporary, pertinent technology; • emphasize an exciting environment for learning and preparation for future employment to attract and retain students; • reengineer and renovate the department for a modern, upscale 21st century appearance; • hire new faculty and provide professional development for current faculty to teach and conduct research on contemporary industrial technology and education; • offer competitive salaries for new and existing faculty based on productivity; • form alliances with local constituencies, business, and industry as well as campus departments/units; • develop technology transfer programs that foster economic development; and, • increase involvement in state-level activities, particularly those related to the technology education degree programs. With its diverse programs, faculty, and curricula, the IET department has the potential to serve a larger number of undergraduate and graduate students. The following table reflects our modest vision of the potential growth over the next five years given the support described herein. Degree Current Expecte % Program Majors d Majors Increas 2001 2006 e ‘01-‘06 Undergraduate Programs • Industrial Technology Associate/Bachelor of 200 260 30% Science 10 25 150% • Industrial Education Bachelor of Science Graduate Programs • Career and Technical Education Master of Science 10 25 150% • Industrial Technology Master of Science 20 50 150% Total 240 360 50% Improvement and growth in the IET department are dependent upon and coupled to progress in both the Undergraduate and Graduate programs. Brief and contemporary descriptions of each of these academic programs, as well as the primary needs are provided as follows. Undergraduate Programs The following degree options are offered at the undergraduate level. Industrial Technology – Associate of Applied Science and Bachelor of Science options in: 35
    • Construction/Mining Technology (CON/MIN): This degree option has gone from under 30 to over 60 majors in the last two years. This growth is likely a result of an increasing need for construction managers in MSU’s service region and beyond, careful recruiting of high school and MSU undeclared students, and a commitment to retention of majors by program faculty. We expect the growth in this option to continue and, with enhanced facilities and faculty, plan for the program to increase to over 90 majors within the next five years. The primary need of this program is an additional faculty member. One faculty member is advising all the current 60+ majors in this option. This faculty member is the only full-time faculty in the option with a part-time instructor carrying the remaining teaching load for the program. An additional full-time, tenure track faculty member is needed to meet the academic needs of the increasing student enrollment. Electricity/Electronics Technology (EET): While this option will continue to provide students with a strong foundation required for preparation of competent industrial technologists, it is important that the EET facilities be updated and equipped for study of electromechanical machines and advanced control systems demanded by manufacturing industries. The addition of a Computer and Telecommunication program will significantly increase student enrollment. Collaborating with and supporting the University’s Space Science Center, this program will cover areas such as computer hardware and interfacing, digital communication and networking, and telecommunication technology. This program will develop in three phases as follows: 1. An AAS option in Computer and Telecommunications will be added. 2. Upon assessment of the program effectiveness in a 2-year period, the AAS will be upgraded to a BS degree program. 3. Upon a comprehensive self study regarding the faculty and facilities availability, curriculum, and administrative support, the decision will be made whether to seek NAIT (Computer and Telecommunication Technology) or ABET accreditation (Computer and Telecommunication Engineering Technology). In order to develop and maintain a Computer and Telecommunications program, the primary need of this program is an additional faculty who is able to teach advanced technical subjects in the field of computers and telecommunications. In addition, to maintain such a program, there is a need for a resident technician. Graphic Communications Technology (GCT): Revisions in this option include dividing the option into Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) and Computer Aided Graphics (CAG). The CADD option will emphasize using computers to design and develop mechanical, structural, civil, and architectural projects. The CAG option will emphasize using computers to design and develop illustrations, animations, simulations, books, and other text-based and graphic productions. While the enrollment in this option is relatively low compared to the other IET options, it has great potential for student enrollment growth. There is an immediate need for a faculty member knowledgeable in CADD and solid modeling. The IET department hired a new faculty member in August 2001 to enhance the CADD and solid modeling aspects of this option. However, this faculty member has accepted another faculty position and must be replaced. Manufacturing/Robotics Technology (MFT/ROB): Due to industries’ growing interest in locating in this region, the potential for growth in this option is excellent. With a state-of- the art program, it is reasonable to expect an increase in enrollment of 30 to 50 percent. This would be the first truly comprehensive manufacturing program in eastern Kentucky. Part of the mission of the IET department is to assist in the preparation of a technologically 36
    • competent workforce and enhance economic development in the MSU service region. While the current program continues to prepare graduates who are highly successful in the manufacturing workplace, the inclusion of hands-on Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) into the program would give MSU students a deeper understanding of real-world manufacturing. This program has the potential to attract more transfer students through new and existing joint degree programs (2+2) and dual admissions with KCTCS institutions. It can attract numerous non-traditional students who may have been downsized from a previous manufacturing position. It can attract current managers and manufacturing professionals who want to enhance their management and technical skills. This program will enhance economic development in the region by providing on-site and distance learning training for new and existing employees with emphasis on the new economy. In order to improve this option, new hardware and software is needed, an additional manufacturing faculty will be needed, and a full time technician is a must. Some of the equipment needs for a typical CIM cell would include hardware such as robots, machine tools, conveyors, automatic storage and retrieval system, and software to manage the CIM environment. The CIM and automated manufacturing system would help the IET Department develop a value-added wood processing training center. Faculty in the IET Department has been actively pursuing external grants to fund a CIM facility. They have submitted CCLI grant proposals during the last two years to the National Science Foundation for such renovations. Industrial Education – Bachelor of Science Technology Education in Kentucky, and around the nation, has been identified as a discipline in critical need of teachers. As a result, faculty in the IET Department believes this program has the potential for growth in the future. The curriculum in Technology Education is currently being revised to incorporate the use of instructional technology to meet State Standard IX for teacher competency as well as the new standards set forth by the International Technology Education Association (ITEA). The curriculum will reflect the changes occurring in technology education that need to be incorporated into this discipline. In order to realize the potential of this degree program, it is important that at least one full time faculty member be dedicated to direct the program. This faculty should primarily teach courses related to technology teacher education. In addition, at least one other faculty should have a part time teaching load with this program. The existing faculty in the department should be able to meet these needs, given other needs of the Industrial Technology program are supported by the University. These faculty members will participate in regional, state and national activities and associations. The department will continue to work with schools through the Eastern Kentucky Technology Education Association (EKTEA), the Technology Student Association (TSA), and the Kentucky Applied Technology Education Association (KATEA). Graduate Programs Master of Science in Career and Technical Education (C&TE): The Master of Science in C&TE will continue to serve technical-vocational and technology education teachers and administrators for Kentucky public schools and KCTCS system. The graduate program in Career and Technical Education (C&TE) prepares individuals to take a leadership role in teaching and administration settings in school systems. In order to enhance enrollment and extend our services beyond traditional student population, all program courses will be offered via the Internet. Master of Science in Industrial Technology (MSIT): The demand for professional technical 37
    • managers have been created by a number of technological advances in industry, including: The rapid infusion of the microprocessor into all facets of business operations and production systems. The newly developed MSIT is to provide students with the advanced technical- management skills. In today's age of high technology and specialization, MSIT graduates will serve as technical managers, trainers, instructors, researchers, and practitioners in business, industry, government and education. The MSIT program is structured to meet industry's need for advanced technical managers who possess business and leadership skills along with technical preparation in a specialized area. The program prepares individuals who will assume leadership positions to ensure quality, productivity, and competitiveness for their employers. In order to extend our services to non-traditional students, the department is planning to offer all required course via the Internet. It is expected that Internet accessibility, coupled with the recent growth in this newly developed program, will double the current enrollment provided qualified faculty are available. The MSIT and MS in C&TE provide the University with an opportunity to join the Consortium’s Doctor of Philosophy in Technology Management offered by seven Universities. This program is designed to prepare students for positions of leadership in the public and private sectors of society in order to provide service to the industrial and educational community. MBA graduates could also benefit from such a doctoral program. Department of Industrial Education and Technology Necessary Resources for Future Growth Personnel Faculty: As the IET Department strives to accomplish its objectives, maintain program quality and enhance student enrollment in accordance with the standards of our Vision Statement, we believe that three additional faculty members will be necessary. The new faculty must able to teach undergraduate courses in the various Industrial Technology options using cross-disciplinary approaches. In addition, at least one of these additional three faculty members must be able to teach at the graduate level in the MSIT. Maintenance Technician: A full-time laboratory technician is needed to maintain equipment, computers, and prepare facilities for student use. The technician is also necessary to maintain NAIT accreditation for the Industrial Technology degree program. Competitive Salaries: Salaries offered to new and existing faculty in the IET Department must be state and nationally competitive to remain current and expand new programs. Criteria for measuring faculty productivity will primarily include professional development to improve teaching of contemporary technology and technology-based instruction, development and revision of state-of-the-art curricula, active student recruitment and retention, discipline-focused applied scholarship, technology transfer to business and industry, and involvement in state and national educational/technology activities. Facilities The following facilities improvements are needed in order to improve IET programs. Detailed plans will be developed • Renovate the department (classrooms and laboratories) into a modern, upscale 21st century facility to emphasize an exciting environment for learning and preparation for future employment; 38
    • • Install overhead projection systems in the primary classrooms for all programs to increase technology-based instruction. • Convert all existing IET microcomputers in laboratories over to MSU computer replacement program (three-year cycle). • Install a network server and communications network (high speed access via fiber optical cable) throughout Reed and Lloyd Cassity Halls. The network server would become the software base for distance learning (ITV and online), CAD/CAM, CIM, and solid modeling classes. The server would provide laboratory opportunities for networking classes, especially at the graduate level. • Provide a state-of-the-art laboratory for telecommunications program. • Install a communications hub for wireless Internet access by departmental and student laptop computers in Reed and Lloyd Cassity Halls. This will also aid the telecommunications and networking undergraduate and graduate classes. • Replace laboratory equipment, in a timely manner, with contemporary, pertinent technology. • Purchase computer software for industrial simulation, project management, and material analysis, as well as more specific program software to make available to students in modern computer laboratories within the department. • For security purposes, install video-monitoring systems with long-term tape backup in all computer laboratories. The academic programs in the IET Department are experiencing an increased level of interest among technology-oriented students and have the potential to grow from its current enrollment of approximately 240 majors to 360 majors, a 50% increase over the next five years. This expansion requires fiscal and professional support from the University administration for new and existing faculty, support personnel, and facilities maintenance and upgrades. With this support, the IET faculty is confident that we will prepare successful graduates at both the undergraduate and graduate levels assisting Morehead State University to continue to make contributions to the economic development of Eastern Kentucky and the Commonwealth. 39
    • APPENDIX D 40
    • 41
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    • APPENDIX E TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (5-12) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CON 101. Introduction to Construction Technology. (3-0-3); I. Discussion of various aspects of the 43
    • construction industry including typical building methods, cost factors, and personnel requirements. Includes residential and commercial building. CON 303. Material Properties and Testing. (2-2-3); II. Prerequisites: MATH 152 or higher and MFT 186. An organized investigation of engineering materials, including their classification, properties, and means of testing to determine their properties. The application of materials to manufactured and constructed products and the effects of manufacturing processes and in-service stress on materials will be considered. CIS 101. Computers for Learning. (3-0-3); I,II,III. Students will learn effective strategies for learning and applying microcomputer software. The course introduces concepts, terminology, And tools of the microcomputer software operating and application system environment. CTE 207. Foundations of Career and Technical Education. (3-0-3); II. Orientation for students enrolled in vocational teaching program in agricultural education, industrial education, and family and consumer science education. Course will provide a historical overview of vocational education legislation. EDEM 330. Foundations of Reading.(2-2-3; I,II. PREREQUISITE: 24 semester hour including EDF 207, 211, EDSP 230, EDEE 305 or EDMG 306, and EDEE 327 or EDMG 347. (Industrial Education and Consumer Science students are exempt, prerequisites not required in their program). An explanation of the development aspects of the reading process in grades P-9 in terms instruction, assessment materials, and classroom organization. EDF 211. Human Growth and Development. (3-0-3); I,II,III. Survey of developmental patterns from birth to adolescence and their implications for elementary and secondary teachers. (Laboratory experiences an integral part of the course). EDF 311. Learning Theories for Teachers. (3-0-3); I,II,III. This course considers the principles of learning and cognition, motivation, individual differences, and adjustment of students, especially as they are applied to the classroom. This course includes study related to culturally diverse and exceptional populations. Theories, principles, and concepts of human development, learning, motivation, and assessment are presented and applied to the interpretation and explanation of human behavior in relation to classroom practices and the teaching profession. Field experience (observation) in a school or other educational agency is required and is a foundational element of the course. EDSP 332. Teaching the Exceptional Student. (2-0-2); I,II. An introduction to the field of special education; an historical overview of trends and issues and an introduction to the physical, mental, social and educational characteristics of exceptional children and youth in special education and regular education contexts. EET 140. Basic Electricity. (2-2-3); I, II. General course on the laws, theories, and applications of electricity. Options of electricity, electronics, or robotics should take EET 141. Lab required. EET 240. Residential Wiring. (2-2-3); I, II. Prerequisite: EET 140, or EET 141, or consent of the instructor. Designing, planning, estimating, and methods of constructing electrical systems for single family dwellings. Based on most recent National Electrical Code. Lab required. EET 245. Digital Electronics. (2-2-3); II. Prerequisites: EET 241 or consent of the instructor. Functional and logical operation of digital circuits, including logic gates, combinational logic, multi-vibrators, counters and registers. GCT 102. Graphic Arts I. (1-4-3); I. A survey course covering the broad practices, techniques and problems of the graphic arts industry. Study and experience include history, design and layout, composition methods, image reproduction, screen process and bindery applications. 44
    • GCT 103. Computer Aided Design & Drafting I. (2-2-3); I, II. The study and application of producing 2 and 3 dimensional drawings with CAD. Costs, software applications, advantages and disadvantages of a CAD system are also discussed. GCT 202. Graphic Arts II. (1-4-3); II. Prerequisite: GCT 102. An advanced course for students to apply the principles and competencies developed in the initial course. Units include automatic press operation (letter-press and offset), bindery operations, and darkroom procedures for photography and photographic screen process applications to the graphic arts industry. GCT 203. Computer Aided Design & Drafting II. (1-4-3); I, II. Prerequisite: GCT 103. Breadth and depth are derived from the background of principles and techniques developed previously in CADD. Focus on working drawings. GCT 215. Intro to 3D Design & Modeling. (2-2-3); I, II. The introduction to 3-D design and modeling, including parametric modeling software. The course includes an introduction to illustration, presentation drawings, and animation. IET 111. Basic Wood Techniques. (2-2-3); on demand. This is the beginning course in wood shop, consisting of theory and application with particular emphasis on individual and industrial values of wood. IET 120. Technology Systems. (3-0-3); I, II, III. Pre-college curriculum requirements should be met. An introduction to major areas of technology including communication, construction, manufacturing, and transportation systems. This course satisfies the area studies-practical living for general education. IET 160. Introduction to Power and Fluid Mechanics. (2-2-3); I, II. Beginning instruction in energy sources and fluid systems. Steam engines, steam turbines, diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, and exhaust emissions are studied. IET 260. Hydraulics and Pneumatics. (2-2-3); I. Introductory course in the design and analysis of power transfer devices utilizing hydraulics and pneumatics, with emphasis on robotics applications. IET 300. Technology and Society. (3-0-3); I, II, III. Prerequisites: ENG 100, MATH 123 or higher. A study of the issues that arise as technology becomes a creative human enterprise. Students will be engaged in reading, dialog, and group activities in order to increase their abilities to identify and assess the implications and ramifications of productively living in a technological society. This course satisfies area studies-social and behavioral sciences for general education. IET 319. Quality Control. (3-0-3); I, II. Analytical and statistical inference techniques for process and manufacturing product control. IET 320. Supervisory Practices. (3-0-3); I, II. Development of various direct and indirect supervisory techniques commonly used in management positions with special emphasis placed on those unique to manufacturing industries. IET 388. Methods of Curriculum Development. (3-0-3); II. Prerequisites: VOC 207 or consent of instructor. A comprehensive study of current curriculum content in Vocational Education. Emphasis on modifying and developing new curricula. See AGR 388 and HS 388. IET 392. Methods of Instructional Technology. (2-2-3); I, III. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program and VOC 207. Holistic approach to curriculum development with an introduction to the use of technology to develop and enhance curriculum and instruction. A portfolio will be maintained and presented at the end of the class. (See AGR 392 and HS 392). IET 398. Supervised Work Experience. (1 to 9 hrs.); I, II, III. Prerequisite: 20 hours in major department and consent of the department head prior to registration. An enrichment program which 45
    • will give experience in an occupational area which is not possible to provide in a classroom setting. Student will work under supervision in an approved organization for a period of time specified by his or her major department. Credit will be commensurate with the amount of time worked. The student will be supervised by faculty from the major department. A representative of the cooperating organization will be directly responsible for the work experience of the student and will make a written evaluation of the student periodically. IET 422. Industrial Safety Standards and Enforcement. (3-0-3); II. A study of industrial safety codes, standards, regulations, and enforcement procedures. Explanations of worker safety as related to attitude and production. Review of current laws regulating safety and those agencies related to enforcement and training. IET 470. Methods of Instruction. (3-0-3); I. Prerequisites: Junior and senior standing in Industrial education and admission to the teacher education program. The principles of instructional methods which apply to the teaching of industrial education subject matter which is included under the major program components of Orientation/Exploration and Preparation Level education programs. (See AGR 470 and HS 470.) IET 478. Student Teaching Practicum. (12-0-12 hrs.) Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program. Each student is assigned to an approved student teaching center offering comprehensive teaching experience in the Industrial Technology Education. See AGR 478 and HS 478. IET 496. Organization and Management of the Laboratory. (2-0-2); Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Principles of shop and class organization and management, including program planning and development of shops and laboratories; selecting and purchasing equipment and supplies; and organizing and administering the instructional program. IET 499C. Senior Project. (1-4-3); I, II. Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of 18 hours in option. Problems using the scientific method of inquiry in conjunction with faculty members from the major area of study will be conducted. The proposed problem is inclusive of the statement, background, and parameters of the problem, as well as methods and procedures for the solution. This course satisfies the integrative component for general education. MATH 152. College Algebra. (3-0-3); I,II,III. Prerequisite: ”C” or better in MATH 093 or minimum of 20 ACT. Field and order axioms; equations, inequalities; relations and functions; exponentials; roots; logarithms; sequences. MFT 186. Manufacturing and Fabrication. (2-2-3); I, II. Ferrous and nonferrous metals, basic metallurgy and heat treating, sheet metal, basic welding, casting, forging, manufacturing processes and concepts. MFT 286. Machine Tool Processes. (2-2-3); II. Prerequisite: MFT 186 or consent of the instructor. Various metal forming and machining experiences; emphasis on exact tolerances and precise dimensions. Lathe, mill, and grinder experiences. PHYS 201. Elementary Physics I. (3-0-3); I,II,III. Prerequisite: MATH 141. Kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, impulse and momentum. Gravitation, rotation, and equilibrium. ROB 170. Fundamentals of Robotics. (3-0-3); I, II. An introduction to the operations and applications of robots. Android and industrial robots; emphasis on the history, development, sociological implications, and future trends. A survey class appropriate for any college major. 46