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Program of Studies (Full)

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  • 1. 1Prospect Mountain High School 2004-2005 Program of Studies Timber Wolves
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents Page No. Accreditation 3 Title IX Compliant & Grievance 4 Introduction 5-9 Your 4 Year Plan 10 Graduation Requirements Class 2005 11 Graduation Requirements Class 2006-2007 12 Graduation Requirements Class 2008 13 PMHS Academic Offerings 2005-2005 15-18 Course Selection 19-30 Course Descriptions 31-73 Region 9 Vocational Center Offerings 74-84 Extra Curricula Activities 85 2
  • 3. ACCREDITATION For the first year of Prospect Mountain High School students that are entering PMHS from a school, which is accredited by the NEASE, will be considered as attending an accredited high school. Prospect Mountain High School will be applying for accreditation by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. a non-governmental, nationally recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering post-graduate instruction. Accreditation of an institution by the New England Association indicates that it meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment of institutional quality periodically applied through a peer group review process. An accredited school or college is one which has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation. Accreditation by the New England Association is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not a guarantee of the quality of every course or program offered, or the competence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance about the quality of opportunities available to students who attend the institution. 3
  • 4. PROSPECT MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHOOL TITLE IX COMPLAINT AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE MEMORANDUM To: Employees, Students, and Parents, Title IX provides that "no person in the United states shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance," with certain exceptions. Title IX is similar to Title IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 except that Title IX applies to discrimination based on sex, is limited to education programs and activities, and includes employment. In accordance with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Public Law 92-318, and amendments, thereto in Public Law 93-568 and of the code of Federal Regulations, Title 45, Part 86, which implements those laws, it is hereby declared formally that it is the policy of the Supervisory Union in its actions, and those of its employees, that there shall be no discrimination of any education program or activity in the Alton School District. Inquiries, complaints, and other communications relative to this policy and to Title IX of the Education amendments of 1972 and other public laws and federal regulations concerned with non-discrimination on the basis of sex, shall be addressed to the following person designated for this area: Prospect Mountain High School, P.O. Box 120 Alton, NH 03809 (603) 875-0366 Guidance Director School Nurse COMPLAINT AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE 1. Any complaint from or on behalf of any person employed or served by the School District shall communicate to the designated person in your immediate area. 2. The designee shall investigate the complaint, and attempt to resolve the issue. 3. If the issue is not resolved, the complaint shall be reduced to writing and submitted to the Superintendent of Schools, who will consider the evidence provided by the aggrieved and designee and rule on any corrective action, if necessary. 4. Any appeal from the decision of the Superintendent of Schools may be taken to the School Board within ten days, and the Board will render a decision within sixty days of the appeal, after hearing evidence in the case. 5. Appeal from the School Board's decision may be brought within ten days to the Federal office of Civil Rights and appeal from its decision may be brought in Federal Courts, whose decision shall be final. THIS MEMORANDUM IS PUBLISHED TO COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF SECTION *86.9 OF TITLE 45, CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATION. 4
  • 5. Introduction This course description book is provided to help you develop a program of study based on your interests, abilities, and goals. Brief course descriptions will acquaint you with both the required courses and the elective courses for the current school year. Please study this booklet and make very careful decisions about course selections since your schedule will be determined by the choices you make at this time. The Counselor at Prospect Mountain High School is eager to assist you and to provide you with information that may help in the decision making process. As you review the courses described in this booklet and make your choices for next year, keep the following points in mind: • Review graduation requirements. • Read the information given about each course. • Take advantage of the many electives offered while you are still in high school to help you decide about your future career. • Keep as many doors as possible open while you are still in high school. Recent research shows that students your age will have seven different jobs in their lifetime. Therefore, acquiring skills as well as completing post secondary education is important. • Most colleges have required courses. • If you are undecided about your career future, simply remember you are surrounded each and every day by competent, well educated staff members who are a valuable resource in answering questions about educational requirements and careers in their particular field of study. Spend some of your time with these talented people! Basic Programs Student that may need to receive remediation on skills from previous years would be eligible for basic courses. The focus is on small class size with development of skills. Student must have teacher recommendation for basic programs. Basic classes are only offered in English & Science. General Programs 5
  • 6. General courses offer students an academic background in preparation for life after high school as well as preparation for Vocational/Technical School and some colleges. The general courses are for students whose academic interests and goals do not require extensive preparation time. CP Programs Preparation for post secondary education is a concern for many students. As requirements for admission have become more demanding for all colleges and universities, course selections should be made carefully to assure admission to the college of choice. Public and private institutions expect the transcript to show that the applicant has met certain prerequisites for admission or can qualify under special circumstances as designated by individual colleges/universities. Be aware that requirements do vary and students should consult school catalogs of institutions they may wish to attend as they plan their programs of study. Honors Program Students who intend to participate in Honors Program should be highly motivated, self- disciplined, and intellectually capable. In addition, students should possess reading, writing, speaking, thinking and research skills above grade level, as they will be studying a wider range of materials at a greater depth. Criteria for acceptance in an Honors class include: Teacher recommendation and a Grade B+ or better in prerequisite courses. Students in Honors courses should expect the following: More complex skill reasoning and conceptual development (emphasis on analysis and synthesis); Considerable homework and/or independent extensive project or thesis; Primarily subjective testing or composite application of skills (essay questions for testing; and a Final exam is required). AP Programs Advanced Placement (AP) programs provide incentives for public comprehensive high schools in New Hampshire to provide access to rigorous, college-level courses for interested and prepared students. With such programs, students may pursue college- level work while still in secondary school and receive college credit, advanced academic standing, or both. AP gives you the chance to try college-level work in high school, and to gain valuable skills and study habits for college. If you get a "qualifying" grade on the AP Exam, there are thousands of colleges worldwide that will give credit or advanced placement for your efforts. This is just one of the reasons to get involved in AP. The hard work really does pay off — in the form of AP awards, time and money saved 6
  • 7. in college, the chance to challenge yourself by studying a subject in depth. Satellite Program Students who are self-motivated, independent learners and have the desire to pursue areas of learning not offered as part of the regular curriculum may wish to consider classes offered by satellite. Criteria include an overall "B" average, fulfilling course prerequisites, and subject area teacher recommendation (if applicable). Students should meet with the Guidance Director to determine available courses. Satellite courses require a sincere commitment and students are strongly discouraged from dropping a satellite course after the normal add/drop time. Work-Study A Work Study Program is an opportunity to explore an area of work related to a student's program of study or to his/her career goals. One credit per year can be obtained through a work-study program. One half of a credit can be earned for ½ of a year. A credit or portion of a credit will be issued upon successful completion of the required number of hours. Students may earn a credit towards graduation requirements by spending one period every day in a supervised work assignment. This may be within the school environment itself or in an off site location in town or possibly out of town. Approval must be granted through the Guidance Department. Summer School Grades 9 – 12 credit for courses that have been failed. Students will not be considered eligible for summer school unless they have obtained a 58%-64% average during the regular school year in that specific subject. Students who have failed specific subjects can receive credit for these subjects by taking the necessary courses during summer school. Laconia, Wolfeboro, and Rochester schools offer these summer courses. A student may use the summer school program only one time for each academic area for graduation during their high school years. Students in summer school must take and pass a comprehensive exam at the conclusion of the summer school’s specific academic class that is created and given by curriculum leaders at Prospect Mountain High School, unless the summer school course and its exam have prior approval from the curriculum leader. Failing English or other Academic Courses Students who fail an English or other academic courses have the following options: 7
  • 8. 1. Attend Summer School (only if you have obtained a 58% - 64% average) 2. Repeat the course at Prospect Mountain High School 3. Take a course from an approved Adult Education Program The Prospect Mountain High School policy generally does not permit students to take two English courses simultaneously at the school. Exceptions to this may be made on a case-by-case basis upon approval by the principal. Course Load: Each student will be encouraged to participate in a full academic schedule. Students should not plan on having a study period in their day. This will be the last opportunity for students to receive an education that they do not have to pay for, and should take as many classes that are not only challenging but of interest to that student. Many of the electives that are offered at PMHS are skills that students will require for a positive healthy life. All students must register for 8 courses. Course Change Policy It is the philosophy of the guidance department to help students in the process of making decisions about courses they take each year. The selection of courses is an important decision in the educational process and changes are not taken lightly. On the first day of school, all students will follow their class schedule as provided to them. No course changes will be made during the first days of school unless special circumstances exist. Students may request course changes beginning the third day of school. In order to add or drop a class, a student must first meet with the Guidance Director who will issue, when appropriate, a course change form to the student. Signatures from the added and/or dropped course must be obtained as well as a parent / guardian signature. When all signatures have been acquired, the form is to be returned to the Guidance Office. The deadline for course changes is as follows: Year long courses: 2 weeks after the year begins Semester length courses: 1 week after the semester begins Any courses dropped after the deadline will result in a WP (Withdrew Passing) or WF (Withdrew Failing) recorded on the transcript depending on the student’s grade up to that point. When a course change is requested and in the opinion of the Guidance Director the change is not in the best interest of the student, an appeal may be made to the Principal. Parents, teachers and Principal must approve all add / drop slips. 8
  • 9. What Courses Do Colleges Want? The single most important factor in admission decisions is your academic record. The types of courses you select, as well as the number of years you study a subject and the grades you earn, are the primary importance. The academic vice-presidents of the six New England public universities have published a pamphlet titled Preparing for Higher Education in which they discuss admissions expectations. The recommended course work listed here has been taken from this pamphlet. A four-year college-bound student should plan a program to include the following: English: 4 years Math: 3-4 years “at least three, and preferably four, years of college preparatory mathematics.”* Social Studies: 2-3 years Foreign Language: 2-4 years of the same language “We believe that each student should achieve proficiency in foreign language, and that such proficiency requires significantly more than two years of study.” Science: 2-3 years “at least two, and preferably three, years of study devoted to biology, chemistry and physics…” Some two-year colleges and MOST technical colleges expect a student to take all of the above courses with the exception of foreign language. See your counselor for information about specific requirements for your program of interest. 9
  • 10. Your 4 Year Plan Name: Plans after graduation (please check one) Occupational goals: Four year college or university Two year college or technical school Military training 1st Choice on-the-job training or apprenticeship immediate employment 2nd Choice Please use this sheet to list the courses you will need to take during your four years of high school. Your selections must reflect PMHS graduation requirements as well as the admissions requirements for any post-secondary education or employment you might be interested in. Be sure to use the Program of Studies book as well as your guidance counselor, teachers and parents to make your choices as accurate as possible. It is expected that changes will be made to this plan throughout your high school career. Freshman Year – 9 Sophomore Year - 10 English: English: Math: Math: Social Studies: Economics: (½) Science: Science: Freshman Seminar: (½) Health: (½) P.E.: Social Studies: Total Credits: Total Credits: Junior Year - 11 Senior Year - 12 English: English: Math: Social Studies: Science: Total Credits: Total Credits: 10
  • 11. Graduation Requirements Class of 2005 All Students will need to Achieve Graduation requirements from sending school. In addition to recommendations concerning course work and overall objectives, we want to make suggestions about course schedules. Several studies have noted the tendency for high school students to avoid the more demanding and challenging courses available to them. This tendency has been especially apparent during the senior year, after most college and university admission decisions have been made. We want to emphasize that this interruption in the learning process makes the transition to college more difficult. We urge high school seniors to test their abilities at more demanding levels during their final year and to use that time period as an opportunity to experiment with new subject areas. 11
  • 12. Graduation Requirements Class of 2006 & 2007 Students will be required to achieve 25 credits to graduate. REQUIRED COURSES REQUIRED CREDITS English: English 9,10,11,12 –1 credit per class 4 Social Studies: Civics -1 credit, 3½ World History - 1 credit Economics or Gen. Business - ½ credit U.S. History -1 credit Science: Phys. Science - 1 credit 3 Biology - 1 credit Physics – 1 credit See Science Listings for Additional Choices Math: Applied Math or Algebra I Part I or Algebra I Part II – 1 credit 3 Geometry or Algebra I CP or Geometry CP – 1 credit Algebra II CP or Algebra II Honors – 1 credit Geometry Honors or Advanced Math – 1 credit See Math Listings for Additional Choices Physical Education: Freshmen Year – 1 credit 1 Health: Health - ½ credit ½ Arts Education: Art - ½ credit ½ Theatre - ½ credit Music - ½ credit Computer Education: Computer Literacy - ½ credit ½ Required Courses 16 Elective Courses 9 TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION 25 (Class of 2006 and beyond) I. Elective Credits: Each full year course receives 1 credit. Semester courses receive ½ credit. Consult the Program of Studies for course identification. 12
  • 13. II. Course Load: A student may not schedule less than 8 courses without the approval of the Principal or Guidance Director. 13
  • 14. Graduation Requirements Class of 2008 REQUIRED COURSES REQUIRED CREDITS English: English 9,10,11,12 4 Social Studies: Civics -1 credit 3½ World History - 1 credit Economics or General Business - ½ credit U.S. History -1 credit Science: Phys. Science - 1 credit 3 Biology - 1 credit Physics - 1 credit See Science Listings for Additional Choices Math: Applied Math or Algebra I Part I or Algebra I Part II – 1 credit 3 Geometry or Algebra I CP or Geometry CP – 1 credit Algebra II CP or Algebra II Honors – 1 credit Geometry Honors or Adv. Math – 1 credit See Math Listings for Additional Choices Physical Education: Freshmen Year - 1 credit 1 Health: Health - ½ credit ½ Arts Education: Art - ½ credit ½ Music - ½ credit Theatre - ½ credit Computer Education: Computer Literacy - ½ credit ½ Freshman Seminar: Required for all Freshman - ½ credit ½ Starting with the class of 2008 Required Courses 16 ½ Elective Courses 8½ TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION 25 (Class of 2006 and beyond) 14
  • 15. I. Elective Credits: Each full year course receives 1 credit. Semester courses receive ½ credit. Consult the Program of Studies for course identification. II. Course Load: A student may not schedule less than 8 courses without the approval of the Principal or Guidance Director. PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS 9-12 (Class of 2008 and beyond) Promotion for Grades 9 and 10 will occur if the following requirements are met: To Grade 10 requires a minimum of 6 credits To Grade 11 requires a minimum of 12 credits To Grade 12 requires a minimum of 19 credits 25 credits to graduate Students must assume the responsibility to monitor their graduation requirements. Transfer students are advised to pay particular attention to Prospect Mountain High School requirements since they may differ from the previous school. 15
  • 16. PROSPECT MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHOOL ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 2004-2005 STUDENT NAME ____________________________________________GRADE NEXT YR._________ We understand that any course changes need to be completed within the first three weeks of a year long class or within the first two weeks of a semester length class. PARENT SIGNATURE ________________________________________________________________ CODE: * REQUIRED COURSE ** INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION *** PREREQUISITE NEEDED COURSE GRADE LEVEL LENGTH CREDIT TRAD./BLOCK ARTS EDUCATION 9 10 11 12 ____200 Art 1 X X X X Sem 1 ____201 Art 2 X X X X Sem 1 *** ____202 Art 2 CP X X X X Sem 1 *** ____203 Art 3 X X X X Sem 1 *** ____204 Art 3 Honors X X X Sem 1 *** ____205 Art 4 X X Sem 1 *** ___ 206 Art 4 Honors X X Sem 1 *** ____207Adv. Placement Art Sem 1 Honors X X Sem 1 *** ____208 Adv. Placement Art Sem 2 Honors X X Sem 1 *** ____210 2-Dimensional Design X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____212 2-Dimensional Design CP X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____214 3-Dimensional Design X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____216 3-Dimensional Design CP X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____218 Art History CP X X Quarter ½ *** ____219 Theatre 1 (History of Theatre) X X X X Quarter ½ ____220 Theatre 3 (Acting) X X X X Quarter ½ ____250Concert Band X X X X Year 1 *** ____251 Mixed Chorus X X X X Year 1 ____252 Intro to Music X X X X Sem ½ ____253 Intro to Music X X X X Quarter ½ ____254 Music Composition X X X Quarter ½ *** ____255 Applied Music Lessons X X X X Sem ½ ____256 Applied Music Lessons X X X X Quarter ½ ____257 Music Technology X X X Quarter ½ *** ____258 Guitar X X Quarter ½ *** ____259 Music Theory X X X Quarter ½ *** ____260 Piano I X X X X Sem ½ ____261 Piano I X X X X Quarter ½ 16
  • 17. BUSINESS EDUCATION ____450 Keyboarding/Word Processing X X X X Sem ½ ____452 Intro. to Business X X X X Sem 1 ____453 Business II X X X X Sem 1 *** ____453 Accounting I X X X Sem 1 ____453 Accounting II X X X Sem 1 *** ENGLISH ____100 Basic English X X Sem 1** ____101English 9 X Sem 1* ____102 English 10 X Sem 1* ____103 English 10 Honors X Sem 1* ____104 English 11 X Sem 1* ____105 English 11 CP X Sem 1* ____106 English 11 Honors X Sem 1* ____107 English 12 X Sem 1* ____108 English 12 CP X Sem 1* ____109 English 12 Honors/AP X Sem&Quarter 1-½* Summer Reading for Honors ____111 Yearbook X X Sem 1 ____112 Yearbook CP X X Sem 1 *** ____113 Creative Writing X X X X Quarter ½ ** ____114 Topics in Literature X X X Quarter ½ ____115 Basics of Public Speaking X X X X Quarter ½ WORLD LANGUAGES ____151 French I CP X X X X Year 1 ____152 French II CP X X X Year 1 *** ____153 French III CP X X Year 1 *** ____154 French IV CP X Year 1 *** ____155 Spanish I CP X X X X Year 1 ____156 Spanish II CP X X X Year 1 *** ____157 Spanish III CP X X Year 1 *** ____158 Spanish IV CP X Year 1 *** ____159 Latin I CP X X X X Year 1 ____160 Latin II CP X X X Year 1 *** ____161 Latin III CP X X Year 1 *** PHYSICAL EDUCATION ____276 P. E. 9 X X X X Sem 1* ____277 Weightlifting X X X X Sem ½ *** ____278 Weightlifting X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____279 Aerobics and Fitness X X X X Sem ½ *** ____280 Aerobics and Fitness X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____281 Team Sports and Officiating X X X X Sem ½ *** ____282 Team Sports and Officiating X X X X Quarter ½ *** FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES ____475 Food & Nutrition I X X X X Quarter ½ ____476 Food & Nutrition II X X X Quarter ½ *** ____477 Bake Shop X X X Quarter ½ *** ____478 Housing & Home Décor X X X X Quarter ½ ____479 Relationships & Marriage X X Quarter ½ ____480 Parenting X X Quarter ½ *** ____481 Clothing & Textiles X X X X Quarter ½ TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION ____486 Power & Energy X X X X Sem ½ ____487 Power & Energy X X X X Quarter ½ ____488 Robotics X X X Quarter ½ *** ____489 Intro. to Woods X X X X Sem ½ ____490 Intro. to Woods X X X X Quarter ½ ____491 Intro. to Cabinetry X X X Sem 1 *** ____492 Intro. to Metals X X X X Sem ½ ____493 Intro. to Metals X X X X Quarter ½ ____494 CAM/CAD X X X Quarter ½ *** ____495 Materials Properties & Testing X X X X Sem ½ 17
  • 18. ____496 Materials Properties & Testing X X X X Quarter ½ HEALTH EDUCATION ____301 Health X Quarter ½ * ____302 Basic Human Anatomy X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____303 Intro. to Sports Medicine X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____304 Graded Fitness Testing X X X X Quarter ½ *** MATHEMATICS ____350 Algebra I Part I X X X X Year 1 ____351 Algebra I Part II X X X X Year 1*** ___ 352 Algebra I Part III X X Sem ½ *** ____353 Algebra I CP X X X X Year 1*** ____354 Algebra II CP X X X X Year 1*** ____355 Algebra II Honors X X X X Year 1*** ____356 Geometry CP X X X Year 1*** ____357 Geometry Honors X X X Year 1*** ____358 Probability & Statistics CP X X X Quarter ½ *** ____359 Statistical Studies & Research CP X X X Quarter ½ *** ____360 Pre Calculus Honors X X Year 1*** ____361 Calculus Honors/AP X Year 1*** ____362 Applied Math X X X X Year 1 COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY ____460 Computer Literacy X X X X Quarter ½ *** ____461 Web Programming I X X X Quarter ½ *** ____462 Web Programming II X X X Quarter ½ *** ____463 Advanced Computer Applications X X X Sem 1 *** ____464 Desktop Publishing X X X Quarter ½ *** ____465 Multimedia Production I X X Quarter ½ *** ____466 Multimedia Production II X X Quarter ½ SCIENCE ____600 Basic Physical Science X X X X Sem 1* ____601 Intro. to Phys. Science X X X X Sem 1* ____602 Physical Science CP X X X X Sem 1* ____603 Basic Biology Principles X X X Sem 1* ____604 Biology X X X Sem 1* ____605 Biology CP X X X Sem 1* ____606 Applied Chemistry X X Sem 1*** ____607 Chemistry CP X X Sem 1*** ____608 Chemistry A/P X X Sem 1*** ____609 Chemistry Honors X X Sem 1*** ____610 Conceptual Physics X Sem 1*** ____611 Physics CP X Sem 1*** ____612 Adv. Placement Anatomy & Physiology X X X Sem&Quarter 1-½ *** ____614 Adv. Placement Biology X X X Sem&Quarter 1-½ ** ____616 Field Ecology X X X Sem 1 18
  • 19. ____617 Limnology X X Sem 1 *** ____618 Biotechnology X X Sem 1 *** ____619 Emergency Response X X X Quarter ½ *** ____620 Science in the News X X X Quarter ½ SOCIAL STUDIES ____400 Civics X Year 1 * ____401 Civics X Sem 1 * ____402 Civics CP X Year 1 * ____403 Civics CP X Sem 1 * ____404 World History X X X Year 1 * ____405 World History X X X Sem 1 * ____406 World History CP X X X Year 1 * ____407 World History CP X X X Sem 1 * ____409 Economics X Quarter ½* ____410 U.S. History X X Sem 1* ____411 U.S. History X X Quarter 1* ____412 U.S. History CP X X Year 1 ** ____413 U.S. History CP X X Sem 1 ** ____414 U.S. History Honors X X Sem 1* ____415 U.S. History Honors X X Quarter ½* ____416 AP U.S. History X Year 1 ** ____417 AP U.S. History X Sem&Quarter 1-½ ** ____419 Cont Issues X X Quarter ½ ____421 Buried Places & Lost Cultures X X Quarter ½ *** ____423 Anthropology X X Quarter ½ ____425 Psychology X X Quarter ½ ____427 Sociology X X Quarter ½ GENERAL STUDIES ____500 Freshman Seminar X Sem ½* ____501 Freshman Seminar X Quarter ½* ____502 Driver Education X X ½ ____503 Office Aide X X X X Sem ½ ____504 Office Aide X X X X Quarter ½ VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS ____700 Agri-Science I X X Year 2 19
  • 20. ____701 Agri-Science II X X Year 4 ____702 Administrative Business & Office Systems X X Year 2*** ____703 Automotive Service Tech. I X X Year 2 ____704 Automotive Service Tech. II X X Year 4 ____705 Child Care Program I X X Year 2 ____706 Child Care Program II X X Year 2 ____707 Construction Trades I X X Year 2 ____708 Construction Trades II X X Year 4 ____709 Culinary Arts I X X Year 2 ____710 Culinary Arts II X X Year 4 ____711 Health & Human Services I X X X Year 2 ____712 Health & Human Services II X X X Year 4 ____713 Computer Networking I X X X Year 2 ____714 Computer Networking II X X X Year 2 ____715 Marketing Education I X X X Year 2 ____716 Marketing Education II X X X Year 2 ____717 Microcomputer Accounting X X Year 2 ** ____718 Multimedia Communications I X X X Year 2 ____719 Multimedia Communications II X X X Year 2 Reminders: If you choose 1 yearlong class i.e. Algebra 1, you must pick another yearlong class to back it up. If you pick three yearlong classes you must take a forth. If you choose 1 quarter class you must pick another quarter class to back it up. If you pick three quarter classes you must pick a forth to back them up. 20
  • 21. FRESHMEN We will be running a Flex Block Schedule at Prospect Mountain High School. In order to help you plan your course selection we have given you several examples. We will also visit your school and review this information with you and answer any question you may have. If you need any assistance during this process please call Mr. Holden at 875-0366 or e-mail rholden@pmhschool.com Flex Block Schedule (Times may change) Period a 7:45 - 8:30 Block A&B 7:45 - 9:20 Period b 8:34 - 9:20 Period c 9:25 -10:10 Block C&D 9:25 -11:00 Period d 10:13 - 11:00 Block E 11:05 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 -1:00 11:35 - 1:00 Lunch 11:05 -11:35 11:05 -11:45/lunch 11: 50 -12:15/12:15 -1:00 Period f 1:05 -1:50 Block F&G 1:05 - 2:35 Period g 1:54 - 2:40 EXAMPLE SCHEDULES If you are Freshmen your schedule will look similar to the following: Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 A Freshman Freshman P.E. 9 P.E. 9 Seminar Seminar B Keyboarding Keyboarding P.E. 9 P.E. 9 C Art 1 Art 1 English 9 English 9 D Art 1 Art 1 English 9 English 9 Physical Physical Science Civics Civics E Science CP CP Lunch F Spanish 1 Spanish 1 Spanish 1 Spanish 1 G Algebra 1 Algebra 1 Algebra 1 Algebra 1 Semester 1 Semester 2 Freshman Seminar Period A semester 1 credit 1 Keyboarding Period B semester 1 credit 1 Physical Ed. block AB semester 2 credit 1 Art 1 block CD semester 1 credit 1 English 9 block CD semester 2 credit 1 Physical Science block E semester 1 credit 1 Civic block E semester 2 credit 1 Spanish 1 period F year credit 1 Algebra 1 period G year credit 1 Total Credit 8 21
  • 22. COURSE SELECTION 2007-2008 GRADE 9 REQUIRED COURSES English 9, English 9 CP, Basic English Social Studies (Civics or Civics CP) Science (Basic Physical Science, Intro. to Physical Science or Physical Science CP) Mathematics (Intro. to Algebra Part I., Algebra I or Algebra II) Freshman Seminar Physical Education *ELECTIVES* ARTS EDUCATION credit) Aerobics and Fitness (½ credit) Art 1 (1 Team Sports & Officiating (½ credit) credit) FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES Art 2/Art 2 CP (1 credit) Art 3 (1 Foods & Nutrition (½ credit) credit) Housing & Home Decor. (½ credit) 2-Dimensional Design or CP (½ credit) Clothing & Textiles (½ credit) 3-Dimensional Design or CP (½ credit) Theatre 1 (History of Theatre) (½ credit) TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Theatre 3 (Acting) (½ credit) *Power & Energy (½ credit) Concert Band (½ credit) *Intro. to Woods (½ credit) Mixed Chorus (½ credit) *Intro. to Metals (½ credit) *Intro. to Music (½ credit) ∗ Materials Properties and Testing (½ credit) *Applied Music Lessons(½ credit) *Piano I (½ credit) HEALTH EDUCATION BUSINESS EDUCATION Basic Human Anatomy (½ credit) Intro. to Sports Medicine (½ credit) Intro. to Business (1 credit) Graded Fitness Testing (½ credit) Business II (1 credit) *Keyboarding (½ credit) COMPUTER ENGLISH Computer Literacy (½ credit) Web Programming (½ credit) Creative Writing (½ credit) Public Speaking (½ credit) GENERAL STUDIES WORLD LANGUAGES Office Aide (½ credit) French I (1 credit) Spanish I (1 credit) Latin I (1 credit) PHYSICAL EDUCATION Weightlifting (½ Would back Traditional Semester long 1 period classes & 1 Quarter Blocks. 22
  • 23. SOPHOMORE We will be running a Flex Block Schedule at Prospect Mountain High School. In order to help you plan your course selection we have given you several examples. We will also visit your school and review this information with you and answer any question you may have. If you need any assistance during this process please call Mr. Holden at 875-0366 or e-mail rholden@pmhschool.com Flex Block Schedule (Times may change) Period a 7:45 - 8:30 Block A&B 7:45 - 9:20 Period b 8:34 - 9:20 Period c 9:25 -10:10 Block C&D 9:25 -11:00 Period d 10:14 - 11:00 Block E 11:05 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 -1:00 11:35 - 1:00 Lunch 11:05 -11:35 11:05 -11:45/lunch 11: 45 -12:15/12:15 -1:00 Period f 1:05 -1:50 Block F&G 1:05 - 2:35 Period g 1:54 - 2:40 EXAMPLE SCHEDULES If you are Sophomore your schedule will look similar to the following: Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 A English 10 English 10 House & Interior Web Design Programming I B English 10 English 10 House & Interior Web Design Programming I Intro to Intro to Business C Business Health Economics D Intro to Intro to Business Business Health Economics E Biology CP Biology CP World History World History Lunch F Band Band Band Band G Algebra 2 Algebra 2 Algebra 2 Algebra 2 Semester 1 Semester 2 English 10 block AB semester 1- credit 1 Economics block CD quarter 4 credit ½ House & Interior Design block AB quarter 3 credit ½ Biology CP block E semester 1 credit 1 Web Programming I block AB quarter 4 credit ½ World History block E semester 2 credit 1 Intro to Business block CD semester 1 credit 1 Band 1 period F year credit 1 Health block CD quarter 3 credit ½ Algebra 2 period G year credit 1 23
  • 24. Total Credit 8 24
  • 25. COURSE SELECTION 2006-2007 GRADE 10 REQUIRED COURSES English Honors English 10 CP or English 10, Basic English Social Studies (Economics (½ credit) or General Business, World History or World History CP) Science (Basic Biology Principles, Biology or Biology CP) Math (Applied Mathematics, Intro. to Algebra Part I, Intro. to Algebra Part II, Algebra I, Algebra II or Geometry CP or Honors) Health (½ credit) *ELECTIVES* ARTS EDUCATION Art 1 (½ credit) WORLD LANGUAGES Art 2/Art 2 CP (½ credit) Art 3 (½ French I, II (1 credit) credit) Spanish I, II (1 credit) 2-Dimensional Design or CP (½ credit) Latin I, II (1 credit) 3-Dimensional Design or CP (½ credit) Theatre 1 - History (½ credit) PHYSICAL EDUCATION Theatre 3 - Acting (½ credit) Concert Band (½ credit) Weightlifting (½ Mixed Chorus (½ credit) credit) Intro to Music (½ credit) Aerobics and Fitness (½ credit) Music Composition (½ credit) Team Sports & Officiating (½ credit) Applied Music Lessons (½ credit) Music Technology (½ credit) FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES Music Theory (½ credit) Piano I (½ Foods & Nutrition I, II (½ credit) credit) Bake Shop (½ credit) Housing & Home Decor. (½ credit) BUSINESS EDUCATION Clothing & Textiles (½ credit) Keyboarding (½ credit) TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Intro to Business (1 credit) Business II (1 credit) Power & Energy (½ credit) Accounting I (1 credit) Robotics (½ Accounting II (1 credit) credit) Intro. to Woods (½ credit) ENGLISH Intro. to Cabinetry (1 credit) Intro. to Metals (½ credit) Topics in Literature (½ credit) CAM/CAD (½ credit) Creative Writing (½ credit) Materials Properties and Testing (½ credit) Public Speaking (½ credit) HEALTH EDUCATION 25
  • 26. Basic Human Anatomy (½ credit) Intro. to Sports Medicine (½ credit) Graded Fitness Testing (½ credit) COMPUTER EDUCATION Computer Literacy (½ credit) Web Programming I, II (½ credit) Advanced Computer Applications (½ credit) Desktop Publishing (½ credit) GENERAL STUDIES Office Aide (½ credit) VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS Ag-Science I Administrative Business & Office Systems Automotive Service Tech. I Child Care I Construction Trades I Culinary Arts I Health & Human Services I Computer Networking I Marketing Education Multimedia Communications I 26
  • 27. 27
  • 28. JUNIOR We will be running a Flex Block Schedule at Prospect Mountain High School. In order to help you plan your course selection we have given you several examples. We will also visit your school and review this information with you and answer any question you may have. If you need any assistance during this process please call Mr. Holden at 875-0366 or e-mail rholden@pmhschool.com Flex Block Schedule (Times may change) Period a 7:45 - 8:30 Block A&B 7:45 - 9:20 Period b 8:34 - 9:20 Period c 9:25 -10:10 Block C&D 9:25 -11:00 Period d 10:14 - 11:00 Block E 11:05 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 -1:00 11:35 - 1:00 Lunch 11:05 -11:35 11:05 -11:45/lunch 11: 45 -12:15/12:15 -1:00 Period f 1:05 -1:50 Block F&G 1:05 - 2:35 Period g 1:54 - 2:40 EXAMPLE SCHEDULES If you are Junior your schedule will look similar to the following: Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 A English 11 English 11 CAM/CAD Guitar B English 11 English 11 CAM/CAD Guitar C French 3 French 3 French 3 French 3 D Chorus Chorus Chorus Chorus E Chemistry Chemistry Limnology Limnology Lunch F Geometry Geometry Geometry Geometry G US History US History US history US History Semester 1 Semester 2 English 11 block AB semester 1 credit 1 Chemistry block E semester 1 credit 1 CAM/CAD block AB quarter 3 credit ½ Limnology block E semester 2 credit 1 Guitar block AB quarter 4 credit ½ Geometry period F year credit 1 French 3 period C year credit 1 US History period G year credit 1 Chorus period D year credit 1 Total Credit 8 28
  • 29. COURSE SELECTION 2005-2006 GRADE 11 REQUIRED COURSES English 11, English 11 CP or English 11 Honors U.S. History or U.S. History CP or AP U.S. History *ELECTIVES* ARTS EDUCATION WORLD LANGUAGES Art 1 (½ credit) French I, II, III (1 credit) Art 2/Art 2 CP (½ credit) Spanish I, II, III (1 credit) Art 3/Art 3 Honors (½ credit) Latin I, II, III (1 credit) Art 4/Art 4 Honors (½ credit) Adv. Placement Art Sem I Honor (1 credit) PHYSICAL EDUCATION Adv. Placement Art Sem II Honor(1 credit) 2-Dimensional Design or CP (½ credit) Weightlifting (½ 3-Dimensional Design or CP (½ credit) credit) Art History (½ credit) Aerobics and Fitness (½ credit) Theatre 1 (½ credit) Team Sports & Officiating (½ credit) Theatre 3 (½ credit) Concert Band (½ credit) FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES Mixed Chorus (½ credit) Intro to Music (½ credit) Foods & Nutrition I, II (½ credit) Music Composition (½ credit) Bake Shop (½ credit) Music Technology (½ credit) Housing & Home Decor. (½ credit) Applied Music Lessons (½ credit) Relationships & Marriage (½ credit) Guitar (½ Parenting (½ credit) credit) Clothing & Textiles (½ credit) Music Theory (½ credit) Piano I (½ credit) TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION BUSINESS EDUCATION Power & Energy (½ credit) Robotics (½ Keyboarding (½ credit) credit) Intro to Business (1 credit) Intro. to Woods (½ credit) Business II (1 credit) Intro. to Cabinetry (1 credit) Accounting I (1 credit) Intro. to Metals (½ credit) Accounting II (1 credit) CAM/CAD (½ credit) Materials Properties and Testing (½ credit) ENGLISH HEALTH EDUCATION Yearbook/Yearbook CP (1credit) Creative Writing (½ credit) Basic Human Anatomy (½ credit) Topics in Literature (½ credit) Intro. to Sports Medicine (½ credit) Public Speaking (½ credit) Graded Fitness Testing (½ credit) 29
  • 30. SOCIAL STUDIES MATHEMATICS World History, or CP (1 credit) AP US History (1 credit) Algebra I Part 2 (1 credit) Cont Issue (½ Algebra II or Honors (1 credit) credit) Geometry CP or Honors (1 credit) Buried Places & Lost Cultures (½ credit) Pre-Calculus Honors (1 credit) Anthropology (½ Probability & Statistics CP (½ credit) credit) Statistical Studies & Research CP Psychology (½ (½ credit) credit) Applied Mathematics (1 credit) Sociology (½ credit) COMPUTER Computer Literacy (½ credit) Web Programming I, II (½ credit) GENERAL STUDIES Adv. Computer Applications (½ credit) Desktop Publishing (½ credit) Drivers Education (½ credit) Multimedia Production I, II (½ credit) Office Aide (½ credit) SCIENCE Chemistry (Applied, CP & H) (1 credit) Conceptual Physics (1 credit) Adv. Plac. Anatomy & Physiology (1credit) Adv. Placement Biology (1 credit) Field Ecology (1 credit) Limnology (1 credit) Biotechnology (1 credit) Emergency Response (½ credit) Science in the News (½ credit) VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS Ag-Science I, II Administrative Business & Office Systems Automotive Service Tech. I, II Child Care I, II Construction Trades I, II Culinary Arts I, II Health & Human Services I, II Computer Networking I, II Marketing Education I, II Microcomputer Accounting Multimedia Communications I, II 30
  • 31. SENIOR We will be running a Flex Block Schedule at Prospect Mountain High School. In order to help you plan your course selection we have given you several examples. We will also visit your school and review this information with you and answer any question you may have. If you need any assistance during this process please call Mr. Holden at 875-0366 or e-mail rholden@pmhschool.com Flex Block Schedule (Times may change) Period a 7:45 - 8:30 Block A&B 7:45 - 9:20 Period b 8:34 -9:20 Period c 9:25 -10:10 Block C&D 9:25 -11:00 Period d 10:14 - 11:00 Block E 11:05 - 12:30 Lunch 12:30 -1:00 11:35 - 1:00 Lunch 11:05 -11:35 11:05 -11:45/lunch 11: 45 -12:15/12:15 -1:00 Period f 1:05-1:50 Block F&G 1:05 - 2:35 Period g 1:54 - 2:40 EXAMPLE SCHEDULES If you are Senior your schedule will look similar to the following: Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 A English 12 English 12 Anthropology Yearbook B English 12 English 12 Anthropology Yearbook C Spanish 4 Spanish 4 Spanish 4 Spanish 4 D Pre-Calculus Pre-Calculus Pre-Calculus Pre-Calculus E Physics Physics Bake Shop Bake Shop Lunch F Intro to Woods Music Theory Advance Computer Graded Fitness Applications Testing G Intro to Woods Music Theory Advance Computer Graded Fitness Applications Testing Semester 1 Semester 2 31
  • 32. English 12 block AB semester 1 credit 1 Anthropology block AB quarter 3 credit ½ Yearbook block AB quarter 4 credit ½ Spanish 4 period C year credit 1 Pre-Calculus period D year credit 1 Physics block E semester 1 credit 1 Bake Shop block E semester 2 credit 1 Intro. to Woods block FG quarter 1 credit ½ Music Theory block FG quarter 2 credit ½ Advanced Computer Applications block FG quarter 3 credit ½ Graded Fitness Testing block FG quarter 4 credit 1/2 Total Credit 8 32
  • 33. COURSE SELECTION 2004-2005 GRADE 12 REQUIRED COURSES English 12, English 12 CP, English 12 Honors or AP English Literature *ELECTIVES* ARTS EDUCATION Latin I, II, III, IV (1 credit) Art 1 (½ PHYSICAL EDUCATION credit) Art 2/Art 2 CP (½ credit) Weightlifting (½ Art 3/Art 3 Honors (½ credit) credit) Art 4/Art 4 Honors (½ credit) Aerobics and Fitness (½ credit) Adv. Placement Art Sem I Honor (1 credit) Team Sports & Officiating (½ credit) Adv. Placement Art Sem II Honor(1 credit) 2-Dimensional Design or CP (½ credit) FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES 3-Dimensional Design or CP (½ credit) Art History (½ credit) Foods & Nutrition I, II (½ credit) Theatre 1 (½ credit) Bake Shop (½ credit) Theatre 3 (½ credit) Housing & Home Decor. (½ credit) Concert Band (½ credit) Relationships & Marriage (½ credit) Mixed Chorus (½ credit) Parenting (½ credit) Intro to Music (½ credit) Clothing & Textiles (½ credit) Music Composition (½ credit) Music Technology (½ credit) TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Applied Music Lessons (½ credit) Guitar (½ Power & Energy (½ credit) credit) Robotics (½ Music Theory (½ credit) credit) Piano I (½ Intro. to Woods (½ credit) credit) Intro. to Cabinetry (1 credit) Intro. to Metals (½ credit) BUSINESS EDUCATION CAM/CAD (½ credit) Keyboarding (½ credit) Materials Properties and Testing (½ credit) Intro to Business (1 credit) Business II (1 credit) HEALTH EDUCATION Accounting I (1 credit) Accounting II (1 credit) Basic Human Anatomy (½ credit) Intro. to Sports Medicine (½ credit) ENGLISH Graded Fitness Testing (½ credit) Yearbook/Yearbook CP (1credit) MATHEMATICS Creative Writing (½ credit) Topics in Literature (½ credit) Algebra I Part 2 (1 credit) Public Speaking (½ credit) Algebra II or Honors (1 credit) Geometry CP or Honor (1 credit) WORLD LANGUAGES Pre-Calculus Honors (1 credit) Probability & Statistics CP (½ credit) French I, II, III, IV (1 credit) Statistical Studies & Research CP (½ Spanish I, II, III, IV (1 credit) credit) 33
  • 34. Applied Mathematics (1 credit) Calculus Honors (1 credit) COMPUTER Computer Literacy (½ credit) Web Programming I, II (½ credit) Adv. Computer Applications (½ credit) Desktop Publishing (½ credit) Multimedia Production I, II (½ credit) SCIENCE Chemistry (Applied, CP & H) (1 credit) Conceptual Physics (1 credit) Physics CP (1 credit) Adv. Plac. Anatomy & Physiology (1 credit) Adv. Placement Biology (1credit) Field Ecology (1credit) Limnology (1credit) Biotechnology (1credit) Emergency Response (½ credit) Science in the News (½ credit) SOCIAL STUDIES World History, or CP (1 credit) Cont Issue (½ credit) Buried Places & Lost Cultures (½ credit) Anthropology (½ credit) Psychology (½ credit) Sociology (½ credit) GENERAL STUDIES Driver Education (½ credit) Office Aide (½ credit) VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS Ag-Science I, II Administrative Business & Office Systems Automotive Service Tech. I, II Child Care I, II Construction Trades I, II Culinary Arts I, II Health & Human Services I, II Computer Networking I, II Marketing Education I, II 34
  • 35. Microcomputer Accounting Multimedia Communications I, II 35
  • 36. Art Department Art 1 - (1 Credit) Gr. 9-12 This is a beginning art course, which is designed to introduce students to a variety of visually oriented artistic disciplines, mediums and techniques. It is also designed to develop an awareness of the elements of art and principles of design, art history, culture & art appreciation. Successful completion of Art one fulfills the art requirement for graduation and is required if other studio art classes are to be taken. Students will start to build a foundation for more advanced art classes. Most of the class time will be spent with hands on application of drawing, painting, and printing as well as other two dimensional design disciplines. Students will also study three- dimensional designs through sculpture and ceramics. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams while developing original ideas. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. Art 2 - (1 Credit) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: pass Art 1 This is a beginner to intermediate level course. Art 2 is a continuation of Art 1 and strives to strengthen and expand upon the skills and knowledge gain from Art 1. Some of the artistic disciplines students will study include the following: drawing, painting, printing, ceramics and three-dimensional design. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams while developing original ideas. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. Art 2 CP - (1 Credit) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: pass Art 1 with a “B” or better average This is an intermediate level course for students who display strong artistic talent and work ethic. Art 2cp is a continuation of Art 1 and strives to strengthen and expand upon the skills and knowledge gain from Art 1 while focusing students upon skills needed to succeed in college level art courses. Some of the artistic disciplines students will study include the following: drawing, painting, printing, ceramics and three-dimensional design. 36
  • 37. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams. They will also be required to develop original ideas in both a structured and independent format. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. Art 3 - (1 Credit) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: pass Art 2 This is an intermediate to advanced level course, which focuses upon the areas of drawing, painting, printing making, ceramics and 3D design. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams while developing original ideas. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. Art 3 Honors - (1 Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: pass Art 2 CP or Art 2 with a “B” average and the completion of 3 summer art assignments This is an advanced level course for students who display exceptional artistic talent and work ethic. Art 3 Honors is a continuation of Art 2 CP with those skills and concepts learn in Art 2 CP being expanded upon. A major goal of this class is to prepare student for college art classes by developing the personal creativity and skills need to succeed in a college art class. Some of the artistic disciplines students will study include the following: drawing, painting, printing, ceramics and three-dimensional design. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams. They will also be required to develop original ideas in both a structured and independent format. Students will develop a portfolio, a portion of which must include a body of work that has a unified theme or concentration. Students will be required to complete 3 summer art assignments, which will be passed in for grading during the second week of classes. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. In order to receive the honors credit students and their parent/guardian must sign a contract outline specific assessment requirements to be completed by the student. Failure to complete all contractual requirements will prevent the student from receiving an honors level credit for this course. Art 4 - (1 Credit) Gr.11-12 Prerequisite: pass Art 3 This is an advanced level course, which focuses upon the areas of drawing, painting, 37
  • 38. printing making, ceramics and 3D design. Students will expand upon concepts learned in Art 1, 2, & 3. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams while developing original ideas. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. Art 4 Honors - (1 Credit) Gr.11-12 Prerequisite: pass Art 3 CP or Art 3 with a “B” average and the completion of 3 summer art assignments This is an advanced level course for students who display exceptional artistic talent and work ethic. Art 4 Honors is a continuation of Art 3 Honors with those skills and concepts learn in Art 3 Honors being expanded upon. A major goal of this class is to prepare student for college art classes by developing the personal creativity and skills need to succeed in a college art class. Some of the artistic disciplines students will study include the following: drawing, painting, printing, ceramics and three-dimensional design. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams. They will also be required to develop original ideas in both a structured and independent format. Students will develop a portfolio, a portion of which must include a body of work that has a unified theme or concentration. Students will be required to complete 3 summer art assignments, which will be passed in for grading during the second week of classes. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. In order to receive the honors credit students and their parent/guardian must sign a contract outline specific assessment requirements to be completed by the student. Failure to complete all contractual requirements will prevent the student from receiving an honors level credit for this course. Advanced Placement Art Semester 1 (Honors) - (1 Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisite: Written approval by a Visual Art Educator Pass Art 3/3cp Completion of 5 different summer art assignment developed at an AP Quality Level. Advanced Placement (AP) Art is a nationally standardized course. There are three different portfolio exams a student may take for credit. Requirements for completing the course and receiving credit vary each year based upon the requirements established by the College Board for Advanced Placement. In years past, students have been required to develop a portfolio with three sections. The quality section requires 5 works; the concentration section requires 12 works, and the breath section requires 12 works. Photographic slides of the work will be taken by the students and developed with their own resources. Students will be required to complete 5 summer art assignments, which will be passed in for grading during the second week of classes. It is required by the end of first semester for the student to have completed 2/3 of all pieces of art required for their 38
  • 39. Advanced Placement portfolio exam. The AP Art portfolio/exam is due in May. A fee is required to take the exam. The fee has been under 100$ in years past. Full completion and submission of the portfolio to the College Board is required to earn and maintain any credits from this course. In order to receive the honors credit students and their parent/guardian must sign a contract outlining specific assessment requirements to be completed by the student. Failure to complete all contractual requirements will prevent the student from receiving any credit for this course or have the AP copyright label on their transcript for this course. Advanced Placement Art Semester 2 (Honors) (1 Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisite: Successfully Completes AP Art Semester 1 This course is the second half of the Advanced Placement Portfolio Exam. Advanced Placement (AP) Art is a nationally standardized course. There are three different portfolio exams a student may take for credit. Requirements for completing the course and receiving credit vary each year based upon the requirements established by the College Board for Advanced Placement. In years past, students have been required to develop a portfolio with three sections. The quality section requires 5 works; the concentration section requires 12 works, and the breath section requires 12 works. Photographic slides of the work will be taken by the students and developed with their own resources. The AP Art portfolio/exam is due in May. A fee is required to take the exam. The fee has been under 100$ in years past. Full completion and submission of the portfolio to the College Board is required to earn and maintain any credits from this course. In order to receive the honors credit students and their parent/guardian must sign a contract outlining specific assessment requirements to be completed by the student. Failure to complete all contractual requirements will prevent the student from receiving any credit for this course or have the AP copyright label on their transcript for this course. 2-Dimensional Design - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: Pass Art 1 This is an intermediate course that focuses on various two-dimensional design mediums & techniques. The artistic disciplines to be covered in this class include: drawing, painting, printing, graphic/commercial arts, and Illustration. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams while developing original ideas. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. 2-Dimensional Design CP - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: Pass Art 1 or Art 1 CP with a “B” Average. This is an intermediate to advanced course that focuses on various two-dimensional design mediums & techniques. The artistic disciplines to be covered in this class include: drawing, painting, printing, graphic/commercial arts, and Illustration. 39
  • 40. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams. They will also be required to develop original ideas in both a structured and independent format, while developing skills to succeed in a college level art course. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. 3-Dimensional Design - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: Pass Art 1 This course is an intermediate level course that focuses on various three-dimensional design mediums & techniques. Clay mediums and techniques will be used and could include wheel thrown, coil, and slab clay construction. Non-clay sculptural mediums will also be used and could include plaster/wood/stone carving, wire construction along with other additive and deductive processes. Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams while developing original ideas. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom and recycle clay. 3-Dimensional Design CP - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: Pass Art 1 with a “B” Average or Pass Art 1CP This course is an intermediate to advanced level course that focuses on various three- dimensional design mediums & techniques. Clay mediums and techniques will be used and could include wheel thrown, coil, and slab clay construction. Non-clay sculptural mediums will also be used and could include plaster/wood/stone carving, wire construction along with other additive and deductive processes Students will be expected to complete regular homework, bookwork, and written exams. They will also be required to develop original ideas in both a structured and independent format, while developing skills to succeed in a college level art course. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom and recycle clay. Art History CP - (½ Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisite: Completed Sophomore Level CP English or CP History This course fulfills the NH graduation art requirement. In this course students will study and research Art History, the art critiquing processes, the elements of art and how they are applied through the principles of design. Some hands on lessons that involve producing artwork will be done in class to reinforce concepts studied from the textbook and in class lectures. The bulk of the course will involve reading, note taking, research papers, open response questions, as well as writing from writing prompts. Students will be expected to complete regular homework. They will also be required to work with other peers to maintain a clean classroom. 40
  • 41. Theatre 1: The History of Theatre - (½ Credit) Theatre 1 is an introduction to the history of theatre from ancient Greece to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on ancient Greek tragedy, medieval morality plays, Elizabethan theatre, and modern American drama. Plays are studied in terms of character analysis, theatrical conventions, practices, and attitudes of the time periods, and the challenges of performing these plays before an audience. Occasionally, students may be asked to provide a written or oral analysis of a film. Opportunities to work on costuming, directing, blocking scenes, make-up, and acting are afforded by performing scenes from these plays. Eventually, this course will grow into a broader study of world drama as materials become available to the department. Some of the plays studied may vary from year to year. Students will be graded on quizzes, projects, performance, participation, and tests. This course fulfills the fine arts requirement. Theatre 3: Acting - (½ Credit) Students will work on the challenges actors face concerning how to develop or "become" his character. Objectives will be met by written and oral analysis of characters presented to the class in film, improvisational techniques, working with monologues and soliloquies, researching techniques of accomplished actors, and by performing several skits. Reading from The Art of Acting will be required, as well as reading several scenes/plays. Emphasis will also be placed on projection, diction, posture, timing, and other key elements in line delivery. 41
  • 42. Music Department Concert Band - (½ Credit per Semester) Gr.9-12 Prerequisite: Students must be able to play a concert band instrument. The course will be performance oriented with an emphasis on teamwork and cooperative learning. Students will have the opportunity to perform a variety of musical styles and in a number of different configurations. Band members will have the chance to audition and participate in State and New England Music Festivals. This course may be retaken for credit with permission. All students are expected to schedule a private or group lesson with the Director either during common study hall time or after school. Lesson times will vary according to semester and individual schedules. A minimum of 2 ½ hours of practice per week outside of class is expected. Attendance at all group rehearsals and performances is mandatory. Applied Music Lessons - (½ Credit per Semester) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: Arrangements for this course are made with the instructor. Group or private instrumental music lessons are available once a week to students in grades 9-12. Some instruments are available for students who do not own one (check with the instructor in regards to availability) and a “rent-to-own” program is also offered. Lessons are available on all of the instruments in the band. Mixed Chorus - (½ Credit per Semester) Gr. 9-12 Open to all students with an interest in singing. Experience is helpful, but not required. The course will be performance oriented and will explore a variety of musical styles from different time periods and cultures. In addition, skills in sight singing, ear training, rhythm and musical notation will be developed and/or improved. Students will have the opportunity to perform as soloists and in small ensembles, and to audition for participation in State and New England Music Festivals. This course may be retaken for credit with permission. A minimum of 2 ½ hours of practice per week outside of class is expected. Attendance at all group rehearsals and performances is mandatory. 42
  • 43. Music Theory - (½ Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Intro to Music Fulfills ½ Credit Fine Art Requirement In this course, students are led beyond their playing knowledge, and have the opportunity to explore the why and how of music through improved understanding and musicianship. The class is taught seminar style with the free exchange of ideas highly encouraged. The course objectives include the following: 1) Students will improve their understanding of music notation and to develop a clear manner of writing music down on staff paper; 2) They will learn to recognize intervals through ear training exercises and the use of sight singing techniques (singing participation is required); 3) Students will become familiar with scale construction (major and minor) and the circle of 5ths; 4) They will understand the role of the conductor, and how to direct an ensemble from the podium; and 5) Students will be exposed to traditional harmony, chords, voice leading, and inversions that will assist the students in composing their own music. Guitar Class - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Fulfills ½ Credit Fine Art Requirement Guitar offers to the student an opportunity to learn basic techniques and skills that may be applied to many styles of guitar music. Students will be provided with an acoustic guitar for use in class. Material covered includes the various parts of the guitar, how to name the strings, how notes relate to the guitar, music reading, common guitar chords, care and tuning of the instrument and common strumming and picking styles. Students will learn how to play easy popular songs of many different styles by the end of the course with the emphasis being on basic techniques of playing melody and chords. Regular practice is a must for successful completion of this course. Piano I - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Fulfills ½ Credit Fine Art Requirement Piano I is open to all students who wish to learn how to play a keyboard instrument. Previous musical experience is helpful but not required. Instruction will be offered from beginning to intermediate levels with an emphasis on performance and basic music theory. Students will need access to a keyboard to do their out of class practice. Intro to Music - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Fulfills ½ Credit Fine Art Requirement This course will provide the students with the basics in music that are required before moving on into the advanced music courses. Students will study the basic elements of music – melody, harmony and rhythm. Students will learn how to read and write music. They will also learn how to construct major and minor chords, intervals and how to sight read/sing. Singing in front of others is required for this course. 43
  • 44. Music Composition - (½ Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Intro to Music or Director’s Approval Fulfills ½ Credit Fine Art Requirement This course will give aspiring musicians and composers a chance to focus on their talents and abilities in writing music. Students will learn about the different types of music and how to properly write music in each different style. Students will also be able to compose their own music in whatever styles they choose. The goal will be to compose a song and eventually record it at the end of the class. Music Technology - (½ Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Intro to Music or Director’s Approval Fulfills ½ Credit Fine Art Requirement This course will give students an opportunity to explore the world of music technology. Students will receive hands on experience with mixers, microphones, speakers and various instruments. Students will also learn how to use the computer to compose and record their own music. Students will learn how to run a soundboard and will work the soundboard at various school functions during which a sound system is required. 44
  • 45. Business Technology Department Keyboarding/Word Processing - (½ Credit) Gr.9-12 During the first part of this course students develop skills in operating an alphanumeric keyboard by using the touch system. The software program used allows students to keep track of their progress while improving accuracy and speed. During the second part of the course, students use the features of MS Word to properly format basic business documents. *Students may take a proficiency test as an option to this course. Introduction to Business - (1 Credit) Gr. 9-12 This introduction to the world of business helps students prepare for the economic roles of consumer, worker, and citizen. Topics include: economic systems, world trade, business enterprises, e-commerce, and communication skills. Students will also complete the NEFE High School Financial Planning Program to learn financial planning, banking services, credit, and insurance. Introduction to Business serves as a background for other business courses, assists the students with consumer decision- making, and helps to prepare for future employment. This course fulfills the Economics requirement for graduation. Business II – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Intro to Business Are you interested in a career in business? Did you know that practically any career choice you make will benefit from a good background in business? Building upon the knowledge of business practices studied in Intro to Business, this course is designed to introduce four major areas of focus: Business Law, Marketing, Business Management and E-Commerce. Covered in depth throughout the course will be discussions and activities pertaining to international business, technology used in business, the importance of good communication skills and explorations into careers in business. Accounting I - (1 Credit) Gr. 10-12 45
  • 46. Accounting I provides students with instruction in the terminology and concepts of sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Accounting principles and procedures of the accounting cycle are applied in maintaining business records for service and merchandising businesses. Automated accounting programs are introduced. Projects and simulation packets that follow each unit provide students with an on-the-job type of experience. This course fulfills one math credit requirement for graduation. Accounting II – (1 Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisites: Accounting II Accounting II upon the foundation established in Accounting I. This course helps students to develop deeper knowledge of the principles of accounting with more emphasis being placed on financial statements and accounting records. Students apply previously learned principles to the more complicated types of business organizations: partnerships and corporations. Students also become familiar with such specialized fields of accounting as cost accounting, tax accounting, payroll accounting, and not-for- profit accounting. Automated accounting programs are utilized. Projects and simulation packets that follow each unit provide students with an on-the-job type of experience. 46
  • 47. English Note: Students in English 9-10-11-12 can choose a College Preparatory course designed to prepare them for a 4-year college program. TO ELECT OR TO REMAIN IN A COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH, A STUDENT MUST MAINTAIN A "C" OR BETTER AVERAGE IN HIS/HER PRESENT ENGLISH COURSE. Students selecting CP level courses should expect extensive work with vocabulary, grammar, writing assignments and reading selections beyond General English. Students in Grades 11 and 12 may also choose Honors English; see course description below. Basic English - (1 Credit) Gr. 9-10 Prerequisite: Recommendation of English Teacher This is a full year course for freshmen and sophomores who need more intensive and prescriptive work in the areas of reading and writing. Class will be kept small to allow for more individual attention in the areas of each student’s needs. Literature will focus on short stories and short novels to promote reading comprehension. Writing assignments will vary by student. Students needing this course will take it in lieu of general English 9 or 10. Placement in this course must be approved by the Guidance Director. English 9 - (1 Credit) Required - English 9 or 9 CP The 9th grade English program includes an extensive study of basic grammar skills. Composition work covers good sentence construction, paragraph formation, and short essays. This course introduces correct research format and a short research paper is required. Literature study includes short stories, poetry, several novels, Mythology, and Shakespeare. Outside reading is required . Vocabulary work is also covered. English 10 - (1 Credit) Required - English 10 or 10 CP The 10th grade English program covers more advanced grammar skills, as the basics should have been learned by this level. Composition emphasis is placed on lengthy essays and an extensive research paper is required. World Literature study includes short stories, poetry, several novels, and a Shakespearian play in addition to outside book reports. Units on vocabulary and mythology are also included. 47
  • 48. English 10 Honors - (1 Credit) Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of English 9, with a grade of “B” or higher. And recommendation of English teacher. In this course, critical thinking and independent work are emphasized. English 10 Honors moves at an accelerated pace. It is a survey course that covers literature of different time periods and countries and is organized by theme. Class discussion of the literature is an essential element of the course, and participation is required. Writing assignments will be frequent and will be primarily in the form of analytical essays. Vocabulary studies are imbedded in the literature and applied in all writing assignments. English grammar and composition will include review of the parts of speech and the elements of the sentence, the phrase and the clause. Assessments: Essay tests, objective tests, quizzes, papers, projects, oral presentations, homework, and class discussion. English 11 - (1 Credit) Required The 11th grade English program is a comprehensive course designed to introduce advanced grammar and vocabulary skills. Lengthy essays are required, as is an in- depth research paper. American literature is emphasized in various forms: short stories, poems, essays, plays, and at least five novels in addition to outside reading assignments. When possible, assignments will correlate with American History. Some time is also given to completing applications, filling out forms, etc... English 11 CP - (1 Credit) Required The course of study for English 11 CP is American Literature. Students should expect to write at least one (possibly 2) research papers based on American Literature. These papers will be at least 7 pages long, contain thesis statements, textual citations and bibliographies. They will be written according to the MLA (Modern Language Association) format. Students will be expected to study an American author of their choice by reading a large quantity of his/her work and writing a research paper on that author’s style and impact on American culture or pick an important person, era, or event in U.S. History. Other shorter papers will be assigned throughout the year. Many of these will be critical evaluations of the works we have read in class. There will also be various projects related to the literature we read. Students will read several novels, short stories, and plays by various authors. Students will also work to improve their writing and grammar skills. Attention will be paid to the study of vocabulary, the correction of common problems in usage and punctuation, and in working to improve areas of weakness as evidenced by the students’ errors in writing. Students should expect homework every night. They will be expected to read an average of 15-20 pages per night. English 11 Honors - (1 Credit) 48
  • 49. Prerequisite(s): English 10 Honors Grade of “B” or Higher in English 10 CP Teacher recommendation English 11 Honors is a challenging, history-based course for students who are self- motivated lovers of language. The focus of the course is American literature and it complements the US history course that is taught in the 11th grade. The course is a chronological survey of literary works from the Native Americans to the writers of today. Novels, plays, short stories and poetry are read in the original form. Reading and writing assignments are extensive. Vocabulary and usage are important components, with an emphasis on SAT preparation. Students work on projects and papers independently but are expected to participate in class discussion and group work. Suggested Titles The Great Gatsby Our Town The Scarlet Letter Ethan Frome The Color of Water The Crucible The Grapes of Wrath Assessments: Critical, analytical papers, research papers, teacher made tests, homework, quizzes, individual projects and presentations, and class discussion. English Grade 12 - (1 Credit) Required English 12 focuses on British Literature from early times to the present. The readings will generate several essays of 500-1000 words. Students should expect to write at least one research paper based on an author of their choice or an important historical or political event relating to British history. This paper will be a minimum of 5 to 7 pages long, contain a thesis statement, textual citations, and bibliography. It will be written according to the MLA (Modern Language Association) format. We will also work on writing resumes and other important documents relating to life skills. Students will also work in improve their vocabulary and understanding of grammar and its application to writing. Students will have weekly vocabulary lists and important grammatical concepts will be addressed. Students should expect homework every night. They will be required to read 15 pages or more per night. Shorter stories, poems, and essays may be read concurrently with longer reading assignments. Students will receive a syllabus of due dates with each new novel assigned. English Grade 12 CP - (1 Credit) Required 49
  • 50. College Prep (CP) English will differ from General English in several ways. First and foremost, CP students will be expected to do a significantly larger amount of writing. This includes fiction, poetry, essays, and research writing. Essays will also be a major part of regular exams. Reading will also be more intensive for the CP class, including most of the same material as the General level class, with additional reading as required. Works of literature will be studied in much greater depth of detail; including historical and biographical analysis. Students in the CP class should expect regular homework assignments, quizzes, and classwork. Some of the studies are Gilgamesh, Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Macbeth, Le Morte D’Arthur, Frankenstein, and 1984. Early work will emphasize epic poetry, while later in the year the class will read Romantic and Modern poems, plays, and novels. English 12 AP/Honors Literature and Composition - (1 Credit) Prerequisite(s): English 11-Honors This Humanities AP course is an inquiry into man’s search for meaning and existence as seen through philosophy, religion, government, art, music, and, of course, literature. Much of the class is conducted as a seminar in which students are expected to teach and learn from each other as we explore literature from ancient Greece to the twentieth century. This is a rigorous course appropriate for the serious student of literature and ideas. Students have the option of taking the Advanced Placement Exam in English Literature and Composition in May for possible college credit. Typical Titles Song of Solomon Frankenstein The Awakening Candide Hamlet Song of Roland Oedipus the King Dante’s Inferno The Stranger A Prayer for Owen Meany Heart of Darkness The Canterbury Tales The Iliad The Niebelungenlied The Rape of the Lock Assessments: Essay tests, papers, oral presentations, AP practice tests (objective), quizzes, class participation, and homework. Summer Reading for Honors English – Required Gr. 11-12 50
  • 51. A list of required summer reading will be given to students planning to take either English Honors 11 and English Honors 12. Throughout the summer and during the first week of school various assessments will be made to measure completion and comprehension of the reading. Assessments will include essays and pen and paper tests. Yearbook (formerly Journalism) - (1 Credit) Gr. 11-12 This course is open to all juniors and seniors. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of yearbook and publication technology and will be responsible for producing the schools two yearbooks. A school newspaper will also be produced. The course includes writing articles, news stories, feature stories, and editorials, taking photographs, designing layouts, meeting deadlines, typing copy, and financing publication costs. Students must have good writing skills and must be self-motivated as this class requires a great deal of personal responsibility. Teacher recommendation for the course will be based on the student's command of the English language and the student's sense of responsibility. Yearbook CP - (1 Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisite: Yearbook This course is a continuation of Yearbook I and will meet at the same time. Writing assignments and layout design will be on a more advanced level. Those students who have successfully completed Journalism may elect to receive college preparatory credit for Journalism, by successfully completing specific assignments designed to meet college preparatory standards and by maintaining a "B". This is subject to teacher approval. Creative Writing - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation Poetry, short stories and unusual essays form the basis of this course which stresses the creative aspect of writing. Professional writers are sometimes invited to speak to the class. Students are required to submit an original work for possible publication in a national magazine. Topics in Literature - (½ Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Can be taken for two consecutive semesters. This course will examine three literary genres: drama, fiction and poetry. The form, language and content of each will be studied. Analysis and appreciation will be stressed. Basics of Public Speaking - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 This course will focus on the basic elements of oral communication - speaker, speech, method of speech, and audience. Students will learn how to apply these concepts in 51
  • 52. order to become effective, poised speakers. By organizing and delivering various types of speeches - to inform, to demonstrate, to persuade/convince, to entertain, to inspire - students will gain practice using the skills they will learn. Lessons will examine topics such as articulation and pronunciation, methods of speech delivery, choosing a topic, gathering information, and targeting the audience. A sample syllabus of possible topics: Introductory speech, speech of personal experience, opinion speech, speech to inform, speech to persuade, speech to motivate, speech to entertain, introduction speech, speech to welcome, presentation speech, acceptance speech, farewell speech, eulogy, dedication, nomination, commencement speech, announcement, interview, book review, oral presentation of research. 52
  • 53. World Languages The goals of the World Languages Department at PMHS are: To use all of the technology at our disposal to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing of the target language. To provide students with a non-threatening, relaxed environment conducive to practicing newly acquired skills. To expose students to a variety of cultural stimuli in order to connect language study with actual populations around the world. To make students aware of the concept of global interdependence. To have students become familiar with the relationship between second language skills and future career development. French I CP – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Enrollment in CP English and/or Teacher Recommendation Students are introduced to the wonderful, challenging world of communicating in French. During this first year of language study, the goals are to introduce the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Many creative activities are used to involve the students, and active participation in class is essential, as well as memorization and daily preparation of the material. Students will have the opportunity to make presentations in the target language and will be encouraged to work on the Internet. French II CP – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: French I CP Students who demonstrate continued interest and success in Level I advance to Level II. In this level, emphasis is placed on oral communication and reinforcement of basic pronunciation and reading and writing skills. Level II provides additional exposure to the target culture via readings, skits, filmstrips, projects and other assignments in correlation with the textbooks and classroom materials. 53
  • 54. French III CP – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: French II CP and Teacher Recommendation Students will review the first two years, followed by a more intense study of grammar, idioms, vocabulary, new verb tenses, and culture. They will continue to improve all four language skills by means of daily practice in class and detailed homework assignments. The target language is used in class, requiring students to hone their listening and speaking skills. In addition, reading and writing assignments are more challenging and students are expected to be independent learners. Along with written/oral tests and quizzes, students are assessed by means of spoken dialogues and other communicative activities. French IV CP – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: French III and Teacher Recommendation Students continue to study advanced written and oral expression through music, film, art, and literature. This is a multi text course designed to meet the four main components of language study. Students are integrating the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in all lessons. Regular work includes communicative refinement, study of complex grammar, vocabulary expansion, and literary reading comprehension. Various other activities and projects will expand conversational language skills and enrich the appreciation of the culture, civilization and history of the countries. Spanish I CP – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Enrollment in CP English and/or Teacher Recommendation Students are introduced to the wonderful, challenging world of communicating in Spanish. During this first year of language study, the goals are to introduce the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Many creative activities are used to involve the students, and active participation in class is essential, as well as memorization and daily preparation of the material. Students will have the opportunity to make presentations in the target language and will be encouraged to work on the Internet. Spanish II CP – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Spanish I CP Students who demonstrate continued interest and success in Level I advance to Level II. In this level, emphasis is placed on oral communication and reinforcement of basic pronunciation and reading and writing skills. Level II provides additional exposure to the target culture via readings, skits, filmstrips, projects and other assignments in correlation with the textbooks and classroom materials. 54
  • 55. Spanish III CP – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Spanish II CP and Teacher Recommendation Students will review the first two years, followed by a more intense study of grammar, idioms, vocabulary, new verb tenses, and culture. They will continue to improve all four language skills by means of daily practice in class and detailed homework assignments. The target language is used in class, requiring students to hone their listening and speaking skills. In addition, reading and writing assignments are more challenging and students are expected to be independent learners. Along with written/oral tests and quizzes, students are assessed by means of spoken dialogues and other communicative activities. Spanish IV CP – (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Spanish III and Teacher Recommendation Students continue to study advanced written and oral expression through music, film, art, and literature. This is a multi text course designed to meet the four main components of language study. Students are integrating the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in all lessons. Regular work includes communicative refinement, study of complex grammar, vocabulary expansion, and literary reading comprehension. Various other activities and projects will expand conversational language skills and enrich the appreciation of the culture, civilization and history of the countries. Latin I CP - (1 Credit) - Offered by Satellite The student begins to develop the cultural understanding, attitude, and linguistic performance skills necessary to experience the life-style and culture of the classical world. The student will gain greater perspective on the present by examining the culture and language of Romans in areas such as history, government, literature, art, architecture, philosophy, religion, the military, and linguistics. As the student begins to understand the impact of Ancient Rome on the present, English vocabulary skills and understanding of the structure of the language will develop. Latin II CP - (1 Credit) - Offered by Satellite The student continues to develop cultural understanding, attitudes, and linguistic performance skills. This study increases awareness of the contribution of the Roman civilization to our western civilization, increases the knowledge of the Roman way of life, builds Latin and English vocabularies, improves reading skills, and improves mastery of the Latin structural system. As knowledge is gained, a broader perspective of life and the influence of the past on today’s languages will be achieved. 55
  • 56. Latin III CP - (1 credit) - Offered by Satellite The student in this course continues to study classical culture, attitudes, and history and their relevance to the present day. Emphasis will be placed on the development of Rome as an empire and the military, literary, and political figures who played prominent roles in that development. The formal study of Latin grammar will be completed during the course of the year with emphasis on the subjunctive and participial moods of the verb and the constructions associated with these moods. The review of grammatical forms studied during earlier levels of Latin will continue via the reading used in the course. At least one grading period will focus on the works of a particular Roman author-Caesar, Livy, Pliny, or Ovid. 56
  • 57. Physical Education Department P.E. 9 - (1 Credit) – Required The Physical Education program provides students with the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of physical activities. These activities challenge the students physically, mentally, and socially. Life-time sports and games, team sports, individual activities and fitness are some of the key features in the P.E. curriculum. Weightlifting Prerequisite: PE 9 Students will learn proper lifting and spotting techniques. Each student will develop their own work out based on each individuals needs. The class will also provide information on the muscle groups of the body and their development. Aerobics and Fitness Prerequisite: PE 9 Students will participate in a wide variety of aerobic activities. Emphasis will be placed on developing each students fitness level. A record of fitness testing will be recorded for each student. Jogging, aerobics, step aerobics, plyometrics, crunches and sprint training are a few of the activities offered in this class. Team Sports and Officiating Prerequisite: PE 9 Students will participate in a variety of team sports in this class. Emphasis will be placed on skill development, strategy, team work, and sportsmanship. The class will also provide students with the opportunity to officiate each sport. Students will learn rules, positioning, and general referee skills. Students will rotate as a player and referee throughout the units. 57
  • 58. Family and Consumer Science Food and Nutrition I – (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 Description: Students will learn the relationship of food to good health and changing lifestyles. Understanding where information about food comes from, how to assess its accuracy, and using this information to promote good health is covered. The importance of safety and sanitation in the kitchen, basic measuring skills, reading and understanding a recipe, and “how-to” techniques are all practiced as the students prepare a variety of foods from each group. Consumer skills and meal management are also learned as the students prepare one or two luncheons for invited guests. Planning and preparing a healthy dinner for their family is a final requirement for completing this course. Food and Nutrition II – (½ Credit) Gr.10-12 Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition I Students will briefly review measuring and how-to techniques learned in Foods and Nutrition I. They then will explore regional and world foods and the relationship they have to our eating habits while actually preparing a variety of those foods. More extensive cooking methods, including baking techniques, will be practiced. Topics such as eating disorders, sports nutrition, weight management, and many more topics relevant to teenagers will be explored. Bake Shop - (½ Credit) Gr.10-12 Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition I In this course, students will go beyond the basic baking techniques learned in Foods and Nutrition I. In-depth study of ingredients in baked goods and the role each plays will be studied as they prepare and test a variety of breads, both yeast and quick, batters, cakes of all varieties, cookies, pies, desserts, and foreign baked goods! Demonstrators and speakers from various colleges and tech schools will be called in to expand the program. Relationships and Marriage - (½ Credit) Gr. 11-12 In this course, students are guided in establishing healthy, happy, stable relationships with family, friends, teachers, boy/girl friends, and eventually husbands and wives. Subjects such as self-esteem, communication, respect, and other related aspects of adult life are discussed in length. This course is about single, married, and family living. It includes units on planning your future, developing your personality, skills for living, sexual development and related issues, dual-worker families, partner selection, marriage customs and laws, working for a successful marriage, and money matters. As 58
  • 59. negative as they are, the problems of abuse and violence and those of divorce are fully discussed. Guest speakers are invited to help cover these subjects. The one subject which is continually stressed throughout the course is communication. The ability to communicate effectively has emerged as the dominating factor in the success or failure of a relationship, whether it be friends, co-workers, parents and children, or husbands and wives. After being in this course, it is hoped the students will be better equipped to maintain good interpersonal relationships. Parenting – (½ Credit) Gr.11-12 Prerequisite: Relationships and Marriage In this course the students will be exposed to the many responsibilities of raising children. The course will take students beyond the infant stage where adolescents tend to romanticize parenting to the many complicated issues parents face with their children. Stages in development from infancy to adolescence and the necessary adjustments each stage involves for parents will be covered. Contemporary issues in parenting will also be addressed. Clothing and Textiles - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 In this course, students will learn both hand and machine sewing techniques. The affects of clothing, choosing and caring for it, repairs, alterations, redesigning, and recycling one’s clothing will be discussed. Actual repairs and alterations will be done on sample pieces of clothing. The importance of knowing how to repair and alter their clothing will be stressed, proving you can save money and extend the garment’s wear ability. A garment of the student’s choice will be constructed, beginning with selecting the correct pattern, material, and notions through its basic construction and adding details to personalize it. Careers in this field are discussed and shown by video for interested students. 59
  • 60. Housing and Interior Design – (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 In this course, students will examine the need for housing and the role society plays in your decision. Housing styles will be studied, tracing the development of housing from primitive shelters to today’s hi-tech homes. Consumer concerns when renting, leasing, or buying a home are addressed. Students also get a basic background in home construction and its relationship to the environment. By designing a variety of floor plans and practicing the principles of design and color, students are given the opportunity to design a furnished home of their choice. 60
  • 61. Technology Education Department Power and Energy – (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 A study of the fundamental concepts, devices and applications of electronic components and controllers used on industrial equipment. The theory and application of hydraulic and pneumatic power will be explored, with reference to alternative power sources. Robotics - (½ Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Power & Energy An introduction to the operation and applications of robots. Android and industrial robots; emphasis on the history, development, sociological implications, and future trends. Economic justification, application, safety, maintenance, and programming. Introduction to Woods - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 An introductory course for those interested in working with wood. Students will experience the satisfaction of making a piece of furniture with individualized help from the instructor. Includes hands on practice with woodworking equipment and instruction in methods to design, build, and finish a wood project. Also focus on species identification and machine safety. Introduction to Cabinetry – (1 Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Intro. to Woods Studies cabinetmaking methods including joinery, construction, gluing, and clamping. Includes hand and portable electric tools safety, operation, tool care, and minor repair. Stresses functions, selection, maintenance, and safety. Prerequisite introduction to woods Introduction to Metals - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 A study of the origin, nature, extraction, and refining processes. Investigation into the processes and procedures of identifying metals and their respective properties. Student will also learn application of metal working processes used in metal manufacturing. 61
  • 62. CAM/CAD - (½ Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Intro. to Metals A study of computer utilization in the areas of designing, engineering, manufacturing, and documentation as they relate to production processes. Emphasis on the utilization of computer-aided drafting and design (CADD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) hardware and software. Materials Properties and Testing - (½ Credit) Gr. 9-12 This is a basic course designed to acquaint the student with the properties and testing procedures of today’s common industrial materials. Materials science, metals, woods, plastics, concrete, paper, and industrial fluids will be covered through classroom and laboratory activities. Destructive and nondestructive testing procedures will be performed to identify and determine mechanical, physical, and other properties for specific industrial uses. 62
  • 63. Health Health - (½ Credit) – Required Gr. 10 This course will be offered to all sophomores and will concentrate on the areas of nutrition, STD’s, the life cycle, mental and social stressors, abuse of alcohol, drugs and tobacco. The instructional content and learning activities are planned to enable students to make decisions which promote their own good health based on a wholeness model. Basic Human Anatomy – (½ Credit) Prerequisite: Biology (See Science) The course is geared towards providing the learner with anatomical terms used for various body systems. A comprehensive look at the internal workings of the human body and how they all relate. Galen and Vasillase medical findings will be discussed. Reference points and planes of the body are introduced. Introduction to Sports Medicine – (½ Credit) Prerequisite: Basic Human Anatomy and Health The course provides the learner with an overall view of athletic training principles. Mechanisms of certain injuries, first aid, and treatment modalities are stressed. Practical applications as well as visitations to local clinics enhance the student’s understanding. Graded Fitness Testing – (½ Credit) Prerequisite: Health, Basic Human Anatomy, and Advanced Life Support A rigorous study of how exercise and diet affects health. Various modalities of exercise and how it impacts fitness will be addressed. Practical lab work allows the student to comprehend benefits of exercise. Observations and visitations will be utilized to increase comprehension. 63
  • 64. Math Department Applied Mathematics - (1 Credit) Mathematics With Business Applications contains two major components, computation and applications of arithmetic to business and consumer topics. Emphasis focuses on: banking, income, credit, taxes, transportation-vehicle purchases, housing insurance, investments, purchasing, and budgeting. A calculator is required for the course. Algebra I Part One - (1 Credit) Part I of a two-year program in Algebra explores mathematics through hands-on -learning, technology, applications, and connections to the world around us. Our number system as well as linear equations and inequalities are studied extensively. Graphing and data management techniques help develop problem-solving skills and contribute to success with word problems. Formulas will be used and applied to real world applications. Students need to complete daily homework assignments to master these concepts. Algebra I Part Two - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Algebra I Part 1 “C” average, or approval of the Mathematics Curriculum Director This is Part II of a two-year Algebra I course. It will start with a review of the basic operations using integers, real numbers as well as solving equations and inequalities. Work with powers, roots and polynomials will follow. Major emphasis will be on the different types of factoring including quadratic formulas and the solving of systems of equations. Discussions of a variety of problem solving techniques will be explored. Students need to complete homework on a daily basis to master these concepts. A scientific calculator is required. Algebra I Part Three Semester 1 - (½ Credit) This course is designed for those students who fail to achieve at least a “C” in Algebra I Part 2 and desires to work toward raising their algebraic skill level. Intensive drilling on the basic algebraic skills using a workbook approach to solidify techniques. Algebra I Part Three Semester 2 - (½ Credit) 64
  • 65. Prerequisite: “C” in Algebra I Part 3 Semester 3 Concludes the Study of Algebra I Part 3. Algebra I CP - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra “C” average, or approval of the Mathematics Curriculum Director The purpose of this course is to develop the mathematical abilities of the student so that he/she may take additional courses in mathematics, physics and chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the structure of mathematics and the application of concepts and skills. The course deals with the basic operations of arithmetic as they relate to monomials and polynomials using real numbers. Equations, systems of equations, and inequalities will be solved. Graphing and functions will be explored. Factoring of all kinds will be stressed. Problem solving techniques will be used throughout. Note taking skills will be enhanced as well as communication skills as they relate to the subject. Students will need to complete assignments on a daily basis in order to master these concepts. A scientific calculator is required. Algebra II CP - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Algebra I, "C" Average The purpose of this course is to extend the student's ability to solve problems. Topics studied in Algebra I are extended so that the student is capable of solving more complex equations. Fractions, radical and higher degree equation solving techniques are studied to enable the student to solve more advanced problems. Systems of equations, quadratic equations, logarithmic and exponential equations are also studied to further the student's understanding of the concepts of number and function. Major emphasis will be placed on technology involving the graphing calculator. A graphing calculator is required for this course. Algebra II Honors - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Algebra I, "B or Better" Average The purpose of this course is to explore in depth the topics of Algebra II from an advanced level and to develop the student as a problem solver. The course will be presented at a level designed to please the serious student and to probe topics and extensions not normally considered in the standard Algebra II class. Any student not maintaining at least an 80% average will be placed on a two week probation and transferred to the standard Algebra II class if he fails to improve his/her average. A graphing calculator is required for this course. 65
  • 66. Geometry CP - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II "C" average Geometry Honors - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II “B” average Students are expected to master the characteristics and qualities of both 2 and 3 dimensional Geometric figures as well as develop and apply the principles of logic in their presentations. They will solve applications, connections and visual integration problems. By proving theorems they will establish models for logical and purposeful thought. Applications, modeling activities and open-ended projects encourage and engage students in various types of transformations. Students need to complete assignments on a daily basis in order to master these concepts. A scientific calculator is required for this course. Probability and Statistics CP - (½ Credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II - “C” average This first semester course probes the application of basic laws of probability to games of chance, actuarial tables and random events. The interpretation and organization of data emphasized in this course offers models for logical thought and informed decision making. Histograms, graphs, scores, stanines, and central tendencies aid the student in analyzing information, making wise choices and assimilating the abundance of information which confront us daily. A graphing calculator is required for this course. Statistical Studies and Research CP - (½ Credit) Prerequisite: Probability and Statistics “C” average This second semester course represents a unique opportunity to apply the techniques of statistical study and research to a project chosen by the student and approved by his teacher. Each project will be graded at the conclusion of each term as the total grade for the course by three members of the faculty whose grades will then be averaged together. Our English Curriculum Director will grade the writing involved, the appropriate science, math, social studies and/or psychology curriculum director will grade the research subject content and the math curriculum director will grade the use of mathematics and accuracy of the study. At the end of the third term, the outline and data collected will be graded with the final report at the end of the 4th term. A third term grade of less than a “C” will result in a withdrawn failing grade for the course. A graphing calculator is required for this course. Pre-Calculus CP - (1 Credit) 66
  • 67. Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry “C” average Pre-Calculus Honors - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry “B” average This course continues the study of relations and functions begun in Algebra. Higher degree functions are analyzed algebraically and graphically. Special emphasis is placed on trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions, because of their value in solving various types of problems. Other topics that will be covered include sequences and series, the conic sections, and an introduction to limits and the derivative. A graphing calculator is required and major emphasis will be placed on using technology to solve mathematical problems. This course establishes a firm foundation for Calculus available either at Prospect Mountain High School or undertaken at the college level. Calculus Honors/AP - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus “B” average Calculus marks the entry into collegiate level studies of advanced mathematical topics including but not limited to high order functions, limits, derivatives, and integration. Emphasis is placed on being able to apply the techniques studied to applications, models, and problem solving. Many problems will relate to the three-dimensional world around us. Graphing techniques will be enhanced as a problem solving tool and intense use of a graphing calculator will increase the student’s level of mastery. A graphing calculator is required for this course. AP credit will be given to those who take either the AB or BC AP Exam with a score of at least “3". Mathematics Course Sequence Intro. to Algebra I Part I Algebra I ↓ ↓ ↓ Applied Math ↔ Intro. to Algebra I Part II → Geometry → Algebra II → Adv. Math →Pre Calculus ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ Algebra I Part III Probability & Statistics (½ credit) Calculus ↓ Statistical Studies (½ credit) Computer Technology 67
  • 68. The Computer and Business Technology department will offer courses in Computer Technology and Business Education. Proposed course offerings for Computer Technology follow: Computer Literacy - (½ Credit) Prerequisite: demonstrated Keyboarding proficiency Computer literacy will provide students with a basic background in computer architecture, operating systems, the Internet and applications software. Students will use Microsoft Office technology tools such as Word, Power Point, Publisher and Excel in lab assignments that are intended to reinforce and improve their research, oral communications and writing skills. This course satisfies the NH state minimal requirement for Computer Education. Web Programming I - (½ Credit) Prerequisites: Computer Literacy; Demonstrated Keyboarding Proficiency Students will be learning the fundamentals of web programming with a basic introduction to HTML, Javascript, photo composition and editing, animated gif creation, and planning the design of a website. While developing a knowledge and appreciation of good programming and troubleshooting techniques, students will be completing specific lab assignments and contributing content to the school website. Web Programming II - (½ Credit) Prerequisites: Computer Literacy; Web Programming I, Demonstrated Keyboarding Proficiency Students will be using an integrated multi-purpose software environment for creating graphics, writing html, creating animated web-based interactive applications, testing, debugging and publishing. Students will be expected to complete and demonstrate several original interactive web applications utilizing audio, video and animation. Advanced Computer Applications - (1 Credit) Prerequisites: Computer Literacy; Demonstrated Keyboarding Proficiency 68
  • 69. This course builds upon previously learned computer skills. Students will focus on the capabilities and applications of Microsoft Office software programs. This will be an application-oriented course designed to develop personal, educational, and professional computer skills. Students will learn the advanced applications within the integrated program Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. Project Running Start: The Running Start Program allows current high school students to enroll in a New Hampshire Community Technical College course while completing their high school program. This course may be chosen for Running Start – 3 college credits. Desktop Publishing - (½ Credit) Prerequisites: Computer Literacy; Demonstrated Keyboarding Proficiency Students will learn the principles of layout design, typography and graphics manipulation using MS Publisher and Adobe PageMaker. Hands-on experience includes the opportunity to design and produce a variety of publications (flyers, brochures, newsletters, business publications). Multimedia Production I - (½ Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisites: Computer Literacy; Demonstrated Keyboarding Proficiency Multimedia Production I is an introduction to the art of effective communication through digital presentations. Students will be taught technical and artistic control of digital still cameras and camcorders, and various methods of interfacing the equipment to computer ports, a VCR and output devices. Assignments and projects will include the use of various software programs to gain experience in graphical, photo, audio and video editing, desktop publishing, and presentation software. Each student will be expected to contribute and work effectively on a production team, work independently on an individual project and collaborate with the school media specialist in specific projects and work assignments. Multimedia Production II - (½ Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisites: Computer Literacy; Demonstrated Keyboarding Proficiency, Multimedia Production I Each student will be participating as a team member in producing a major class collaborative video project. Project assignments will utilize various output formats such as streaming video for web applications, Video CD, DVD and VHS. Each student will be expected to contribute and work effectively on a production team, work independently on an individual project and collaborate with the school media specialist in specific projects and work assignments. 69
  • 70. Science Department Basic Physical Science - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Recommendation of Science Teacher This introductory course is intended to serve as a foundation for other science courses. Topics to be covered include: matter, neutrons, laws of motion, chemical reactions, periodic table, metric system, platetectonics and others. This course will focus on developing laboratory techniques, study skills, and writing research papers. Information will be presented by lectures, group work, projects, oral presentations and films. Introduction to Physical Science (IPS) - (1 Credit) Freshman requirement Basic concepts of physics, chemistry, and some earth science. Topics covered are the same as below except the emphasis is on relating science to everyday life situations. The approach is less mathematical. Physical Science CP (PSCP) - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: At least a “C” in Math and Science during Grade 8 and Teacher Recommendations Basic concepts of physics, chemistry, and some Earth science. Topics include volume, mass, weight, properties of matter, atomic models of matter, mechanics, forces, speed, velocity, acceleration, waves, energy, chemical bonding and reactions. Note taking, record keeping, problem solving techniques and study skills are required and improved upon. Applied Chemistry - (1Credit) Prerequisite: Pass IPS or PSCP and BBP or BCP) This basic Chemistry course uses laboratory and classroom activities to study the structure and behavior of matter. A good foundation of the principles of chemistry is laid for students who seek general knowledge of chemistry or may go on to attend vocational or technical schools. This elective course uses laboratory techniques and testing in a less mathematical study of nutrition, consumer concerns, health, and practical applications of everyday chemistry. 70
  • 71. Chemistry CP - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: "C" or better in Algebra I, “C” or better in Geometry is Recommended Pass BCP or BBP and pass IPS or PSCP) Chemistry is the study of the properties of matter, changes in matter, and how matter behaves. Inorganic reactions, why they occur and what products might be expected is the emphasis in this course. A lot of laboratory work is used to reinforce the theory studied in this elective class. Precision is necessary. Math at the algebraic level is used daily, therefore, students must have the recommendation of a past year’s science teacher and math teacher. Also, students must have earned a “C” or better in Algebra I. A grade of “C” in Geometry is also recommended. This rigorous elective course that requires daily study. A scientific calculator is needed. Chemistry AP/Honors - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: "B" or better in Algebra I, “B” or better in Geometry is Recommended or Permission of Instructor This course is intended to provide students with a very rigorous in depth study of chemistry in preparation for further study of science in college. Basic topics are the same as for Chemistry CP. Students will be required to work on outside projects as well as class work. A scientific calculator is required for this course. Conceptual Physics - (1 Credit) Conceptual Physics students will study force and motion, thermodynamics, waves and energy, electricity, and other physics concepts. Emphasis will be on written, pictorial and graphic descriptions rather than the complex math equations of conventional physics. Although advanced math skills will not be required, students must have good reading, writing and study skills. Due to the technical reading skills needed in this course, candidates must have a recommendation from an English teacher. Physics CP - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Algebra II - Grade "C" or Better Because Physics is the foundation of many other sciences, students planning careers in science, engineering, mathematics or medicine should take Physics. The course explores, through problems and experiments, the topics of mechanics (how and why objects move) heat, electricity, and light. A scientific calculator is required for this course. 71
  • 72. Advanced Placement Anatomy and Physiology – (1 Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Biology: Approval from Instructor This accelerated course will follow the guidelines outlined by the College Board and will allow students to receive college credit upon successful completion of the AP exam. An in-depth study of the biological mechanisms of the human body will be investigated through lectures, labs and independent research. Students will be required to write extensive research papers, give lectures and presentations, complete dissections and lab reports and read scientific journals and other publications. Students taking this course need to be comfortable with a fast paced and independent workload. Reading and homework will be extensive and are essential for successful complete on of the course. Advanced Placement Biology – (1 Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Approval from instructor This advanced course will follow the guidelines outlined by the College Board and will allow students to receive college credit upon successful completions of the AP exam. A compressive study of cell biology, genetics and evolution, and organisms and population will be the focus of the course. Advanced laboratory techniques will be examined and students will be expected to write comprehensive lab reports. Students will be required to participate in lecture, give presentations and write research papers. Students taking this course need to be comfortable with a fast paced and independent workload. Reading and homework will be extensive and are essential for successful completion of the course. Biology CP - (1 Credit) - Required Gr. 10-12 This course is designed for the college bound student. Topics that are covered include cell biology, genetics, anatomy, ecology, biological communities, animal kingdoms, viruses and bacteria. This course is presented through lectures, laboratory work, and independent research. Technological advancements in the biological community are studied to help relate science to real world applications. Biology – (1 Credit) - Required Gr. 10-12 This course is designed to help those who need one-on-one assistance. The course outline will follow the same topics as the CP Biology course but information will be modified on an individual level. 72
  • 73. Basic Biology Principles – (1 Credit) Gr. 10-12 Prerequisite: Science Teacher Recommendation This course is designed to promote and develop an awareness as well as an understanding to the biological world around us. The general biology student will study the biological world through lectures, research, labs, oral presentations, group work and films. A general and broad based curriculum will allow student interests to dictate some of the course topics within the biological sciences. Field Ecology - (1 Credit) Gr. 10-12 This hands on science class that will examine a number of areas in ecology. Lectures will be intergraded with field research were students will design and conduct experiments, gather information and present their findings. Students will investigate aquatic environments, study and identify macro-invertebrates, complete land transects, identify plants and trees, complete an environmental impact statement and study terrestrial environments and the animals that inhabit them. Students will be required to write research papers, complete lab reports and research local environmental issues. Be prepared to get dirty a lot of work will be conducted outside. Limnology – (1 Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisite: Biology In this course we will investigate freshwater ecosystems, with a principal focus on lakes. Topics covered will include chemical, physical, and biological processes that occur in aquatic ecosystems. We will study local watersheds and conduct experiments that relate to the material covered in lecture. Students will be required to design and conduct experiments, gather data and present their findings. Information will be presented through lectures and reading. Students will need to maintain a portfolio, write research papers and give presentations. Biotechnology - (1 Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisite: Biology, Approval Needed from Instructor This course will incorporate genetic principles with advancements in science. We will examine the structure and function of DNA, gene regulation and mutations. Once the basic principles of genetics are understood we will study biotechnology and how it is used in society; topics include genes in medicine, forensic science, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, and pollution control. Students will be required to examine the dangers and benefits of biotechnology and formulate educated and defendable opinions on each topic. Students will learn through lecture, readings, research papers, presentations and 73
  • 74. debates. Emergency Response - (½ Credit) Gr. 10-12 This comprehensive first aid course will cover all aspects of how to respond to an emergency. Those students with interests in the medical and health fields, veterinary medicine and biology are encouraged to take this course. Topics include CPR, defibrillator use, preventing disease, emergency childbirth, assessing vital signs, muscle and bone injuries, spinal injury management, and healthy lifestyle tips. The course is presented through lecture, demonstration, videos, discussions, and hands on practice. Upon successful completion, students will earn a 3-year American Red Cross Emergency Response Certificate and a 1-year CPR for the Professional Rescuer Certificate. Science in the News - (½ Credit) Gr. 10-12 This course allows students to develop an awareness of how current scientific topics affect their world. Topics covered in this course include political, ethical, medical, environmental and local science issues that are currently being investigated by the scientific community. News and student interest will also dictate topics to be discussed. Students will work independently and in small groups, researching current events by using scientific journals and other publications. Students will present information orally, engage in debates, write research papers and maintain a portfolio. 74
  • 75. Social Studies The Social Studies Department offers a variety of required and elective courses at various levels. The purpose of the social studies offerings is to challenge students to become knowledgeable, principled thinkers who can use their skills in their years after Prospect Mountain High School. Throughout their coursework students will be encouraged to think as: historians, geographers, economists, and other social scientists. The graduation requirements for Prospect Mountain High School are that each student completes three and a half credits in the area of social studies. The following courses are sequenced in such a way that students will have a well-rounded understanding of the democratic principles and ideals upon which good citizenship is founded and develop a sense of his or her role in the local, state, national and international communities. Grade 9: Civics Civics CP Grade 10: Economics World History World History CP Grade 11: United States History United States History, CP United States History, Honors United States History, Advanced Placement Grade 9-12 Electives: Contemporary Issues Contemporary Issues, CP Grade 11 and 12 Electives: Anthropology Psychology**/Sociology** 75
  • 76. *Part of the Running Start program with Laconia Community Technical College. Students may receive 3 college credits for their coursework in these classes. Civics General or College Prep - (1 Credit) Required This course offers the student an in depth study of government at the national level; exploring Congress, the Presidency, the Federal Court System and the United States Constitution. In addition, the course reviews government at the state and local level. Students will also examine the rights and duties of citizens. World History General or College Prep - (1 Credit) Required This year long course is designed to study significant historical events and their geographic importance. This course will emphasize the study of ancient and medieval times, Western and Eastern civilizations with an emphasis on cultural developments that have shaped the experience of the entire world. Economics - (½ Credit) Required This course will examine and analyze the process in which people seek to satisfy their needs and wants by making decisions. The course will focus on businesses and labor, governments, market structure, international and domestic economic challenges. United States History General, College Prep, or Honors - (1 Credit) Required This course is designed to identify and examine major events and themes of United States history from the Colonial period to the Modern Age. Students will develop an appreciation for domestic issues as they arose through time, and have an understanding of how America’s circumstances in the global community have changed. AP United States History - (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Department Approval This course examines topics from the Colonial Period to Modern Age in greater depth and detail than the traditional US History course. Emphasis will be placed on interpreting primary source documents as well as learning to write analytically. Reading, studying, reflecting and discussing documents as well as examining significant historians of the past will be stressed. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination that is given in May of each year. Contemporary Issues - (½ Credit) Students in this course will examine, discuss and dissect political, economic, and social issues as they appear in weekly news. The course will examine in depth important issues in their historic and contemporary framework. 76
  • 77. Buried Places and Lost Cultures - (½ Credit) Gr. 11-12 Prerequisite: World History This course is designed to be a general introduction to world prehistory and archeology. It covers the development and spread of modern man in the Old and New Worlds, the development of prehistoric cultures to the beginning of civilizations throughout the world. Anthropology - (½ Credit) Gr. 11-12 Anthropology is the holistic study of human groups throughout the world. This course will introduce students to key concepts in Physical and Cultural Anthropology. Students will explore the biological and cultural interdependence of being human through studying selected eastern and western cultures. Psychology - (½ Credit) Gr. 11-12 This survey course will introduce students to the theories and applications of this behavioral science. Students will be required to form essential questions about topics and develop and articulate possible answers to the questions. Some of the topics that we will be focusing on are: life span development, cognition and learning, abnormal psychology, and health and stress. Sociology - (½ Credit) Gr. 11-12 This course will introduce students to basic concepts and terminology in sociology, methods of research, and cultural influences on the development of individual personality. A great deal of the class discussion will center on the nature of society today. Coursework consists of reading and analysis through discussion and research. 77
  • 78. General Studies Freshman Seminar – (½ Credit) Required All freshmen will be enrolled in one semester of the seminar. The class will focus on developing goals for a four-year high school academic plan, as well as looking at what Prospect Mountain High School has to offer each student (Athletics, Extra Curricular Activities). Students will review career paths and explore a wide variety of career options available to them. They will work on developing study and test taking skills that will prepare them for future high school classes. Students will look at real-world connections to the curriculum with an emphasis on technology integration. Community outreach, as well as character education will also be reviewed. The goal of the course is to give freshmen an outlet for questions and help guide them in making positive decisions for high school and beyond. Driver Education – (½ Credit) Driver Education is a course designed to provide the student with knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for the safe operation of a motor vehicle. The course consists of a minimum of thirty hours of class work and eight hours of supervised driving experience. A student must be sixteen years old by the end of the class to enroll. If the demand for this course is greater than the school can meet in any given year, preference will be given to students on the basis of grade and age. Office Aide – (½ Credit) Office Aide is offered to teach actual office procedures to students and to help them gain experience and poise for future positions in this area. They are taught how to operate the various office machines and how to handle many assignments pertaining to a school office. 78
  • 79. 1REGION 9 VOCATIONAL CENTER Students from Prospect Mountain High School in their Junior and Senior years may choose a vocational program in Wolfeboro. Three classes will be taken at the center and two or more classes will be taken at Prospect Mountain High School. The following ten programs are offered. ADMINISTRATIVE BUSINESS AND OFFICE SYSTEMS C/TP Grades 11-12 2 Credits/Year One Block All Year Prerequisite: Word Processing and Desktop Publishing, or Office 2000 and Desktop Publishing (all College/Tech Prep) Administrative Business & Office Systems provides a junior or senior, who has advanced through a sequence of business courses, the skills mandatory to be successful in the electronic office or world of today. This is an advanced computer applications and management course. Students will become proficient in advanced computer applications, such as PAGEMAKER, ADOBE PHOTOSHOP, EXCEL, multi-tasking, scanning, ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR, and POWERPOINT, as well as additional equipment used in an office of the 2000’s. A major emphasis is placed on graphic design and layout. Students will design brochures, etc. and layout the entire yearbook in PAGEMAKER incorporating manipulated graphics files from ADOBE PHOTOSHOP. QUARK and FREEHAND may also be available. This course will also explore career opportunities available and sophisticated software reflective of the business climate. This is an extremely creative environment. Students are encouraged to generate new ideas and concepts for the yearbook and then design appropriate graphics to complement the section. Management activities and styles are particularly stressed as each student will experience a leadership position. An emphasis is placed on realistic tasks (as the students will manage a $12,000 a year business) and workflow within the office. Students will be encouraged to participate in the Center's Cooperative Education Program to further enhance their acquired skills. **This course also fulfills your 1/2 credit of computer education required for graduation. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Office Manager Word Processing Specialist Receptionist Administrative Secretary Graphic Design Assistant Opportunities through further training or education: Administrative Assistant Computer Programmer Business Teacher Graphic Designer Required background: Word Processing Have had or presently taking Office 2000 or Desk Top Publishing Recommended background: Office 2000 Speedwriting Accounting I Desk Top Publishing AG-SCIENCE PROGRAM C/TP 79
  • 80. Grade 10 or 11 - Ag-Science I** 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Grade 11 or 12 - Ag-Science II 4 credits - 2 Blocks - Full Year Ag-Science is a two-year program. In Ag-Science I the course is a full block. In the Ag- Science II class will meet for 2 blocks per day. Students will participate in supervised work experience programs and related theory concurrently. They will use a variety of tools, supplies, instruments and equipment in the areas relating to: Agribusiness, Horticulture, Agriculture Mechanics, Aquaculture, and Forestry/Agriculture Resources. Safe work habits and attitudes are heavily stressed. FFA activities designed to develop leadership skills will be learned at various community locations including areas for forestry, nursery, landscaping, crop production, and water and air experimentation. The skills and knowledge learned in these courses are also basic for occupations in the many fields allied with agriculture. The Center's Cooperative Education Program will be available to students in this program. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Greenhouse Employee Horticulture Supply Sales Florist Landscape Gardener Nursery Worker Groundskeeper Conservation Specialist Farm Equipment Maintenance Agribusiness Sales Person Heavy Equipment Operator Opportunities through further education or experience: Greenhouse/Nursery Manager Fruit Grower Landscape Architect Agricultural Teacher Soil Conservationist Conservation Officer Forester Farm Equipment Mechanic Agribusiness Manager Recommended background: Exploring Careers Related Math/Science Courses Related Industrial Technology/Technology Education Courses **Ag-Science I may be taken for biological science credit. (Effective September 1987). AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM C/TP Grade 10 or 11 - Automotive Technology I 80
  • 81. 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Grade 11 or 12 - Automotive Technology II 4 credits - 2 Blocks - Full Year This two year program is designed for both male and female students interested in developing mechanical and technical skills in repairing and servicing automobiles. Both two and four cycle engines will be studied to include many applications of these systems in modern automobiles. Safe and proper use of many tools and pieces of equipment found in today's automotive repair shops will be stressed and welding equipment will be introduced. Second year activities will sharpen and expand skills attained in the first year and also include introduction to automobile diagnostics and tune-up procedures covering larger internal combustion engines using both gas and diesel fuels. The student will study the major components of today's automobile and gain experience with electrical and electronic systems, steering & suspension, power train, brakes, and related tools and diagnostic equipment. The Center's Cooperative Education program will be available to students in this program. All students are eligible to elect Automotive Technology I in grade 11. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Entry Level Automotive Technician Service Station Attendant Parts Counter Person Opportunities through further training and education: Automotive Dealership Owner Service Writer Power Mechanics Instructor Service Manager Master Technician Recommended background: Related Industrial Technology/Technology Education Courses Math/Science Accounting I Computers CHILD CARE PROGRAMC/TP Child Care I 81
  • 82. 2 Credits - 1 Block - Full Year Child Care II 2 Credits - 1 Block - Full Year If you like to work with small children, possibly one day run your own day care center, teach elementary school or be a nanny, this program will get you started. You will plan new activities, teach new things, answer questions and help with small problems. As larger companies include day care centers on site the need for qualified child care workers grow. This program is also an invaluable experience for raising your own family and becoming a responsible parent. The program is a cooperative effort between the Wolfeboro Area Children’s Center and Region #9. The lab and classroom are located at the Center, and students are provided transportation. The Center’s Cooperative Education Program will be available to students in this program. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Teacher’s Aide Pediatric Assistant Nanny Opportunities through further education or experience: Elementary School Teacher Owner/Day Care Center Pediatrician Social Worker Teacher Recreation Director Recommended Background: Family and Consumer Sciences Courses 82
  • 83. CONSTRUCTION TRADES PROGRAM C/TP Grade 10 or 11 - Construction Trades I 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Grade 11 or 12 - Construction Trades II 4 credits - 2 Blocks - Full Year The Construction Trades program is designed for the student who wishes to pursue a building construction career. Students are instructed in the safe use of all tools, materials, and construction techniques necessary to succeed in the building trade. Areas of instruction include carpentry, plumbing, residential electricity, heating, cabinet making, masonry and painting. The basic principles of math, blueprint reading, local building codes, cost estimates, building materials and structural design, with a strong emphasis on construction and structural safety are integrated into these instructional areas. The first year of this program will provide the fundamentals and basic skills in the planning and construction of a residential home, including framing methods, foundation work, insulation, roofing, flooring, and dry wall construction. Instruction in these skills will take place in a laboratory setting and on-site at the Building Trades House. In the second year, the program centers on the construction of an actual house to be sold upon completion. Instruction will focus on areas such as: windows and doors, staircases and interior finish work. Level II students will be able to concentrate on specific areas according to their interests and continue their development in the areas of advanced carpentry and cabinet making techniques. The Center's Cooperative Education Program will be available to students in this program. All students are eligible to elect Construction Trade I in grade 11. Students electing Construction Trades I in grade 10 must be 16 years of age by January 15th of that school year. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Apprentice Carpenter Mason's Assistant House Painter Hardware Supply and Sales Electrician's Assistant Mill Worker Plumbing and Heating Assistant Opportunities through further education or experience: Master Carpenter Building Contractor Master Mason Apprentice Plumber Cabinet Maker Licensed Plumber Journeyman Apprentice Mason Master Electrician Journeyman Electrician Heating Apprentice Heating Contractor Recommended background: Related Industrial Technology/Technology Education Courses Math/Science Accounting I 83
  • 84. CULINARY ARTS PROGRAM C/TP Grade 10 or 11 - Culinary Arts I 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Grade 11 or 12 - Culinary Arts II 4 credits - 2 Blocks - Full Year The Culinary Arts Program provides the student the opportunity to specialize in the areas of food preparation, quantity cooking, purchasing and storage of products, serving, and the various management aspects of the food service industry. Students will be trained in the use of various kitchen, fast food, and restaurant equipment common to the modern food service trade and become involved in the actual preparation of food, and volume cooking for activities such as banquets, luncheons, and special community functions. Additional topics in the Culinary Arts program include menu development and costing, purchasing, bookkeeping, inventory control, sanitation and safety, and local and state food service regulations. A major part of this program will be the students' involvement in the Center's restaurant. This facility will provide an area for students to experience the various functions of a person involved in the foods industry. The Center's Cooperative Educational Program will be available to students in this program. All students are eligible to elect Culinary Arts I in grade 11. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Cook Dietary Aide Apprentice Cook Baker Assistant Short Order Cook Waiter/Waitress Restaurant Management Trainee Storeroom Assistant Opportunities through further education or experience: Master Chef Purchasing Agent Restaurant Manager Food Service Manager Dietician Food & Equipment Sales Airline Catering Cruise Line Food Services Recommended background: Food & Nutrition Human Relations Math Consumer Education Science Accounting I HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM C/TP 84
  • 85. Grade 10 or 11 - Health & Human Services I 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Grade 11 or 12 - Health & Human Services II 4 credits - 2 Blocks - Full Year The Health and Human Services program helps students explore the vast career opportunities within this field. The program provides students with the theory and basic health skills for consideration of employment in the area of their choice. Further professional training and education may be obtained at the post-secondary level which prepares a person to function as a high quality technician and/or professional healthcare provider role. First year students are given an orientation and overall picture of the Health and Human Services field. There is also an introduction to anatomy and physiology, nutrition, basic medical terminology, growth and development, and general health care subjects. Field trips are an integral part of the program. Level II of the program includes a more in-depth study of the above as well as receiving on-the-job experience at local health care facilities in the area of the student's choice. The Assistant-to-Nurses students will receive a certificate issued by the teacher through the Vocational Center. This enables students to take the State of N.H. Board of Nursing examination for Nursing Assistants. Each student receives supervision by a professional in his or her area of clinical work. NOTE: Prior to participating in the clinical experience students will incur some costs relating to their personal health records and required uniforms. All Health & Human Services students participate in HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America) to enhance leadership skills and health related skills development. Students electing the Certified Nursing Assistant component of the program will elect Health & Human Services I in grade 11 or have the written approval of the teacher. All students are eligible to elect Health and Human Services I in grade 11. Employment opportunities upon completion of the course: Child Care Aide Medical Aide Radiological Aide Dental Office Aide Physical Therapy Aide Respiratory Therapy Aide Medical Records Aide Veterinarian's Office Aide Housekeeping Aide Pharmacy Aide EMT Aide Dietary Aide Assistant-to-Nurses (certification required by N.H. State Board of Nursing) Opportunities through further education or experience: Child Care Worker/Supervisor Dental Hygienist Athletic Trainer Respiratory Therapist Physical Therapy Assistant Chiropractor Surgical Technician Registered Nurse Massage Therapist Licensed Practical Nurse Medical Records Assistant Dentist Animal Technician Medical Assistant Psychologist Physical Therapist Physician Nurse Practitioner Occupational Therapist Physician's Assistant ** Health and Human Services I may be taken for the third science credit required for graduation from Kingswood Regional High School. (Effective September 1996) COMPUTER NETWORKING C/TP 85
  • 86. *Grade 10 or 11 - Industrial Electronics I 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Grade 11 or 12 - Industrial Electronics II 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Individuals with specialized technical skills in the area of electronics are in high demand and can look forward to challenging and rewarding careers. Begin your career in electronics by studying the fundamentals of AC/DC circuits, discrete components, digital logic circuits and microprocessors. This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of digital and analog devices, skill development for use of test equipment, troubleshooting failures and construction of electronic systems and projects. If you are interested in a career as an electronic technician, electrical engineer, computer technician, or industrial electronics technician this course is the gateway towards achieving your goal. Through this course you can earn course credit towards a college associates degree program and begin your career in electronics while in high school. Industrial Electronics II is a continuation of Industrial Electronics I. Students can continue their pursuit of earning their A+ certification in computer repair and/or their Networking certificate. The networking certification will be obtained in cooperation with the Cisco Academy program as part of a collaborative agreement between the Vocational Center, New Hampshire Community Technical College and Cisco Systems Corporation. In addition to these certifications, individuals can elect to continue the study of electronic devices, components and continue development of related troubleshooting skills. As a direct result of participating in the Industrial Electronics program students will be eligible to earn college credit toward a certificate program in cooperation with New Hampshire Community Technical College. *Note - Students may elect Industrial Electronics I providing they have completed Technology courses in Electricity or Electronics with a 70% average for this course. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technician and Technologist Electrical and Electronic Assembler Electrical and Electronic Assembler, Precision Electromechanical Equipment Assembler, Precision Electromechanical and Biological Equipment Repairer Data Processing Equipment Repairer Opportunities through further education or experience: Electrical and Electronic Engineer Computer Engineer Computer Programmer Teacher and Instructor, Vocational Education System Analysis Automotive Electronic Technician Avionic Electronic Technician Recommended background: Algebra Chemistry/Physics Related Technology Education Courses Word Processing I and/or Computer Skills MARKETING EDUCATION PROGRAM C/TP Grade 10 or 11 - Marketing Education I 86
  • 87. 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Grade 11 or 12 - Marketing Education II 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Marketing Education includes a wide variety of career preparation activities. It is designed to provide the basic skills and knowledge required for job placement in one or more of the marketing functions. These marketing functions include: buying, selling, storing, transporting, financing, merchandising, pricing and marketing research as performed by managers and employees of various retail, wholesale and service businesses. Topics in the first year of the Marketing Education program include the basic selling, employability and communication skills, retail mathematics, display skills, and customer services. In Level II, students will learn more management, selling, merchandising, and advertising techniques, as well as business planning, store location, layout and organization. Individual project work will be arranged so that students may specialize in any particular area that meets his/ her needs and interests. Students will obtain their skills and knowledge in these functions through classroom instruction, group and individual projects, the operation of "lab-Business" and DECA-" an association of Marketing students". All students in the Marketing Education program will become involved in the operation and maintenance of the "Pro Depot", the Center's Store. The students will also have the opportunity to become involved in the Cooperative Education Program which is a work study program designed to give him/her the opportunity to obtain related jobs in the community that correspond with their Marketing Education instruction. All students are eligible to elect Marketing Education I in grade 11 This program also fulfills the economics requirement for graduation. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Salesperson Buyer's Assistant Stock Clerk Display Assistant Customer Service Clerk Advertising Assistant Opportunities through further education or experience: Store Manager Insurance Agent Advertising Manager Real Estate Sales Business Owner Recommended background: Consumer Education Computer Literacy Art Accounting I Word Processing Human Relations Business Dynamics Business and Technology Information MICROCOMPUTER ACCOUNTING C/TP *Grade 11 or 12 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year 87
  • 88. This one-year vocational program is for 11th or 12th grade students in the accounting area. *Eligible juniors may be admitted upon instructor's approval. The program is designed to prepare students for an entry-level position in a public accounting business or as a small business bookkeeper. Students will master the operation of a microcomputer terminal, be able to complete simple problems using Excel, and be able to complete accounting activities using the accounting system Quick Books Pro, on the microcomputer. Additional activities will include computer literacy, career awareness, employment skills, 10 key calculating machine operation, filing, and communication and leadership skills. Students will be expected to complete some clerical accounting work experience in school or through participation in the Center's Cooperative Education Program. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: Accounting Clerk Accounts Payable Clerk Payroll Clerk Accounts Receivable Clerk Inventory Clerk Coding Clerk Bank Tellers and New Accounts Clerks Opportunities through further education or experience: Bookkeeper Accountant Auditor Required background: Word Processing I or College/Prep Word Processing Accounting I MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS C/TP *Grade 10 or 11 - Multimedia Communications I 2 credits - 1 Block - Full Year Grade 11 or 12 – Multimedia Communications II 88
  • 89. 2 credits –1 Block – Full Year This is a technology-based program that develops knowledge and skills in the field of communications. Students will learn basic techniques of video production, graphic communications, interviewing techniques, and editing. Productions will be created that will be shown on local community access television channels available through the cable television company. Current and up-to-date equipment used to create electronic media will be used. Production, editing, and scriptwriting for local community and school events will also be taught. Students will have an opportunity to become involved with local youth group activities and community service projects. Students will be expected to assume real leadership roles in the creation of community broadcasts and public service activities. Independent work within the communities of the Lakes Region to publicize various activities, sports events, and government operations will be expected. The areas of development are: Media Specialist, Corporate Writer, Graphics Editor, Video Producer, Television Camera person, and Cable Television Coordinator. The students will also have the opportunity to become involved in the Cooperative Education Program which is a work study program designed to give him/her the opportunity to obtain related jobs in the community that correspond with their Multimedia Communications instruction. All students are eligible to elect Multimedia Communications I in grade 11. Employment opportunities upon completion of course: TV News Producing News Reporting & Anchoring Telecommunications Production Radio Broadcasting Corporate Training & Marketing Opportunities through further education: Media Specialist Communications Technician Journalism Communication Arts & Sciences Required background: Computer Literacy Word Processing Creative Writing Journalism Extra Curricula Activities 89
  • 90. Timber Wolves Athletics Fall Varsity/Junior Varsity Boys & Girls Soccer Varsity/Junior Varsity Girls Volleyball Varsity /Junior Varsity Boys & Girls Golf Winter Varsity/Junior Varsity Boys & Girls Basketball Varsity/Junior Varsity Boys & Girls Ski Spring Varsity/Junior Varsity Baseball Varsity /Junior Varsity Softball Varsity/Junior Varsity Boys & Girls Track & Field Clubs SADD Students Against Destructive Decisions US FIRST Robotics World Language Club Math Team Project Search Granite State Challenge National Honor Society Fine Arts Pep Band Jazz Ensemble Select Chorus Drama Drama Festival Student Government Class Officers Student Council 90

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