Google Android Social Media Landscape - Executive Summary

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  • 1. 
 
 
 Surviving
in
 iPhone
Territory

 Lessons
in
Competitive
Brand
– Building
from
the
Android
and
G1
 Phone
Launch

 Executive
Summary
by
Chris
Thomas
and
Haydn
 Shaughnessy


 Scope:
The
Launch
of
the
First
Android
Phone,
 The
T‐Mobile
G1;
the
Open
Handset
Alliance
&
 the
Android
operating
system
 

  • 2. Introduction
 As
mobile
handset
makers
gear
up
to
launch
a
new
generation
of
Android
 mobile
phones
a
question
mark
hangs
over
their
ability
to
gain
online
traction
in
 the
face
of
the
Apple
iPhone's
game
changing
success.
To
date
marketers
have
 had
little
access
to
true
competitor
landscape
analysis
in
online
media
 campaigns,
or
to
share‐of‐voice
data.
The
Conversation
Group
set
out
to
change
 that
by
creating
this
report
into
the
launch
of
the
HTC/T
Mobile
G1
and
the
 lessons
it
holds
for
this
falls
crop
of
new
launches.
In
short
we
set
out
to
create
a
 case
study
in
online
competitor
analytics.
 Social
media,
as
everyone
knows,
is
a
fast
growing
area
of
communications
but
 one
that
has
proved
difficult
for
many
companies
to
exploit
in
predictable
and
 measured
ways.
Yes,
we
tweet
and
yes
we
blog,
but
few
companies
know
the
 true
value
of
those
investments
nor
can
present
their
outputs
to
senior
 management
in
a
coherent
way.
 The
Conversation
Group
has
been
involved
in
social
media
since
its
inception
 and
is
constantly
refining
its
measurement
and
analytical
services.
Here
we
 show
what
can
be
learned
from
a
systematic
analysis
of
the
high
profile
 G1/Android
campaign.
 Google
Android
and
the
Open
Handset
Alliance
have
pioneered
an
open
source
 approach
to
mobile
phones,
while
Symbian
has
followed
with
an
open
source
 initiative
of
its
own.

Given
the
popularity
of
the
mobile
(the
market
stands
at
 around
800
million
units
per
annum),
and
the
strength
of
the
opposition
(the
 iPhone
and
Symbian‐powered
handsets)
there
is
a
potentially
huge
community
 of
interest
investing
in
shaping
perceptions
of
what
Android
can
deliver.
 When
HTC/T‐Mobile
launched
the
first
Android
phone
in
Q4
2008
the
stakes
 could
not
have
been
higher.
In
a
market
dominated
by
Nokia
here
was
not
just
a
 competitor
but
a
new
movement
and
eco‐system.
 What
can
social
media
analysis
add
to
the
understanding
of
how
an
online
 campaign
and
associated
comment
shaped‐up,
following
the
launch
of
the
 HTC/T‐Mobile
G1?
We
believe
the
lessons
can
be
illustrated
by
the
scale
of
the
 undertaking.

 There
were
over
90,000
relevant
&
unique
posts
referencing
G1
on
English
 language
blogs
between
October
15th
2008
and
January
25th
2009.
Many
 commercial
campaigns
have
a
similar
impact
on
the
social
space.
If
you
want
to
 guide
your
social
media
campaigns
and
learn
from
them
then
it
is
important
to
 gain
experience
in
highly
scalable
metrics
and
reporting,
an
area
The
 Conversation
Group
specializes
in.
 About
This
Project
 The
output
of
this
research
project
consists
of
three
parts
 • Google Android Social Media Landscape – Executive Summary (this document, PDF) • Google Android Social Media Landscape – Full Report (PDF)
  • 3. • Google Android Social Media Landscape – influencer Wiki (Tiddlywiki) All
three
documents
are
contained
in
a
compressed
file
archive
available
for
 download
from
http://www.tcgemea.com/Home/research‐assets,
or
via
email
 on
request
to
the
report
authors.



  • 4. A
Case
Study
of
Social
Media
 Analysis
 1.
The
HTC
G1
Handset
Launch
Was
One
of
the
Key
Tech
 Stories
of
2008.
Or
Was
It…?
 The
official
October
launch
of
the
Android
G1
was
big
technology
news,
 extensively
reported
and
discussed
by
a
large
range
of
media
outlets
and
 bloggers.
The
launch
of
the
phone
made
‘best
of
the
year’
lists
in
a
range
of
 influential
online
media,
including
Tech
Crunch;
Consumer
Reports;
Mashable;
 CNET;
PC
Mag;
Fommy
Blog;
InformationWeek
and
ReadWriteWeb.

 However,
to
HTC/T‐Mobile's
potential
cost,
there
was
some
confusion
about
 exactly
what
these
authorities
were
excited
about
–
the
G1
handset,
or
the
 Android
operating
system.

 While
the
launch
of
HTC’s
G1
was
a
catalyst
for
interest
in
Android,
in
fact,
it
was
 the
Android
story
that
dominated.
But
not
even
geek
and
expert
interest
could
 build
the
HTC
or
Android
story
sufficient
to
compete
with
the
iPhone.
Even
on
a
 quiet
day
the
iPhone
had
twelve
times
as
many
online
references
as
the
 Android.
 Six
weeks
after
the
HTC
launch
Android
references
came
back
to
the
fore
with
 news
that
a
raft
of
other
companies
(including
Sony
Ericsson)
had
joined
the
 Open
Handset
Alliance.
OHA
membership
in
other
words
spiked
more
interest
 than
the
G1
handset
launch.
 The
social
media
space
is
made
up
of
experts
and
amateurs,
professionals
and
 public
and
that
can
lead
to
confusion
–
particularly
among
consumer
facing
/
 “non‐expert”
pundits
–
between
the
handset
(G1)
and
the
operating
system
 (Android),
and
how
the
respective
merits
of
the
two
should
be
collectively
or
 separately
presented.
Secondly,
a
sense
of
disappointment
about
the
 shortcomings
of
the
G1
handset
as
a
showcase
for
Android’s
market‐changing
 potential
is
clear
in
the
comments.

 Lesson
1:
Social
media
analysis
needs
to
take
an
extended
timescale
for
its
 parameters.
Android
coverage
at
the
launch
of
its
first
handset
might
be
 considered
adequate
or
impressive
but
looked
at
over
time
it
was
 overshadowed
by
what
is
essentially
a
trade
press
story,
and
by
routine
 coverage
of
its
major
competitor.
These
factors
put
the
actual
scale
of
coverage
 at
launch
into
a
disappointing
context.


 Lesson
2:
best
practice
in
social
media
communications
is
to
set
benchmarks
for
 coverage
by
scoping
out
competitor
buzz
in
advance;
keep
monitoring
and
 profiling
your
campaign
against
these
benchmarks.

 2.
Smartphone
Enthusiasts
Look
Ahead
–
G2
and
Beyond
 Within
a
short
time
of
launch,
many
commentators
were
looking
ahead
to
the
 next
developments
for
the
Android
platform.
The
fire
was
fueled
with
rumors

  • 5. and
leaks
about
a
forthcoming
“G2”
handset
–
including
speculation
about
 feature
sets;
handset
manufacturer
and
carrier
identity.

 There
were
both
positive
and
negative
outcomes
from
these
rumors
and
leaks.
 On
the
positive
side,
discussion
moved
on
from
criticism
of
and
disappointment
 with
the
G1
handset,
and
the
mood
grew
that
stakeholders
were
prepared
to
 give
Android
a
second
chance
to
impress.

 However,
on
the
negative
side,
the
chilling
effect
on
market
performance
of
this
 new
buzz
became
apparent
–
that
the
handset
would
soon
be
rendered
 obsolete
by
a
superior,
second‐generation
Android
phone,
for
launch
of
which
 many
prospective
customers
were
prepared
to
wait.
 This
was
also
manifest
in
the
reluctance
of
developers
to
commit
in
large
 numbers
to
developing
applications
for
the
platform.
The
slower‐than‐predicted
 accrual
of
applications
for
Android
poses
a
major
threat
to
the
long‐term
 prospects
of
the
platform.

 Lesson
3:
Look
sideways
as
well
as
forwards
and
be
sure
you
are
ready
to
 counter
errors
and
misconceptions
in
the
pro‐amateur
environment
of
the
social
 web.

Social
media
is
a
democratized
venue
for
discussing
your
products
and
 brands
but
you
can
still
anticipate
how
the
grapevine
and
word
of
mouth
might
 become
distracted.

 3.
Android
Defined
by
Relationship
with
Apple
iPhone

 The
G1
launch
was
most
often
framed
in
context
of
the
challenge
it
posed
to
the
 Apple
iPhone.
This
did
not
often
work
to
the
term
advantage
of
any
of
the
 “Android”
players
–
HTC;
T‐Mobile;
or
the
Open
Handset
Alliance.

 Most
of
the
Android
hype
was
built
up
around
the
open
operating
system,
and
 the
reputation
and
track
record
of
the
members
of
the
Open
Handset
Alliance.
 However,
in
its
first
commercial
outing,
the
word‐of‐mouth
found
Android's
flag‐ bearer
HTC
G1
handset
wanting.

 Head‐to‐head,
the
G1
lost
out
to
the
iPhone
in
almost
every
category:
style;
 design;
features;
application
availability;
sales
and
market
traction.

 This
“head
to
head”
narrative
is
clearly
evidenced
among
the
largest
and
most
 influential
voices
in
the
mobile
telephony
/
gadget
space
–
TechCrunch;
 EnGadget;
GigaOm
and
so
forth.
 True,
author,
blogger
and
open
source
advocate
Cory
Doctorow
–
who
has
taken
 issue
with
Apple
in
general,
and
the
iPhone
in
particular,
is
representative
of
a
 demographic
that
looks
to
Android
as
the
“anti‐Apple”
smartphone
alternative2.
 But
on
a
volume
and
quality
test,
Android
lost
out
in
part
because
of
G1
 coverage.


 Lesson
4:
Put
your
best
foot
forward.
There
is
no
point
trying
to
build
out
a
story
 through
inferior
product
or
trying
to
tell
this
community
that
better
things
are
 on
the
horizon.
No
amount
of
schmoozing
will
persuade
the
social
space
to
wait
 while
another
bus
comes
along.

  • 6. 4.
Positive
Sentiment
Focuses
on
Android
Operating
System
 The
narrative
wasn’t
uniformly
negative.
Beyond
lukewarm
appraisals
of
the
 “whole
package”,
as
our
qualitative
analysis
of
detailed
G1
reviews
shows,
 reviewers
were
uniformly
positive
about
their
experience
of
using
the
Android
 OS
on
a
live
smartphone
handset.
 Lesson
5:

Really
know
your
strengths
and
case
harden
your
story
by
taking
 those
and
your
weaknesses
to
the
important
voices
first.
If
you
have
a
weakness
 you
won't
convince
detractors
as
the
debate
unfolds
but
you
may
be
able
to
buy
 time
by
having
those
discussions
with
key
voices
ahead
of
the
game.
 5.
Lack
of
Credible
Advocates
Within
Smartphone
Community
 
 Figure
1:
Influencer
Network
Visualization
 This
community
network
visualization
thumbnail
(which
can
be
viewed
and
 navigated
with
Touchgraph
Navigator
–
the
datasheet
and
structure
template
is
 available
from
TCG
on
request)
shows
a
highly
populated,
active
and
densely
 networked
community
of
interest
relevant
to
Android.
Yet,
our
qualitative
 identification
of
influencers
shows
most
of
its
key
advocates
are
not
established
 participants
in
this
community.

 This
is
in
marked
contrast
to
the
G1’s
detractors
–
which
include
extremely
 influential
and
well‐connected
sources
such
as
the
Boy
Genius
Report
and
 Venture
Beat.

 Further,
the
bulk
of
Android
advocacy
appears
to
originate
from
sites,
 individuals
or
communities
that
have
been
formed
solely
to
follow
Android
 developments,
either
from
a
personal
interest
or
commercial
perspective
–
a

  • 7. position
that
tends
to
work
against
the
credibility
or
influence
of
these
sources
 as
independent,
objective
commentators.
This
creates
a
distorted
view
of
the
 aggregated
nature
of
discussion,
with
much
of
the
serious,
positive
content
 about
Android
originating
from
sources
outside
of
the
established
hub
of
the
 smartphone
community,
or
from
sources
whose
credibility
and
impartiality
 could
be
called
into
question.

 Lesson
6:
Credible
advocacy
takes
a
long
time
to
establish
on
the
web.
From
a
 metrics
viewpoint
it
is
important
to
differentiate
comment
from
credible
 sources
and
comment
from
non‐credible.
The
objective
of
making
this
 distinction
is
not
to
jettison
the
latter
but
to
question
how
and
over
what
 timeframes
it
might
gain
in
strength.
 6.
Developer
Communications
Succeed,
But
Market
 Communications
Fail
 Our
analysis
of
topic
sentiment
in
Android
discussion
shows
that
developer
 engagement
efforts
–
particularly
via
the
pre‐release
“developer
model”
of
the
 G1,
and
the
Cupcake
site
‐
were
generally
positively
received.
Cupcake
in
 particular
was
the
subject
of
extensive
positive
comment
for
the
degree
of
 openness
it
demonstrated
over
issues
such
as
release
timescales
and
logistics.

 However,
market
communications
appeared
to
be
both
less
energetically
 pursued,
and
to
have
achieved
less
positive
results.
The
confusion
identified
 earlier
in
this
section
about
how
the
G1
handset
and
the
Android
OS
interrelate
 appears
symptomatic
of
a
failure
to
successfully
engage
with
and
communicate
 concepts
to
the
key
influencers
in
the
smartphone
sector.

 Lesson
7:
As
eco‐systems
become
more
important
companies
need
to
be
aware
 that
while
developer
sentiment
might
get
you
good
code
or
bright
innovations,
 the
litmus
test
is
still
the
market
and
it
is
dominated
by
quite
a
different
set
of
 actors.

  • 8. Recommendations
 If
you
were
an
Android
marketing
or
brand
manager
responsible
for
promoting
 the
platform
and
its
member
products
online
what
would
you
do?
These
would
 be
our
recommendations.



 
 Develop
a
Coordinated
Communications
Plan
at
OHA
Level
 While
communications
relating
solely
to
the
Android
operating
system
appeared
 to
be
successfully
handled,
communications
relating
to
the
launch
of
the
G1
 handset
were
not.
The
confusion
evident
among
online
sources
about
the
 respective
roles
of
Android
and
HTC
in
the
G1
offer
suggests
that
there
may
in
 fact
have
been
no
significant
market
engagement
concerning
Android
in
 connection
to
the
launch,
other
than
that
pursued
by
HTC.

 The
Open
Handset
Alliance
shares
a
stake
in
the
successful
market
adoption
of
 the
Android
operating
system,
and
a
market
failure
for
one
participating
 manufacturer’s
handset
harms
all.
For
this
reason,
it
is
important
to
address
the
 issue
of
communications
at
a
higher
level.

 Align
Development
Objectives
With
Market
Goals
 Existing
Android
communications
are
heavily
developer
focused.
Given
the
 Android
initiative’s
emphasis
on
openness,
and
the
collaborative
nature
of
 participation
in
the
OHA,
this
is
not
surprising.
However,
communication
 towards
developers
without
aligned
communication
towards
Android
end‐users
 represents
potentially
wasted
effort.
Application
volumes
and
developer
 engagement
with
Android
will
be
more
effectively
driven
by
handset
volume
 sales,
and
a
weakness
in
market
communications
undermines
this
goal.

 Engage
Existing
Smartphone
Community
 There
is
a
thriving
online
community
of
interest
for
smartphones
/
consumer
 electronics.
This
community
appears
to
have
been
significantly
under‐engaged
 in
relation
to
the
G1
launch.
This
is
in
contrast
to
engagement
by
the
Apple
 iPhone,
which
has
cultivated
a
passionate
and
enthusiastic
advocacy
base
in
the
 community.
Android
–
and
manufacturers
and
carriers
of
handsets
using
 Android
–
could
and
should
do
the
same.


 Disassociate
Android
from
Market
Narrative
of
iPhone
/
 Android
Duopoly
 The
collaborative
structure
of
the
Open
Handset
Alliance
puts
Android
handsets
 at
a
clear
disadvantage
in
a
head
to
head
battle
against
the
efficiency,
 incumbency
and
sheer
clout
of
the
Apple
iPhone’s
marketing
machine.

 There
is
an
understandable
attraction
inherent
in
the
“Apple
v
Android”
 narrative,
and
while
the
narrative
may
make
a
contribution
to
driving
discussion,

  • 9. the
discussion
has
so
far
not
favored
Android.
The
accumulated
brand
currency,
 critical
mass
of
available
applications
and
user‐base
of
the
iPhone
adds
up
to
a
 significant
challenge.

 The
Apple
iPhone
is
a
significantly
different
offer
to
the
G1,
though,
and
quite
 possibly
to
any
subsequent
Android
handset.
There
are
clear
strategic
 advantages
to
telling
a
distinct
Android
story.

  • 10. Appendix
1.
Research
Design
 Monitoring
and
analyzing
online
conversation
around
product
and
brand
is
 potentially
a
huge
undertaking
–
one
of
the
reasons
why
a
lot
of
social
media
 marketing
takes
place
with
inadequate
metrics
and
analysis.
Done
properly
it
 should
yield
insights
that
a
non‐metrics
based
approach
cannot
hope
to
match.

 In
the
case
of
Android,
as
with
many
other
large
brand
projects,
the
task
extends
 to
apparently
peripheral
but
ultimately
essential
by‐products,
in
this
case
 comment
around
the
Open
Handset
Alliance
and
the
ever‐present
Apple
iPhone.
 The
three
are
inextricable,
even
if
the
other
actors
wished
it
to
be
different.
 Our
approach
–
which
is
documented
in
the
methodology
annex
at
the
end
of
 this
paper
–
is
based
on
a
combination
of
blog
and
comment
acquisition
 technology
and
contextual
analysis
by
human
researchers.

 The
objective
of
the
research
was
to
collect
an
appropriately
scaled
subset
of
 data,
sufficient
to
infer
accurate
findings
and
to
make
recommendations
for
 action.

Those
findings
and
recommendations
can
be
found
here
in
our
 summary.

 For
those
who
like
their
data
raw
the
full,
accompanying
document
contains
a
 significantly
more
detailed
level
of
data
and
analysis,
and
concludes
with
a
 benchmark
study
of
the
presence
of
competing
handset
manufacturers
on
social
 media
channels.
 Detailed
profiles
and
influence
metrics
relating
to
the
main
advocates
and
 detractors
identified
in
this
research
are
also
available
in
an
accompanying
wiki
 –
configured
to
provide
a
basis
for
note‐taking
and
collaboration
in
active
 influencer
engagement
activities.

  • 11. Appendix
2:
Topic
analysis
 Smartphone
Market
and
Sales
 • While reaction to the G1 handset itself was qualified, sentiment towards Android in principle, and the Open Handset Alliance as an entity was unreservedly positive. Both were regarded as significant, newsworthy and strategic drivers of media and discussion interest • There was significant and sustained social media buzz around the smartphone sector in general; sales were perceived as robust despite global economic situation • The Android platform established itself as part of leadership tier in smartphone market, despite reservations about the quality and market prospects of the G1 handset Competitors
 • The G1’s key competitor for social media interest / discussion is the market- dominant Apple iPhone. The iPhone secured many times more discussion than the G1 during the period of this audit • The second main competitor in the conversation space is the recently-debuted Palm Pre, which lagged behind iPhone and G1 but sat significantly ahead of other smartphone competitors, as well as attracting very positive; anticipatory comment Market
Segments
 • G1 was a particularly popular topic of discussion among ‘early adopters’ & gadget lovers as well as the OS community. • G1 v Apple iPhone was popularly portrayed as a dichotomy, and frequently a competitive face-off, explicitly characterized in some circles as an extension of the ‘PC v Mac’ marketing battle Reviews
 • There was qualified sentiment in many reviews of the Android G1, with a common perception that it is ‘a work in progress’, most notable for its potential rather than its quality as a finished product • Interest in G1 launch was overshadowed by anticipation about how soon afterwards a putative G2 would launch
  • 12. • Trending negative, battery life, video capacity, handset design & appearance, browser security and the touch screen were the most commonly-mentioned features of the G1 handset; Trending positive, Android’s potential, the trackball, calling, using Gmail & other Google apps, and stability. • Launch of the Android G1 was regarded by many influencers as a noteworthy tech event, featured in many best of / end of year technology roundups Open,
Collaborative
&
Transparent
 • The radical openness of the Android platform led to both positive and negative discussion, although the overall trend was positive • Positive aspects centered on the potential upside of Android’s open principles; manifest in discussion of application development, and the openness demonstrated through the Cupcake developer site • Negative aspects centered on two issues: the potential downside of Android’s open principles (manifest in technology vulnerability and data security risks), and the practical downsides arising from the qualified success of its commercial launch, including: • Application availability, which lagged significantly behind iPhone despite open development platform • Market penetration, particularly insofar as the handset was in sufficiently widespread use to drive developer interest
  • 13. Appendix
3:
Key
Benchmarks
and
 Metrics

 Baseline
Metrics
(Oct‐15‐08
–
Jan‐15‐09) 
 • 93,228 relevant & unique posts referencing G1 on English language blogs • Of 264 blogs influential in the smartphone sector, 166 of these posted about Android G1 • 2,201 unique posts about ‘Android G1’ from these influential blogs • 216 G1-related tweets from influential microbloggers • Sentiment a) mixed, trending negative towards G1 HTC-handset b) mixed, trending positive toward Android G1 phone overall c) mixed, trending positive towards Android d) positive towards the Open Handset Alliance Key
Events
 Social
media
discussion
spiked
around
the
following
dates:

 • Oct-22-08: Android G1 launch • Dec-08-08: Unlocked developer mode available to registered app developers • Dec-09-08: 14 New members join Open Handset Alliance • Jan-08-09: Palm Pre debuts at CES • Jan-10-09: G1 is runner-up to iPhone at Crunchies Awards • Jan-12-09: Discussion of Cupcake update delays escalate Key
Citations
 • “In a Nutshell…,” Gizmodo, 1/9/09, 43 links • “T-Mobile G1 Review,” Engadget, 10/15/08, 34 links • “T-Mobile G1 Review,” Boy Genius Report, 10/15/08, 25 links • “The T-Mobile G1, How Would You Tweak It?” Engadget Mobile, 12/20/08, 20 links • “Cupcake” Update to Android Sees Video Recording, Stereo Bluetooth, On- Screen Keyboard and Much More!,” Android Guys, 12/18/08, 17 links • “T-Mobile G2 Coming,” Cell Phone Signal, 12/19/08, 15 links
  • 14. Main
G1
Advocates

 • Android
Central
(http://www.androidcentral.com/)

 • Android
Community
(http://www.androidcommunity.com/)

 • Android
Guys
(http://www.androidguys.com/)

 • Android
Tapp
(http://www.androidtapp.com/)

 • Engadget
(http://www.engadget.com/)

 • Engadget
Mobile
(http://www.engadgetmobile.com/)

 • Google
And
Blog
(http://www.googleandblog.com/)

 • Google
Phone
Online
(http://www.googlephoneonline.info/) • TechCrunch
(http://www.techcrunch.com/)

 Main
G1
Detractors

 • Boy
Genius
Report
(http://www.boygeniusreport.com/)

 • VentureBeat
(http://www.venturebeat.com) • The
Gadget
Blog
(http://www.thegadgetblog.com/)
  • 15. Appendix
4.
Scope

 This
online
social
media
analysis
is
provided
as
an
example
of
The
Conversation
 Group’s
social
media
research
methodology.
The
method
is
built
on
a
 combination
of
two
key
principles:

 • The application of established qualitative and quantitative media and market research best practice. • Leveraged application of our knowledge and expertise in the use of cutting edge content acquisition and analysis tools. In
combination,
these
two
principles
allow
us
to
deploy
an
effective
and
flexible
 toolkit,
optimized
to
produce
the
best
approach
for
each
client.

 For
this
particular
project,
a
combination
of
human
and
technology‐driven
 approaches
was
used
to
acquire
and
analyze
relevant
content.
Search
and
 analysis
technology
comprised
both
free‐to‐use
and
commercially
licensed
tools.
 Details
of
all
key
method
and
scoping
decisions
follow.
 Time
Scope
 The
research
was
scoped
to
cover
a
period
of
three
calendar
months,
running
 from
October
15,
2008
to
January
15,
2009.
This
period
was
determined
so
as
to
 support
the
collection
of
immediate
pre‐launch
buzz
about
the
G1,
as
well
as
to
 include
a
substantial
rump
of
post‐launch
reviews,
commentary
and
otherwise
 relevant
content.
Content
collected
during
this
period
forms
the
basis
for
all
 partly
or
wholly
quantitative
analyses
used
in
this
report.

 On
occasion
we
have
referenced
noteworthy
commentary,
events
and
 developments
that
took
place
shortly
prior
or
subsequent
to
the
audit
period.
A
 clear
note
has
been
made
in
the
text
wherever
this
is
the
case.


 Content
Scope
 The
report
covers
early
reviews
of
the
Android
G1,
prelaunch
and
launch
 coverage,
reviews
of
the
phone,
and
contextually
relevant
mobile
phone
 industry
related
news
published
in
the
English
language,
and
occurring
on
blogs,
 forums
and
microblogs.
Topics
considered
in‐scope
include:

 • All direct mentions of the T-Mobile G1 in the context of consumer reviews or industry commentary • Mentions of the Open Handset Alliance (OHA) in the context of Android / the G1 • Mentions of the Android and / or the developer site Cupcake
  • 16. Credits
 This
executive
summary
was
written
by
Haydn
Shaughnessy,
Partner
and
Chris
 Thomas,
Head
of
Research
at
The
Conversation
Group.

 Please
direct
enquiries
to
the
project
lead:

 Chris
Thomas;
Head
of
Research
@
The
Conversation
Group
 Email:
christhomas@theconversationgroup.com

 Phone:
+44
7970
665497

 Skype:
christhomasuk

 Copyright
 This
report
is
published
under
a
Creative
Commons
Attribution‐Share
Alike
3.0
 License.
The
terms
of
this
license
can
be
viewed
here:
 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by‐sa/3.0/us/.