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    • SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL BA (HONS) FILM AND VIDEO: THEORY AND PRACTICE SCIENCES 2009-2010
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 1 WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS Welcome and Introduction to UEL, Image Welcome to School of Humanities and Social Sciences Image Welcome to the New Media programmes Image Contacts: Programme Leaders: Dr Anat Pick and Dr Steven Eastwood: a.pick@uel.ac.uk eastwood@uel.ac.uk Important The information in this handbook maybe out of date and have changed. For the latest version please visit: www.uel.ac.uk/HSS/handbook 2 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film & Video: Theory and Practice Handbook: Contents About the School 4 General Enquiries 5 Enrolment 5 Programme and Module related enquiries 5 Student support 5 Student Enquiries Desk 6 General University Services 6 UEL direct 6 Equal opportunities 6 Introduction to Film & Video at UEL 7 Programme structure 8 Graduate opportunities 8 The Film & Video team 9 Useful contacts and web sites 9 Programme aims and outcomes 10 Programme duration and modes of study 10 Delivery, Employability, Skills curriculum 11 Programme specifications 11 Programme Structure 12 Brief Module descriptions 13 Understanding and selecting your modules 16 The modular system at UEL 18 Core and option modules, Levels 1-3 20-78 UEL programme operation and student registration 79 Enrolment 79 Induction 79 Teaching methods 80 Student practice 81 Assessment criteria and fairness 81-83 Essay writing guidelines 84-88 Grade performance tables and Benchmark criteria 89-94 Submitting coursework 95 Extenuating circumstances 96-99 Appeals against decisions 99 Notification of results 100 Reassessment and assessment offences 101 Feedback 101 Plagiarism and collusion 102-3 Programme management and Programme committee 104 Module Feedback 104 Student satisfaction 104 Student support: further information 105 Disabilities and dyslexia 105 English language support / The Writing Centre 105 The Student Union 106 Other resources 106 The Library 107 MultiMedia Production Centre (MPC) 107 Academic Appeals 108 3 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Complaints 108 Appendices 110-134 4 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 1.1 School of Humanities and Social Sciences: key roles and contact details1: Introduction School of Humanities & Social Sciences University of East London, 4-6 University Way London E16 2RD Welcome to the Film & Video Programmes Phone: 0208 223 7631 / 7641 / 7303 at the University of East London’s Docklands Fax: 020 8223 2898 campus. 0208 223 + ext: Student Enquiry Desk EB.G.04 Atrium This Programme Handbook is intended as a Sue Cohen s.cohen@uel.ac.uk 7641 ready source of information and advice as Anne Stowe a.l.stowe@uel.ac.uk 7631 you work towards completing your degree. Maya Davis maya.davis@uel.ac.uk 7303 This handbook provides key information about the school and contact details for Dean of School programme teaching team and other key Steve Trevillion s.p.trevillion@uel.ac.uk staff. Associate Deans of School The handbook provides programme Andrew Blake a.j.blake@uel.ac.uk information; describing the content of the Vacant Post modules, how they are taught and assessed. The handbook and its appendices provide SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 4241 detailed advice and information to help you Registrar Gary Smith gary.smith@uel.ac.uk make the most of the programme and of Quality & Compliance Manager : Vacant Post 2175 your studies as you work towards achieving Senior Administrator (QA) Caroline David c.david@uel.ac.uk 2155 your award. Senior Administrator (Collaborative) Diane Sharrier d.sharrier@uel.ac.uk UEL is committed to ensuring you have a rewarding academic experience here. We aim to provide an environment offering an Anthropology, Politics & International Development enjoyable, engaging and challenging higher (AI) 2784 education experience. This will, we hope, Field Leader: Lionel Sims l.d.sims@uel.ac.uk 2770 provide a platform for your future personal Administrator: Diane Ball d.m.ball@uel.ac.uk and career development. Cultural Studies & Creative Industries (CC) Across the range of its programmes, UEL Field Leader: Stephen Maddison S.Maddison@uel.ac.uk 6240 takes pride in providing excellent teaching, Administrators: Tracey Leader t.leader@uel.ac.uk 7454 nurtured by excellent research. Supporting Vacant Post these activities, we also promise our students clarity and consistency in the administration of programmes and high Media, Communications & Screen Studies (MS) levels of support and pastoral guidance Field Leader: Paul Gormley (MS) p.gormley@uel.ac.uk 2936 throughout the period of their studies. Administrators: John McDonald j.mcdonald@uel.ac.uk 2743 Vacant Post UEL is fully supportive of the Students’ Union and University’s Equal Opportunities Performing Arts (PA) policy. No student or member of staff Field Leader: Mark O’Thomas (PA) m.othomas@uel.ac.uk 7250 should be disadvantaged due to matters of Administrator: Vacant Post 2767 ‘race’, class, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation or disability, and that all members of the UEL community are entitled Social Work, Policy & Psychosocial Studies (PS) to be treated with courtesy according to Field Leader: David Jones (PS) d.jones@uel.ac.uk 2799 these consensual norms of mutual respect Administrators: Sylvie Hudson s.j.hudson@uel.ac.uk 2768 and understanding. Cheryl Wiley c.wiley@uel.ac.uk 6229 Sociology & Innovation Studies (IS) Field Leader: Penny Bernstock P.Bernstock@uel.ac.uk 2795 Administrator: Lucy Bore l.bore@uel.ac.uk 4257 Combined Honours Leader, Olive Stubbs o.m.stubbs@uel.ac.uk 6265 MPC Administration & Enquiries mpcadmin@uel.ac.uk 2680 1 (Please see Appendix I for current full staff list with full email, room and telephone details) 5 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Field Leaders Field Leaders are each responsible for the management of staff in the field, ensuring compliance with School policy and representing the interests of programmes and subject panels on the School Management Team. Field Leaders will not normally be in a position to deal with student problems directly. That duty lies with Module Leaders, Programme Leaders and/or Personal Tutors. Programme Leaders Programme Leaders coordinate the day-to-day business of programmes with responsibility for students on that programme. Programme Leaders enjoy the confidence of Field Leaders, assuming daily charge of programmes and student matters on behalf of the School. Programme Leaders naturally possess close knowledge of the programme aims and objectives and will have an intellectual commitment to and understanding of the subject. As such they are ideally placed to advise and officiate on day-to-day student matters and to represent the academic and collegial interests of the programme and subject panel on the HSS Programme Leaders’ Committee. Module Leaders If a problem arises in a particular module, e.g., you wish to change your seminar group or you would like further reading on one of the topics appearing in the module, you should consult the relevant Module Leader who is responsible for the overall operation of the module. In most cases, however, you may find it more convenient to approach your seminar tutor who will normally be prepared to answer queries on behalf of the Module Leader. Be sure to define your problem as precisely as possible to ensure that the guidance given will be as effective as possible. Personal Tutors Personal Tutors are members of academic staff trained to provide tailored academic advice and counsel. Meeting with their tutees at regular intervals, with the cooperation of students, personal tutors will keep up-to-date records through the course of their tutees’ studies and in compact with tutees, will track and ‘profile’ personal development and academic progress. If experiencing difficulties with your programme, students should discuss these problems with their Personal Tutor at the earliest opportunity. S/he will be able to give you advice about your programme and academic progress, including assistance in compiling a programme of study. Equally, if having personal problems that may be adversely affecting your studies, your personal tutor will be able to offer guidance as to how to best to address whatever the problem might be. Their advice may involve referring you to specialist sources of counsel and support, if appropriate. New students will be advised of the identity of their personal tutor at the commencement of the teaching period. A complete list of personal tutors is posted-up in the SED. Details are also on UEL Direct. 1.2 General Enquiries & Communications 1.2.1 IMPORTANT: Enrolment at University It is essential that you complete the process of enrolment on-line before (re)commencing your studies. If you fail to enrol as a UEL student, your Local Education Authority will not pay the fees due. Nor will you be eligible for a student loan or be able to receive an email account or Student Card, without which you will not be able to access key facilities, such as the Library. Where required, assistance with enrolment for new students will be available during Induction week. 6 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 1.2.2 Programme and module-related Enquiries Programme enquiries should be directed to either the Programme leader, or to your personal tutor. Enquiries about your work on individual modules should, in the first instance, be referred to your module leader or your seminar tutor. Student support in Humanities & Social Sciences Information and support are available from a variety of places and publications. Further general information may be found in, The Essential Guide to UEL. Enquiries about enrolment, fees, student loans, Access and Hardship funds, Learning Difficulties, Counselling (including immigration matters), Careers, Healthcare, Sports & Fitness, should be directed to the Student Information Centre (SIC) in the Student Services building. Other initial codes (AI, MS, PA etc.) refer to times/slots primarily set aside for students from programmes in other fields. Anthropology, Politics & International Development (AI) Cultural Studies & Creative Industries (CC) Media, Communications & Screen Studies (MS) Performing Arts (PA) Social Work, Policy & Psychosocial Studies (PS) Sociology & Innovation Studies (IS) Student Enquiries Desk Commonly the first point of contact for students making general enquiries about their studies, the Student Enquiry Desk (SED) is located on the Atrium by the blue stairwell in the East Building. SED staff will often be able to answer general enquiries on the spot about programme-related matters (module registration, change of pathways, handing-in assignments, making appointments with personal tutors or module leaders, etc.) or they may, depending on the nature of the enquiry, find it necessary to refer you onto the another department within the University. The specified functions and areas of responsibility of the Student Enquiry Desk are: • General enquiries, making appointments with academic staff • the handing-in and return of coursework assessment • source of surplus module guides • distribution of blank forms – module registration, pathway change form, etc.. Details of Room Bookings and timetabling of modules Opening Hours for the SED : 10.00 am – 4.00 pm during semester 10.00 am – 12.00 pm & 2.00– 4.00 pm during vacations General (University Services) Enquiries General enquiries should be directed to the Student Information Centre (SIC) in the Student Services building on the square on the Docklands campus. Student Services incorporates and handles enquiries relating to: enrolment status, careers, counselling (including immigration matters), healthcare, student finance and disability & dyslexia. The UELSU offices are also housed in the same location. 7 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 ONLINE COMMUNICATION WITH UEL: IMPORTANT - How to Use UEL Direct UEL Direct is used increasingly as the principal and preferred means of communicating with the student community.2 Details of Assessment deadlines, re-assessment requirements, and exam results are now all routinely published via UEL Direct. At present, you can use UEL Direct to: • check which modules you are registered for in student records (DELTA); • update your address details in DELTA; • view coursework and exam marks; • access re-assessment requirements; • access your e-mails; • link to other online services such as UEL+ and the Learning Support Services web pages. Accessing UEL Direct Using an internet browser (e.g., Microsoft Internet Explorer) follow these steps to access UEL Direct: • Go to the UEL home page: www.uel.ac.uk • Click on the 'UEL Direct link' - it is on the left of the screen. Enter your login ID (i.e. your full 7 digit student number prefixed by the letter 'u' e.g. u0123456). Enter your password. Your initial password is your date of birth in the form dd-mmm-yy (e.g., 01-apr-81 for 1st April 1981). Equal Opportunities UEL is fully supportive of the Students’ Union and University’s Equal Opportunities and anti-harassment policy, insisting that members of the student community ‘treat all staff and students in a polite and mature way.’ We will never accept prejudice, intolerance, aggression or violence. No student or member of staff should be disadvantaged due to matters of ‘race’, class, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation or disability. All members of the UEL community are entitled to be treated with courtesy according to these consensual norms of mutual respect and understanding. FILM AND VIDEO THEORY AND PRACTICE Programme Leaders Anat Pick EB. 2.19 7335 a.pick@uel.ac.uk Steven WB 1.14 2759 eastwood@uel.ac.uk Eastwood Enquiries Student Support Atrium DL x2502 studentsupport.ssmcs@uel.ac.uk Office The Film and Video: Theory and Practice programme presents an original interdisciplinary combination of film theory and practice. Students study cinema and film history, theory, analysis and film and video practice as it has emerged in different parts of the world in both the past and the present. They will have the scope to experiment with and reflect on the properties of different formats including digital imaging systems and more traditional 16mm film. These experiments and reflections will be guided by their studies just as their studies will be given a focused urgency by their projects. 2 8 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 In theory and through film and video practice, students will study the character and conditions of cinema and film, locating the significance of motion pictures in the long-view of their historical development. Examining how film form (including patterns of film narrative, visual style, thematic motifs) and genre (including popular fiction, documentary cinema, and film animation) have been adapted in a range of international contexts, Film & Video questions the universalist assumptions of traditional models of film history and theory. Film & Video: Theory & Practice offers students the opportunity to develop the craft skills of cinematic production by evolving and realising production projects where the aim, overall, is to acquire critical skills grounded in practical knowledge of the media of film and video. At the same time and in parallel with their practical studies, students will develop skills of textual analysis situated within the frame of a geopolitical understanding of cinema and film studies. The intellectual and formal fusion of Film & Video characterises the programme’s distinctive approach. Programme Structure – Single & Combined Honours Level 1 of the single honours programme provides a foundation of core concepts and the critical tool-kit for doing Film Studies as well as a grounding in film and video technique. On this basis, Level 2 core modules develop and deepen skills and knowledge of film analysis, production, history and theory. Around this core students choose from among a group of specialist studies, giving them the opportunity to follow up in greater detail areas of the course that are of particular importance to them. Level 3 of the programme is marked by the opportunity to complete an independent major research project in film history, film theory and studies, or in production mode. Film may also be studied in combination with another subject towards the award of a Combined Honours Degree where Film Studies occupies either two thirds of the degree (we call this a ‘major’ programme), one half (a ‘joint’), or one third (a ‘minor’). PRODUCTION MODULES ARE NOT PART OF A COMBINED ROUTE. Programme Aims & Learning Outcomes Aims: o To provide students with the knowledge of the content and character of cinema and film - institution and form; o To provide understanding of the main theories and methods of study currently constituting the field of film and cultural studies; o To introduce, develop and combine practical and critical skills in the technologies and techniques of film and video production; o To provide the opportunity to undertake work-based learning in the film or related culture industries within the frame of a ‘critical vocational’ understanding of industry practices - by which is meant, the activity and experience of a work placement is situated in the context of a grounded analytical awareness of the structures and organising logics of the cinematic medium; o to provide innovative, interdisciplinary studies that may enable students to become critical practitioners in the creative, knowledge-based economy. Upon completion of the Film & Video degree programme students should be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes: o detailed knowledge of film and cinema through applied use of an appropriate range of critical approaches to their studies; o critical skills in the study of film-texts and have developed complementary strategies for learning and personal development; o skills of expression and analysis, synthesis, evaluation and argument in assignments and in oral forms of expression; 9 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 o key production skills appropriate to their programme of study in analogue and digital-video film making processes (scripting, storyboarding, cinematography, editing, lighting, etc.), in addition to resource and time management; o the ability to work effectively, individually and in groups, to find information, pursue research, solve problems, manage projects. (For information, it should be noted that each of the above may of course be equally well-expressed in terms of an ‘employability’ agenda and as key transferable skills.) Graduate Opportunities Film & Video: Theory & Practice prepares students for many different parts of the contemporary job market. The student work placement module offers experience of the cinema and film industries in London and the programme will help students reflect on this experience in the light of their work on the degree and in terms of their own assessment of possible further directions they might wish to take upon leaving UEL. Such ‘employability’ skills will help those students interested in negotiating the complexities of this particular area of the contemporary media industries. Equally, these degree programmes will seek to offer, across the range of its modules, critical skills that can be used to gain admission to and insights on other related areas of the media and creative industries as well as developing the general ‘transferable’ skills associated with graduate level study. Our graduates have the skills to take up work in film, television, and the creative industries. Some of our Film & Video students go on to postgraduate degrees in film, and film schools. 10 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Academic Staff Haim Bresheeth (rm 3203 x2758) Head of Research and Professor of Cultural and Media Studies, film maker and author of numerous works on middle Eastern and world cinema. Teaches Documentary Cinema module. David Chapman (rm 3208 x7405) Video Film maker, lecturer in media production. Teaches on production strand of the Film & Video programme. Research interests include documentary practice in the digital age. Paul Dave (rm 2230 x7245) Joint programme leader. Teaches ‘primitive cinema’ and throughout the programme. Research interests include English film culture, film history and theory, documentary studies. Jill Daniels Teaches video production. Research interests include documentary and fiction. Steven Eastwood (WB 1.14 x2759). Programme Leader, video and filmmaker, senior lecturer. Research interests include experimental fiction, documentary, cinematic essay and artists' moving image. Paul Gormley (rm 2312 x2936). Teaching and research interests include relationships between film, identity and contemporary cultural theory. Modules include Urban Film: Race, Nation & the Cinematic. Yosefa Loshitzki (rm 2308 x2176) Professor of Film. Publications include The Radical Faces of Godard and Bertolucci and Spielberg's Holocaust: Critical Perspectives on Schindler's List. Jill Nelmes (rm 2309 x2259) Historian, critic of film, scriptwriter. Teaching and research interests include classical cinema, national cinemas, the processes of script writing. Anat Pick (EB.2.19 x 7335) Programme Leader, teaching throughout the Film & Video programme. Research interests include documentary cinema, Critical Theory, especially ethics, posthumanism, eco-critical approaches to cinema, and animals. Susannah Radstone (rm 2234 x2751) Teaching and research interests include Film and Memory, film historiography, psychoanalysis and film. Has published widely on these topics. Eyal Sivan (rm EB.2.32 xt 7696) Senior Lecture Media Studies. Filmmaker, producer and essayist. Valentina Vitali (rm EB 2.38 xt 3342) Senior Lecturer in Film Studies. Research includes Indian and Mexican cinemas, the action and fantasy film, national cinema, film as history and image-based work by women. Some useful film & video related web sites: www.vertigomagazine.co.uk www.shootingpeople.org www.lux.org.uk www.mandy.com www.shortfilms.org.uk www.film-philosophy.com www.explodingcinema.org www.filmlondon.org.uk www.filmwaves.co.uk www.riocinema.ndirect.co.uk www.secretcinema.co.uk www.richmix.org.uk www.bfi.org.uk www.thehorsehospital.com www.no-w-here.org.uk www.team-online.co.uk www.sohofilmlab.co.uk www.fourcornersfilm.co.uk www.widescreen-centre.co.uk www.vet.co.uk www.ubu.clc.wvu.edu www.animateprojects.org www.wallflowerpress.co.uk www.hi-beam.net www.artsadmin.co.uk 11 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film and Video Programme 2009-10 Pre- Combined Code Slot Title Requisi Excluded Single Major Joint Minor te LEVEL 1 Semester A MS1200 Th PM Introduction to Film Studies ♣ All other study skills core core option N/A modules MS1201 Mn Cinematics 1 core N/A option N/A PM MS1202 Tu PM Early and Silent Cinema, 1895-1929 Core core core core Semester B MS1203 Th PM Cinematics 2 core option option N/A MS1204 Fr PM Hollywood Cinema core option option core MS1402 Fr AM Media Meanings core option option N/A MS1406 Th PM Film Analysis N/A core core N/A LEVEL 2 Semester A MS2204 Th PM Film and Critical Theory 1 core core core core MS2201 Wd Screenwriting 1 option option option N/A PM MS2202 Cinematics 3: Projecting History core option option N/A MS2203 Tu AM Documentary Cinema option option option Option CC2501 Tu PM Understanding the Culture Industries N/A option option N/A ¶ Semester B CC2508 Fr PM Working in the Culture Industries All other core core option N/A employabilit * y modules MS2205 TH PM Film and Critical Theory 2 core MS2202 Tu PM Cinematics 4: Screen Visions MS1201 option N/A option N/A MS1203 MS2404 Wd Reading Film option core core core AM LEVEL 3 Semester A MS3000 Th AM Final Project/ Thesis Core MS3407 Th PM Film & Memory option MS3406 Tu PM Beyond Science Fiction option MS3202 Tu AM British Cinema option MS3203 Mon European Cinema: New Waves to Now option PM CC3101 TH AM On the Screen (Screenwriting) MS220 option 1 MS3404 Media Production 5 option Semester B MS3000 Final Project/ Thesis Core MS3205 Fri PM World Cinema option MS3204 Fri PM Asian* option MS3405 Tu PM Urban Film option * Options year by year. Check which options are running before registering. ♣ Study Skills module 12 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Understanding your degree Programme If you want to do well in your degree it is very useful to develop a close working knowledge of the contents, aims and structure of the programme you are studying. You are strongly encouraged to study the following pages carefully. This is helpful at the start of your course, especially during induction. Use the guide later on too, at the end of level 1 and when you register for your modules in the following year (level 2); and then as you approach the end of your studies, and select your final year modules. The information included here is detailed and accurate at time of printing, but should be treated as indicative and subject to change and alteration. We will, of course, advise when any such changes are introduced, and when information in this guide is superseded. Please be alert to such changes. It is your responsibility to keep up to date with information relevant to your programme. INTRODUCTION TO THE FILM AND VIDEO: THEORY AND PRACTICE PROGRAMME PROGRAMME STRUCTURE FOR SINGLE HONOURS AT A GLANCE Students take six modules in each level of their studies made up of a combination of compulsory (in bold) and optional modules Semester A Semester B LEVEL 1 MS1200 Introduction to Film Studies MS1402 Media Meaning MS1202 Early/Silent Cinema MS1204 Hollywood Cinema MS1201 Cinematics 1: Introduction MS1203 Cinematics 2: Narrative Experiments LEVEL 2 MS2204 Film & Critical Theory 1 MS2205 Film & Critical Theory 2 MS2203 Documentary Cinema CC2508 Working in the Cultural Industries MS2206 Cinematics 3: Projecting History MS2201 Screenwriting MS2405 Documenting the Self MS2202 Cinematics 4: Screen Visions LEVEL 3 MS3407 Film & Memory MS3405 Urban Film MS3406 Beyond Science-Fiction MS3204 Asian Cinema MS 3202 British Cinema MS3205 World Cinema MS3203 European Cinema MS3000 Project/Thesis double module MS3000 Project/Thesis double module MS3403 Media Production 5 CC3103 Screenwriting 2 N.B. Italicized modules are offered by other programmes. BA (Hons) Film and Video: Theory and Practice The programme presents an original interdisciplinary combination of film theory and practice. Students study cinema and film history, theory, and film & video production as it has emerged in different parts of the world in both the past and the present. They will have the scope to experiment with and reflect on the properties of different formats, including digital imaging systems and more traditional 16 mm film. We believe in the vital exchange between theory and production, treating production as theoretically engaged, and theory as a productive form of film practice. Students study the character and conditions of cinema and film, locating the significance of motion pictures in the long-view of their historical development. Film & Video questions the universalist assumptions of traditional models of film history and theory, examining how film form and genre (including popular fiction, documentary, and experimental film) have been adapted in a range of international contexts, 13 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film & Video: Theory & Practice offers students the opportunity to develop the craft skills of cinematic production by evolving and realising production projects. The aim, overall, is to acquire critical skills grounded in practical knowledge of the media of film & video. In parallel with their practical studies, students develop skills of textual analysis situated within the frame of a geopolitical understanding of cinema and film studies. About the Programme: Innovations We have introduced a number of innovative changes to the structure and content of the BA (Hons) film & video programme at UEL. Our motivation has been to offer students additional practical opportunities and to create practice-theory integrated modules. This new structure increases connectivity between module content across theory, production and history, and proposes several modules that actively merge these disciplines. A range of modules introduce students to the historical development of the cinema and the diversity of theoretical frameworks currently and historically applied to it, in order to advance understandings of the cinema as a political, psychological, phenomenological and aesthetic form. Film & Critical Theory I and II amongst other modules ground the student in the cinema lexicon, covering such areas as semiotics, identity politics and the deconstruction of the moving image. Concurrent production modules take students through the clear progression of Cinematics 1-4. These classes induct students into the various technical disciplines and conceptual approaches to moving image production then focus on experimenting with narrative forms, critiquing the way factual representations are made in the documentary, examining a range of avant-garde processes, and writing screenplays. A double module in level 3 offers students the choice to produce a written dissertation or to work on a research-intensive film/video production. Production: In terms of production, students now pass through the clear progression of the core modules Cinematics 1-3, with the options of Cinematics 4 or Screenwriting 1. Cinematics 1 is an introduction to the various technical disciplines and conceptual approaches to moving image production. Cinematics 2 allows students to experiment with narrative forms. Cinematics 3 encourages students to critique the way factual representations are made in the documentary, and to locate their practice both politically and historically. Cinematics 4 offers students the chance to experiment with moving image by examining a range of avant- garde processes and would be of particular interest to students wishing to develop their aesthetic, technical and conceptual skills. Screenwriting 1 is designed as an intensive writing workshop for students wishing to become writer/directors and who plan to work with narrative drama in their final year. Students are advised to consult the programmer leaders when deciding between Cinematics 4 and Screenwriting 1. MS3000, the level 3 double module final project (Semesters A and B) remains essentially the same, although there is greater emphasis on production structuring and research, and, most significantly, there is the proposed additional output of the cinematic essay, where students can opt to research and produce a dissertation in video (or film) form. Students have the option of taking the additional production module: Level 3, CC3103 Screenwriting 2 On the Screen, offered by CC. 14 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Brief Module Descriptors The below information provides a brief and indicative outline of each of the modules you will take on the programme. These brief module descriptors are designed to give you an overview of the aims and content of the module, as well as outlining the assessments you will need to take. More detailed module information is available from the module guide – issued when you begin the module, and in the formal module specification (typically included in the module guide). Time table and module leadership information is provisional, and may be subject to change. We will, of course notify you of any such changes as soon as we are able. Level One MS1200: Introduction to Film Studies This module offers an introduction to the understanding of the ‘language’ of cinema. By learning to analyse specific aspects of filmic narration, including elements of the mise en scène, cinematography, editing and sound, students will acquire the skills to examine how films present facts and events, ‘tell’ stories and, above all, shape the spectator’s attitudes, opinions and feelings about the objects and events given to be seen on the screen. MS1201 – Cinematics 1: an intro to the disciplines An introduction to the various technical disciplines, cultural practices and conceptual approaches applied in the production of moving images. A carousel system inducts students to digital video, digital sound and non- linear editing software. The unit establishes the film & video degree programme as uniquely located between cultural studies, the industry film school model of TV and Film production, and the art school system of negotiated studio practice. MS 1202 Early and Silent Cinema The module will provide an introduction to fundamental formal, historical and theoretical issues involved in the study of silent cinema from 1895-1930. We will be principally covering the following subjects: the ‘early cinema of attractions’ from 1895-1906; modernism and experimental film in the 1920s; American silent directors such as D.W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton; German cinema of the 1920s including the work of Fritz Lang and F.W. Murnau, and early Russian and Soviet Cinema, including the work of the Eisenstein and Pudovkin.. One of the central issues that the module will address is – what challenges does the writing of the history of a mass medium like the cinema present? MS1203 – Cinematics 2: Experiments with Narrative Recognising that a high proportion of students wish as filmmakers to tell fictional stories, this module enables students to work together in a production group on a researched and developed narrative project. The unit will increase critical thinking in terms of how narrative operates in the cinema. It encourages the students to experiment with the existing structures for screen storytelling. MS 1204 Hollywood Cinema This module examines the history, techniques and theories of the ‘classical’ Hollywood studio system as well as the development of that system from the post-war moment to the present. The module will consider the social, economic and technological development of Hollywood as well as its formal and stylistic features. We will also be looking at key critical concepts that have been developed in the context of the Hollywood studio system – including film ‘authorship’ and the notion of ‘genre’. MS1402 Media Meanings Students critically analyze media texts, using the range of ideological critiques that interpret the gender, race, and class specificity of media discourse and images, including Semiotics, Marxism and post-Marxism, Psychoanalysis and gender, Race representation and Postmodernism. Level Two 15 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 MS2206 – Cinematics 3: Projecting History This module has been specifically written to address factual production. It looks at issues of representation, identity, history and politics through the lens of producing authored documentary. The unit intends to encourage debate and discussion regarding the specific forms we value and require for the factual depiction of the ever changing world, with a view to stimulating opinions, ideas and personal expression within the student as filmmaker. MS2204 Critical Theory I This module aims to provide an examination of the central principles and methods of film and critical theory and it will seek to explore theoretical issues that are integrated as closely as possible with areas of student practice. Specifically it will seek to familiarise students with theorisations of the following issues: the relationship between film and ‘reality’ in silent and sound cinema; theorisations of the ‘essence’ of film and cinema; and psychoanalytic, semiotic, feminist and deconstructionist theorisations of the cinematic spectator and the film ‘text’. MS2203 Documentary Cinema This module looks at the history of documentary film cinema from 1895 to the present, covering key moments and movements in documentary, including “actualities,” City films of the 1920s, state-sponsored film of the 1930s; the British Documentary Movement; Free Cinema, docu-dramas; American documentary; Black-audio; Direct cinema and observational tradition. It examines issues of documentary “truth” and the relationship between fiction and nonfiction film. MS2404: Reading Film (combined studies) The aim of this module is to enable students to acquire an understanding of, and familiarity with some of the core question that have the shaped film theory and history during the last fifty years. Each of the twelve lectures explores different but connected ways in which film and cultural historians have sought to theorize a film’s relation to the specific historical (economic, social and political) context which generated the film and which the film, in turn, helped shaping. MS2205 Critical Theory II This module aims to develop the examination of the central principles and methods of film and critical theory studied in Film and Critical Theory 1. The module will seek to explore theoretical issues that are integrated as closely as possible with areas of their practice. It will seek to familiarise students with theorisations of the following issues: cognitivism and questions of ‘Grand’ theory: postmodernism/postmodernity and film, cultural theory approaches to film (including feminist film theory; ‘race’ and post-colonial theory, and queer theory); questions of cinematic affect and the body MS2202 – Cinematics 4: Screen Visions This optional module is a revised form of the previously run MS2202, concerning avant-garde film and video practices. It enables students to further develop their conceptual and aesthetic skills by studying avant- garde material practices, specifically, the use of 16mm film and digital video post-production, in line with current proliferation of film and of tape media in the gallery. MS 2201 Screenwriting 1 This module will provide the necessary skills required to produce two short fiction screenplays. It will examine screenwriting in a global, international sense and include discussion and analysis of art film, experimental film and screenplays from other national cinemas, such as Hong Kong, Iran and France. There will be some reference to the study of conventional narrative screenplays but a core part of the course will emphasise the potential for the short screenplay to break with filmic conventions and to develop the student’s own voice. Level Three MS3000 Thesis by dissertation or production Students devise, develop, plan and produce two appropriate, independent research projects, either as a written dissertation or using video and/or film. Under relevant subject-specialist supervision and through a 16 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 process of drafting & revision, students will be grounded in methods of study and conceptual formulation, as dictated by the scope and character of the research undertaken. MS3202 Contemporary British Cinema The module considers the development of the British film industry and culture since 1979. It seeks to provide a critical and contextual understanding of these changes along with an introduction to the principal academic debates and issues that have arisen in the field of contemporary British cinema. General topics will include: the connections between changing economic, institutional, political and social contexts and film practices since the late 1970s; shifting representations of nationality, 'race', class, gender and sexuality in specific genres and within institutional forms of British cinema. Areas that are examined in detail will include the ‘heritage’ film and art house cinema; documentary and experimental film and video; the 1980s workshop and film co-operative movement; 'style culture’, and contemporary romantic comedies. MS3203 European Cinema To trace major developments within European cinema concentrating first on the post WWII period, referring to Italian Neo-Realism and the French New Wave, and then to look at more contemporary cinemas from Spain and Germany, analysing them in the light of the earlier developments and in the contexts of their particular societies. Ultimately it will give an overview of movements particularly within Western European cinema. MS3205: Film Form in World Cinema This module offers the opportunity to engage with the historicity of a cinema’s aesthetics by exploring a range of national cinemas. Students will be encouraged to familiarise themselves with aspects of production, distribution and exhibition in different national film industries, and to relate those historically specific modes of operation to the generic categories and stylistic features of the film these industries produced at different times in their development. Students will also be expected to engage with the socio- cultural history of diverse geographical areas and to consider how the films examined relate to those broader contexts. MS3406 Film and Memory This module has three aims: to help students familiarize themselves with the growing number of contemporary films concerned with screening memory, including ‘home movies’ that commemorate and remember significant moments in life, contemporary history films, science fiction, and what is now being called ‘trauma cinema’. The second aim of the course is to familiarise students with the approaches used by film critics in their discussions of cinema and memory. The third aim is to employ film & video practice (specifically image and sound editing of existing video/found footage) as a tool for students to gain an applied knowledge of how the cinema produces archives and constructs memory sequences. Students will be provided with creative guidance in and critical feedback on the post-production of a short video. This third aim will provide students with a deeper understanding of the link between theory and practice, through a practice experience. MS 3405 Urban Film The course will explore the urban crime film and its geo-political implications by tracing the historical development of the genre and changes in U.S. national cultural identity, cinematic affect and the construction of the cinematic body. The unit will also present a history of the urban crime film conceived in terms of the mimetic relations between African American and white American culture. Key urban crime films including the classic gangster film, film noir, the blaxploitation film, the conspiracy film, the nostalgia crime film, the ‘hood film and the contemporary “new-brutality” film. MS3204 Transformations in Asian Cinema This module examines the transformations in Asian cinematic forms and genres in the context of modernity, nationalism, capitalism and globalization. It seeks to understand the relationship between film aesthetics 17 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 and the politics of gender, class and identity. Students will analyse specific Asian films using a range of global film theories. MS3206 Beyond Science Fiction: the Posthuman in Cinema This module draws on new and important areas of criticism: eco-criticism, environmentalism, and “animal studies,” to address a range of classical and non-traditional science fiction, fantasy, and horror films that deal with ideas about “humanity” and the non- or posthuman. 18 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Module title and code: Level: Module Leader: Day (MTWThF): Semester (A /B): Credits: Pre-requisite: Pre-cursor: Session (Am/Pm): Campus: DL Co-requisite: Excluded combinations: Main aim(s) of the module and indicative key topics/approaches: Assessment Information Assessment Type (e.g. essay / exam/ Word length/duration Weighting elements production/performance) 1 2 3 Brief indicative reading and other resources for the module Core: Recommended: Check the School Timetable for actual timetabled slot and the web address below for updates to the school handbook and module descriptions. Understanding and selecting the modules in your programme A module is a separate identifiable block of learning which is credit-rated, with credit allocated on the basis of 10 hours of study for each credit. Standard modules are 20 credits in size for undergraduate programmes (indicating 200 hours of student study) or 30 credits in size for postgraduate programmes (indicating 300 hours of student study). Pre-Requisite modules must be passed before a student can be registered on a module. Precursor modules must have been attempted (e.g. awaiting a resit.) before a student can be registered on a module. Excluded modules may not be taken in combination with a module that lists it as excluded. . Modules are usually 20 credits Please ensure you are selecting a module that is appropriate – at undergraduate level. Some i.e. a core or a suitable option module at the right level. Check modules are ‘double’, e.g. 40 against the programme grid above/ the programme A unique module level is specification. associated with each module. This is level 0, 1, 2, 3, or M (and P for placement modules), reflecting the level of The module Please check published timetable updates achievement expected in order to leader works with to times/dates. AM / PM pass (i.e. be awarded credit) in seminar tutors the module. and a teaching Modules Basic indicative are run topics and aims: See within module guides for semester more detailed A or B. 19 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 A module is a prerequisite module for another module if HSS modules a student must have passed are normally the prerequisite module (i.e. at Docklands been awarded credit) in order to study on the other module. A module is a precursor module for another module if a student must register on the precursor module (and Each component will remain registered for the contribute to a specified %age duration of that module) in of the overall module mark. order to study subsequently See assessment guidelines for on the other module. details on passing/failing components. An agreed maximum: word-length, duration A component of a module is or other measure of the ‘amount’ of assessment. a separate part of a module, as identified in the module specification. Your module assessments might be include a combination of Whole number marks are types of task: essays, exams, performance, production etc. Please check Module Guide. awarded for each component of a module. A Indicative only: A more useful and fuller guide to reading, online resources and other materials is provided via the module guide. 20 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 A basic outline to show the underlying structure of programme levels and components towards completion of your degree at UEL. Credits (accumu A programme leads to a university award. This degree programme requires students to pass a specified number and lated combination of modules. Please refer to the above grid to ensure you register for the correct modules. You should ensure you credits are familiar with the programme specification for your degree. Programmes are usually composed of two types of module: Core and Option modules. A core module for a programme is a module which a student must have passed (i.e. been awarded credit) in order to achieve the relevant named award. Core modules are indicated in the programme specification. An Option module for a programme is a module selected from a range of modules specified in the programme specification. University Wide Options – A maximum of 2 University wide options (40 credits) may be taken as part of a programme with only one University wide option (20 credits) taken per1 level. Module timetable slots are indicative and option modules may not be running Level 1 60 Semester A 60 Semester (120) B Re-enrol and register for appropriate modules – please refer to grid and to ensure you select appropriate modules for your level and programme 60 Level 2 (180) Semester A 60 Semester (240) B Re-enrol and register for appropriate modules – please refer to grid to ensure you select appropriate modules for your level and programme. Note: Progression to Level 3 study is conditional upon prior completion of all Level 1 core modules. Level 3 60 (300) Semester A 60 Semester (360) B Graduation 21 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Other module resources Module Guides are a valuable resource. They provide a weekbyweek breakdown of lecture and seminar topics, coursework requirements, and provide detailed primary and secondary reading lists. Typically, they also provide a comprehensive list of all the study materials you will require within the context of the module in question. Module Leaders normally distribute module guides in the first week of teaching. If you would like to see a copy of a particular Module Guide before registering for a module, contact its Module Leader and s/he may be able to provide you with one. The Module Guide provides the definitive statement on how the module is assessed in any given year. If there is any discrepancy between it and any other source, the statement of terms in the Module Guide shall prevail. Set Texts Where appropriate, modules provide a list of ‘set texts’ which students are expected to purchase. Most of these are available from the bookshop on the Docklands campus. You will also find them in the Docklands Library. Module Readers As well as ‘set texts’, modules will generally make extensive use of journal articles, book chapters and extracts that may not be available in multiple copies in the Library. In order to make these latter materials readily available to students, module leaders often compile Module Readers that may be purchased from the bookshop or made available electronically in UEL+ (check with your module leader). Photocopied materials related to the administration of modules (Module Guides, seminar exercises, essay questions and the like) will be distributed free of charge. 22 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 FILM & VIDEO MODULE SPECIFICATIONS Cinematics: Production 1 Module Title: Module Module Leader: Steven Eastwood Film & Video - Production 1 Code: MS 1201 Additional Tutors: Level: 1 Credit: 20 Pre-requisite: none Excluded Combination: Main Aim(s) of the Module: • To provide an overview of the many aspects of moving image working practices, including broadcast television, documentary, commercial Hollywood, artists’ moving image, as well as inter-disciplinarity between these terms. • To introduce students to the reciprocal relationship between practice and theory and develop conceptual and theoretical skills. • To induct students into a range of technical apparatus, including digital video, lighting for video, sound recording, final cut software and DVD authoring. • To develop collaborative skills from working in production groups. Main Topics of Study: This is an introductory module designed as a carousel of production techniques, inducting students into the technical aspects of digital video, sound recording, lighting for video, along with digitising and basic editing on final cut pro software, and DVD authoring. The class will also go over storyboarding, listing your shots and production planning. Weekly sessions will be divided into lectures and screenings, student led seminars, tutorial sessions and intensive practical workshops. Students will be placed in groups of 4-5 and required to conceive, plan and complete a video project of 3-5 minutes. This might be a diary film or slice of life documentary, a short narrative, a fictional sequence or scene from a larger project idea, or merely an experiment with the media you have been introduced to. In addition to this, students are to individually produce a sound piece of not more than 2 minutes that might be designed to work with the group video, or conceived as a stand-alone project. The emphasis is on gathering material and utilising the skills you have acquired. Assessment Criteria: • To develop and demonstrate competence in the use of digital video and sound recording, and video post-production software. • To demonstrate the ability to effectively plan and organise a group production and post- production project. • To indicate a critical, reflective and imaginative engagement with the medium of video in relation to its many cultural practices. • To indicate an understanding of your practice in relation to other relevant media forms and contexts of production and consumption. 23 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the Module By the completion of the module the student will be able to: Knowledge 1. Illustrate knowledge of moving image languages. Thinking skills 2. Critically assess theirs and others’ audio-visual work. 3. Critically research and plan production and post-production of a video project. Subject-based practical skills 4. Demonstrate technical competence in use of technologies and software appropriate to the scope and limits of the video project. 5. Show basic competences in digital video and sound recording, and in post-production equipment. 6. Execute a short video group project and made an individual sound project. Skills for life and work (general skills) 7. Effectively manage time, working relationships, and resources. 8. Work effectively and cooperatively in groups Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, screenings, seminar critique sessions, practical workshops, written assignments, independent learning/production, tailored skills provision and supervision. Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning Weighting: outcomes for the module: Project 1 Group video project (including production folder) 70% All Project 2 Individual sound project 30% 1,3, 4,5,7. Indicative Reading for this Module: Core Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus (2007). The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age (Plume). Cantine, John, Howard, Susan, Lewis, Brady (2000). Shot by Shot, A Practical Guide to Filmmaking, (Pittsburgh Filmmakers). Recommended Lapsley, Robert & Westlake, Michael (1988). Film Theory: An Introduction (Manchester University Press). 24 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Manovich, Lev (2000). The Language of Digital Media (MIT Press). Ohanian, Thomas A. (1996). Digital filmmaking: the changing art and craft of making motion pictures (Focal Press). Rush, Michael (1999). New Media in Late 20th-Century Art (Thames & Hudson). Indicative Activity Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): Student/Tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work etc) Contact Time: lectures, workshops, project supervision 36 hours Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ group work/portfolio/diary etc ) 164 hours independent research, planning and production total: 200 25 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 MS1203 Cinematics 2: Experiments in Narrative Module Title: Module Module Leader: Cinematics 2: Code: Steven Eastwood Experiments with narrative MS 1203 Additional Tutors: Level 1 Credit: 20 Pre-requisite: MS1201 Excluded Combination: Main Aim(s) of the Module: • To offer creative guidance and provide students with the necessary team skills and logistic skills for pre-production, production and post-production of a short video that experiments with narrative. • To enable students to demonstrate the ability to effectively plan and organize group video production projects. • To enable students to develop a critically reflective and an imaginative engagement with the moving image, showing the ability to experiment, play, and take risks in your ideas. Main Topics of Study: Participants in the module will come together in groups to devise a story outline where the emphasis is on experimenting with narrative structure. As a group you will then co-write a treatment and script, generate storyboards, a shot list and schedule, which you will then use to produce a 3-5 minute video project. The first assessment point is a project pitch based on detailed, individually assembled pre- production folders. The second assessment point is the screening of the completed short film made by your group. For the duration of the module, students will be placed in collaborative production groups of approximately 4-5. Your roles within the production groups will rotate and change between Director, Production manager, Sound Recordist and Lighting Camera Operator. Each weekly session will commonly begin with a lecture, followed by a seminar or workshop session, where students are given conceptual and technical guidance in their production groups. Class sessions will involve both playfully and rigorously dismantling existing production structures such as the screenplay, casting and rehearsing a script, creating mise-en-scène, adhering to principles of continuity and working to diegetic order during the edit. By unpacking these systems we will learn about how conventional and unconventional cinema stories are constructed. 26 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the Module By the completion of the module the student will be able to: Knowledge 1. Illustrate an understanding of feature film production skills and discourses, from narrative structures to editing conventions. Thinking skills 2. Critically assess their own and others’ audio-visual work. 3. Demonstrate imagination and creative capacity in the researching, planning, production and post- production of a video project: working within and against narrative film conventions. Subject-based practical skills 4. Produce a short video, indicating knowledge of cinematic languages, especially in terms of narrative structure. 5. Illustrate a range of comprehension, communication, presentation and teamwork skills through individual and collaborative work with other students. 6. Have intermediate competences in digital video and sound recording, and in post-production equipment. 7. Plan and execute a short video group project and effectively compile a detailed dossier of all pre- production text and image materials. Skills for life and work (general skills) 8. Effective time-management skills and resources management. 9. Work effectively and cooperatively in groups. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, screenings, seminar critique sessions, practical workshops, written assignments, independent learning/production, tailored skills provision and supervision. Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning Weighting: outcomes for the Unit: Project 1 Production Folder (incl. script, storyboards, schedule) 30% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ,7, 8 Project 2 Group video production 70% 1, 4, 5,6, 7, 8, 9. 27 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Indicative Reading for this module: Core Robert Lapsley and Michael Westlake (2006). Film Theory: An Introduction (Manchester UP). Bresson, R. (1987) Notes on the Cinematographer (Quartet Books). Hayward, S. (2006), Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts (Routledge). Recommended Mamet, David (1992). On Directing Film (Penguin). Ondaatje, M. (2004) The Conversations: Walter Murch and the Art of Editing Film (Knopf). Christopher Vogler (1992) The Writer's Journey (Michael Wiese Film Productions). Cantine J. (2000). Shot by Shot, A Practical Guide to Filmmaking (Pittsburgh Filmmakers). Suggested Viewing Sherlock Jnr (Keaton 1924) Vertigo (Hitchcock 1958) La jetee (Marker 1962) Don’t Look Now (Roeg 1973) Visions of Light (Glassman, McCarthy, Samuels 1992) Tokyo Story (Ozu) The Idiots (Lars Von Trier) Memento (Christopher Nolan) Orlando (Sally Potter) Me/We/Okay/Gray (Eija Liisa Ahtila 1993) Lost Highway (Lynch 1996) Punch Drunk Love (PT Anderson 2003) Hidden (Haneke 2005) Indicative Activity Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 28 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Student/Tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work etc) Contact Time: 36 hours Lectures, workshops, project supervision Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ group work/portfolio/diary etc ) 164 hours independent research, planning and production Total: 200 29 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Introduction to Film Studies Module Title: Module Code: MS1200 Module Leader: Valentina Vitali Introduction to Film Studies Level: 1 Credit: 20 Last Updated: April 2008 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: N/A Pre-cursor: Co-requisite: MS1202, MS1201, MS1204, Excluded combinations: MS1402 MS1203 Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? Yes University-wide option: No (study skills module) Location of delivery: UEL Docklands Campus Main aim(s) of the module: - To introduce and develop the understanding of film aesthetics - To develop tools of film analysis - To introduce theoretical frameworks for the critical understanding of film-making techniques - To develop study skills Main topics of study: - Forms of film narration, including notions of the shot and other elements of the mise en scène, of continuity editing and of the relation between image and sound; - Learning skills for academic study, including engagement with selected literature, bibliographic skills, essay structuring and writing. Learning Outcomes for the module At the end of the module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate knowledge of key formal concepts of filmmaking and film narration. 2. Demonstrate knowledge of key techniques of film analysis. Thinking skills 3. Evaluate critically central aspects of film-making through the close analysis of different types of films. 4. Recognise the relationship between specific film techniques and the production of meaning in cinema. 5. Engage and evaluate critically sources of information on filmmaking and theory. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 30 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 6. Précis, paraphrase, reference and quote correctly from selected literature. 7. Plan for and produce specific types of assessment. 9. Access effectively the resources available in the LRC. 10. Illustrate competence in the retrieval, evaluation and processing of information from a broad range of academic sources. 11. Produce the type of written work appropriate to the programme. 12. Reference sources properly in a written academic essay. 13. Write a Personal Development Plan. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures Small group seminar discussions Individual/paired tutorial work Screenings Independent study using learning materials Personal Development Planning (through Workbook) Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate Weighting: Learning the learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated CW1: Film analysis (800 words) 40% 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11. CW2: Essay (1200 words) 40% 1-12. CW3: Guided Study Skills Workbook: Typically including: lecture and reading notes, film-viewing notes, seminar preparation, research and coursework planning. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 20% 11, 13. Reading and resources for the module: Core Bordwell, D. and Thompson, K. (1996) Film Art: An Introduction London: McGraw Hill. Cook, P. and Bernink, M. (eds.) (1999) The Cinema Book 2nd Edition. London: BFI Cotterell, S, Study Skills, 4th Ed, (Pergammon, 2004) Hill, J. and Church Gibson, P. (eds.) (1998) The Oxford Guide to Film Studies Oxford: OUP. Nowell-Smith, G. (ed.), (1996) The Oxford Guide to World Cinema Oxford: OUP. Recommended Aumont, J. et al. (1992). Aesthetics of Film. Transl. by R. Neupert. Austin: University of Texas Press. Hayward, S. (ed.) (1996). Key Concepts in Cinema Studies. London and New York: Routledge. Indicative Activity learning and Contact teaching time Independent and group study 31 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 (10 hrs per Preparing for assessment credit): 1. Student/tutor interaction: 2 hour whole group + 2 hour workshop per week 48 hours Tutor groups on 4 occasions 2. Student learning time: Heavily activity based either group work or work book activities to bring to The balance of: workshops for peer review and preparation for assessment 128 hours to include assessment Total hours 200 32 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Media Meanings Module Title: Module Code: Module Leader: MS1402 Media Meanings Level: 1 Dr Terri Senft Credit: 20 Last Updated: ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: N/A Pre-cursor: Rise of the Mass Media (for Media Studies Students only). Co-requisite: Excluded combinations : Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? University-wide option: Yes/No (please delete as Yes/No (please delete as appropriate) No appropriate) Yes Location of delivery: UEL/Other (please delete as appropriate) If ‘Other’ please insert location here: UEL, Docklands Main aim(s) of the module: Introduction of key theoretical texts in semiotics and cultural theory. The module covers a range of approaches to, mainly, visual media, and examines central concepts in media, film, and cultural theory. Main topics of study: Semiotics (Saussure; Barthes) Marxism and post-Marxism Psychoanalysis and gender Race representation Postmodernism Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete any headings that are not relevant. You should number the LOs sequentially to enable mapping of assessment tasks. At the end of this module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Show an understanding of key concepts in semiotic theory. 2. Illustrate knowledge of key theorists in cultural theory. 3. Apply semiotics and cultural theory to examples of visual media. 4. Identify and apply the concepts of race, gender, and class in the context of media examples and cultural discourse. Thinking skills 5. Critically analyze media texts, using the range of ideological critiques that interpret the gender, race, and class specificity of media discourse and images. Subject-based practical skills 33 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Skills for life and work (general skills) 6. Essay writing skills: developing an argument; structuring an essay; using critical tools to interpret and analyze particular case studies; using theorist and critics to formulate and support a written argument. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, seminars, one-to-one tutorials. Lectures and seminars alike make use of media examples. Lectures regularly integrate clips and visual images to illustrate the theory. Seminars includes discussions, group work, and exercises. Courseworks are returned individually, and include a one-to-one feedback session with each student. Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the Weighting: Learning learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated CW1: Semiotic textual analysis of a media image (1,200 words) 30% 1-3, 6 CW2: Essay (2000 words) 70% All 34 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Reading and resources for the module: These must be up to date and presented in correct Harvard format unless a Professional Body specifically requires a different format Core Stuart Hall. Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices (London: Sage, 1997). Images: A Reader. Sunil Manghani, Arthur Piper And John Simons, eds. (London: Sage, 2006) Tolson, Andrew. Mediations: Text and Discourse in Media Studies (London: Arnold, 1996). Media and Cultural Theory. James Curran and David Morley, eds. (London: Routledge, 2006). Recommended Barry, Peter. Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. (Manchester: Manchester UP, 2002). Branston, Gill and Stafford, Roy. The Media Student’s Book. (London: Routledge, 1996) Marris, Paul & Sue Thornham, eds. Media Studies: A Reader. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1999). Strinati, Dominic. An Introduction to the Theories of Popular Culture. (London: Routledge, 1995). Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online interaction, some discussions, online chat etc): of which may be online: Lectures: 18 hours (1.5 hours per lecture, 12 weeks) Seminars: 12 hours. 40 Tutorials: 10 2. Student Activity (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary, studio work etc): Seminar reading Background reading Assignment preparation 160 Total: 200 Total hours (1 200 and 2): 35 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film & Critical Theory 1 Module Title: Module Code: MS2204 Module Leader: Paul Dave Film and Critical Theory 1 Level: 2 Date Modified: April 2008 Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: MS1406; MS1402 Pre-cursor: Co-requisite: Excluded combinations (e.g. skills modules): Skills module: No University-wide option: No Location of delivery: UEL Main aim(s) of the module: This module aims to provide an examination of the central principles and methods of film and critical theory and it will seek to explore theoretical issues that are integrated as closely as possible with areas of student practice. Specifically it will seek to familiarise students with theorisations of the following issues: the relationship between film and ‘reality’ in silent and sound cinema; theorisations of the ‘essence’ of film and cinema; and psychoanalytic, semiotic, feminist and deconstructionist theorisations of the cinematic spectator and the film ‘text’. Main topics of study: The module examines the application of key theoretical traditions on a range of film texts and different models of the cinema. These theoretical traditions include references to the work of Freud, Saussure, Peirce, Volosinov, Althusser, Barthes, Lacan. Specific film theorists covered will include: Munsterberg, Balazs, Epstein, Kracauer, Bazin, Arnheim, Eisenstein, Wollen, Metz, Baudry, Mulvey and McCabe. 36 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete the headings that are not relevant. You should number the Los sequentially. At the end of this Module, students will: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate knowledge of different theoretical approaches to the institutions of cinema. 2. Demonstrate knowledge of different theoretical approaches to textual forms of film production. Thinking skills 3. Critically analyze key premises of different theoretical concepts and the possibilities such concepts offer for the analysis of different forms of film and cinema. 4. Analyse in detail different film texts using selected critical theories. 5. Analytically assess and evaluate selected critical theories across a range of films in order to identify issues related to ideology, subjectivity and representation. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 6. Research and present complex ideas in the form of persuasively argued written texts. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lecture exposition of theory. Seminar discussion based on detailed analyses of a range of film texts. Tutorials. Screenings both in lectures and in seminars to familiarise students with the application of theory to specific examples Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes Weighting: for the module: 1 essay (2,500 words) 60% 2-6 2 project (1,500 words or equivalent) 40% 1-5 37 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Reading and resources for the module: Core Braudy, Leo and Cohen, Marshall, Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings, (Oxford, 1999) Hayward, S, Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts, (London, 2006) R.Stam, Film Theory: An Introduction, (Oxford, 2000). R. Stam and T. Miller, (eds), Film Theory: An Anthology (Oxford, 2000). Recommended Roland Barthes, Image-Music-Text, New York, ( London, 1977). Bazin, What is Cinema ? Vols 1 and 2 (Berkley, 1967). Bignell, J, Media Semiotics; An Introduction, (Manchester, 2002). Carroll, Noel, Philosophical Problems of Classical Film Theory, (Princeton, 1988). Casetti, Francesco, Theories of Cinema 1945-1990, (Austin, 1999). Dudley, Andrew, Concepts in Film Theory, (New York, 1984) Easthope, A, Contemporary Film Theory, (London, 1993) Elsaesser, T and Buckland W, Studying Contemporary American Film: A Guide to Film Analysis, (London, 2002). Kracauer, Theory of Film, (Princeton, 1997). Lapsley, R and Westlake, M, Film Theory: An Introduction, (Manchester, 1988) Metz, C, Psychoanalysis and Cinema, (London, 1982). Mulvey, L, Visual and Other Pleasures, (Bloomington, 1989) Rose, Gillian, Visual Methodologies, (London, 2001). Silverman, K, The Subject of Semiotics, (New York, 1983) Stam, Robert et al, New Vocabularies in Film Semiotics: Structuralism, Post Structuralism and Beyond, (London, 1992). Thornham, Sue, Passionate Detachments: An Introduction to Feminist Film Theory, (London, 1997) Tredell, N, Cinemas of the Mind (Cambridge, 2002) Wollen, Peter, Signs and Meanings in the Cinema, (London, 1997). Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online contact time: discussions, online chat etc) 20 hrs lecture/workshops 10 seminars, tutorials 20 screenings 38 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 2. Student Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary etc) 150 hrs Independent Study Total hours (1 and 2): 200 Cinematics 3: Projecting History Module Title: Module Module Leader: Eyal Sivan Cinematics 3: Projecting History Code: Valentina Vitali MS 2206 Level 1 Additional Tutors: Credit: 20 Pre-requisite: MS1201; MS1203 Excluded Combination: Main Aim(s) of the Module: • To equip students through a practice experience with a deep understanding of the link between theory and practice. • To acquire a historically based understanding of the media they chose to work with; • To enable students to acquire a critical awareness of the political, ideological dimensions of Documentary film, video and digital media’s technologies and aesthetics. • To offer creative guidance and provide students with the necessary team skills and logistic skills for pre-production, production and post-production of a short documentary video. And to enable students to demonstrate the ability to effectively plan and organize group video production projects. • To enable students to develop a critical, theoretically informed approach to Documentary film, and to develop an imaginative engagement with the moving image, showing the ability to experiment with in the documentary genres. • To enable students to acquire an advanced understanding of the aesthetics of a range of visual media as rooted in, and as expressions of economic, social and political dynamics that are historically and geographically specific; 39 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Main Topics of Study: Questions of perception, representation, technology and modes of address (mise en scène); Notions of history and of historiography; Documentary Cinema, fiction and other visual media as historical documents; Notions and modes of perception and representation, as well as the range of technologies available to cinema, video and digital media, which are here revisited and discussed with the aim of foregrounding their emergence and development within a long-term historical context; Industrialisation of culture, notions of the public sphere, and cinema as a dimension of the public sphere; visual perspective and other visual regimes; questions of narration; The above mentioned topics will be the base for collaborative productions. Participants in the module will come together in groups to devise a story outline, conduct the research, co-write a treatment, and develop a script and a production folder which will then use to produce a 5-7 minute video project. Each weekly session will commonly begin with a lecture, followed by a seminar or workshop session, where students are given conceptual and technical guidance in their production groups. Learning Outcomes for the Module By the completion of the module the student will able to: Knowledge ١. Apply theoretical knowledge in the production of a short Video film. ٢. Demonstrate advanced knowledge of the history of specific modes of filmmaking, aesthetics and technology. ٣. Critically examine central debates on issues of perception, representation and ideology of the image. Thinking skills 4. Deploy analytical skills to raise and address questions about the relationship between forms of filmmaking, social formations and social action. 5. Analyze and evaluate a range of cinematic traditions and their own practical work. 6. Demonstrated imagination and creative capacity in the researching, planning, production and post- production of a video project. Subject-based practical skills 7. Demonstrate technical competence in use of technologies and software appropriate to the scope and limits of the video project. 8. Apply intermediate competences in digital video and sound recording, and in post-production equipment. 9. Execute a short video group project. Skills for life and work (general skills) 10. Formulate advanced levels of critical engagement orally and in writing. 11. Group work skills, time and resource management. 40 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, screenings, seminars, practical workshops, tutorials, Commented group screenings, presentations. Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning Weighting: outcomes for the Unit: CW1 Critical approach, Script, Treatment (2000 words) 50% 1-6, 10. CW2 Group video production and Production Folder 50% All Reading and resources for the module: Core: Aumont, Jacques (1994) The Image, London: British Film Institute. Anderson, Perry (1974) Lineages of the Absolutist State, London: NLR. Benjamin, Walter (1969) Illuminations, New York: Schocken Books. Recommended Buck-Morss, Susan (1992) ‘Aesthetics and Anaesthetics: Walter Benjamin’s Artwork Essay Reconsidered’, October 62. Bürger, Peter (1994) Theory of the Avant-Garde, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Barnouw, E, [1974] Documentary – a history of the non fiction film. Oxford University Press Bruzzi, Stella [2000] New Documentary - A Critical Introduction, London: Routledge. Casetti, Francesco (1999) Theories of Cinema 1945-1995, Austin: University of Texas Press. Crary, Jonathan (1990) Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Ninenteenth Century, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. Damisch, Hubert (1994) The Origin of Perspective. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. Ferro, Marc (1988) Cinema and History, Detroit: Wayne State University Press. Gains J & Renov M [1999] Collecting visible Evidence: University of Minnesota Press Hansen, Miriam (1983) ‘Early Silent Cinema: Whose Public Sphere?’, New German Critique 29, pp. 14-84. Hohendahl, Peter Uwe (1995) ‘Recasting the Public Sphere’, October 73, pp. 27-54. Iampolski, Mikhail (1998) The Memory of Tiresias: Intertextuality and Film, Berkeley and London: University of California Press. Izod, K & Kilborn, J, [1997] An Introduction to the Television Documentary, Jakobson, Roman (1988) ‘Linguistics and Poetics’, in David Lodge (ed.), Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader, London: Longman. Jameson, Frederic and Miyoshi, Masao (eds) (1998) The Cultures of Globalization. Durham and London: Duke University Press. Jay, Martin (1993) ‘Scopic Regimes of Modernity.’ in Forcefields: Between Intellectual History and Cultural Critique. New York and London: Routledge. Kochberg Searle [2002] Introduction to Documentary Production: Kochberg Winston, Landy, M, [2001] The Historical Film, History and Memory, Athlone Press Manchester Press Lovell, A & Hillier, J, 1972, Studies in Documentary, Secker/Warburg/BFI McDonald K. and Cousins N (eds) [1996] Imagining Reality, Faber and Faber Nichols, B, [1991] Representing Reality: issues and concepts, Indiana documentary, Faber and Faber 41 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Ohmann, Richard (1996) Selling Culture: Magazines, Markets and Class at the Turn of the Century, London and New York: Verso. Rabiger, Michael [1992] Directing the Documentary Focal Press Renov, M, [1993] Theorizing Documentary, Routledge Rosen, Phililp (2001) Change Mummified: Cinema, Historicity, Theory, Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press. Rosenthal A. and Corner J. [2005] New Challenges for Documentary Manchester: Manchester UP Sorlin, Pierre (1980) The Film in History: Restaging the Past, Oxford: Basil Blackwell. Vaughan, D, [1999] For Documentary, University California Press Weis, Elisabeth and Belton, John (eds) (1985) Film Sound: Theory and Practice. New York: Columbia University Press. Willemen, Paul (1972) ‘On Realism in the Cinema’, Screen 13(1). Willemen, Paul (1995) ‘Regimes of Subjectivity and Looking’, UTS Journal 2. Winston Brian [1995] Claiming the Real, BFI Winston Brian [1998] Media Technology and Society, Routledge Winston Brian [2000] Lies, Damn Lies and Documentaries (Distributed for the British Film Institute) BFI Wollen, Peter (1998) Signs and Meaning in the Cinema, London: British Film Institute. Wollen, Peter (1980) ‘Introduction: Place in the Cinema’, Framework 13, p. 25. Indicative Activity Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): Student/Tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work etc) Contact Time: 36 hours lectures, workshops, project supervision Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ group work/portfolio/diary, studio work etc): 164 hours independent research, planning and production total: 200 Documentary Cinema Module Title: Module Code: Module Leader: MS2203 Documentary Cinema Level: 2 Dr Anat Pick Credit: 20 Last Updated: May 2008 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Film Analysis/ Introduction to Film Pre-cursor: Studies Co-requisite: Excluded combinations : Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? University-wide option: Yes/No (please delete as Yes/No (please delete as appropriate) No appropriate) Yes Location of delivery: UEL/Other (please delete as appropriate) If ‘Other’ please insert location here: UEL, Docklands 42 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Main aim(s) of the module: Introduction of the history of and key documentary films. Main debates around documentary cinema and theory. Main topics of study: History of documentary film cinema: 1895-present Key movements and moments in documentary cinema: “actualities,” City films of the 1920s, state- sponsored film of the 1930s; the British Documentary Movement; Free Cinema, docu-dramas; American documentary; Black-audio; Direct cinema and observational tradition. First person documentary, new media docs, first person documentary and “domestic ethnography.” Documentary theory: Issues of “truth” and transparency (cinematic devices and strategies in the fiction/nonfiction film) Documentary as a social/political tool Documentary form: questions of ethics and aesthetics, narrative and formal strategies in nonfiction Ethnography and the “other” in film Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete any headings that are not relevant. You should number the LOs sequentially to enable mapping of assessment tasks. At the end of this module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the development of the documentary film genre. 2. Analyze the role of documentary cinema in its changing social, cultural, political and economic contexts. 3. Critically interrogate theories of documentary cinema. 4. Demonstrate knowledge of the main tendencies of documentary cinema to date, and the different mechanisms and conventions used by each of them. Thinking skills 5. State the advantages and limitations of the notion of “documentary” through an exploration of and comparison between the various documentary traditions, strategies, and philosophies. 6. Examine the ethical issues that documentary entails, both for its subjects or (“social actors”), and in terms of spectatorship. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 7. Academic research and writing skills. 43 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, seminars, screenings, one-to-one tutorials. Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the Weighting: Learning learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated 30% 1-4, 7 CW1: Critical Analysis (1200words) All CW2: Essay (2500 words) 70% Reading and resources for the module: These must be up to date and presented in correct Harvard format unless a Professional Body specifically requires a different format Core Bruzzi, Stella. New Documentary: a Critical introduction (Routledge, 2006). Cousins and Macdonald, eds. Imagining Reality (Faber, 1996). Grant, K. B. and Sloniowski, J. (eds) Documenting the Documentary: Close Readings of Documentary Film and Video. (Wayne State University Press, 1998). Recommended Beattie, Keith. Documentary Screens. (Palgrave, 2004). 44 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Gaines, J & Renov, M (eds) Collecting Visible Evidence. (Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 1999). Nichols, B. Representing Reality: Issues and Concepts in Documentary. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991). Renov, Michael. Theorizing the Documentary. (New York: Routledge, 1993). Rosenthal, A. New Challenges for Documentary. (Berkley: University of California Press, 1988). Rotha, Paul. Documentary Diary. (New York: Hill and Wang, 1974). Snyder, R L. Pare Lorentz and the Documentary Film. (London: University of Nevada Press, 1994). Sussex, E. The Rise and Fall of British Documentary: The Story of the Film Movement Founded by John Grierson. (Berkley: University of California Press, 1975). Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online interaction, some discussions, online chat etc): of which may be online: Lectures: 12 hours Screenings: 12 hours Seminars: 12 hours. Total contact time: 36 2. Student Activity (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary, studio work etc): Seminar reading 24hours Background reading 24hours Assignment preparation 100 hours 164 Total hours (1 200 and 2): Cinematics 4: Screen Visions Module Title: Module Code: MS2202 Module Leader: David Chapman Cinematics 4: Screen Visions Level: 2 Last Updated: May 2008 Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Cinematics 1,2,3 Pre-cursor: Co-requisite: Excluded combinations : 45 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? University-wide option: Yes/No (please delete as Yes/No (please delete as appropriate) No appropriate) No Location of delivery: UEL/Other (please delete as appropriate) If ‘Other’ please insert location here: UEL, Docklands Main aim(s) of the module: The aim of this module is to encourage students to experiment and develop a creative and critical approach to a range of audio-visual technologies. They will be asked to consider their own production work in relation to both historical and contemporary audio-visual experimentation. All students are expected to prepare their work to a professional standard for exhibition. This unit aims to build on the practical and conceptual skills relevant to moving image production gained in previous modules. Main topics of study: Working in a project team you are asked to originate, research and evolve a project proposal and production. This may involve working with either one or a number of audio-visual technologies, (i.e. digital and analogue video, 16mm and 8mm film, video graphic and animation software, mobile phone, etc). The project may also have a range of exhibition outcomes as appropriate, such as single-screen, multiple-screen, audio-visual installation or on-line site. The technological possibilities and formal qualities of both the media employed and the form of exhibition are to be critically considered in relation to the project’s content. The supporting lecture programme, screenings and seminars are designed to examine a wide range of experimental and critical moving image practices. This will include looking at the historical ‘avant-garde’ (i.e. Impressionism, surrealism, materialist and structuralist film); contemporary artist film and video practice and explorations of new media forms and platforms. We will also look at how many of these experimental approaches have been utilised in mainstream media forms, such as advertising, pop videos and feature films. We will also be considering in detail the role of sound and its interaction with the image, particular in relation to more experimental approaches to film and video work. 46 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete any headings that are not relevant. You should number the LOs sequentially to enable mapping of assessment tasks. At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Realise a script idea in moving image form, indicating knowledge of film language and cine literacy. Thinking skills 2. Show imaginative and critical capacity in the researching, planning, production and post-production of a moving image project. 3. Illustrate self-reflection on practice, recognising constraints as well as imaginative possibilities. Subject-based practical skills 4. Demonstrate technical competence in use of technologies and software appropriate to scope and limits of moving image project. Skills for life and work (general skills) 5. Effectively manage time and resources. 6. Work effectively and cooperatively in groups. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module is delivered in a primarily “laboratory” mode of teaching, lectures, workshops, tutorials, tailored skills provision and supervision. Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the Weighting: Learning learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated CW1: Group Production Project and planning documentation. 80% 1,2,3,4,5,6 CW2: Individual production piece (max duration 1min). 1,2,4,6 20% Reading and resources for the module: These must be up to date and presented in correct Harvard format unless a Professional Body specifically requires a different format Core Altman, Rick (ed) (1992) Sound Theory, Sound Practice, New York. Routledge. 1.2.1 Aumont, Jacques (1997) The Image, London BFI. 47 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 1.2.2 Chion, Michel (1990) Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen. New York: Columbia University Christie, I & Taylor, R.(1994) The Film Factory, London: Routledge Cox, C & Warmer, D (eds) (2004) Audio Cultures: Readings in Modern Music New York. Continuum. Recommended David Curtis (2006) A History of Artists' Film and Video in Britain, 1897-2004 London: Palgrave Knight, Julia (1996) Diverse Practices: a Critical reader on British Video Art. London. University of Luton Press. Le Grice, M (2001) Experimental Cinema in the Digital Age. London: BFI Manovich, Lev. ‘What is Digital Cinema’. P172-197 in The Language Of New Media Boston. MIT Press O’Pray, Michael (1996) The British Avant-Garde Film 1926 To 1995: An Anthology of Writings. London. University of Luton Press. Ray, Robert B. (2001) How a film theory got lost and other mysteries in cultural studies, University of Indiana Press Rees, A.L (1999) A History of Experimental Film and Video. London B.F.I Publications. Russell, Catherine (1999) Experimental Ethnography: The Work of Film in the Age of Video. Durham.Duke University Press. Shaviro, Steven (1993) The Cinematic Body. Minneapolis. University of Minnesota Press. Weis, E & Belton, J. (eds) (1985) Film Sound: Theory and Practice New York: Columbia University Press Youngblood, G (1970) Expanded Cinema. London. Studio Vista Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online interaction, some discussions, online chat etc): of which may be online: Total contact time: 36 48 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 2. Student Activity (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary, studio work etc): Independent and group research, and production work 164 Total hours (1 200 and 2): Screenwriting Module Title: Module Code: MS2201 Module Leader: Jill Nelmes Screenwriting Level: 2 Additional Tutors: TBC Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Last Updated: May 2006 Pre-requisite: Excluded Combination: Main Aim(s) of the Module: • To acquire practical knowledge n the skills and techniques of script writing for film and television – fiction and non fiction. • To develop critical understanding of the conventions and generic patterns of screenwriting. • To realise and instance this learning in the form of an indicative exercise in writing and analysing scripts. Main Topics of Study: This module will provide the necessary skills required to produce two short fiction screenplays. It will examine screenwriting in a global, international sense and include discussion and analysis of art film, experimental film and screenplays from other national cinemas, such as Hong Kong, Iran and France. There will be some reference to the study of conventional narrative screenplays but a core part of the course will emphasise the potential for the short screenplay to break with filmic conventions and to develop the student’s own voice. 49 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate understanding of the conceptual and technical basis of screenwriting. 2. Compare different forms and traditions of screenwriting. 3. Show ability to summarise the essential features of a script idea (treatment) in the form of a script proposal. Thinking skills 4. Analyse and apply theoretical understanding to cinematic practice. 5. Recognise how a script is laid out and why. Subject-based practical skills 6. Produce a script proposal. 7. Write a script. Skills for life and work (general skills) 8. Research and writing skills appropriate to the set tasks of the module. 9. Basic computer literacy and word processing skills. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: The module will consist of a series of lectures, workshops, table readings of students work, seminars and tutorials which aim to give the student a grounding in how to lay out a script, develop creative ideas, the ‘rules’ of scriptwriting and how to break those ‘rules’. Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning Weighting: outcomes for the Module: CW1 : A five minute screenplay (1,000-1500 words) 30% 1,4,5,7, 8,9 CW2 : A portfolio of work typically to include a short treatment in the form of a 70% All screenplay synopsis, a character breakdown, beat outline and a ten minute screenplay (2,000-2,500) 50 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Indicative Reading for this Module: Core Cowgill, L.C. (1993) Writing Short Films, Lone Eagle. Frensham, R. (1996) Screenwriting, Teach Yourself Books, Oxford UP. Recommended MacKee, R. (1997) Story, Methuen. Parker, P. (1998) The Art and Science of Screenwriting, Intellect Books. Phillips, W. H. (1990), Writing Short Scripts, Syracuse UP. Seger,L. (1987), Making a Good Script Great, Samuel French. Indicative Activity Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): Student/Tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work etc) Contact Time: 50 hrs Lectures, guest speakers, indicative viewing, workshops, seminars, tutorials. Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ group work/portfolio/diary etc ) 150 hrs Independent study and practice, assignment preparation, drafting and revision of scripts. Total: 200 Film & Critical Theory 2 Module Title: Module Code: MS2205 Module Leader: Paul Dave Film and Critical Theory 2 Level: 2 Credit: 20 Date Modified: May 2008 51 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: MS1402 Pre-cursor: Film and Critical Theory 1 Co-requisite: Excluded combinations (eg skills modules): Skills module: No University-wide option: No Location of delivery: UEL Main aim(s) of the module: This module aims to develop the examination of the central principles and methods of film and critical theory studied in Film and Critical Theory 1. The module will seek to explore theoretical issues that are integrated as closely as possible with areas of their practice. It will seek to familiarise students with theorisations of the following issues: cognitivism and questions of ‘Grand’ theory: postmodernism/postmodernity and film, cultural theory approaches to film (including feminist film theory; ‘race’ and post-colonial theory, and queer theory); questions of cinematic affect and the body Main topics of study: The module examines the application of key theoretical traditions on a range of film texts and different models of the cinema. These theoretical traditions include references to the work of Bordwell, Saussure, Peirce, Hall, Foucault, Lacan and Deleuze. Specific film theorists covered will include: Jameson Studlar; Massumi; Kennedy; Shaviro Modleksi, de Lauretis, and Clover 52 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete the headings that are not relevant. You should number the Los sequentially. At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate knowledge of different theoretical approaches within Film Studies, consolidating and developing the work carried out in Film and Critical Theory 1. 2. Illustrate knowledge of key theoretical issues concerning the interface between theory and practice. 3. Analyze specific film texts using selected critical theories. Thinking skills 4. Analyze the key premises of different theoretical concepts and the possibilities such concepts offer for the analysis of different forms of film and cinema. 5. Compare different theoretical approaches to film, learnt on this module and Film & Critical Theory 1. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 6. Research, compile and present complex ideas in the form of persuasively argued written texts, appropriate to this module. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lecture exposition of theory. Seminar discussion based on detailed analyses of a range of films. Tutorials. Screenings both in lectures and in seminars to familiarise students with the application of theory to specific examples Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes Weighting: for the module: 1 essay (2000 words) 50% All I essay (2000 words) 50% All 53 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Reading and resources for the module: Core Braudy, Leo and Cohen, Marshall, Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings, (Oxford, 1999) Hayward, S, Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts, (London, 2006) R. Stam and T. Miller, (eds), Film Theory: An Anthology (Oxford, 2000). Bordwell, David. Making Meaning: Inference and Rhetoric in the Interpretation of Cinema. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Gledhill, Christine & Williams, Linda (eds.) Reinventing Film Studies. Arnold, 2000. Recommended Fredric Jameson (1991) Postmodernism or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism Verso Steven Shaviro (1993) The Cinematic Body Minnesota Uni. Press Modleski, Tania. The Women Who Knew Too Much. Routledge, 1989 Gilles Deleuze (1986+1989) Cinema 1: The Movement-Image and Cinema 2 The Time-Image (Athlone) Walter Benjamin Illuminations Verso Metz, C, Psychoanalysis and Cinema, (London, 1982). Fredric Jameson, (1992) The Geo-Political Aesthetic, BFI Paul Gormley (2005) The New-Brutality Film: Race and Affect in Contemporary Hollywood Cinema (Intellect/Uni of Chicago) Carol Clover (1992) Men, Women and Chainsaws (BFI) Linda Williams (1991) Hard Core Uni of California Press Stecopoulos, Harry and Uebel, Michael. (eds). (1997) Race and the Subject of Masculinities. Duke University Press. Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online contact time: discussions, online chat etc) 20 hrs lecture/workshops 10 seminars, tutorials 20 screenings 50 2. Student Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary etc) 150 hrs Independent Study Total hours (1 and 2): 200 54 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 55 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 MS3000: Thesis project video/film production Module Title: Module Module Leader: MS3000 Code: MS 3000 Additional Tutors: Level 1 Credit: 40 Pre-requisite: Excluded Combination: MS1201, MS1203, MS2202 Main Aim(s) of the Module: • To devise, develop, plan and produce two appropriate, independent research projects using video and/or film. Under relevant subject-specialist supervision and through a process of drafting & revision, students will be grounded in methods of study and conceptual formulation, as dictated by the scope and character of the research undertaken. The form of the two projects is to be either fiction/experimental fiction, documentary, cinematic essay or artists’ moving image or a combination of these. • To introduce more complex and thorough forms of research methodology for production. • To encourage students to be critically active and reflective in the way their projects are conceived and executed. • To guide students through a comprehensive and precisely structured set of pre-production, production and post-production markers and deadlines. • To ensure that all projects are accompanied by a detailed production folder and press pack, so that they are reading for submission to festivals and other screening forums. Main Topics of Study: Following a review of the subject disciplines of fiction, experimental fiction, documentary, cinematic essay and artists’ moving image, a series of seminars and workshops will help students to identify a suitable object of inquiry, a pertinent theoretical framework, and a methodological approach. Students are to work individually for project 1 (due at the end of semester A) whilst concurrently collaborating in production groups of approx 4-5 on project 2 (due at the end of semester B). Individual productions for project 2 can be agreed by negotiation. Both projects require a detailed production folder. In semester A students will devise, develop and plan project 1 whilst working on the smaller scale solo project 2. Students will co-write scripts where necessary, or work from existing scripts produced in the second year. Production groups will conduct research, recces, equipment tests (film & video), casting and rehearsals where necessary, and draft a full production plan (including where applicable storyboards and a shooting schedule). The result of this period will be a formal pitching session at the end of semester A. One of the most important things to consider is planning your workload and production responsibilities properly. Assessment points, combined with intermittent work-in-progress and tutorial sessions throughout the year, will help you to target effort accordingly. In semester A, a series of lectures, workshops, seminars and screenings of key film & video texts will assist you in your preparations in terms of concept development and production management. In semester B the emphasis of lectures and seminars will concentrate on project completion. The production folder will comprise of: the final script; the actual production schedule; a synopsis; a 1000-1500 word production report; any additional research undertaken in semester B; tutorial reports; and finally, a production documentation: a press pack comprising of: full title, x2 stills, promotional statement (max 100 words), duration, format (original and for screening), full crew and cast lists, year of production. 56 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 MS3000 Cinematic essay option The cinematic essay is a long debated form which essentially makes use of the structures and systems at work in film and television (shooting style, suture, levels of narration, and so on) to make academic, polemical or poetic assertions rather than default to the narrative means adopted by the traditions of the documentary. In the place of articulating by way of the discourses of sobriety (working towards scientific fact), or producing character led stories from the lived world, the cinematic essay references a variety of sources to introduce complex ideas about how media operates, how arguments are formed, and how cultures produce meanings. Its form is often diary-like, or photo-based, or utilises appropriated or re-visited footage, and is gaining prominence through advances in digital technology and on-line dissemination. The module will give close reading to a number of the chief proponents of the cinema essay, including Agnes Varda Chris Marker, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, Chantal Ackerman, Yvonne Rainer, Werner Herzog, Harun Farocki, the Black audio film collective and Patrick Keillor. The module would be of particular interest to students wishing to more fully integrate theory and practice, and who may be considering postgraduate research by practice. Learning Outcomes for the Module By the completion of the module the student will have: Knowledge • appropriate competency in planning, development and production of thesis/project, with the construction and implementation of realistic research timetable. Thinking skills • identify and apply appropriate research methodologies independence of mind allied to ‘depth’ understanding of field/subject disciplined approach, within limits of field/subject • Frame a research topic Subject-based practical skills • To introduce students to an extended range of researching skills and facilities, necessary for the completion of the pre-production stage of either a major film, video or multimedia project – if taking production mode project. • To allow students the opportunity to creatively and critically devise, research and plan (to pre- production stage) a production project, which engages critically with existing genres/modes of production – if taking production mode project. • To extend a range of production skills needed for production – if taking production route • To introduce and develop a ranges of professional practice skill. • identify and apply appropriate research methodologies • To critically expand and explore upon specific theoretical concerns through a parallel practice and theory research mode of study. • close reading of film & video texts • appropriate historical contextualisation of selected object of study (case study) • critically reflect on ethical considerations of their chosen research topic. Skills for life and work (general skills) • accumulation, synthesis and critical reflection of salient data • investigation, formulation of argument/thesis • analysis, explanation through indicative illustration • demonstrate skills of ‘critical practitioner’ Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, screenings, seminar critique sessions, practical workshops, written assignments, independent learning/production, tailored skills provision and supervision. 57 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning Weighting: outcomes for the module: Project 1 Individual production (including folder) 30% Project 2 Group/individual production (including folder) 70% Indicative Reading for this module: As required/directed by nature and scope of project, but suggested titles include: Bordwell, David (1985) Narration in the Fiction Film, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison. Bresson, Robert (1975) Notes on the Cinematographer, Green Integer Publications, Los Angeles. Bruzzi, Stella (2000) New Documentary, A Critical Introduction, Routledge, London. Deleuze, Gilles (1989) Cinema 2: The Time-Image, Athlone Press, London. Doane, Mary Ann (2003) The Emergence of Cinematic Time: Modernity, Contingency, The Archive, Harvard University Press, USA. Frampton, Hollis (1983) Circles of Confusion: Film - Photography - Video, Texts 1968-1980, Visual Studies Workshop Press, USA. Grant, Barry Keith and Sloniowski, Jeanette (eds). Documenting the Documentary, Wayne State University Press, Detroit. Nichols, Bill (1991) Representing Reality: Issues and Concepts in Documentary, Indiana University Press, Indianapolis. Plantinga, Carl (1997) Rhetoric and Representation in the Nonfiction Film, Cambridge University Press, UK. Rodowick, D.N. (1997) Gilles Deleuze’s Time Machine, Duke University Press, USA. Shaw, Jeffrey and Weibel, Peter (eds.) (2003) Future Cinema, The Cinematic Imaginary After Film, MIT Press, Cambridge MA. Sobchack, Vivian (1992) The Address of the Eye: Phenomenology of Film Experience. Princeton Indicative Activity Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): Student/Tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work etc) Contact Time: 36 hours lectures, workshops, project supervision Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ group work/portfolio/diary etc ) 164 hours independent research, planning and production 58 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Teaching and Activity – self-directed production and related study – 200 hours Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 200 hours Student/Tutor Activity: (eg lectures/workshops,production etc) Contact Time: 36 hours Lectures /workshops/directed production 36 hours Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, workshop demonstration/applied exercises, tutorial support and supervisory guidance Beyond Science Fiction Module Title: Module Code: MS3206 Module Leader: Level: 3 Haim Bresheeth/Anat Pick Practice/Thesis Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Additional Tutors: Pre-requisite: none Excluded Combination: None Main Aim(s) of the Module: This Module is designed to involve students with the history and theory relevant to the development of the Science Fiction cinematic genre, and its negotiation of the human and the post human. Students come to know and analyse some of the key text of the genre, and learn about its use of the alien as a narrative carrier of the social other. The main aims are for students to develop the following skills: 1. The ability to identify historical and generic patterns of narrative, gender and other relationships within this cinema 2. The ability to examine the role and function of nature, landscape, animals and the nonhuman in cinema. 3. The ability to think critically and analyse cinematic texts as carriers of complex social structures, assumptions and messages. 4. The ability to analyse the placement of the viewer in this type of cinema, whether human, non- human or post-human positions are offered and negotiated. 5. The critical skills allowing the discernment of complex critiques enmeshed into the late iterations of the genre – post-humanist, environmental, nature Vs nurture, in order to be able to develop and discern a cinematic ‘eco-criticism’. 6. Ability to consider cinema’s construction of “otherness” in its various manifestations and repercussions. Main Topics of Study: The main topic of the Module is the representation and negotiation of the other in SF cinema, and the generic and conventional determinants of this type of representation. The identities of the other/s, social, sexual, political and cultural, will be investigated through a examination of the historical genre and its contemporary iterations; special attention will be given to the topics and tropes of birth Vs creation, the human Vs animal/alien/robot, and the gendered identities of the alien/animal in many of the iconic SF formative period films, as well as the later films. Through examining gender and its representations 59 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 across the genre, students are presented with a feminist reading of this cinema, and of the male panic encoded into its major texts. A close analysis of the formative period will establish the xenophobic and psychoanalytical layers of content within this cinema, and the interesting transformation it undergoes since 1980, when its inbuilt patriarchal and xenophobic tropes are metamorphosed into the hybrid genre we know today. Learning Outcomes for the Module: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate knowledge of key issues in the study of the sci-fi genre, and the representation of nature in cinema. 2. Demonstrate a grasp of the social, gendered and environmental critiques and apply them to cinematic texts. Thinking skills: 3. Critically examine key concepts in the study of science-fiction and the representation of humanity in film. Subject-specific practical skills General and life skills 4. Ability to work effectively in groups. 5.Research and essay writing skills. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, seminars, screenings, individual and group tutorials, and individual research and writing Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning Weighting: outcomes for the Module: Coursework 1 (CW1): Seminar paper of 500 words + class presentation 30% 1,2,3,4 Coursework 2 (CW2): A 2500 word essay 70% 1,2,3,4,5 Indicative Reading for this Module: Core: Burt, J. (2000), Animals in Film. Reaktion. Brereton, P. (2005) Hollywood Utopia: Ecology in Contemporary American Cinema. Intellect Books. Asimov, I. (1950). I, Robot; Fawcett Crest, Greenwich. 60 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Balsamo, A. “Reading Cyborgs Writing Feminism”; in Communication, Vol 10, # 3/4 (1988) pp 331-334 Bann, S (ed). (1994). Frankenstein: Creation and Monstrosity; Reaktion. Barr, M. (1993). Lost in Space: Probing Feminist Science Fiction and Beyond. University of North Carolina Press. Barr, M. (1987) Alien to Femininity: Speculative Fiction and Feminist Theory; New York, Greenwood Press. Baudrillard, J. (1983) Simulations; Semiotext(e) Verso. Recommended Ben-Tov, S. (1995). The Artificial Paradise: Science Fiction and American Reality; Ann Arbor, Mich. University of Michigan Press. Benjamin, W (1969). “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” Illuminations; Schocken. Bergstrom, J. “Androids and Androgyny” in Camera Obscura # 15 (1986) pp 37-64 Bleiler, E (ed) (1982). Science Fiction Writers Oxford. Booker, K (1994). The Dystopian Impulse in Modern Literature: Fiction as Social Criticism; Westport, Conn. Greenwood Press. Bruno, J. “Ramble City: Postmodernism and Blade Runner” in October # 41 (1987); pp 61-74 Burgess, M. (1992). Reference Guide to Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror; Englewood, Colo. Libraries Unlimited. Chevrier, Y. “Blade Runner: Or, The Sociology of Anticipation”; Science Fiction Studies, Vol 11 # 1 (1984) pp 50-60. Clarkeson, T. (1984). Science Fiction in America, 1870s-1930s; Westport, Conneticut 1984 Indicative Activity Teaching and Learning Time Student/Tutor Activity: (e.g. Pitching sessions, lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work Contact Time: etc) 12 x 3 hours taught sessions consisting of lectures, seminar, workshops, screenings 3 x 1 hour individual supervision in preparation for productions, written reports OR 36 dissertations. 12 x 3= 36 Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ etc ) 164 Students are expected to spend approximately 10 hours per week in private study and preparation for assessments. total: 200 61 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 World Cinema Module Title: Module Code: MS3205 Module Leader: Valentina Vitali World Cinema Level: 3 Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Date Modified: April 2008 Pre-requisite: Pre-cursor: Co-requisite: Excluded combinations : Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? No University-wide option: No Location of delivery: UEL - Docklands Campus Main aim(s) of the module: - to address questions of trans-national, regional, global, world and third cinema by exploring a range of national cinemas, their specificity as well as their inter-connections; - to examine the diverse aesthetics of a range of national cinemas by engaging with the economic, political and social contexts that shaped them; - to study the aspects of production, distribution and exhibition which characterize diverse national film industries; - to discuss the global circulation of films that have emerged within specific national formations; - to provide students with theoretical frameworks for an understanding of the relations between the industrial mode of operation of diverse national cinemas and the generic and stylistic features of the films produced within those specific cinematic traditions; Main topics of study: - concepts of national, trans-national, regional, world and third cinema; - Latin American Third Cinema movements, including Argentina, Cuba and Brazil; - Third Cinema and African cinemas; - Mexican films as Pan-American cinema; - Post-independence Hindi cinema; - Post-war Japanese cinema; - Japanese Cinema: from the emergence of independents to contemporary films; - Silent Shanghai cinema and the rise of a regional Pan-Asian film distribution network; - The European film festival circuit and the Hong Kong and Taiwanese New Waves. 62 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the module At the end of this module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Identify the economic and cultural factors determining the formation of individual national cinemas and their global circulation, if any; 2. Identify generic currents and formal characteristics within individual national cinemas; 3. Apply historical factors to aesthetics or generic patterns; 4. Discuss proficiently questions of national, trans-national, regional and world cinema. Thinking skills 5. Undertake film-historically pertinent analysis of films belonging to a broad range of national cinemas; 6. Evaluate different theories and apply them to the understanding of a broad range of films and other cultural practices; 7. Construct arguments concerning the diversity and range of films within global genres (such as action cinema or melodrama); 8. Critically evaluate the inter-relationship between films’ aesthetics and social, political and economic pressures. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 9. develop an interest in, and aspire to the acquisition of further knowledge of, world history and cultures; 10. cultivate an interest in cultural items that is autonomous from, and critical of, marketing pressures. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, seminars, reading, screenings, independent viewing, group discussion and tutorials. Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the Weighting: Learning learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated Essay 1 (2000 words) 50% 1 to 10 Essay 2 (2000 words) 50% 1 to 10 Reading and resources for the module: Core Barnouw, E. and Krishnaswamy, S. (1980), Indian Film, Revised edition, New York: Columbia University Press. Bernardet, J. C. (1985) ‘A New Actor: the State’ Framework 28, pp. 4-19. Nowell-Smith, G. (ed.) (1996) The Oxford History of World Cinema Oxford: OUP. Burch, N. (1979) To the Distant Observer: Form and Meaning in the Japanese Cinema London: Scholar Press. Chanan, M. (1985), The Cuban Image, London: BFI. 63 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Dennison, S and Hwee Lim, S. (eds) (29006) Remapping World Cinema: Identity, Culture and Politics London and New York: Wallflower. Recommended Chen, L. C. (2006) ‘Cinema, Dream, Existence’, New Left Review II 39 (May-June), pp. 79 103. Chu, T.-H., Hou, H.-H., Hsia, C.-J. and Tang, N. (2004) ‘Tensions in Taiwan’, New Left Review II 28 (July- August), pp. 19-42. Davis, D. W. (1996) Picturing Japaneseness: Monumental Style, National Identity, Japanese Film New York: Columbia University Press. Diawara, M. (1992) African Cinema: Politics and Culture, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Else R.P. Vieira (ed.) City of God in Several Voices Nottingham: Critical Cultural and Communications Press. Fanon, F. (1964) The Wretched of the Earth New York: Grove Press. Fanon, F. (1967) Black Skin, White Masks New York: Grove Press. Gabriel, T. (1982) ‘A Brief Overview’ and ‘The Theoretical Context’ in Third Cinema in the Third World: The Aesthetics of Liberation Ann Arbor: UMI Research; Epping: Bowker. Gadjigo, S., Faulkingham, R., Cassirer, T. and Sander, R. (1993) Ousmane Sembène: Dialogues with Critics and Writers Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. Hou, H.-H. (2003) ‘In Search of New Genres and Directions for Asian Cinemas’, Rouge 1 [available online at http://www.rouge.com.au/1/hou.html Johnson, R. and Stam, R. (eds) (1982) Brazilian Cinema Austin: University of Texas Press. Martin, M. (ed.) (1997) New Latin American Cinema: Studies of National Cinemas Detroit: Wayne State University Press. Mulvey, L. ‘The Carapace that Failed: Ousmane Sembène’s Xala’ in A. Kaplan (ed.) Feminism and Film Oxford: OUP. Nagib, L. (ed.) (2003) The New Brazilian Cinema London: I.B.Tauris. Ollman, Bertell (2001), ‘The Emperor and the Yakuza’, New Left Review II 8, pp. 73-98. Oshima, N. (1994) One Hundred Years of Japanese Cinema. [videorecording] Pfaff, F. (1984) The Cinema of Ousmane Sembène: A Pioneer of African Film Westport and London: Greenwood Press. Pines, J. and Willemen, P. (eds) (1989) Questions of Third Cinema London: BFI. Prasad, M. M. (1993), ‘Cinema and the Desire for Modernity’, Journal of Arts and Ideas 25-26, pp. 71-6. Reynaud, B. (2002) A City of Sadness London: BFI. Shaka, F. O. (2004), Modernity and the African Cinema: A Study in Colonialist Discourse, Postcoloniality and Modern African Identities. Trenton NJ: Africa World Press. 64 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Solanas, F. and Getino, O. (1997) ‘Towards a Third Cinema’ in M. Martin (ed.) Latin American Cinema: Theories, Practices and Transcontinental Articulations. Detroit: Wayne State University Press. Givanni, J. (ed.) (2000) Symbolic Narratives / African Cinema: Audiences, Theory and the Moving Image, London: BFI. Teo, Stephen (1997) Hong Kong Cinema: the Extra Dimension London: BFI. Ukadike, N. F. ‘African Cinema’ in J. Hill and P. Church Gibson (eds) (1998) The Oxford Guide to Film Studies Oxford: OUP, pp. 569-76. Ukadike, N.F. (1994) Black African Cinema Berkeley: University of California Press. Vitali, V. (2004) ‘Nationalist Hindi Cinema: Questions of Film Analysis and Historiography’ Kinema 22 (Fall), pp. 63-82. Vitali, Valentina (2008) Hindi Action Cinema: Industries, Narratives, Bodies Delhi : OUP. Vitali, V. and Willemen, P. (eds) (2006) Theorising National Cinema London: BFI. Willemen, P. (ed.) (1985) Special Issue Brazil – Post Cinema Novo, Framework 28. Willemen, P. and Gandhy, B. (eds) (1982), Indian Cinema, London: BFI. Xavier, I. (1997) Allegories of Underdevelopment: Aesthetics and Politics in Modern Brazilian Cinema Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Yip, J. (2004) Envisioning Taiwan: Fiction, Cinema, and the nation in the Cultural Imaginary Durham and London: Duke University Press. Yueh-yu Yeh, E. and William Davis, D. (2005) Taiwan Film Directors: A Treasure Island New York: Columbia University Press. Zhang, Y. (2004) Chinese National Cinema London and New York: Routledge. Recommeded Viewing: Aar Paar / Here or There (Guru Dutt, India, 1954, Hindi) Amores perros / Love’s a Bitch (Alejandro González Iñárritu, 2000, Mexico) Antonio das Mortes (Glauber Rocha, Brazil, 1969) Bakushu / Early Summer (Yasujiru Ozu, Japan, 1951) Bangiku / Late Chrysanthemums (Mikio Naruse, Japan, 1954) Banshun / Late Spring (Yasujiru Ozu, Japan,1949) Beiqing Chengshi / City of Sadness (Hou Hsiao-hsien, Taiwan, 1989) Borom Sarret (Ousmane Sembène, Senegal, 1966) Certificat d’indigence (Moussa Bathily, Senegal, 1981) Cidade de Deus / City of God (Fernando Meirelles, Brazil, 2003) Dead or Alive (Takashi Miike, Japan 1999) Denko (Mohamed Camara, Guinea, 1993) Deus e o diabo na terra do sol / Black God White Devil (Glauber Rocha, Brazil, 1963) Die Bian / Butterfly Murders (Tsui Hark, Hong Kong, 1979) [screened in class] Fengkuei-lai-te jen / The Boys of Fengkuei (Hou Hsiao-hsien, Taiwan, 1983) Fresa y chocolate / Strawberry and Chocolate (Tomás Guitiérrez Alea and Juan Carlos Tabío, Cuba, 1993) Guantanamera (Tomás Guitiérrez Alea and Juan Carlos Tabío, Cuba, 1994) Guelwaar (Ousmane Sembène, Senegal, 1992) Hyènes / Hyenas (Djibril Diop Mambéty, Senegal, 1992) 65 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Ikiru / To Live (Akira Kurosawa, Japan, 1952) Jalsaghar / The Music Room (Satyajit Ray, India, 1958, Bengali) Kuchisuke / Kisses (Yasuzo Masumura, Japan, 1957) La Hora de los hornos / The Hour of the Furnaces (F. Solanas and O. Getino, Argentina, 1966-68) La Última cena / The Last Supper (Tomás Guitiérrez Alea, Cuba, 1976) Le Cri du corp / The Heart’s Cry (Idrissa Ouedraogo, Burkina Faso, 1994) Meghe Dhaka Tara / The Cloud-Capped Star (Ritwik Ghatak, India, 1960, Bengali) Memorias del subdesarrollo / Memories of Underdevelopment (Tomás Guitiérrez Alea, Cuba, 1968) Moolaadé (Ousmane Sembène, Senegal, 2004) Ochazuke no aji / Flavour of green tea over rice (Yasujiru Ozu, Japan, 1952) Odishon / Audition (Takashi Miike, Japan, 1999) Ônibus 174 / Bus 174 (Jose Padilha, Brazil, 2002) Onna ga kaidan wo agaru toki / When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (Mikio Naruse, Japan, 1960) Pyaasa / Thirst (Guru Dutt, India, 1957, Hindi) Saikaku ichidai onna / The Life of Oharu (Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan, 1952) Shaheed / The Martyr (Ramesh Saigal, India, 1947, Hindi) Suk san: San Suk saan geen hap / Zu: Warriors of the Magic Mountain (Tsui Hark, Hong Kong, 1983) Tetsuo (Shinya Tsukamoto, Japan, 1988) Tetsuo II (Shinya Tsukamoto, Japan, 1988) Tilaï / The Law (Idrissa Ouedraogo, Burkina Faso, 1990) Titas ekti nadir naam / A River Called Titas (Ritwik Ghatak, India, 1973, Bengali) Tokyo Monogatari / Tokyo Story (Yasujiru Ozu, Japan, 1953) Ugetsu Monogatari / Tales of Ugestu (Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan, 1953) Ukigumo / Floating Clouds (Mikio Naruse, Japan, 1955) Waati (Souleymane Cissé, Mali / Burkina Faso, 1995) Wong Fein Hung / Once Upon a Time in China (Trilogy) (Tsui Hark, Hong Kong, 1991) Xala / The Curse (Ousmane Sembène, Senegal, 1974) Ximeng Rensheng / The Puppetmaster (Hou Hsiao-hsien, Taiwan, 1993) Yoidore Tenshi / Drunken Angel (Akira Kurosawa, Japan, 1948) Zhong kui niang zi / The Lady Hermit (Meng Hua Ho, Hong Kong, 1971) Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online interaction, some discussions, online chat etc): of which may be online: Lectures 12 hours Screenings 20 hours Seminars 12hours 2. Student Activity (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary, studio work etc): Seminar reading 30 hours Background reading and independent viewing 30 hours Assignment preparation 100 hours 66 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Total hours (1 200 and 2): European Cinema Module Title: Module Code: MS3203 Module Leader: Yosefa Loshitzky European Cinema: New Level: 3 Waves to Now Credit: 20 Date Modified: ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Pre-cursor: Co-requisite: Excluded combinations : Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? No University-wide option: Yes (please delete as (please delete as appropriate) appropriate) Location of delivery: UEL/ (please delete as appropriate) If ‘Other’ please insert location here: Main aim(s) of the module: To trace major developments within European cinema concentrating first on the post WWII period, referring to Italian Neo-Realism and the French New Wave, and then to look at more contemporary cinemas from Spain and Germany, analysing them in the light of the earlier developments and in the contexts of their particular societies. Ultimately it will give an overview of movements particularly within Western European cinema. Main topics of study: - Italian Neo-Realism from its earliest manifestations to its flourishing in post-war Italy, and subsequently to its development into cinematic modernism - French New Wave, looking at the importance of Cahiers du Cinema, and auteur theory, and at the cinematographic developments that are specific to this movement. - Contemporary French cinema (e.g. Assayas; Ozon, and the “extreme” cinema Breillat and Noé). - Spanish cinema, tracing the influence of Italian Neo-Realism, and addressing the importance of historical changes in the country from Francoism to the movida, and to more recent cinema that concerns some of the issues around Spain’s regions, concentrating largely on the Basque country. - German cinema: the Heimat film; New German Cinema; cinema after “unification.” - An overview of European cinema, looking at its specificity and highlighting ways in which it differs from Hollywood, and how it has influenced Hollywood - Contemporary developments in new European cinema. 67 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete any headings that are not relevant. You should number the LOs sequentially to enable mapping of assessment tasks. At the end of this module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Analyse films from different parts of Europe, and see the ways in which these have influenced each other. 2. Read films within the contexts of the different countries and of Europe as a whole. 3. Illustrate knowledge of the different social, political, and aesthetic contexts of a selection of European films. Thinking skills 4. Critically engage with some of the important areas of film theory which have emerged from Europe and which inform the relevant films. 5. Analyse individual films using the appropriate theories. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 6. Research and essay writing skills. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, seminars, screenings, tutorials 68 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the Weighting: Learning learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated CW1: Textual analysis (1,500 words) 30% All CW2: essay (2,000 words) 70% All Reading and resources for the module: These must be up to date and presented in correct Harvard format unless a Professional Body specifically requires a different format Core Sheil, M. (2006) Italian Neo-Realism: Rebuilding the Cinematic City. London: Wallflower. Monticelli, S. (1998) ‘Italian post-war cinema and Neo-Realism’ in Hill, J. and Church-Gibson, P. (eds) Oxford Guide to Film Studies. Oxford University Press. Truffaut, F. (1954/ 1976) ‘ A Certain Tendency of the French Cinema’ in Nichols, B. (ed) Movies and Methods. Berkeley: University of California Press. Ezra, Elizabeth and Harris, S. (2000) (eds) France in Focus: Film and National Identity. Oxford: Berg. Stone, R. (2002) Spanish Cinema. Harlow: Pearson. Davis, A. (2007) Pedro Almodóvar. Lndon: Grant and Cutler. Recommended Bazin, A. (1971) ‘ An Aesthetic of Reality: cinematic Realism and the Italian School of the Liberation’ in Bazin A. What is Cinema? Vol. 2 . Berkeley, London: University of California Press. Deleuze, G. (1989) Cinema 1: The movement Image and Cinema 2: The Time Image. London: Athlone Kolker, R. (1983) The Altering Eye. Oxford University Press. Nowell-Smith, G. (1996) The Oxford History of World Cinema. Oxford University Press. Nelmes, J. (2007) Film Studies: An Introduction 4th edition. London and New York, Routledge. Jordan, B. and Morgan-Tamosunas, R. Contemporary Spanish Cinema. Manchester University Press. D’Lugo, M. (2006) Pedro Almodóvar. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press. Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online interaction, some discussions, online chat etc): of which may be online: 1 hour lecture 1 hour screening 1 hour seminar 36 = 36 2. Student Activity (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary, studio work etc): 69 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 164 Total hours (1 200 and 2): 70 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Asian Cinema Module Title: Module Code: MS3204 Module Leader: Ashwani Sharma Transformations in Asian Level: 3 Cinema Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Date Modified: Pre-requisite: TBC [Level 2 Core Film Theory Pre-cursor: module] Co-requisite: Excluded combinations : Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? NO University-wide option: No Location of delivery: UEL - Docklands Campus Main aim(s) of the module: To examine the transformations in Asian cinematic forms and genres in the context of modernity, nationalism, capitalism and globalization To understand the relationship between film aesthetics and the politics of gender, class and identity To be able to analyse specific Asian films with a range of global film theories Main topics of study: Studying Asian cinemas – Towards global cultural and film theory What is ‘Asian’ about Asian cinema? Modernity and cultural history Asian film, global capitalism, Marxist film theory and beyond Asian melodramas and nation – India, China and Japan Chinese film - from communism to capitalism Taiwanese and Hong Kong new wave – history and memory Independent Indian cinema – Asian realism examined Japan cinema 1960s to 2000s – film form, gender and capitalism South Korean film, modernity and global cinema Third cinema, avant-garde and political aesthetics Hollywood, ‘Bollywood’ and global Asian cinema Extreme Asian cinemas – horror and exploitation Asian diasporas and transnational film – South Asian, Hong Kong, Chinese Digital media and experimental Asian film 71 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete any headings that are not relevant. You should number the LOs sequentially to enable mapping of assessment tasks. At the end of this module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Identify historical transformations of Asian film genres and forms. 2. Illustrate an understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to Asian cinema in a transnational context. 3. Examine the relationship of film aesthetics to nation and global capitalism 4. Demonstrate knowledge of the ways that politics of gender, class and identity are represented in Asian film. Thinking skills 5. Undertake detailed analysis of Asian films 6. Evaluate critically different theories and apply them to Asian films and genres 7. Articulate the relationship of film to social, cultural, political and economic issues Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 8. Critically and ethically research and write about ‘non-western culture’ Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, seminars, screenings, ‘case study’ workshops, online exercises and resources, handouts and module readers Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the Weighting: Learning learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated Film Analysis (1500words) 30% 3, 4,5,6, 7 Essay (2500words) 70% All 72 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Reading and resources for the module: These must be up to date and presented in correct Harvard format unless a Professional Body specifically requires a different format Core Ackbar Abbas.(1997) Hong Kong: Culture and the Politics of Disappearance. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press Cazdyn, Eric (2002) The Flash of Capital: Film and Geopolitics in Japan Duke University Press Dai Jinhua, (2002) Cinema and Desire: Feminist Marxism and Cultural Politics in the Work of Dai Jinhua, eds. Jing Wang and Tani E. Barlow. London: Verso Prasad, M. Madhava (2000 )Ideology of the Hindi Film: A Historical Construction, Oxford University Press 2 HYANGJIN LEE (2001) CONTEMPORARY KOREAN CINEMA: IDENTITY, CULTURE, POLITICS, MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY PRESS Recommended Ciecko, Anne Tereska (2006) Contemporary Asian Cinema: Popular Culture in a Global Frame, Berg Dissanayake, Wimal (ed)(1993) Melodrama and Asian Cinema, Cambridge University Press Jameson, Fredric (1992) The Geopolitical Aesthetic: Cinema and Space in the World System, BFI Morris, Meaghan (ed) (2006) Hong Kong Connections: Transnational Imagination in Action Cinema, Duke University Press Gateward, Francis (2007) Seul Searching: Culture and Identity in Contemporary Korean Cinema, SUNY Press: Nowell-Smith (ed.)(1996) The Oxford History of World Cinema Oxford: OUP Rajadhyaksha, A. and Willemen, P. (1999) Encyclopaedia of Indian Cinema, Revised Edition, Delhi: Oxford University Press. Teo, Stephen (1997) Hong Kong Cinema: the Extra Dimension London: BFI. Vitali, V. and Willemen, P. (2006) Theorising National Cinema London: BFI Pines, J. and Willemen, P. (eds) (1989) Questions of Third Cinema London: BFI. Yip, J. (2004) Envisioning Taiwan: Fiction, Cinema, and the nation in the Cultural Imaginary Durham and London: Duke University Press. Zhang, Y. (2004) Chinese National Cinema London and New York: Routledge 73 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online interaction, some discussions, online chat etc): of which may be online: Lectures 12 hours Screenings 20 hours Seminars 12hours Online discussion 2 hours 44 44 2. Student Activity (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary, studio work etc): Seminar reading 24hours Background reading 24hours Online activities 6 hours Assignment preparation 100 hours 156 Total hours (1 200 and 2): Urban Film Module Title: Module Code: MS3405 Module Leader: Urban Film: Race, Nation Paul Gormley and the Cinematic Body Level: 3 Additional Tutors: Credit: 20 Ash Sharma Haim Bresheeth Pre-requisite: MS2200, or MS2406 or MS2401 or Excluded Combination: MS2405 Main Aim(s) of the Module: The course will aim to explore the urban crime film and its geo-political implications by tracing the historical development of the genre and changes in U.S. national cultural identity, cinematic affect and the construction of the cinematic body. The unit will also aim to present a history of the urban crime film conceived in terms of the mimetic relations between African American and white American culture. 74 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Main Topics of Study: Key urban crime films including the classic gangster film, film noir, the blaxploitation film, the conspiracy film, the nostalgia crime film, the ‘hood film and the contemporary “new-brutality” film; the city, modernity, modernism and postmodernism; theories of cinematic affect and mimesis, the representation of race; geo-political identity; the cinematic body. Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. demonstrate a conceptual knowledge of the historical changes in a specific cinematic genre in ways which go beyond orthodox (formalist) approaches to the subject. 2. consolidate and develop knowledge of theories of film encountered in previous film modules, and move on to problematise and critique them. Thinking skills 3. employ conceptual knowledge acquired from other Film and Media Studies modules (such as the representation of racial identity) to produce in-depth analyses of a specific form of media text. 4. subject given works of reference to close critical reading through focussed seminar dialogue 5. engage with and apply a wide range of contemporary ideas not always associated with film 6. explain and illustrate their learning of a key aspect of the genre in the form of seminar contributions. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 7. The ability to research and present complex ideas in the form of persuasively argued written texts. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, seminars, tutorial support and supervisory guidance Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning outcomes for Weighting: the Module: 100% One 4000 word essay Indicative Reading for this Module: Core: Walter Benjamin (1989) Illuminations Verso Michael Taussig (1993) Mimesis and Alterity: A Particular History of the Senses. Routledge Frank Krutnik (1993), In a Lonely Street, Film Noir, Genre, Masculinity Routledge. Gilles Deleuze (1986) Cinema 1: The Movement-Image (Athlone) Joan Copjec ed.(1993) Shades of Noir Verso David B. Clarke ed. (1997) The Cinematic City Routledge 75 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Mike Davis (1991) City of Quartz Verso Lalitha Goplan (2002) Cinema of Interruptions: Action Genres in Contemporary Indian Cinema. British Film Institute Ackbar Abbas (1997) Hong Kong: Culture and the Politics of Disappearance. University of Minnesota Press Fredric Jameson (1991) Postmodernism Verso Recommended: Fredric Jameson, (1992) The Geo-Political Aesthetic, BFI Steven Shaviro (1993) The Cinematic Body Minnesota Uni. Press Manthia Diawara (1992) ed. Black American Cinema Routledge Ed Guerrero (1992) Framing Blackness Lesley Stern (1996) The Scorsese Connection BFI Paul Gormley (2005) The New-Brutality Film: Race and Affect in Contemporary Hollywood Cinema (Intellect/Uni of Chicago) Suggested viewing: Early Cinema: Primitives and Pioneers (BFI) Scarface (Hawks 1932) Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich 1955) The Naked City (Dassein 1955) Sweet Sweetback’s Baadassss Song (Van Peebles 1969) The Parallax View (Pakula 1974) Mean Streets (Scorsese 1973) Blade Runner (Scott 1981) Bombay (Ratnam 1995) In the Mood for Love (Wong Kar-wai 2000) Hard Boiled (John Woo 1992) Menace II Society (Hughes 1993) Reservoir Dogs (Tarantino 1991) Strange Days (Bigelow 1995) Indicative Teaching Activity and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): Student/Tutor Contact Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work etc) Time: Lectures, seminars, tutorials – 40 hours Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ Time: background reading/ group work/portfolio/diary etc ) Orientation, research, independent studies, planning, drafting & revision (in response to feedback), writing, re-writing – 160 hours Total : 200 76 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film and Memory Module Title: Module Code: MS3407 Module Leader: Susannah Radstone Film and Memory Level: 3 Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Date Modified: April 2008 Pre-requisite: TBC [Level 2 Core Film Theory Pre-cursor: module] Co-requisite: Excluded combinations : Cinematics 1-3 Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? No University-wide option: NO Location of delivery: UEL - Docklands Campus Main aim(s) of the module: This module has three aims. Its first aim is to help students to familiarize themselves with the growing number of contemporary films concerned with screening memory. The category of the 'memory film' extends beyond home movies and autobiographical films, to include categories such as trauma films, contemporary history films and nostalgia films - genres and modes of cinema concerned with pathologies of memory, and with memories that exceed the personal to embrace - and sometimes contest - cultural memories. The first aim of the course, then, is to introduce a range of ‘memory films’ and to identify their strategies for screening memory. The second aim of the course is to familiarise students with the approaches used by film critics in their discussions of cinema and memory. These approaches are quite varied, but make use of criticism and theory covered in other, earlier modules on the programme: Foucauldianism, psychoanalysis, and postmodernism. Students will have the opportunity to discuss these approaches to memory films and try to evaluate them, to understand, for instance, what is at stake in debates about trauma and cinema, or in debates about postmodernism and nostalgia films. Overall, then, students come away from the module with a greater awareness of the importance of memory in the cinema today, and with a new set of theories and analytic tools to make use of in thinking about this varied and diverse body of contemporary films. The third aim is to employ film & video practice (specifically image and sound editing of existing video/found footage) as a tool for students to gain an applied knowledge of how the cinema produces archives and constructs memory sequences. Students will be provided with creative guidance in and critical feedback on the post-production of a short video. This third aim will provide students with a deeper understanding of the link between theory and practice, through a practice experience. 77 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Main topics of study: The ‘memory film’ and its strategies for screening memory; trauma cinema; film theory and memory; nostalgia; postmodernity; psychoanlysis and memory in film; representing “memory” filmically; trauma theory (unrepresentability). Learning Outcomes for the Module By the completion of the module the student will able to: Knowledge ١. Apply theoretical knowledge of film and memory in the writing of a critical essay ٢. Apply theoretical knowledge of film and memory in the production of a short video. ٣. Identify and critically examine a broad range of memory films Thinking skills 4. Deploy analytical skills to raise and address questions about the relationship between film and memory 5. Analyze and evaluate a range of cinematic traditions and their own practical work. 6. Demonstrate imagination and creative capacity in the editing of a video project. Subject-based practical skills 7. Demonstrate technical competence in use of technologies and software appropriate to the scope and limits of the video project. 8. Execute a short video project. Skills for life and work (general skills) 9. Formulate advanced levels of critical engagement orally and in writing. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, screenings, seminars, tutorials, Commented group screenings, presentations. 78 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning outcomes Weighting: for the Unit: CW1 Essay (2000-3000 words) 60% CW2 Individual video production and Production Folder 40% British Cinema Module Title: Module Module Leader: Paul Dave Code: Contemporary British Cinema Additional Tutors: N/A MS3202 Level: 3 Credit: 20 Pre-requisite: Excluded Combination: none Main Aim(s) of the Module: To provide students with knowledge of the development of the British film industry since 1979. The module seeks to provide a critical and contextual understanding of these changes along with an introduction to key academic debates and issues which have pre-occupied historians and critics of British cinema in recent years. Main Topics of Study: The module considers the connections between economic, institutional, political and social contexts and British cinema and film since the late 1970s. It examines shifting representations of nationality, 'race', class, gender and sexuality in specific genres and within institutional forms of British cinema. Areas that are examined in detail include heritage film and art house cinema; documentary and experimental film and video; the 1980s workshop and film co-operative movement; national allegories and 'state of the nation' films and 1980s 'style culture films and romantic comedies. The module also considers the impact of changes in the relationship between television and cinema during the period under examination. Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate knowledge of key cultural aspects of contemporary British cinema and film. 2. Identify and analyze aspects of change and continuity in the British film industry since 1979. Thinking skills 3. Critically evaluate key concepts around developments in contemporary British film and cinema. 4. Critically examine the importance of social and cultural contexts in the analysis of particular films and 79 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 genres. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 5. Record information from a variety of sources including lectures, seminars, texts and internet sources. 6. Produce written work appropriate to module and observe the conventions of academic writing. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Whole group lecture Small group seminar discussion Individual/paired tutorial work Screenings Research based tasks, e.g. information searches, surveys etc. Independent study using learning materials Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning outcomes Weighting: for the Unit: 50% All Essay (2000 words) 50% All Essay (2000 words) Indicative Reading for this module: Core Ashby, Justine and Higson, Andrew, (eds.), British Cinema: Past and Present, (London, 2000). Dave, Paul, Visions of England, (Oxford, 2006). Hill, John, British Cinema in the 1980s: Issues and Themes, (Oxford,1999). Murphy, Robert, (ed.), The British Cinema Book, 2nd Edition, (London, 2001). Murphy, Robert, British Cinema in the 90s, (London, 2001) Recommended: Barr, Charles, (ed.), All Our Yesterdays, (London, 1985) Blandford, Steve (ed.), Wales on Screen, (Bridgend, 2000) Beynon, Hugh and Rowbotham, Sheila, (eds.), Looking at Class, (London, 2001). Eshun, Kodwo and Sagar, Anjalika, The Ghosts of Songs ( Liverpool, 2007) Higson, Andrew, (ed.), Dissolving Views, (London, 1995) Hill, John, Cinema and Northern Ireland, (London, 2006) Keiller, Patrick, Robinson in Space, (London, 1998). Lay, Samantha, British Social Realism, (London, 2002). Mercer, Kobena, Black Film ,British Cinema, ( London, 1987) Monk, Claire and Sargeant, Amy (eds.), British Historical Cinema, (London, 2002) 80 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Morley, David and Robins, Kevin, British Cultural Studies, (Oxford: 2001) Munt, Sally R., (ed.), Cultural Studies and the Working Class, (London, 2000). Petrie, Duncan, Screening Scotland, (London, 2000). Pidduck, Julianne, Contemporary Costume Film, (London, 2004). Sargeant, Amy, British Cinema: A Critical and Interpretive History ( London, 2005) Smith, Murray, Trainspotting, (London, 2002) Smith, Paul, Millennial Dreams, (London, 1997). Mike Wayne, The Politics of Contemporary European Cinema: Histories, Borders, Diasporas, (Bristol, 2002). Teaching and Activity Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): Student/Tutor Activity: (eg lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops etc) Contact Time: Lectures with film extracts; film screenings; seminars and tutorials. 40 Student Learning Activity: (eg seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ etc ) 160 Seminar reading and preparation. Assignment preparation – including background reading and research. Note taking and the drafting of essays. total hours: 200 Hollywood Cinema Module Title: Module Code: MS1204 Module Leader: Paul Dave Hollywood Cinema Level: 2 Date Modified: April 2008 Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: Pre-cursor: MS1202 Co-requisite: Excluded combinations (eg skills modules): Skills module: No University-wide option: No Location of delivery: UEL Main aim(s) of the module: This module aims to provide students with knowledge of the issues raised by historical accounts of classic Hollywood cinema from 1929 to the late 1960s as well as providing an introduction to debates surrounding the emergence of ‘new’ Hollywood from the late 1960s to the present. 81 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Main topics of study: · Issues deriving from the writing of film history, including debates concerned with defining different periods of Hollywood history. · The economic, technological and institutional development of Hollywood cinema during the Studio era. · The ‘transition’ from silent to sound cinema. · The key formal and stylistic features of the output of different studios during this era. · The ‘Star-System’. · Critical concepts that have been developed in the context of a study of the Hollywood Studio System. Including notions of ‘authorship’; spectatorship and genre. · The decline of the Hollywood Studio System. · Debates around classical and post-classical narrative in the context of contemporary Hollywood. Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete the headings that are not relevant. You should number the Los sequentially. At the end of this Module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the formal and stylistic features of the studio system and the institutional structures supporting these features. 2. Illustrate knowledge of the factors responsible for the decline of the ‘classical’ Hollywood model. 3. Critically examine the formal and stylistic features of the post-classical studio system and the institutional structures supporting these features. Thinking skills 4. Evaluate competing accounts of the history of Hollywood between the late silent era and the early 1960s. 5. Analyze the importance of social and cultural contexts in the analysis of particular Hollywood films. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 6. Record and reasearch information from a variety of sources including lectures, seminars, texts and internet sources. 7. Produce different types of written work appropriate to module and observe the conventions of academic writing. 82 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lecture exposition of theory. Seminar discussion based on detailed analyses of a range of film texts. Tutorials. Screenings both in lectures and in seminars to familiarise students with the application of theory to specific examples Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the learning outcomes Weighting: for the module: 1 essay (2,000 words) 50% All I essay (2,000 words) 50% All Reading and resources for the module: Core Bordwell, David, Staiger, Janet and Thompson, Kristin, Classic Hollywood Cinema, (Columbia UP,1985). Cook, Pam, The Cinema Book, (London,1985/1999/2007). 83 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Hill, John and Church Gibson, Pamela, The Oxford Guide to Film Studies, (Oxford UP,1997). Nowell Smith, Geoffrey, The Oxford History of World Cinema, (Oxford UP, 1997). Recommended Allen, R and Gomery, D, Film History: Theory and Practice, (New York, 1985). Altman, R, The American Film Musical, (Bloomington, 1987). Altman, R, Genre: The Musical, (London,1981). Balio, T, The American Film Industry, (ed), (Madison,1985). Belton, J American Cinema/American Culture, (New York, 1994). Bordwell, D, Staiger, J, Thompson, K, Classic Hollywood Cinema, (London,1985). Bordwell D, and Thompson, K, Film History: An Introduction, (London,1994). Bould, M, Film Noir, (London), 2005 Buscombe, E, and Pearson, R, (eds.), Back in the Saddle Again, (London, 1998). Buscombe, E (ed), BFI Companion to the Western, (London, 1988). Cohan, S, (ed), Hollywood Musicals: The Film Reader, (London, 2002). Cook, D.A, A History of Narrative Film, (London,1996). Cook P, and Bernink, M, (eds.), (London, The Cinema Book, 1985/1999/2007). Coyne, M, The Crowded Prairie, (London,1997). Dyer, R, Stars, (London,1979/1997). Dyer, R, Heavenly Bodies, (London,1986/2004). Finler, J, W, The Hollywood Story, (London, 2003). Gledhill, C, Stardom: Industry of Desire, (London,1991). Grant, B.K, Film Genre Reader. (ed.), (Austin,1986). Grant, B.K, Film Genre Reader II, (ed.), (Austin, 1995). Hayward, S, Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts, (London, 2000/2006). Hill J, and Church Gibson, P, (eds.) The Oxford Guide to Film Studies (Oxford,1997). Jancovich, M and Hollows, J, (eds), Approaches to Popular Film, (London,1991). King, Geoff, New Hollywood Cinema, (London, 2002) Kerr, P, The Hollywood Film Industry, (ed) (London,1986). Maltby, R, Hollywood Cinema, (Oxford, 2003). Naremore, J,Acting in the Cinema, (Berkely,1988). Neale, S, Cinema and Technology: Image, Sound, Colour, (London,1985). Neale, S, and Smith, M, Contemporary Hollywood Cinema, (London, 1998). Nelmes, J, Introduction to Film Studies, (ed), (London, 1999, 2003, 2007). Nichols, B, Movies and Methods, Vol 1, (ed) (Berkley,1976). Nichols, B, Movies and Methods, Vol 2, (ed) (Berkley,1985). Nowell Smith, G, The Oxford History of World Cinema, (Oxford, 1997). Ray, R, A Certain Tendency of the Hollywood Cinema 1930-1980, (Princeton, 1985). Sarris, A, The American Cinema: Directors and Directions, 1929-1968, (New York,1968/1996). Schatz, T The Genius of the System, (Faber,1998). Sklar, R, Movie Made America, (New York,1975, 1994). Smith, S, The Musical: Race, Gender and Performance, (London, 2005). Staiger, J, The Studio System, (ed.), ( New Brunswick, 1993). Williams, Linda Ruth and Hammond, Michael, (eds.), Contemporary American Cinema, (London, 2006). Wollen, P, and Hillier, J, (eds.), Howard Hawks, American Artist, (London,1996). Wollen, P, Signs and Meaning in the Cinema, (London, 1972/1998). Wollen, P, Singin’ in the Rain, (BFI,1992). Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online contact time: discussions, online chat etc) 84 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 20 hrs lecture/workshops 10 seminars, tutorials 20 screenings total contact time: 50 2. Student Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary etc) 150 hrs Independent Study Total hours: 200 85 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Early & Silent Cinema ModuleTitle: Module Module Leader: Paul Dave Code: Early and Silent Cinema Additional Tutors: Anat Pick/ Jill Nelmes MS1202 Level: 1 Credit: 20 Pre-requisite: Excluded Combination: Main Aim(s) of the Module: To provide students with knowledge of early and silent cinema (1895-1929) and to enable them to reflect critically on the issues raised by the study of film history as well as to analyse films with due attention to historical contexts. Main Topics of Study: Topics covered: the pre-history of cinema and the ‘early cinema of attractions’ from 1895-1906; European modernism and experimental film in the 1920s; ‘race’, nation and film form in the work of D.W. Griffith; silent comedy and the experience of modernity; German Expressionist cinema of the Weimar era; early Russian and Soviet Cinema, including the work of the Eisenstein and Pudovkin, Dovzhenko, and Vertov. Learning Outcomes for the Module At the end of this Module, students will: Knowledge 1 Demonstrate knowledge of key aspects of the history of silent film in an international context. 2 Demonstrate knowledge of processes of modernisation and experiences of modernisation and their relevance for early twentieth century cinema. Thinking skills 3. Critically evaluate competing accounts of the history of early and silent cinema. 4. Critically evaluate the importance of social and cultural contexts in the analysis of particular early and silent films, genres and national cinemas. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 5. Record information from a variety of sources including lectures, seminars, texts and internet sources. 6. Produce different types of written work appropriate to module and observe the conventions of 86 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 academic writing. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Whole group lecture Small group seminar discussion Individual/paired tutorial work Screenings Research based tasks, e.g. information searches, surveys etc. Independent study using learning materials Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning outcomes Weighting: for the Unit: 50% 1,2,3,4 Case Study Analysis (1000-words) 50% All Essay (2,000) words Indicative Reading for this Unit: Core Bordwell, David, Staiger, Janet, and Thompson, Kristin, The Classical Hollywood Cinema, (Columbia,1985). Burch, Noel, Life to Those Shadows, (London, 1990). Elsaesser, Thomas, and Barker, Adam (eds.) Early Cinema, (BFI, 1990). Grieveson, Lee, and Kramer, Peter, The Silent Cinema Reader, (Oxford UP, 2004). Popple, Simon, and Kember, David, Early Cinema, (Wallflower, 2004). Nowell-Smith, Geoffrey, The Oxford History of World Cinema, (Oxford UP, 1997). Recommended Abel, Richard, Silent Cinema, (New Jersey, 1996). Bean, Jennifer. M., and Negra, Diana, A Feminist Reader in Early Cinema, (Durham, 2002). Chanan, Michael, The Dream That Kicks, (London, 1980). Charney Leo, and Schwarz, Vanessa R., Cinema and the Invention of Modern Life, (Berkley, 1995). Christie, IanThe Last Machine, (London, 1994). Cherchi Usai, Paolo, Burning Passions: An Introduction to the Study of Silent Cinema, (London, 1994). Elsaesser, Thomas, Metropolis, BFI, 2000 Elsaesser, Thomas, Weimar Cinema and after: Germany’s Historical Imaginary, (London, 2000). Finler, Joel. W., Silent Cinema, (London, 1997). Gillespie, David, Early Soviet Cinema, (London, 2000). Gunning, Tom, DW Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Cinema, (Champaign, 1991). Gunning, Tom, The Films of Fritz Lang: Allegories of Vision and Modernity, (London, 2000). Hansen, Miriam, Babel and Babylon, Harvard University Press, (Harvard, 1991). Salt, Barry, Film Style and Technology: History and Analysis, (London, 1992). Testa, Bart, Back and Forth: Early Cinema and the Avant-Garde, (Ontario, 1992). Nowell-Smith, Geoffrey, The Oxford History of World Cinema, (Oxford, 1997). Musser, Charles, Before the Nickelodeon: Edwin S. Porter and the Edison Manufacturing Company, (University of California Press, 1991.) Toulmin, Vanessa, et al, (eds.), The Lost World of Mitchell and Kenyon: Edwardian Britain on Film, 87 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 (London, 2004) Williams, Christopher, Cinema: The Beginning and the future, (London, 1996). Teaching and Activity Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): Student/Tutor Activity: (eg lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops etc) Contact Time: 40 Lectures with film extracts; film screenings; seminars and tutorials. Student Learning Activity: (eg seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ etc ) 160 Seminar reading and preparation. Assignment preparation – including background reading and research. Note taking and the drafting of essays. Total: 200 88 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 PROGRAMME OPERATION AND STUDENT REGISTRATION (GENERIC TO BE ADDED BY REGISTRAR/FIELD OFFICE) Enrolment at University It is essential that you complete the process of enrolment on-line before (re)commencing your studies. If you fail to enrol as a UEL student, your Local Education Authority will not pay the fees due. Nor will you be eligible for a student loan or be able to receive an email account or Student Card, without which you will not be able to access key facilities, such as the Library. Where required, assistance with enrolment for new students will be available during Induction week. Induction: Joining the course During Induction, or “First Week”, all students need to attend to get to know the course, meet fellow students and the programme staff team. This is a chance to find out about the university, ask questions, settle nerves and prepare for your course. You MUST attend an Enrolment slot, where you can obtain your ID card. You should also ensure you attend a programme talk. (Combined Honours (CH) students will also first attend a dedicated CH day, on Monday 21/09/09, prior to attending specific programme talks later in the week). You should expect to go to the HSS school Welcome Talk (including talks/presentations from the VC's Group, Dean, Registrar and various central UEL services). Part-time day and evening students can enrol between 1630hrs and 1900hrs, Monday to Thursday (last admission is 1830hrs). Combined Honours students will enrol on the dedicated CH day, Monday 21/09/09. Students who have already enrolled online will still need to come along to these sessions to obtain their ID cards. 2.0.1 Qualification Checks UEL staff will conduct qualification checks during First Week – so please bring certificates from your qualifying exams (such as A-levels, NVQs or other). We need to confirm that you have met the qualifying criteria ASAP. 2.0.2 Your address and phone Number From time to time the School will need to communicate with its students, in writing or by telephone. It is vital therefore that you inform us of any changes to your contact details. You can update your details through UEL Direct. It is your responsibility to ensure contact details are accurate and up-to-date. The University cannot be held responsible for problems created by your failure to do so. The best way to do this is via UEL Direct. 89 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT Rights and responsibilities inside and outside the seminar/lecture room Effective learning and teaching depends crucially on the attitude and behaviour of students in the classroom and prior to reaching it. Failure to prepare for a class – to complete the essential reading, for example, prior to the lecture – naturally puts you at a disadvantage, making it less likely that you’ll be able to appreciate or grasp all of what the lecturer is explaining. Failure to prepare is also a discourtesy to your peers if your lack of preparation requires the tutor to repeat material in class which should otherwise have been covered in independent study, thus slowing-down the progress of the session. Inconsiderate behaviour by some students towards their peers is among the most common complaints made in module evaluation questionnaires. In particular, turning-up late, talking while the lecture is in progress, or other such behaviour that distracts concentration from listening and learning are issues that come-up time and again in feedback and programme committees. These vital ‘rights & responsibilities’ are defined in the UEL Student Charter, as follows: We aim to give you high-quality teaching and support for your learning that leads to academic success and employment or opportunities for further study. You can expect that we will: • use a balanced range of teaching and learning approaches which will suit your aims, needs and experience, and which is appropriate to the programme; • at the start of each module, give you information in module guides on learning outcomes and teaching and assessment methods; • have lecturers, tutors and support staff who set and meet high professional standards and who are knowledgeable, competent and well qualified in their subject; • maintain well-managed and co-ordinated learning programmes and support services; • provide a clean, safe and appropriately-equipped learning environment; • maintain and improve high standards of teaching by putting our learning, teaching and assessment strategies into practice; • postpone, reschedule or cancel classes only in exceptional circumstances; • normally provide at least seven days, notice if we need to change teaching and assessment timetable arrangements; • display on your main school notice board and UEL+, if appropriate, up-to-date information on any matters that affect your timetable or classes before 9 am each morning; • provide a schedule of module assessments deadlines at the start of the semester; • provide two months, notice of exam timetables for written assessments; • provide scheduled support and guidance if you are on a work placement; • provide regular scheduled contact with named academic staff, to review and provide feedback on your achievements and help plan your progress; • provide scheduled regular contact and support if you are taking flexible learning and part-time programmes; and • talk to students with disabilities or dyslexia to find out if they have any study support needs we must meet so they can have full access to teaching, learning and assessment. We will expect you to: • have a professional and responsible attitude, go to all timetabled classes on time and let your school know if you cannot attend; • work hard on your coursework and ask for advice and help if you are having difficulties with your academic work or any other problems that may affect that work; 90 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 • hand in coursework on time to the named receiving officer; • tell us about any disabilities you have that you need study support for so you can have full access to teaching, learning and assessment; • make the most of our facilities, such as the Learning Resource Centres, Skillszone and student support services; • take part positively in your learning and let us know if you need help; • help us improve what we offer by using the opportunities provided for you to have your say and assess what we do; • behave appropriately and not disrupt other students by using mobile phones, eating in class, dropping litter and so on; • help us keep our community safe and secure by keeping to our policies on health and safety and security (including carrying ID cards); • talk to your personal tutor if you are unhappy with your programme choice and work with them to move you to a more appropriate programme; and • avoid taking breaks during semesters as this can disrupt your studies. If you want a break in your studies, you must agree this with your school. Minimum Standards Of Behaviour Consequently, in addition to the above-outlined, in HSS: • Use of mobile phones during lectures, seminars or workshops is not permitted. Should you use a phone during class-time you will be asked to leave immediately; • Turning-up late is discourteous. If arriving more than 10 minutes after the advertised start-time you may be required to wait until the first break before joining the class; • Persistent disruption may result in expulsion from the classroom. Other penalties may follow depending on the circumstance. Study Time The total of timetabled hours will vary from module to module. The norm is three to four hours per week over the course of the teaching period. A typical format might be one lecture, one seminar, one workshop plus small-group and/or individual tutorials on a couple of occasions through the teaching period. It is presumed that students will spend a total of 200 study hours on each module in their programme (equivalent to the accumulation of 20 credits). How this is broken down across the different activities will vary from module to module. In general terms you should aim to spend about 13 hours on each module each week for the 15 weeks of the semester. A typical breakdown for each module each week might be: • Attending lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops > 3/4 hours • Preparing for a seminar (completing an exercise, reading, thinking about pre-set questions, practicing use of key software packages, or other technical competence etc.) > 4 hours • Gathering information for a forthcoming assignment (reading, accessing electronic databases, taking notes etc.) > 4/5 hours Weekly Total = 12 hours per module Independent Studies This is the phrase used to describe scholarly work undertaken independently by the student in relation to their programme of studies – that is, self-directed work outside of ‘contact time’ with tutors. As will be apparent from the above indicative weekly schedule, the expectation and understanding of the HE learning environment is that the majority of your time will be self-directed. Typically, of the notional 12 hours of work identified as required per module of study, only 3 or 4 of these will be with a lecturer. 91 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Multiplied by three (that is, modules per semester), to estimate a typical working week of 36 hours, less than a third of this is comprised of ‘contact time’. The shift from the relatively high levels of tutor-contact and directed learning characteristic of school and FE to a culture of autonomous study and self-directed learning is perhaps the key challenge for undergraduate students in adapting to the requirements of University life. 92 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Assessment By assessment we mean the formal ratification of marks and decisions on student performance in individual modules and overall profile. The purposes of assessment are twofold. It provides students with ‘hard’ feedback-evidence of how they are performing and it permits staff to determine whether students have reached the necessary standard for continuation on an honours degree programme. From the beginning of the second year, assessment contributes towards the final degree classification. Students are only eligible for assessment on a module if registered on the module. Schools should ensure that students have ready access to their module registration data and that students are aware of the means of access. (It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the record of registration is accurate and notify Schools of any inaccuracies). Note: Students are required to familiarise themselves with the guidelines on conduct for examinations and conduct themselves in the appropriate manner Fairness in Assessment The University operates a rigorous code of practice to ensure that students are assessed fairly: • Wherever possible, student work is marked anonymously, i.e., the assessors see only the student number, not the name. • All coursework contributing towards your degree classification is marked by a member of academic staff and monitored by another academic within UEL. • External Examiners, who are senior academics from other Universities, are sent comprehensive samples of internally marked work and have access to every piece of work. They carefully monitor overall marking levels to ensure these are comparable to standards elsewhere. Given the above, it is worth noting that marks can be modified in the course of monitoring and confirmation procedures. Once marks have been monitored, confirmed and then ratified by the relevant Assessment Board, there can be no appeal against any mark awarded for any mark awarded for an individual piece of work (Manual of General Regulations, Part 7 ‘Appeals Against Award Board Decisions’, www.uel.ac.uk/qa/manual/index.htm). 2.0.1 Forms of Assessment ‘Credit bearing’ modules are assessed by a combination of means. Typically, the main forms of assessment are: Essays are formal assignments written in response to questions, where typically the question is intended to evaluate knowledge and learning of selected topics. Essays call for conceptual understanding, requiring the ability to develop a coherent thesis, using ideas, arguments, evidence and indicative examples as well as creative thought. Presentations encourage collaborative working and are intended to assess the ability to summarise ideas in a salient fashion and in such a way as to stimulate debate and dialogue around key questions. Examinations are intended to establish what you have learnt from the whole module by addressing your synoptic knowledge of a broad range of issues and key concepts. Class Tests are similar to examinations but cover local rather than general concerns and typically deploy non-traditional methods of assessment to evaluate applied understanding. Production or Performance pieces are the realisation of a process of critical-creativity, involving research and practised understanding of the character of the medium, as demonstrated in the final product or show. 93 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Projects & Dissertations aim to test the ability to research a topic and demonstrate understanding of core concepts through applied and sustained case-study analysis. Assessment Criteria - Principles of Assessment The function of assessment boards - and especially the sovereign role of external examiners within these - is to assure consistency and accuracy of grading across a given course, subject area or cluster of subject areas. The HSS does not favour prescriptive systems of valuation - where requirements are ticked off in driving test fashion. To go down this route may well risk penalising creative and imaginative approaches in favour of robotic compliance with published criteria. At the same time it nonetheless the view of the School that students are entitled to expect transparency of assessment procedures and full explanation of judgements reached. Gradations between Essays Essays are marked in relation to one another. The differences between 55% and 57% and between 62% and 65% are not absolute. Markers will ordinarily read the entire batch before beginning to apportion scripts to roughly figured top (60s and above), middle (50s) and bottom (40s and below) divisions. From here, estimation of numerical value is a matter of making increasing refinements in relation to broad ‘benchmark’ distinctions. Calculations at the margins are the toughest to determine (59/60, etc.). In these instances judgement will rest upon how far the work does or does not exhibit certain attributes. For indeed there are certain, estimable distinctions between 55%, 58%, 62% and 65%. These numerical scores are approximate to indices on the scale of ‘satisfactory’, ‘quite good’, ‘good’ and ‘very good’, which in turn correspond to specific qualities of scholarship, namely: • the scope and depth of reading and application evidenced in the answer (Knowledge & Understanding), as indicated in the marker’s margin notes by comments such as ‘sources’, ‘evidence’; • the clarity, precision and effectiveness of developed argument (Analysis), as indicated by comments such as ‘i.e.’, ‘explain’, ‘analyse rather than describe’; • the ability shown by the student to support analysis with indicative explanation and to develop independent thinking (Synthesis/ Creativity), as indicated in the marker’s margin notes by comments such as ‘illustrate by example’, ‘in your own words’; • the technical competence of the work (formal features of presentation, spelling, grammar, use of English etc.) will also be taken into account. As a minimum, then, a ‘very good’ essay is one in which the author clearly demonstrates in-depth and/or applied understanding of a topic based on considered evaluation of relevant sources, and in which the examples chosen are apt and original. Whereabouts an essay is finally graded, at 62%, 65% or, perhaps, 70% plus (that is, in the ranges of ‘good’, ‘very good’, or ‘excellent’), will depend on the comparative strengths and weaknesses of the signal features bullet-pointed above. Seminar Presentations Whether working alone or collaboratively, students generally prepare seminar papers as they would an essay. Yet the presentation of these in a public setting - among a community of their peers - requires the deployment of specific skills, distinct from those of academic writing. Seminar papers are like essays in that they will be expected to demonstrate Knowledge & Understanding of module content (evidence of investigation, drafting and revision, relevance and range of sources). However, 94 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 because the spoken word does not work in just the same way as the written word, in addition it is appropriate that the assessment of seminar presentations should privilege qualities of Communication & Presentation (effectiveness of delivery, appropriateness of format, use of visual aids, success in provoking discussion). Besides the finished product - as realised in the seminar Performance - the process of learning leading-up to this may be judged by assessment of the presentation Portfolio, to include (where appropriate) Self-Appraisal/ Reflection on Practice and Interactive & Group Skills (evidence of learning and of co-operation in planning and execution). Production and Performance Modules The assessment of learning in a production or performance mode is of course founded in the same core precepts and principles of assessment outlined just above (undertaken in lens and/or auditory media, IT & multimedia, or live performance). That said, as the project work submitted in these modules differs in kind from essay-based coursework, it follows that assessment of production and performance requires elaboration of particular means of assessment attuned to those ways of working. There was a time when, akin to an exams-only system, laboratory and studio work in the visual, audio and performing arts was assessed solely on the basis of the final show, exhibition or performance. The equivalent in the broad field of social sciences media and cultural studies would be to evaluate the product alone for 100% of the module mark. In HSS we prefer and are pledged to assess the process of learning in conjunction with the product, or text. And because this approach is better suited to testing integrative knowledge - as with seminar presentations - the assessment requirements for work submitted in a production or performance mode routinely include the submission of a portfolio (detailing the conception and development of the project) and/or critical review sessions between staff and students, as well as the making of a text/product or performance. The mark finally attributed to a student production work will be arrived at in a manner parallel to the procedures used for grading essays; though to reflect the specific character of media production and the performing arts, discriminating criteria are codified somewhat differently, as follows (see Tables below). Coursework produced in a production or performance mode will be judged in terms of Composition, Critical Imagination and Presentation/Technique. The last of these is equivalent in essay writing to use of English, spelling, syntax, presentation of references, etc. - that is, levels of skill and technical competence with media languages. In the case of video, for instance, this equates to visual literacy, the use of montage, lighting, sound, etc.. Composition denotes the combining of formal elements, to include, in a specifically practice-informed-by- theory context: structure; the aptness of the format and materials used; unity of concept and realisation (aims and objectives); effectiveness of outcome. Critical Imagination denotes awareness of the capacities of technology and genre; clarity and cogency of expression of ideas; evidence of an integrative approach; evidence of learning and independent perspective. It is expected that analytical value be present in both composition and critical imagination. Essay Writing Guidelines Essays should be regarded as serious pieces of work that have to be well presented, well researched and properly argued. Planning and Structure 95 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 1. Keep in mind the specific question or particular problem that you are addressing. It is worth spending some time on the key terms and the context of the question, as it relates to the module. If the essay title is taken from a quotation, try to follow up the reference and to read the quotation in its original context. In most cases, where a quotation forms the basis of a title following it up should also provide a useful theoretical introduction to the essay topic. 2. Before writing the essay it is a good idea to draw up a plan. It should not be elaborate or detailed, but should indicate the structure of the essay, the points and arguments that you are going to make, and the order in which they will come. 3. Be aware of the historical context of your argument. This is not to suggest that you must have detailed expert knowledge of each period you refer to, rather it is to remind you of the significance of historical shifts. It is most important that you avoid making general or sweeping statements about the historical context of theories, ideas or cultural debates. 4. Your essay should have a structure that is easily perceived by the reader. There should be an introduction, followed by the development of the essay, and a conclusion. 5. The introduction gives you the opportunity to explain to the reader your interpretation of the question. The introduction should not contain a lengthy outline or recapitulation of your overall argument but should be concise and to the point. 6. The conclusion should end your essay by providing a brief summation of its main points and then stating the conclusion you have reached. The conclusion is not the stage at which to introduce a new argument or new evidence. 7. Every part of the essay should make a logical contribution to the whole. Random, disconnected points do not add up to a proper argument and fail to convince the reader that you have much of a grasp of a topic. 8. Be concise and to the point. Think of the most economical way to put across your arguments. 9. Be as clear as possible. Always ensure that you understand fully what you have written. 10. Try to combine an explanation and assessment of critical concepts and ideas with relevant examples (e.g., from the newspapers or cd-roms which you have consulted or the films and television programmes which you have viewed). Try and find examples that are your own rather than simply relying on those found in the books. 11. Write in paragraphs. A paragraph marks a particular topic, or a specific stage in the development of your argument. Although there are no hard and fast rules for this, a paragraph in an undergraduate paper usually consists of about 8-12 lines. This is not simply a question of formal presentation. If you are writing very short paragraphs of one or two sentences this is an indication that you are not developing an argument, or thinking through the topic as deeply as you could. If your paragraphs roam across pages, this is usually an indication that your essay is not properly structured. 12. Syntax is a problem in many student essays. If you see this highlighted in the margin notes it means that the person who marked your work could not understand what you were trying to say. You are likely to lose marks if your ideas and arguments are not clearly expressed. Students often attempt to express more than one idea, or thought, in a long sentence. The sentence is then punctuated, sometimes quite randomly. The effect of this can be a series of joined-up‚ clauses which are difficult to read, and therefore difficult to understand. 13. Do not be afraid of writing short clear sentences, especially if you are working through a complicated idea. Indeed, this can be a useful way of checking the fine detail of your argument. The important questions to ask yourself before submitting an essay are - Does this make sense? Will my reader understand exactly what I am trying to say? - Crucially, the person who is to mark your work must be able to understand it on the first reading. 14. When dealing with critical concepts (such as ‘ideology’) make it clear how you are using these terms and show that you are aware that these may be used in different ways by different writers. 15. Remember that there is no one ‘right’ way to study any given topic. All subject paradigms, such as History, Multimedia or Anthropology, are characterised by considerable critical debate and, in answering the essay question, you should explain and bring out the different critical perspectives which may be involved in discussing the same topic. 16. Throughout the essay you must use your own words (unless, of course, you are deliberately making use of a quotation). Plagiarism refers to quoting or paraphrasing someone else’s words without acknowledgement. This is a serious offence and is regarded as cheating. An essay containing a 96 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 minor offence of plagiarism will normally receive a mark of zero, and a new piece of work will have to be submitted. Serious instances of plagiarism may lead to formal disciplinary action. 17. Stick to the word limit. A part of the discipline of essay-writing is that it involves decisions about what material to include and what to exclude. Essays that are much too long or too short may be penalised. 18. Re-read your essay throughout the process of drafting and before you hand it in to ensure that it makes sense and to eliminate errors. Presentation All essays must be presented in a clear and legible form. The typing or word-processing of essays is required. Care must also be taken over spelling, grammar and syntax. An essay that is poorly written and sloppily presented will be marked down. Avoid ‘noisy’ or elaborate typefaces. Cover Sheet All essays should be handed-in to the Student Enquiry Desk with an assessment cover sheet, on which you should indicate the following information as requested: • your student number • the relevant module number (e.g. AI1301) • the assessment code (e.g. CW1) • your programme of study (e.g. Sociology) • the relevant module title (e.g. Media Meanings ) • the name of your personal tutor • the name of the assessor of the work in question (usually your seminar or workshop tutor) Bibliography At the end of the essay you should add a bibliography listing the books and articles you have read in preparing your answer. These should be in alphabetical order according to author surname. You will note from your reading that there are a number of different styles of bibliography and referencing used in academic texts. We prefer the name-date (Harvard) system. This is not to say we are insisting on slavish adherence to one particular set of rules. The key point is this: whichever system of scholarly citation you use, it is essential that you use the conventions of referencing consistently. These remarks notwithstanding, the following procedures for bibliographical referencing are recommended. In the case of books, you should provide the name of the author, the date of publication, the book title (italicised or underlined), and the name of the publisher, for example: Lury, C. Prosthetic Culture: photography, memory and identity (1997, Routledge). Lury, C., 1997, Prosthetic Culture: photography, memory and identity, Routledge. Where there is more than one author: Maltby, R. and I. Craven (1995) Hollywood Cinema: An Introduction (Blackwell). (NOTE as the bibliographical reference is looked-up by the surname of the first author, it isn’t necessary to list the other contributors in surname-initial order, as above). When citing a chapter in an edited collection the page numbers should be given: Williams, L. (1987) ‘”Something Else Besides A Mother”: Stella Dallas and the Maternal Melodrama’, in Gledhill, C. (ed.) Home is Where the Heart Is: Studies in Melodrama and the Women’s Film (London: BFI) pp. 299-325. 97 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 (Variations in style are acceptable so long the basics of the ‘author-date of publication-title-publisher’ rubric are adhered to.) In the case of articles in scholarly journals, you should give author, date of publication, title of article (in inverted commas – single or double, but be consistent in the use of one or the other), title of journal (underlined or in italics), volume number, and pages, as follows: Caughie, J. (1991) “Adorno’s reproach: repetition, difference and television genre”, Screen, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 127-153. Curran, J. (1990) “The New Revisionism in Mass Communication Research: A reappraisal”, European Journal of Communication, Vol. 5 Nos. 2-3, pp. 135-164. Ryall, T. (1975) “Teaching through Genre”, Screen Education, No.17, pp. 27-33. Student writers increasingly use internet-sources. Articles from electronic Journal should be referenced in the format: Author Year of publication (in brackets) Title of article Title of journal (underline or italicise) Volume, issue [Online] Available at: URL of web page (Date accessed). e.g.: Lloyd, J. (2001) Blessed are the pure in heart: globalisation. New statesman, 23 April [Online]. Available at: http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles (Accessed: 23 November 2004). As a matter of convention, most academic writers prefer single to double inverted quotation marks, as in the second block of citations, just above. The main point to stress, again, is the need for consistency of form. If using single ‘quotation marks’ around essay titles, double “quotation marks” should only be used for a quotation within a quotation (or vice versa) as in the reference to the Linda Williams essay above. Otherwise, don’t mix use of single and double quotation marks. Referencing All quotations and sources of arguments should be identified by an internal reference - the placing of a reference in brackets after a quotation or summary of someone’s argument - or by means of numbered footnote which refers to an accompanying list of references (cited at the foot of the page or at the end of the script) which identifies where the quote or idea has come from. Internal references should be used as follows: Genres may be defined as patterns/ forms/styles/ structures which transcend individual films, and which supervise both their construction by the film maker, and their reading by an audience. (Ryall, 1975:28) Or: Ryall (1975: 28) argues that genres “may be defined as patterns/forms/styles/structures which transcend individual films, and which supervise both their construction by the film maker, and their reading by an audience”. In these examples, the reference indicates that the quote comes from page 28 of the article by Ryall which is included in the bibliography. If there is more than one work by Ryall in the bibliography, the use of the date - 1975 - also makes clear to the reader which work by Ryall reference is being made to. Where quotations run to more than three lines, convention dictates these should be indented. Thus: Linda Colley (1994: 6) writes: As an invented nation heavily dependent for its raison d’être on a broadly Protestant culture, on the threat and tonic of recurrent war, particularly war with France, and on the triumphs, profits and Otherness represented by a massive overseas empire, Britain is bound now to be under immense pressure. It is not just that it has had to adjust to the loss of its empire, though that is obviously part of the problem. It is also that Protestantism is now only a residual part of its culture, so it can no longer define itself against a predominantly Catholic Europe. Indeed, now that it is part of the 98 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 European Economic Community, Great Britain can no longer comfortably define itself against the European powers at all. Whether it likes it or not, it is fast becoming part of an increasingly federal Europe, though the agonies that British politicians and voters of all partisan persuasions so plainly experience in coming to terms with Brussels and its dictates show just how rooted the perception of Continental Europe as the Other still is. This work would then be cited in the bibliography as: Colley, L. Britons: Forging the Nation, 1707-1837 (1994, Pimlico): 6. Or: Colley, L., 1994, Britons: Forging the Nation, 1707-1837, Pimlico, p. 6. Check the Library and learning services website for more examples and guidance: http://www.uel.ac.uk/lss/Harvardreferencing.htm Qualities of a Good Essay • A good essay will define the subject or question as the student writer understands it. • It will answer all parts of the question and not just a part of it. • It will be addressed directly to the question and its content will be clearly relevant to the question. • It will be well organised. Its arguments and evidence will be presented logically, clearly, coherently and concisely. It will contain no unnecessary material or digressions. • It will have a clear and concise introduction and a conclusion, effectively drawing the essay to a close. • It will select and marshal its evidence carefully. This will involve considered use of both ‘empirical’ evidence (such as authoritatively-derived statistics indicating social trends of one kind or other) and ‘theoretical’ evidence (e.g. an exposition of the use to which concepts such as ‘discourse’ have been put). In both cases, the handling of evidence should relate closely to the argument the essay is making. • Where there are differing views or perspectives on a subject, the essay will demonstrate an awareness of these. The essay may come down in favour of one view rather than another, but will also explain the reasons for doing so. • It will demonstrate perceptive and independent thought about its subject, and a critical awareness of how the subject has been dealt with by media scholars. Common Weaknesses • Failure to answer the question. • Lack of overall focus and coherence. • Lack of balance: too much space devoted to some issues to the detriment of others, or as much space given to minor issues as to major ones. • Digressions which carry the content of the essay away from the question. • Failure to define concepts or the terms of a debate. • Use of assertion rather than argument and the offering of opinions without supporting argument or evidence. • Little evidence of reading around the subject. • Inaccuracies and vagueness in describing examples. • Excessive dependence on lecture-notes or reading. • Poor grammar and spelling. 99 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Grade Performances in Essay Writing Classification Knowledge & Analysis Synthesis/Creativity Presentation/ Understanding (and logical (and independent Technique (reading & development) thinking) application) A++ 75 Excellent: in-depth use Excellent: Excellent: illuminating Fluent. No errors of of knowledge from a comprehensively well- integration of material grammar, syntax, spelling A+ 72 wide range of relevant made structure, and construction of and punctuation. Clear, sources. Applied and argument and use of strongly supported coherent and style of A 70 FIRST illustrated evidence. Sharply and distinctive, writing; avoiding understanding of incisive analysis of perspective. inelegance of mixed material. material. Insightful metaphor, adjectival conceptual links overload etc. Smooth developed. handling of subsidiary clauses. Instructive use of paragraphs. A-/A 68 - 9 Good: thorough use of Good: effective Good: effective and Quotes appropriately cited knowledge, fairly wide structure, coherent appropriate and set out. Mood and A- 67 range of sources, argument and use of integration of source, tone apt. Avoids pitfalls of demonstrating evidence, connections argument and bombast, long- B++ 64 – 5 ‘Very good’ relevance of these by made. illustration. Evidence windedness, sexist, well-made indicative of writer's own point abusive and/or strident B+ 62 example. of view emerging. language. B 60 II.1 B-/B 58 - 9 Satisfactory: shows Satisfactory: structure Satisfactory: material Satisfactory: for the most evidence of reading generally sufficient, holds together in part competent use of B- 57 ‘Quite good’ and learning. Material argument and use of generally satisfactory language, but with some generally relevant. evidence okay, but but not distinctive infelicities and C++ 55 Examples okay but some structural way. inconsistencies in features ‘Satisfactory’ sometimes derivative, weakness and listed above. Evidence of not always well- inconsistencies of undue reliance on original C+ 52 chosen or convincingly argument. source, paraphrasing etc. developed. Connections C 50 II.2 underdeveloped. C-/C 48 - 9 Barely adequate: Barely adequate: some Barely adequate: Barely adequate: uneven, Descriptive &/or structuring and material not unruly, poor use of C- 47 mainly reliant on attempt made to use integrated to reasoned language. Dependent on recapitulation of evidence, but overall argument. Negligible source. Confused and D+ 42 source, demonstrating effect is fragmentary evidence of genuine confusing. weak grasp of and unconvincing. authorial presence. D 40 THIRD knowledge. Links poorly (pass) Unconvincing developed. Fuzzy examples. reasoning. D/D- 38 - 9 Very Poor: Very Poor: Very Poor: no Very Poor: close Inappropriate use of unstructured. Reliant connecting argument paraphrasing, perhaps D- 37 source material. Little on lists of or explanation in the edging over into or no evidence of unconnected points. work. plagiarism. Error-ridden, E+ 32 knowledge. Much Muddled, illogical and inarticulate, disjointed irrelevant material. incoherent thinking. writing. Inadequate reading. E 30 FAIL Unacceptably Poor: no Unacceptably Poor: no Unacceptably Poor: Unacceptably Poor: Badly evidence of reading or structure or logic of entirely lacking crafted to the point of learning. Inaccurate development. integration or being non-sense. BELOW 30% LEVEL IS AN and inappropriate. Confused, evidence of effort to Incomprehensible. Obvious UNACCEPTABLE FAILURE disconnected, develop it. Writer plagiarism. (RESUBMIT) irrelevant thinking. adopts inconsistent point of view. The comments inscribed in the boxes above correspond to the benchmark score highlighted in the left-most column. That is to say, these indicative remarks relate to the signal numerical mark pointed-to within each class (42%, 62%, etc.) and do not encapsulate the whole band or class (40-50, 60-70, etc.) 100 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 101 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 ‘Generic Levels Descriptors’ in Essay Writing (Level-by-Level) KNOWLEDGE & ANALYSIS SYNTHESIS/ PRESENTATION/ UNDERSTANDING (and logical CREATIVITY TECHNIQUE (reading and development) (independent thought/ application) practice) LEVEL ONE Suggests a formative Suggests awareness of Suggesting critical capacity Avoiding technical errors knowledge of specified salient points of to collect, categorise and (of grammar, spelling and reading materials contention in specified process given ideas and punctuation) and stylistic consistent with Level One reading and suggests evidence; where the confusion (resulting from engagement. ability to make an student begins to inarticulateness or argument where the establish a viewpoint from verbosity), writing shall be Indicates initial submitted work possesses within the scope of the clear and comprehensible, understanding of given logical development and analysis undertaken. complying at all times with theoretical precepts organisation of evidence. the conventions of through applied scholarly citation. Word illustration. selection should be apt to the level of intellectual engagement. LEVEL TWO Shows a developing Able to develop a Able to collect, process Avoiding technical errors knowledge of relevant competent analysis which and categorise relevant and stylistic confusion or reading materials. explains conceptual links source materials in line excess, writing shall be in a clearly ordered way. with the limits of comprehensible and Demonstrates effective assessment as described direct, complying at all understanding through and to integrate evidence times with the the devising of examples to a well-structured conventions of scholarly which apply theory researched argument citation. Word selection appropriate to the terms through which an should be apt to the level of assessment. independent perspectives of intellectual may emerge. engagement. LEVEL ONE Demonstrates Demonstrably able to Demonstrably able to Avoiding technical errors comprehensive construct a coherent and select and synthesise and stylistic confusion or knowledge of reading critically precise analysis evidence in a manner excess, writing shall be materials and illustrates which illuminates relevant to the prospectus critically precise, critical understanding conceptual relationships of assessment and to complying at all times with through detailed and in the work under integrate these materials the conventions of precise examples which discussion in a logically to a clearly structured and scholarly citation. Word apply theory in a manner structured way. appositely resourced selection should be apt to appropriate to the range argument which enables the level of intellectual and depth of assignment. an independent engagement. perspective to emerge strongly. 102 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Grade Performances in Presentations Knowledge & Interactive Group Communication & Self-Appraisal/ Class Understanding Skills Presentation Reflection On (Where Appropriate) Practice (Where Appropriate) A piece of work which High level of academic Maintains high level of Is able to avoid the usual shows clear evidence of a co-operation and oral clarity and logical clichés of self- firm command of the independence in development of assessment; can think relevant intellectual issues; production of proficient concepts; maintains high critically and non- independence of thought, group oral work and level of accuracy in defensively about own such that complex written reports. standard English; uses criteria of judgement and First arguments and concepts appropriate, sensitive articulate alternative (70% +) can be defended or language. approaches. questioned; and which displays a high level of skill in written and oral expression of ideas. A piece of work in which Demonstrates ability to Oral skills developed to Can produce insightful students engage with deal independently with the extent that relevant and appropriate relevant issues in depth group conflicts and concepts can be criticisms of own work Upper and consistently attempt conflicting interests and communicated and understand Second to elaborate ideas for maintain an effective accurately in standard alternative approaches. (60 - 69%) themselves and display level of work over an English. Written work in well-developed skills and extended period of time. good English and oral expression. assembled logically. A piece of work which Has been able to put Adequate: for the most Can articulate obvious displays evidence of together coherent piece part competent use of criticisms of own work competent handling of the of collaborative group language, but with and envisage other relevant intellectual issues, work over the period of infelicities of style and possibilities. and some engagement time indicated. evidence of excessive Lower with them. Evidence of paraphrasing of sources. Second some independent (50 - 59%) thinking. Ideas expressed clearly in oral and written forms. A piece of work which Elementary ability shown Comprehensible but Employs the usual clichés provides evidence of an to assemble, uneven use of language; of self-assessment, elementary grasp of the collaborative, an a considerable number of whether or not they are Third relevant intellectual issues acceptable piece of errors; over-dependence applicable. (40 - 49%) and a basic competence in group work. on paraphrasing sources; oral and written occasionally confusing. presentation. A piece of work which Inability to work Unacceptably poor use of No serious attempt to shows only (or less than) a collaboratively; language; confused to reflect on own practices, rudimentary ability to fragmentation of efforts; the point of since they were not conduct an extended demonstrably unable to incomprehensibility; worked out in the first argument orally or in plan work over a period paraphrasing close to place. Fail writing. Failure to of time. plagiarism. demonstrate a consistent grasp of the most basic intellectual issues. 103 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Generic Levels Descriptors’ for Student Presentations (Level by Level) KNOWLEDGE & INTERACTIVE GROUP COMMUNICATION & SELF-APPRAISAL/ UNDERSTANDING SKILLS PRESENTATION REFLECTION ON (grasp of module’s work; (co-operation in planning (oral communication; PRACTICE investigation; insight) and execution) compilation of Portfolio) (Where Appropriate) (Where Appropriate)) LEVEL ONE Suggests a formative Suggests acquisition of Suggests the ability to Suggests the ability to knowledge of module basic skills required to present basic module think comparatively about materials consistent with agree on divisions of concepts orally in a clear, own work and offer Level One engagement. labour and produce helpful and informative obvious criticism of self coherent groupwork. way. and group (where Indicates initial appropriate); has ideas understanding of given These skills include the Written materials are about possible alternative theoretical concepts ability to acknowledge assembled logically and approaches. through applied others and their points of supplement the oral illustration. view and co-operate in presentation effectively. group endeavours. Materials are well drafted and show evidence of revision and improvement over period of preparation. LEVEL TWO Shows developing Has developed Has developed enhanced Is able to evaluate own knowledge of module interpersonal study skills skills in formulating strengths and materials and to the point where complex ideas for oral weaknesses; can demonstrates the relevant debates and presentation. Can make challenge received capacity to take an results of further co- clear the differences opinion and begins to independent view operative research can be among varying theoretical develop own criteria and suggested by evidence incorporated into positions. judgement. and argument. coherent piece of coursework. Written materials used to Demonstrates effective elaborate upon and understanding through enhance ideas introduced the devising of examples in oral presentation; which apply theory written materials appropriate to the demonstrate that relevant module learning process has materials. continued throughout the stages of preparation. LEVEL THREE Demonstrates Can interact effectively Can engage effectively Can confidently apply comprehensive on a proficient academic and accurately in debate own criteria of judgement knowledge of materials level, manage conflict in proficient manner and with regard to intellectual relating to the module independently and produce - co-operatively endeavours and group and to the broader field produce coherent and independently - interaction and of knowledge. Can use a groupwork of detailed and coherent productivity; variety of complex professional standards group reports which concepts with ease and based on wide-ranging demonstrate the learning Can reflect on own accuracy and apply these reading and research. process. practices and procedures appropriately to the and envisage alternative module materials. approaches. 104 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Grade Performances in Production Modules Composition Critical Imagination Presentation/Technique Appropriateness of format and clarity and cogency of expression of level of cohesion & control structure ideas formal literacy unity of concept & realisation evidence of integrative method evidence of planning/rehearsal effective of outcome evidence of learning & independent drafting & revision and effective thinking organisation Innovative: illuminating and Intellectually rich: advanced, Commanding: innovative use of expansive articulation of source complementary understanding of technology - exceeds convention; material and format; integrated theory, technology and form, realised authoritative, fluent control of idiom, expression of theme through form through cogent; insightful thesis. metaphor, citation etc. Expertly compelling, lyrical text. Lucid and persuasive, demonstrates organised and managed. 70% + ability to uncover and connect structural relations between media, creative productivity and society. Original, distinctive authorial voice. Imaginative. Accomplished: informed and Developed: thoroughly well grounded Assured: high level of technical informative use of relevant source and achieved, integrative exposition. efficiency; low incidence of material; complementary application Demonstrable evidence of applied superfluous and/or redundant or 60% + of theme through appropriately learning. Convincing, informative. gratuitous effects. Appropriate care styled format. Effective structure, Strong authorial voice. taken; cohesive, effective pacing etc.; consistent composition; impactful in control. Effectively organised and text. managed. Competent: quite well designed; Satisfactory grasp of theory practice Adequate: in general, technically endeavours to integrate medium and relations, though not entirely competent; sufficient but restricted theme, though inconsistent in parts sustained or convincing. Indistinct formal register. Does not establish full and not always demonstrating a perspective. control. Some redundant elements. complementary relation between the Inclined to technological fetishism 50% + two. Not wholly convincing, though and/or literalmindedness. (Would shows demonstrable commitment benefit from further drafting). Fairly and application to task; perhaps too well organised and managed. reliant on conventional approaches. Adequate text. Underdeveloped: sparsely resourced; Naive, ill-prepared conception and Underdeveloped: confused, and mismatched and superficial representation and though effort sometimes inappropriate use of treatment of theme and form. made and some suggestion of technology and poor command of Generally unconvincing of diligence thought, overall, not convincing. formal language. Prone to 40%+ and deliberation. Poorly structured, Lacks rigour. Limited awareness; awkwardness. Slack and at times ill-composed. weak presence. languid, repetitive, off-key. Uncertain. Inarticulate. Shabby management and organisation. Inadequate: vacuous, little if any Intellectually impoverished: no Nonsensical : wholly inefficient and evidence of planning, or attention to connecting argument. Irrelevant, ineffective command of formal means specificities of presentation in the incoherent miscellany, made without of communication. Artless, confused project. Confused, disjointed, ill- awareness of significance of form. and confusing. Rash of unmotivated informed. Inappropriate - should not Unselfconscious; suggesting effects. Below threshold of technical Fail proceed with media practice. indolence and/or incapacity. Fail. competence. Incompetent management and organisation. 105 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 ‘Benchmark’ Criteria in Assessment of Production & Performance Modules (Level-by-Level) Composition Critical Imagination Presentation/ Technique LEVEL ONE Suggests a foundational level of Suggests initial understanding of Instances a basic level of technical practical knowledge in the design key ideas as context for practical skills and, within limits of prescribed and production practical works studies, within limits of directed exercises, suggests acquisition of within the prescribed limits of theory-practice exercises. working knowledge of production directed production exercises. practices, to include: ability to communicate and work in groups, handle time-management, problem solving, project organisation, drafting and revision, completion of appropriate documentation, etc. LEVEL TWO Displays a developing practical Displays evidence of exploring, Displays technical competence and knowledge of format and idiom in testing and applying ideas through formal literacy in use of media the design and production of text, adaptation of module's motivating technologies and in line with where exploration of theme and theoretical prospectus to module aims; demonstrates form are engaged within scope of conception and development of effective management and module aims and sources. integrative approaches; evidence organisation of project (as above). of emerging critical creative Conscious of connection of concept perspective in relation to module Avoid obvious technical error and to approach taken; showing critical content and aims. stylistic confusion/excess. and creative awareness of production of meaning and effect, through effective use of structure, organisation, integration of source materials, style, mode of address, tone, duration, etc. LEVEL THREE Clearly demonstrates Clearly and demonstrably able to Demonstrates technical proficiency complementary practical select, synthesise, and apply and formal literacy in use of media knowledge in the design and theory-practice learning to the technologies appropriate to production of an independent conception and development of a realisation of independent practical practical study; in which media project of own devising; through study; evidencing demonstrably technologies and formal which independent thinking and effective management and conventions are used in a manner imagination may emerge in critical organisation of project (as above). pertinent to the realisation of an creative integration. independently originated research Avoids obvious technical error and theme project (in response to a stylistic confusion/excess. supervisory framework); and where there is imaginative and critical control of the processes of meaning-making, structure and organisation, integration of source materials, style, mode of address, tone and duration, towards the production of cohesive and coherent project. 106 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Submitting Coursework For all modules in HSS you will be required to submit coursework assignments not later than the published Deadline Dates given in module guides. Module deadline dates must be compliant with the absolute deadline dates for each semester indicated by the academic calendar. Assignments will not be accepted after the published deadline dates – unless governed by ‘extenuating circumstances. If work is not handed-in at all or if, by missing the deadline, it is deemed to have been handed-in late, a mark of zero (and non-submission) will be recorded for the submission in question. When handing in an assignment you must complete the appropriate coversheet, attaching it to your work. Be sure to fill-in all sections correctly: seek assistance if you’re uncertain. Submit coursework at the Student Enquiries Desk not later than 4.00pm on the day of submission. The date of submission of all assignments is recorded and receipted for each piece of work handed-in (manually and electronically). Please be sure to keep receipts safely as it may be necessary to produce in the event of any disputes over the date a particular assignment was submitted. Similarly, it is important that you keep a duplicate of your work in case the copy you submitted is mislaid. Students may send in coursework by post (but if doing so we strongly recommend Recorded Delivery). Please note, though, that it is your responsibility to ensure that coursework reaches the Student Enquiries Desk in HSS on time, i.e., before 4.00pm on the Deadline Date. We do not accept responsibility for postal or other unforeseen delays. If work arrives by mail after the deadline, it will be recorded as a non-submission. On occasion you may be required to submit coursework in an electronic format, in addition to hard copy. Generally, however, the SED is not empowered to accept or receipt coursework submitted solely in an electronic format. Any exceptions to this general will be explicitly detailed in the relevant module guide and the module leader will give the SED prior notice of these exceptional conditions. We do not accept coursework assignments sent by email. NEVER hand-in or send your assignment directly to a member of academic staff. 107 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Extenuating Circumstances What are Extenuating Circumstances? Extenuating Circumstances are circumstances which • impair the performance of a student in assessment or reassessment • prevent a student from attending for assessment or reassessment • prevent a student from submitting assessed or reassessed work by the scheduled date Such circumstances would normally be • unforeseeable - in that the student could have no prior knowledge of the event concerned • unpreventable - in that the student could do nothing reasonably in their power to prevent such an event • expected to have a serious impact Students are expected to make reasonable plans to take into account commonly occurring circumstances, even those which, on occasion, may have been unforeseeable and unpreventable. Examples of circumstances which might normally constitute grounds for extenuation are • serious personal illnesses which are not permanent medical conditions (which are governed by other procedures): For example, an illness requiring hospitalisation • the death of a close relative immediately prior to the date of assessment. Examples of circumstances which would not normally constitute grounds for extenuation are • minor illnesses - even if covered by medical certification • computer failure of non University equipment or storage media • computer failure of University equipment or storage media (where failure is less than a continuous 24 hours) • transport problems • moving house • holidays • inadequate planning, organisation or time management • misreading of assessment timetables • family, work, social, financial or other general problems Procedures for the Submission of Claims for Extenuating Circumstances For an extenuation claim to be considered, it is the student’s responsibility to ensure that for each component affected • they submit details of the circumstances via their School Office on the standard University proforma • details are submitted by the designated date and time • details are submitted with accompanying documents and evidence. The designated date and time for submission of claims for extenuation are: for assessment by examination: 5pm on the Tuesday after the final week of examinations. 108 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 for assessment by submission of assessed work: no later than School Office closure time one calendar week after the scheduled date and time for the submission of the assessed work. Claims will not be considered unless submitted on the standard University proforma by the designated date and time with accompanying evidence. Procedures for Consideration of Extenuating Circumstances Claims for extenuation will be considered by a panel consisting of the Head of Modular Programmes as Chair, the Director of Student Services, and one Senior Academic for each School (Head, Associate Head or Field Leader), nominated by the Head of School. In considering claims for extenuation, wherever possible, the identity of the student will not be made available to the Panel. Where extenuation for more than one component is sought by a student, extenuation will be considered on a component by component basis. The decision of the Extenuation Panel is binding on Field and Award boards. The Extenuation Panel will meet once in each semester, normally before the week of the Field Boards, and once during reassessment, normally before the week of the Field Boards. Decisions will be implemented on the student records system after completion of the Field Boards and before commencement of the Award Boards. The process will be independently supported and administered by Quality Assurance and Enhancement, who will be responsible for: • receiving claims for extenuation from School Offices • preparing material for the Extenuation Panel • minuting Panel meetings and decisions. Outcomes Assessed tasks (e.g. coursework) to be submitted by a scheduled date: a) Work submitted by the published deadline: No claim for extenuation may be submitted. b) Work submitted late, but within one calendar week of the published deadline: A claim for extenuation may be submitted. If a student seeks extenuation, the submitted work will be marked; If the Extenuation Panel grants extenuation, then the mark achieved for the work will be awarded; the mark achieved will not be notified to the student until the Field Board results are published; If the Extenuation Panel does not grant extenuation, then a mark of zero will be recorded; the mark achieved will not be notified to the student. c) Work submitted later than one calendar week after the published deadline, or not submitted: A claim for extenuation may be submitted. The submitted work will not be assessed; The mark awarded will be zero; 109 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 If a student seeks extenuation and this is granted by the Extenuation Panel, the outcome is as follows • any mark recorded for the relevant component(s) (including 0 for non-submission of assessed work) is ignored • the Field Board will not consider the module result until after reassessment • the student will be reassessed, in the extenuated component(s) only, in the Summer, by submission of the standard retrieval work (not by resubmission of the original piece of work) • no other components will be reassessed • the Field Board will consider the module result after Summer reassessment • the mark achieved for the module will not be capped (unless it is a repeated module: see Academic Framework Modular Regulations 6.1.4 (undergraduate) or 11.1.4 (postgraduate)). There is no provision for giving extensions to coursework deadlines and therefore extensions may never be given. In summary the outcomes are: Submitted by the published deadline: No extenuation possible Submitted within one calendar week of the published deadline: Extenuation possible, and if granted, the mark achieved is recorded Submitted later than one calendar week after the published deadline: The work is not assessed. Extenuation is possible and, if granted, the student module decision is deferred until reassessment, the student is required to retrieve the extenuated component only, and the module is not capped Assessed tasks (e.g. examinations) in which attendance is required If extenuation is granted by the Extenuation Panel then: • any mark achieved for the relevant extenuated component(s) is ignored (including 0 for non- attendance at the assessment task) • the Field Board will not consider the module result until after reassessment • the student will be reassessed, in the extenuated component(s) only, in the Summer (any previous mark for the component being ignored) • no other components in that module will be reassessed • the Field Board will consider the module result after Summer reassessment • the mark achieved for the module will not be capped (unless it is a repeated module: see Academic Framework Modular Regulations 6.1.4 (undergraduate) or 11.1.4 (postgraduate)). If extenuation is not granted, the mark recorded will be the mark achieved. Additional key information (a) Where a student submits an application for extenuation then that application cannot be withdrawn at a later date. (b) The granting of extenuation has the effect of restoring the student, via uncapping of reassessment, to the position that the student would have been in, with respect to uncapping, had the extenuating circumstance not occurred. (see Academic Framework Modular Regulations 6.1.5.2 and 11.1.5.2) (c) Once a module has been capped, extenuation does not uncap the module (see Academic Framework Modular Regulations 6.1.5.3 and 11.1.5.3) (d) Where 110 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 • a student submits an application for extenuation for a component, and • the student has failed to achieve the threshold mark in a second component, and • no extenuation has been granted to this second component the effect of granting extenuation for the first component would be to ensure that the (below threshold) mark for the second component was carried forward to reassessment, thus automatically preventing that student from passing the module at reassessment. In such cases, the application for extenuation will formally be denied, as it is not in the student’s interest. As a result, the student will have the opportunity to pass the module at reassessment. (see Academic Framework Modular Regulations 6.1.5.4 and 11.1.5.4) (e) Where a component consists of more than one element, and the circumstances of extenuation apply to one element, the extenuation granted is for the whole component in its entirety. (f) Where extenuation is sought, this will be recorded on the student record (so that the student is aware that the extenuation claim was considered). Late submission of claims for extenuating circumstances Normally, late submission of a claim for extenuating circumstances is not accepted. However, it is recognised that there may be cases where a student is unable to submit a claim for extenuation within the time period (e.g. emergency in-patient hospital treatment occurring during the examination period). In this case, submission of the claim at the earliest opportunity, via the School Office, should be made. This must be accompanied by evidence as to why the claim is being submitted late. The Chair of the Panel will decide whether to accept the late submission. The Chair’s decision will be final. Note: Late submission through unwillingness earlier to disclose the grounds for claiming extenuation will not be regarded as sufficient grounds for late submission. Appeals against the decisions of the Extenuation Panel There will be no appeal against the decision of the Extenuation Panel other than on the grounds that an administrative or procedural error has occurred. Appeal will be by the normal academic appeal procedures. Web link to extenuation procedures (Manual of General Regulations) see Appendix C Please see http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/extenuation.htm for forms and other details on extenuation. 111 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Notification of results (generic to be provided) You are expected to monitor your email account and UEL Direct on a regular basis. UEL Direct is also the medium through which students complete module registration, find details of timetabling and receive notification of results. Please be aware that the onus is on you to pick-up all relevant notices as these appear. Failure to check email will not be an acceptable explanation for missing deadlines or other key dates and activities Reassessment in a module not passed Where a student does not achieve an aggregate of 40%, or does not achieve the component threshold marks, the student is reassessed in the module at the next reassessment point, in all and only those components achieving a mark of less than 40%. Component marks of 40% or over are carried forward to reassessment. The reassessment point for all on-campus modules is in the summer reassessment period i.e. normally July for hand-in in August/September In determining whether a student has passed a module on reassessment, the calculation is based on the highest component marks achieved, whether in assessment or reassessment Feedback Feedback is given in order to help promote learning and facilitate improvement. Feedback is often given in written form on the mark sheets attached to your essays. Feedback may be: Individual – identifying specific issues relating to you and your work, or Generic – referring to general points about the assessment as a whole, arising from an overview of the work produced by the student group. Feedback will be given following formative assessment (i.e. that which does not contribute to the module mark, such as activities prepared for discussion in seminars, practice essays etc) and after summative assessment (i.e. that which does contribute to the module mark, for example following Coursework and exams). Assessment Offences For the purposes of our University’s Regulations, an assessment offence is defined as any action(s) or behaviour likely to confer an unfair advantage in assessment, whether by advantaging the alleged offender or disadvantaging (deliberately or unconsciously) another or others. Examples of such offences are given below: the list is not exhaustive. • Importation into an examination room of materials other than those which are specifically permitted under the regulations pertaining to the examination in question. • Reference to such materials (whether written or electronically recorded) during the period of the examination, whether or not such reference is made in the examination room. • Copying the work of another candidate. • Disruptive behaviour during examination or assessment. • The submission of material (written, visual or oral), originally produced by another person or persons, without due acknowledgement*, so that the work could be assumed to be the student's own. For the purposes of these Regulations, this includes incorporation of significant extracts or 112 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 elements taken from the work of (an)other(s), without acknowledgement or reference*, and the submission of work produced in collaboration for an assignment based on the assessment of individual work. (Such offences are typically described as plagiarism and collusion.) • *(Note: The incorporation of significant elements of (an)other(s) work, even with acknowledgement or reference, is unacceptable academic practice and will normally result in failure of that item or stage of assessment.) • Being party to any arrangement whereby the work of one candidate is represented as that of another. • If an examiner suspects that a candidate has breached the regulations, the matter will be dealt with under the Procedure to be followed in the Event of a Suspected Assessment Offence, Part 8, paragraph 3 (or, for postgraduate research students, paragraph 4) of the Manual of General Regulations (available for view at www.uel.ac.uk/qa). If it is determined that a breach of regulations has taken place, a range of penalties may be prescribed which includes expulsion from the programme. Definition of Plagiarism Our University defines plagiarism and other assessment offences in Part 8 of the UEL Manual of General Regulations. All students will have received a copy of this when they joined UEL as it is reprinted in "The Essential Guide to the University of East London". In this document, the following example of an assessment offence is given: (e) The submission of material (written, visual or oral) originally produced by another person or persons without due acknowledgement*, so that the work could be assumed to be the student's own. For the purpose of these Regulations, this includes incorporation of significant extracts or elements taken from the work of an(other(s), without acknowledgement or reference*, and the submission of work produced in collaboration for an assignment based on the assessment of individual work. (Such offences are typically described as plagiarism or collusion). The following note is attached: *Note: To avoid potential misunderstanding, any phrase not the students' own should normally be in quotation marks or highlighted in some other way. It should also be noted that the incorporation of significant elements of an(other(s) work, even with acknowledgement or reference, is not an acceptable academic practice and will normally result in failure of that item or stage of assessment. Plagiarism in Greater Detail Work that students submit for assessment will inevitably be building on ideas that they have read about or have heard about in lectures. Students can, however, only demonstrate that they have learnt from their sources by presenting the concepts in their own words and by incorporating their own commentary on the findings. Where students submit work purporting to be their own, but which in any way borrows ideas, wording or anything else from other source without appropriate acknowledgement of the fact, the students are guilty of plagiarism. Plagiarism includes reproducing someone else's work whether it be from a published article, book chapter, website, an assignment from a friend or any other source. 113 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 When an assignment or report involves outside sources, or information, the student must carefully acknowledge exactly what, where and how he/she has employed them. If the words of someone else are used, they must be put in quotation marks or otherwise identified and a reference as to source appended. See the next section for more guidelines. For advice on actual referencing techniques, and for some helpful tips on how to avoid plagiarism, see "The Study Skills Handbook" by Dr Stella Cottrell, pages 122-125. Making simple changes to the wording of a section from a book, article, web-site etc. whilst leaving the organisation, content and phraseology intact would also be regarded as plagiarism. Do not use websites that write assessments for you – academic staff are fully aware of their existence and the material they offer!! You will be required to defend your work at a viva if your marker suspects you have used this kind of service. Collusion Collusion is the term used to describe any form of joint effort intended to deceive an assessor as to who was actually responsible for producing the material submitted for assessment. Students may obviously discuss assignments amongst themselves and this can be a valuable learning experience. However, if an individual assignment is specified, when the actual report/essay is produced it must be by the student alone. For this reason students should be wary of lending work to colleagues since were it to be plagiarised they could leave themselves open to a charge of collusion. Investigating plagiarism: Flow chart to show course of events for First Offences of plagiarism or collusion NO Mark Assessment Assessment Offence awarded, + Marking suspected work returned to student Plagiarism or Collusion Assessment Offence SUSPECTED, student informed in writing Offence dismissed Level and asked to respond A P Student ADMITS E assessment offence SCHOOL N MEETING Student DENIES A assessment offence L T Matter referred to Head of Student Compliance and Responsibilities Y for Investigating Panel When to Reference Since the regulations do not distinguish between deliberate and accidental plagiarism, the key to avoiding a charge of plagiarism is to make sure that you assign credit where it is due by providing an appropriate reference for anything in your essay or report which was said, written, drawn, emailed or implied by 114 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 somebody else. You should try and master a standard referencing system suited to your discipline: see http://www.uel.ac.uk/lss/Harvardreferencing.htm You need to provide a reference: • when you are using or referring to somebody else's words or ideas from an article, book, newspaper, TV programme, film, web page, letter or any other medium; • when you use information gained from an exchange of correspondence or emails with another person or through an interview or in conversation; • when you copy the exact words or a unique phrase from somewhere; • when you reprint any diagrams, illustrations, or photographs. You do not need to reference: • when you are writing of your own experience, your own observations, your own thoughts or insights or offering your own conclusions on a subject; • when you are using what is judged to be common knowledge (common sense observations, shared information within your subject area, generally accepted facts etc.) As a test of this, material is probably common knowledge if - you find the same information undocumented in other sources; - it is information you expect your readers to be familiar with; - the information could be easily found in general reference sources. Unacceptable Academic Practice rather than Plagiarism? Students occasionally misunderstand the concepts being presented here and submit essays or reports where substantial and significant elements of another author's work are used and acknowledged. It is clear that such an essay or report cannot satisfy the normal assessment criteria to: • use your own words; • provide a critical commentary on existing literature; • aim for novelty and originality; • demonstrate your understanding of the subject area. It is thus likely in such a case that the outcome will be a fail mark for the particular piece of work concerned. Academic Integrity Policy University Academic Integrity Policy Students are asked to be aware of “academic integrity”: As a learning community, we recognise that the principles of truth, honesty and mutual respect are central to the pursuit of knowledge. Behaviour that undermines those principles diminishes us, both individually and collectively, and devalues our work. We are therefore committed to ensuring that every member of our University is made aware of the responsibilities s/he bears in maintaining the highest standards of academic integrity and of the steps we take to protect those standards. 115 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Our determination that students should know and understand academic good practice is matched by our resolve that academic malpractice should not prosper. Accordingly, we have adopted a balanced approach, providing support to enable students to acquire knowledge and skills to maintain academic integrity and a comprehensive set of Assessment Offence Regulations to protect academic integrity. 116 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Programme Management Programme Committees Enabling students to provide feedback on their learning experiences is a key mechanism in promoting improvements to this experience. Programme Committees provide a formal structure for student participation and feedback on their programme of study. Programme Leaders (or the nominated School Contact) seek to select Programme Representatives at the start of each year. This is a good way to help your peers, the course and develop useful experience. UELSU provide training and support for Programme Representatives and students should be referred to the Programme Representatives Co-ordinator in UELSU In Chairing Programme Committees, Programme Leaders will normally the support of a nominated administrator to service the committee, further information for Chairs and Servicing Officers are available in the Programme Committee Handbook and Terms of Reference (see links below). See Appendix F below on the purpose of these meetings which provide a forum in which students can express their views about the management of the programme, and the content, delivery and assessment of modules, in order to identify appropriate actions to be taken in response to the issues raised and to ensure that the implementation of these actions is tracked Module Feedback The minimum requirement for collecting end of module feedback is detailed in the proforma below (see link), however the forms and additional methods used may vary from field to field within Schools as agreed by the School’s Learning & Teaching Committee. http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/documents/Appendix8-ModuleEvaluation.doc The anonymity of respondents should be ensured during collation of completed MEQs. UEL Student Satisfaction Survey and the National Student Survey We are keen to encourage participation in formal national level evaluative surveys. The National Student Survey (NSS) is targeted mostly at final year undergraduates in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and participating Higher Education Institutions in Scotland, and for the first time in 2008 final year higher education students studying at Further Education Colleges in England were also eligible to participate. The NSS is managed by IPSOS MORI and the results are publicly available on the UNISTATS website. http://www.unistats.com/ The UEL Student Satisfaction Survey (SSS) is targeted at first and second year undergraduate and taught masters’ students, the survey is available in online and paper form and was reduced in size in 2008, with questions aligning more closely to the National Student Survey. The SSS is managed by Quality Assurance & Enhancement and an external market research company. Results from both surveys are provided in a detailed report which is discussed at CMT and Academic Board and copies sent to Schools and Services for consideration in the annual planning process. Results are also considered as part of our Review and Enhancement Process and a commentary on issues raised by students 117 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 together with an action plan are provided at programme level (as appropriate), field and at School Overview level. Students are informed of resulting actions through an annual newsletter ‘Your Views Count’. Since 2003 overall satisfaction with UEL has increased from 61% in 2003 to 71% in 2007 (SSS results). http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/StudentSatisfactionSurvey.htm See also: http://www.uel.ac.uk/studentcharter/index.htm STUDENT SUPPORT: FURTHER INFORMATION UEL aims to give you a range of high-quality student services, which offer advice, information, financial help, counselling, services for people with a disability or dyslexia, recreational opportunities, careers guidance, health services and childcare support throughout the period of your studies. Further information can be found through UEL student services, the UEL web site and the UEL student Union. Some guidance is included below. Disabilities and dyslexia You can expect us to: • offer advice during admissions, first semester and throughout your time at UEL on the services, financial support and equipment available to help with your studies. This can be done via email, fax, over the telephone or in person; • provide a confidential environment for you to discuss your needs with a knowledgeable member of staff; • provide help from disability advisors throughout the year on both campuses regardless of disability. Our core hours are Monday - Friday, 9 - 5pm but we also offer drop in times and flexible days starting from 8am until 8pm;; • help you to apply for allowances from the local education authority that you may be eligible for, and give you information about the support and equipment that these allowances may pay for; • provide up to date information on services and support available for students with disabilities from the Disability and Dyslexia Unit, UEL community and relevant outside agencies; • be a service led by you the student. Regular feedback will be obtained about our service through focus groups, questionnaires, comment boxes, emails and our website: www.uel.ac.uk/disability; We expect you to: • arrange to discuss your particular needs us as soon as possible - ideally before you join us; • ensure that you show up for appointments with our specialists i.e. Educational Psychologists, tutors, advisors and assessors; • tell us if your needs change; • take responsibility for your own studying. If you find that you are struggling, then it is your responsibility to come to us before it is too late; • if you are Dyslexic, remember to attach your Dyslexia Certificate to all assignments, essays, tests and exams English Language support/ The Writing Centre There are a number of support systems designed to assist with improving writing and other academic skills. These include referrals from your tutors on skills modules and dedicated language-based work for international and domestic students. 118 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Writing Centre • Individual tutorials - work on essay and dissertation structuring • grammar, punctuation, critical thinking etc. • Essay Writing Workshops • Writer in Residence • Literary E-Zine • Reading series The School of Social Sciences, Media and Cultural Studies is home to UEL’s Writing Centre, which is the focal point for the school’s writing events and activities. The centre offers writing support, and is also the headquarters of our Writers in Residence, our student literary e-zine -- and our reading series, which features well-known as well as undiscovered authors. Offers: • Tutorial help with your writing, whatever your individual needs may be • Information, contacts, and guidance • Writers In Residence, Millie Murray and Simon Jenner • Literary Events • Creative Writing Magazine where you can be Published Especially useful if: • You want advice and specific help with your own writing for academic, professional or creative purposes • You are interested in Creative Writing, Professional Writing, Journalism, or Academic Writing • Your tutor has told you to seek out help with your writing EMPLOYABILITY, SKILLS AND OTHER USEFUL INFORMATION UEL’s Students’ Union The University of East London Students Union (sometimes just called 'The Students' Union' or UELSU) is an autonomous body that's formed to help you to get the most out of your degree and university life here at the University of East London. This can be an important source for information, representation of your views, support and entertainment. Please also make use of “The Essential Guide to UEL” at: http://www.uel.ac.uk/essguide/ Please take the time to make yourself aware of the following information resources Careers: Manual of General Regulations http://www.uel.ac.uk/employability http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/manual/index.htm Employability at UEL: Referencing guidelines: http://www.uel.ac.uk/employability/index.htm http://www.uel.ac.uk/lss/Harvardreferencing.htm Computer based training for Word: Skills Curriculum: http://www.uel.ac.uk/it/training/index.htm http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/skills.htm Counselling: Skillzone: http://www.uel.ac.uk/counselling http://www.uel.ac.uk/skillzone Disability support: Student Charter: http://www.uel.ac.uk/disability/index.htm http://www.uel.ac.uk/studentcharter/ 119 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Equality and Diversity Policy: Student Services: http://www.uel.ac.uk/personnel/EqualityDiversity_Policy.htm http://www.uel.ac.uk/studentservices/index.htm Student Information http://www.uel.ac.uk/students 120 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES AND GENERAL INFORMATION The Library The Learning Resource Centre (or Library) at Docklands contains an appropriate range of books, journals, videos and other reference materials for all of the programmes offered by the HSS. The library is also equipped with ranks of networked PC terminals. Students have the opportunity to obtain an email address and user account, giving access to the Internet and UEL’s networked resources. During the teaching semesters the Library is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In Student Vacation periods the opening times are restricted, check the website for details: http://www.uel.ac.uk/lss/opening_hours Multimedia Production Centre Students following programmes with a production component will be taught and work independently in the Multimedia Production Centre (MPC). The MPC is fully equipped with digital facilities, including: Apple and PC labs, a TV studio, control room and edit suites, a recording studio, radio station and edit suites, photography and dark room facilities, and an AV (tape-slide) studio. All facilities are digitally interconnected, facilitating cross-platform production. For more information visit http://mpc.uel.ac.uk/ ACADEMIC APPEALS Students who dispute a decision of an Assessment Board may appeal in accordance with the Procedure for notification of Appeal, Part 7, paragraph 2 of the Manual of General Regulations. No appeal will be entertained on matters of academic judgement. These remain the exclusive prerogative of the Assessment Board. Matters of academic judgement include: whether a student has reached the academic standard required for the relevant stage of the programme; whether a student would benefit academically from further study on the programme. An appeal may be made only on the following grounds: • The assessment was not conducted in accordance with the current regulations for the programme, or there has been a material administrative error or some other material irregularity relevant to the assessments has occurred. • For a student with a disability or additional need, the initial needs assessment was not correctly carried out, or the support identified was not provided, or the agreed assessment procedures for that student were not implemented. Any student wishing to appeal against a decision or recommendation of an Assessment Board must lodge his or her notice of appeal with Quality Assurance and Enhancement, normally using a pro forma available from the UEL web site. 121 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Further information about the UEL appeals process, including copies of the formal Notification of Appeal Form, is available for view at www.uel.ac.uk/qa COMPLAINTS If you feel that our University has not delivered the standard of service which it would be reasonable to expect, you may be entitled to lodge a complaint, in accordance with section 14 of the Manual of General Regulations. The Complaints Procedure should be used for serious matters, and not for minor things such as occasional lapses of good manners or disputes of a private nature between staff and students. Complaints can be lodged by students, prospective students and members of the general public, but cannot be made by a third party. Separate procedures exist for the following, which therefore cannot form the substance of a complaint: − appeals against the decisions of Assessment Boards; − appeals against the decisions of the Extenuation Panel; − complaints against the Students' Union; − appeals against decisions taken under disciplinary proceedings; − complaints about businesses operating on University premises, but not owned by our University; − complaints about the behaviour of other students. The procedure has four possible stages: − Complaint raised informally with the staff concerned at the local level (Stage 1) − Complaint to Head of School/Service or other line manager (Stage 2) − Appeal to a Complaints Review Panel (Stage 3) − In addition, if you have exhausted the internal procedures and are not satisfied with the outcome you may request that the case is reviewed by the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education (Stage 4). Every reasonable effort should be made to raise the complaint informally. If no satisfactory outcome is reached, you can lodge a formal complaint with the Complaints Liaison Officer, based in Quality Assurance and Enhancement. You are also advised at this point to discuss the matter with a member of the Students’ Union Welfare team. A complaint must normally be lodged within two calendar months of the incident giving rise to the complaint; this ensures that the people involved still remember the case, and the facts can be established. Further information about our University’s complaints procedure, Including copies of the formal Complaints Form, is available for view at www.uel.ac.uk/qa If you would like to discuss a complaint you have made (or are considering making) with a member of University staff, you should make an appointment with the Head of Student Compliance & Responsibilities, by emailing Toby Grainger (t.j.grainger@uel.ac.uk). 122 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 123 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 3 APPENDICES A-I Appendix A: Docklands Campus map 124 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Appendix B ACADEMIC CALENDAR START WEEK NO. 17-Sep-07 1 INDUCTION 24-Sep-07 2 TEACHING 01-Oct-07 3 TEACHING 08-Oct-07 4 TEACHING 15-Oct-07 5 TEACHING 22-Oct-07 6 TEACHING 29-Oct-07 7 TEACHING 05-Nov-07 8 TEACHING 12-Nov-07 9 TEACHING 19-Nov-07 10 TEACHING 26-Nov-07 11 TEACHING 03-Dec-07 12 TEACHING 10-Dec-07 13 TEACHING 17-Dec-07 STUD VAC 24-Dec-07 STUD VAC 31-Dec-07 STUD VAC 07-Jan-08 14 EXAMS 14-Jan-08 15 EXAMS/MARKING 21-Jan-08 16 MARKING 28-Jan-08 17 INDUCTION/FB 04-Feb-08 18 TEACHING/AB 11-Feb-08 19 TEACHING 18-Feb-08 20 TEACHING 25-Feb-08 21 TEACHING 03-Mar-08 22 TEACHING 10-Mar-08 23 TEACHING 17-Mar-08 STUD VAC 24-Mar-08 STUD VAC 31-Mar-08 24 TEACHING 07-Apr-08 25 TEACHING 14-Apr-08 26 TEACHING 21-Apr-08 27 TEACHING 28-Apr-08 28 TEACHING 125 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 05-May-08 29 TEACHING 12-May-08 30 REVISION 19-May-08 31 EXAMS 26-May-08 32 EXAMS/MARKING 02-Jun-08 33 MARKING 09-Jun-08 34 FB 16-Jun-08 35 AB/COUNSELLING 23-Jun-08 STUD VAC 30-Jun-08 STUD VAC 07-Jul-08 STUD VAC 14-Jul-08 STUD VAC 21-Jul-08 STUD VAC 28-Jul-08 STUD VAC 04-Aug-08 STUD VAC 11-Aug-08 STUD VAC 18-Aug-08 STUD VAC 25-Aug-08 36 STUD VAC/EXAMS 01-Sep-08 37 STUD VAC/MARKING 08-Sep-08 38 STUD VAC/FB/AB 126 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 APPENDIX C: USEFUL WEB PAGES Academic Appeals: http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/qualityass_appeals.htm Academic Integrity Policy http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/manual/index.htm Accreditation of Experiential Learning: http://www.uel.ac.uk/apel/index_ways.htm Assessment policy: http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/AssessmentPolicy.htm Attendance policy: http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/documents/attendancestudentguidelinesprogrammehandbo ok.doc Careers: http://www.uel.ac.uk/employability Complaints Procedure: http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/qualityass_complain.htm Computer based training for Word: http://www.uel.ac.uk/it/training/index.htm Counselling: http://www.uel.ac.uk/counselling Disability support: http://www.uel.ac.uk/disability/index.htm Employability at UEL: http://www.uel.ac.uk/employability/index.htm Equality and Diversity Policy: http://www.uel.ac.uk/personnel/EqualityDiversity_Policy.htm Extenuating Circumstances: http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/extenuation.htm Learning Teaching and Assessment Strategy 2006-09 http://www.uel.ac.uk/internal/l_and_t_strat/index.htm 127 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Library and Learning Services http://www.uel.ac.uk/lss/index.htm Manual of General Regulations http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/manual/index.htm Programme Specification: http://www.uel.ac.uk/courses/index.htm Referencing guidelines: http://www.uel.ac.uk/lss/Harvardreferencing.htm Skills Curriculum: http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/skills.htm Skillzone: http://www.uel.ac.uk/skillzone Student Charter: http://www.uel.ac.uk/studentcharter/ Student Services: http://www.uel.ac.uk/studentservices/index.htm Student Information http://www.uel.ac.uk/students Suitability Procedures http://www.uel.ac.uk/qa/manual/documents/PART14-Suitability.pdf 128 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 APPENDIX D Student Attendance Policy Guidance for Students: The Importance of Attendance You have made a commitment to work towards achieving academic success by enrolling on your programme and registering on your modules. We know, as you do, that in order to achieve ultimate success in your studies it is important that you participate in, and engage fully with, all your scheduled activities such as lectures, workshops and seminars. We therefore regard attendance as essential, as we are sure you will. Punctuality is also crucial (if you turn up late you may find you will not be allowed to enter -late attendance causes disruption for others). Other aspects of behaviour are important as well - for instance, no food or drink should be consumed in lectures or classes, all mobile phones should be turned off. Recording attendance We are obliged to keep records of your attendance. For all teaching activities specified by your School (workshops, seminars, practical sessions etc.) a record will be kept. You must ensure that you can demonstrate your attendance through this recording process. If you cannot attend If you cannot attend you should let us know, either beforehand or as soon as possible afterwards. You should notify your School office. A short note or email will do - but you should give your name, student number and the class for which you were unable to attend. If you do not attend regularly If you do not attend regularly or do not keep us informed of occasional non attendance you will find that your School will contact you to discuss the matter with you. It is important that you take this communication seriously and make contact immediately. We are so firmly convinced of the importance of attendance that we regard persistent non attendance as a statement by you that you are not interested in being a student. You will therefore find that if you do not attend three consecutive occasions for a module (without communicating with us), you will be deregistered on that module, or if your attendance falls below 75% at any time you can also be deregistered. You may even find that you are withdrawn from your programme. We will also inform the Student Loans Company and any other sponsors about the situation. If you attend regularly If you attend regularly you will get the most out of your studies, you will maximise your chances of success, and you will find the relationships you build up in your classes support you in your achievements. 129 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 APPENDIX E: Programme Committee TITLE: PROGRAMME COMMITTEE REPORTS TO: SCHOOL BOARD TERMS OF REFERENCE To be responsible for assuring and enhancing the quality of the student experience at programme level by: 1. Providing a forum in which students can express their views about the management of the programme, and the content, delivery and assessment of modules, in order to identify appropriate actions to be taken in response to the issues raised and to ensure that the implementation of these actions is tracked. 2. Providing formal yearly student feedback on the programme as input into the preparation of the Programme REP 3. Reviewing programme questionnaire results and making recommendations and changes arising from these. 4. Receiving, considering and approving the Programme REP and identifying responsibilities for action to be taken before it is considered by School Quality Standing Committee. 5. Reviewing the relevant documentation and other evidence prepared for Academic Review and other external review processes. 6. Considering proposals for modification of the programme structure. 7. Making recommendations for new modules to the appropriate Field Committee. 8. Advising the Programme Leader on mechanisms by which University policy statements, which have an impact on module design and delivery, are implemented. MEMBERSHIP Programme Leader (Chair) Administrator/Servicing Officer (ex-officio) Module leaders of all modules core to the programme Learning Support Services representative Technician representative (if appropriate) Head of School/Associate Head of School (ex officio) Two student representatives for each level and at least one part-time student (where appropriate) In attendance Programme staff, making a significant teaching contribution to the programme, will be entitled to attend The meeting will be quorate if 40% of the members are present. 130 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Appendix F: Modular Regulations Definitions and Explanations 1.1 A module is a separate identifiable block of learning which is credit-rated, with credit allocated on the basis of 10 hours of study for each credit. Standard modules are 20 credits in size for undergraduate programmes (indicating 200 hours of student study) or 30 credits in size for postgraduate programmes (indicating 300 hours of student study). 1.2 A unique module level is associated with each module. This is level 0, 1, 2, 3, or M (and P for placement modules), reflecting the level of achievement expected in order to pass (i.e. be awarded credit) in the module. 1.3 A module is a prerequisite module for another module if a student must have passed the prerequisite module (i.e. been awarded credit) in order to study on the other module. 1.4 A module is a precursor module for another module if a student must register on the precursor module (and remain registered for the duration of that module) in order to study subsequently on the other module. 1.5 A module is a co-requisite module with another module if both modules must be studied at the same time. 1.6 A module has one or more delivery modes. These will be either ‘on-campus’ or by ‘distance learning’ or both. The delivery mode(s) must be designated at approval. 1.7 An on-campus module is predominantly delivered on campus. A distance learning module is predominantly delivered by distance learning. 1.8 A component of a module is a separate part of a module, as identified in the module specification. Whole number marks are awarded for each component of a module. A standard module may have one, two or three components. Double and treble modules have a maximum of six and nine components respectively. 1.9 A Field comprises modules forming a coherent academic grouping. Each module belongs to one and only one Field. 1.10 A module specification specifies (amongst other matters) • module name • module unique identifying code • module credit value • the Field to which the module belongs • any prerequisites, precursors and co-requisites • module learning outcomes • outline module content • details of the component assessments and their weightings (together with the threshold mark for assessment if , for Professional and Statutory Regulatory Body requirements, this is set above the minimum standard threshold for) 1.11 In order to study, be assessed, or be reassessed on a module, a student must be registered on the module. Provided a student has registered on a module (and not subsequently been formally withdrawn from the module), the student will be assessed at the next assessment point (for that mode of delivery) and (if the module is not passed) reassessed on that module at the next reassessment point (for that mode of delivery). Assessment or reassessment cannot be deferred. 1.12 Reassessment for all on-campus modules (with the exception of the postgraduate advanced independent research module) will occur in the summer reassessment period. 1.13 A module for which a pass has not been achieved on assessment or reassessment may be repeated only once. This will involve reregistration and further study and assessment (and reassessment if necessary). 1.14 A programme leads to a university award. A programme may be a single module or a combination of modules. 1.15 A programme specification specifies (amongst other matters) • admission requirements for the programme • the structure of the programme • any particular conditions to be met (e.g. Professional and Statutory Regulatory Body requirements) for conferment of the relevant named award 1.16 A core module for a programme is a module which a student must have passed (i.e. been awarded credit) in order to achieve the relevant named award. Core modules are specified in the programme specification. 1.17 An option module for a programme is a module selected from a range of modules specified in the programme specification. 131 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 2. Undergraduate Awards 2.1 Undergraduate Associate Certificate A programme leading to an Undergraduate Associate Certificate consists of 20 credits at Level Zero or Higher 2.2 Undergraduate Certificate A programme leading to an Undergraduate Certificate consists of 40 credits at Level Zero or Higher 2.3 Certificate of Higher Education A programme leading to a Certificate of Higher Education consists of 120 credits at Level One or Higher 2.4 Diploma of Higher Education A programme leading to a Diploma of Higher Education consists of 240 credits at Level One or Higher including 120 credits at Level One or Higher 120 credits at Level Two or Higher 2.5 Foundation Degree A programme leading to a Foundation degree consists of 240 credits at Level One or Higher including 120 credits at Level One or Higher 120 credits at Level Two or Higher A Foundation degree is linked to a named Honours degree on to which a student may progress after successful completion of the Foundation degree 2.6 Ordinary Degree A programme leading to an Ordinary degree consists of 300 credits at Level One or Higher including 120 credits at Level One or Higher 120 credits at Level Two or Higher 60 credits at Level Three or Higher 2.7 Honours Degree A programme leading to an Honours degree consists of 360 credits at Level One or Higher including 120 credits at Level One or Higher 120 credits at Level Two or Higher 120 credits at Level Three or Higher Up to half the credits for an award may be achieved through accredited experiential learning, and up to two thirds of the credits for an award may be achieved through accredited certificated learning. (Where a combination of experiential and certificated learning is involved up to one half of the credits for the award may be achieved through accredited experiential learning with further credits being achieved through accredited certificated learning up to a maximum of two thirds of the credits for the award). In the case of an Honours Degree a minimum of 120 UEL credits should be achieved at Level Two or Level Three including a minimum of 80 UEL credits achieved at Level Three in order to ensure honours classification. 3. The Structure of Modular Undergraduate Programmes 3.1 Modules 3.1.1 Undergraduate programmes consist of standard modules whose value is 20 credits (equivalent to 200 student study hours), extending over one semester. Modules of 40 credits and 60 credits may extend over one or two semesters. 3.1.2 A module is allocated to a single level. 3.1.3 No module may be a pre-requisite for another module at the same level. 3.1.4 The programme specification will specify for each module within a programme whether it is a core module or an option module for that programme. 3.1.5 A standard module may be composed of one, two, or three components. 40 credit and 60 credit modules have a maximum of six and nine components respectively. 3.2 Undergraduate Honours degrees 132 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 3.2.1 An Honours degree may be either a named Single Honours degree, a named Combined Honours degree (a major and a minor, or a joint and a joint), or, a General Combined Studies Honours degree (if the credit requirement for an Honours degree is met but the requirements for a named award have not been met). 3.3 The structure of single and combined honours programmes 3.3.1 Single Honours is composed of 360 credits at Level One or Higher including 120 credits at Level One or Higher 120 credits at Level Two or Higher 120 credits at Level Three or Higher 3.3.2 Major Honours is composed of 240 credits at Level One or Higher including 80 credits at Level One or Higher 80 credits at Level Two or Higher 80 credits at Level Three or Higher 3.3.3 Joint Honours is composed of 180 credits at Level One or Higher including 60 credits at Level One or Higher 60 credits at Level Two or Higher 60 credits at Level Three or Higher 3.3.4 Minor Honours is composed of 120 credits at Level One or Higher including 40 credits at Level One or Higher 40 credits at Level Two or Higher 40 credits at Level Three or Higher 3.3.5 In addition, programme specifications may require a period of professional/industrial training or study/work experience abroad in order for a student to achieve the relevant named award. Such periods may be awarded 120 credits at level P for a 12 month period or 60 credits at level P for a six month period (or pro rata in multiples of 20 credits). 4. Undergraduate Student Study 4.1 Student registration and study 4.1.1 A student must be registered on a module in order to be assessed or reassessed on the module. 4.1.2 Once a student has passed (or been awarded a compensated pass (see 6.2.2)) on a module the student may not register, be assessed or reassessed on the module. 4.1.3 A standard study load for a student is 60 credits, or less, in on-campus mode in each semester. However a student may study up to 80 credits in one semester, provided that the total studied in one academic year (September to September) does not exceed 140 credits in on-campus mode (and no more than180 credits in on-campus or distance learning modes in total) . 4.1.4 A student may not study a level three module until all core level one modules on the programme on which the student is enrolled have been passed. 4.2 Time limits for student study 4.2.1 A student may not continue study, or be assessed or reassessed, on a module once three years have elapsed from first study on the module. 4.2.2 The time limit for completion of a programme is eight years after first enrolment on the programme. 4.3 Intermission 4.3.1 A student may intermit from a programme with the agreement of the programme leader. 4.3.2 During the intermitted period, which must be one or more complete semesters and no more than two consecutive years, no module study may be undertaken. However all outstanding reassessment requirements should be undertaken or else the module will automatically be regarded as not passed on reassessment (Note: Standard regulations on extenuation apply). 4.3.3 An intermission extends the time limits for study on the module and the programme for the period of the intermission (unless prohibited by Professional and Statutory Regulatory Body requirements) 133 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 5. Undergraduate Admission 5.1 Students are admitted in accordance with the admission requirements in the programme specification of the approved programme. 5.2 Students may be admitted with advanced standing through the recognition of credit, or the accreditation of experiential or certificated learning according to the University of East London Accreditation of (Experiential) Learning (A(E)L) policy. A student may gain admission to a programme, with advanced standing, with up to half of the credits associated with the award being achieved through accredited experiential learning, or up two thirds through accredited certificated learning. (Where a combination of experiential and certificated learning is involved up to one half of the credits for the award may be achieved through accredited experiential learning with further credits being achieved through accredited certificated learning up to a maximum of two thirds of the credits for the award) In the case of an Honours Degree a minimum of 120 UEL credits should be achieved at Level Two or Level Three including a minimum of 80 UEL credits achieved at Level Three in order to ensure honours classification. 5.3 A student who has been awarded an ordinary degree may be readmitted to the honours degree programme on which they were originally enrolled (or a Combined Studies honours degree programme) and re-enrolled to complete an honours degree programme provided that 5.3.1 There is at least one semester’s break between the award of the ordinary degree by the assessment board and re-enrolment on the honours degree programme 5.3.2 The total period between the first enrolment on the honours degree and its completion does not exceed 8 years as in regulation 4.2.2 In classifying the student the entire assessment profile on the honours degree programme is taken into account in the calculation of the classification. 6. Undergraduate Assessment 6.1 Field Boards and Module assessment 6.1.1 Field Boards 6.1.1.1 Field Boards are responsible for: • assuring the appropriate standards for modules • considering the performance of students on modules • confirming the marks achieved by students on modules • awarding credit for the achievement of students on modules • awarding credit for certificated and experiential learning • noting Breaches of Regulations 6.1.1.2 The Field Board considers all and only modules within the Field. The Field Board meets at the end of Semester A, at the end of Semester B and at the summer reassessment period. 6.1.2 Module assessment 6.1.2.1 In calculating the mark for a module on the basis of the component marks, the final mark is calculated as a percentage with all decimals points rounded up to the nearest whole number. 6.1.2.2 In order to pass a module, a student must both achieve an aggregate mark of 40% and also meet the component threshold marks. 6.1.2.3 For the purposes of passing a module each component has a threshold mark of 30%. (The threshold may be higher where there are Professional and Statutory Regulatory Body requirements; this will be specified in the module specification) 6.1.3 Reassessment in a module not passed 6.1.3.1 Where a student does not achieve an aggregate of 40%, or does not achieve the component threshold marks, the student is reassessed in the module at the next reassessment point, in all and only those components achieving a mark of less than 40%. Component marks of 40% or over are carried forward to reassessment. 6.1.3.2 The reassessment point for all on-campus modules is in the summer reassessment period 6.1.3.3 In determining whether a student has passed a module on reassessment, the calculation is based on the highest component marks achieved, whether in assessment or reassessment. 134 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 6.1.3.4 In order to pass a module on reassessment a student must both achieve an aggregate mark of 40% and achieve the component threshold marks. If the module is passed, the module mark is capped at 40% for the purposes of calculating the degree classification. The actual mark achieved will be recorded on the student transcript. 6.1.3.5 If a student reregisters and undertakes study on the same module prior to reassessment then the mark assigned to the reassessment is 0% 6.1.4 Procedure in the case of a student not passing a module on reassessment 6.1.4.1 A student who does not pass a module on reassessment is entitled to repeat the module once. 6.1.4.2 If a module which has not been passed on reassessment is an option module, the student may choose to register on an alternative option module (rather than repeat the option module). In this case, the regulations governing the first time study and assessment of a module apply and the marks achieved are not capped at 40%. 6.1.4.3 A repeated module must be undertaken after re-registration. Marks achieved previously in the module are ignored for the purposes of assessment of the repeated module (i.e. no marks are carried forward from the previous registration). 6.1.4.4 A repeated module is assessed at the end of the semester of study and (if necessary) reassessed at the subsequent reassessment point. If passed, a repeated module is capped at 40% for the purposes of calculating the degree classification. The actual mark achieved will be recorded on the student transcript 6.1.4.5 No further registration, study or assessment is possible for a repeated module which has not been passed after reassessment. 135 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 6.1.5 Procedure in the event of illness or other valid cause (extenuating circumstances) 6.1.5.1 A student who believes that • his/her performance in assessment or reassessment has been impaired, or • he/she was unable to attend for an assessment or reassessment, or • he/she was unable to submit assessed or reassessed work by the scheduled date due to illness or other valid cause (as defined in the Procedures Governing Extenuating Circumstances), may submit an application for extenuation for the relevant component(s) to the University of East London Extenuation Panel. Such applications will only be considered if the applicant has followed prescribed procedures, which can be found in the Procedures Governing Extenuating Circumstances. 6.1.5.2 If the Extenuation Panel grants extenuation for a component, the outcome is as follows: • any mark achieved for the relevant component(s) (including 0 for non-attendance at assessment or non-submission of assessed work) is ignored • the Field Board will not consider the module result until after reassessment • the student will be reassessed, in the extenuated component(s) only, in the summer reassessment period • no other components will be reassessed • the field board will consider the module result after summer reassessment • the mark achieved for the module will not be capped (unless it is a repeated module: see 6.1.4.). This has the effect of restoring the student, with respect to uncapping, to the position that the student would have been in, had the extenuating circumstance not occurred 6.1.5.3 Once a module has been capped extenuation does not uncap the module 6.1.5.4 Where • a student submits an application for extenuation for a component, and • the student has failed to achieve the threshold mark in a second component, and • no extenuation applies to this second component the effect of granting extenuation for the first component would be to ensure that the (below threshold) mark for the second component was carried forward to reassessment, (thus automatically preventing that student from passing the module at reassessment). In such cases, the application for extenuation will formally be denied in order that the student has the opportunity to pass the module at reassessment. 6.1.5.5 If • a student is granted extenuation for a component at reassessment, and • that component has previously been granted extenuation at assessment then (unless the module has already been repeated) the student will be allowed to repeat the module and the module mark will not be capped at 40% on assessment. The repeated module must be undertaken with study (after reregistration). Marks achieved previously in the module are ignored for the purposes of assessment of the repeated module (i.e. no marks are carried forward from the previous registration). 6.2 Award Boards 6.2.1 Award Boards 6.2.1.1 Award Boards are responsible for: • awarding credit to students on modules passed by compensation (see 6.2.2) • confirming eligibility for awards on the basis of accumulated credit • ensuring any award-specific requirements have been met • conferring awards • formally implementing the decisions of the Extenuation Panel • noting credits achieved on the basis of accredited learning • noting Breaches of Regulations 6.2.1.2 Each School will have one Award Board which meets following Field Boards at the end of Semester A, at the end of Semester B and at the end of the summer reassessment period. 6.2.2 Compensation 6.2.2.1 A student is awarded a compensated pass in a module by an Award Board and awarded credit provided that: 136 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 • the module is a 20 credit option module • the student has been awarded 100 UEL credits at the level (or higher) of the compensated module • the student has both attained at least 35% in the module to be compensated and attained the threshold in all components • the module is not specified as non-compensatable in the programme specification as an award-specific requirement 6.2.2.2 If eligible, the student will be awarded a maximum of one compensated pass on one module at each level on a programme and this will occur at the earliest point at which the student is eligible for compensation. Modules which have already been taken into account in deciding a student’s eligibility for compensation cannot subsequently be taken into account for the further compensation of another module. 6.2.3 Conferment of award for completion of a programme 6.2.3.1 The Award Board will confer an award on a student for completion of a programme at the first occasion on which the student is eligible for the award. 6.2.3.2 Where a student has withdrawn from, or is being discontinued on, a programme and has not transferred to another UEL programme, the Award Board will confer the highest award for which the student is eligible. 6.2.4 Honours degree – classification 6.2.4.1 Where a student is eligible for an Honours degree, and has gained a minimum of 240 UEL credits at level 2 or level 3 on the current enrolment for the programme, including a minimum of 120 UEL credits at level 3, the award classification is determined by calculating: and applying the mark obtained as a percentage, with all The arithmetic The arithmetic 1 decimals points rounded up to the nearest whole number, mean of the best x 2/3 + mean of the next x / to the following classification 100 credits at best 100 credits at 3 level 3 levels 2 and/or 3 70% - 100% First Class Honours 60% - 69% Second Class Honours, First Division 50% - 59% Second Class Honours, Second Division 40% - 49% Third Class Honours 0% - 39% Not passed 6.2.5 Honours degree – classification (A(E)L) 6.2.5.1 Where a student is eligible for an Honours degree, has non-UEL credit (accredited learning, experiential learning or recognised credit), and has achieved fewer than 240 UEL credits at level 2 or level 3 (but with a minimum of 120 UEL credits achieved at Level 2 or Level 3 including a minimum of 80 UEL credits achieved at Level 3) on the current enrolment for the programme, the award classification is determined by calculating: Credits 220 (mean of the best 100 + (mean of the next best credits at level 3)x2/3 100 credits at levels 2 or 3)x1/3 200 (mean of the best 100 + (mean of the next best credits at level 3)x2/3 80 credits at levels 2 or 3)x1/3 180 (mean of the best 80 + (mean of the next best credits at level 3)x2/3 80 credits at levels 2 or 3)x1/3 160 (mean of the best 80 + (mean of the next best credits at level 3)x2/3 60 credits at levels 2 or 3)x1/3 120-140 (mean of the best 80 + (mean of the next best credits at level 3)x2/3 40 credits at levels 2 or 3)x1/3 and applying the mark obtained as a percentage, with all decimals points rounded up to the nearest whole number, to the following classification 137 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 70% - 100% First Class Honours 60% - 69% Second Class Honours, First Division 50% - 59% Second Class Honours, Second Division 40% - 49% Third Class Honours 0% - 39% Not passed 6.2.6 Ordinary degree – classification 6.2.6.1 Where a student is eligible for an ordinary degree, the award classification is determined by calculating the credit-weighted arithmetic mean of all marks at level 2 and level 3 on the current enrolment for the programme and applying the mark obtained as a percentage, with all decimals points rounded up to the nearest whole number, to the following classification 70% - 100% Distinction 55% - 69% Merit 40% - 54% Pass 0% - 39% Not passed 6.2.7 Foundation degree – classification 6.2.7.1 Where a student is eligible for a Foundation degree, the award classification is determined by calculating the credit- weighted arithmetic mean of all marks obtained for modules at level 1 or higher on the current enrolment for the programme and applying the mark obtained as a percentage, with all decimals points rounded up to the nearest whole number, to the following classification 70% - 100% Distinction 55% - 69% Merit 40% - 54% Pass 0% - 39% Not passed 6.2.8 Aegrotat and posthumous awards 6.2.8.1 These may be conferred in accordance with the Manual of General Regulations and Policies. 6.2.9 Award name 6.2.9.1 In order to qualify for a named award, the student must have been enrolled on the programme and satisfied any award- specific requirements as detailed in the relevant programme specification. 6.2.9.2 Students not satisfying any award-specific requirements for a named award, but who are otherwise eligible for the award of an Honours degree or an Ordinary degree, are eligible for the named award from the following list most closely describing their programme of study. The name will be confirmed by the Award Board on the basis of pattern of study Single Honours Degrees BA/BSc Combined Studies BSc Combined Applied Health Sciences BA Combined Art and Design BA Combined Business Studies BA Combined Education Studies BA Combined Humanities BA Combined Legal Studies BSc Combined Psychological Sciences BSc Combined Sciences BA Combined Social Sciences BSc Technological Sciences BSc Technological Studies Combined Honours Degrees BA/BSc X andwith Combined Studies BA/BSc Combined Studies with X BA/BSc Combined Studies 6.2.10 Discontinuation of a student on a programme 138 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 6.2.10.1 A student cannot continue on a programme if the student has not achieved a pass in the reassessment of a repeated core module for that programme. The student will be offered transfer to an alternative programme 12. Modular Programmes - General 12.1 These regulations do not restrict penalties imposed for Breaches of Regulations. 139 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 140 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    • Programme Handbook: Film & Video 2009/10 APPENDIX G HEALTH AND SAFETY There are hazards and potential risks in an academic workplace as much as in an office or factory setting. For example, in manual handling, systems of work, display screen equipment (VDUs), electrical appliances, chemicals (substances hazardous to health), confined spaces, risk to ‘new and expectant mothers’, lone working, work equipment, fire. In HSS your Head of School is responsible for undertaking an assessment of the potential risks to students and staff arising from the workplace environment on the Docklands site and for advertising these. All hazardous situations, dangerous or violent incidents, fires, ‘near miss’ and accidents should be reported to the Head of School and to the HSS Health and Safety Advisor (Steve Lauder, s.lauder@uel.ac.uk, x2558) whether or not personal injury has occurred. Incident/accident report forms may be accessed via the University www.uel.ac.uk/safety. Fire is the most common cause of death and injury at work. It is essential that you familiarise yourself with emergency procedures. If you have a disability which impairs your mobility, or your ability to respond to an emergency in some other way, it must be brought to the attention of a relevant member of staff – e.g., course tutor, school registrar – to enable the University to take additional measures where required to ensure your well being. It is recommended that: - You identify at least two fire exits whilst on the premises - Identify the location of fire fighting equipment - Identify fire assembly points - Never move extinguishers or use them as doorsteps - Know what action you should take in the event of discovering fire - What action to take when the alarm sounds The University designates a number of first-aiders, who maintain First-Aid boxes. First Aid and information as to the nearest first-aiders will be displayed on school noticeboards. The switchboard also holds details of available first-aiders. If injury or illness is severe, do not delay in dialling 9-999 for emergency services. The University of East London (UEL) operates a NO SMOKING policy on its premises. The programme of study you have started involves the use of computers, but in fact most of your time is spent in lectures and seminars rather than in front of a computer screen. When you are required to use computers in a teaching session, we have made sure that your workstation is ergonomically designed and that suitable breaks away from the screen are built into the session. No computer-based session is longer than 90 minutes in total, and no session requires you to look at the screen continuously for a longer period of time. You are more likely to be at risk of problems such as eyestrain and RSI at home than at university, as many people who have a computer at home do not have ergonomically suitable chairs, desks, monitor placement, etc., and do not take regular breaks. It is a good idea to have your eyes checked before you start the course, as any existing problems may be exacerbated by computer use, and future problems may be avoided by intervening at this stage. If you have medical reasons for being concerned about computer use, we suggest you discuss the matter with your doctor before committing yourself to this course.
    • Programme Handbook: Film & Video 2009/10 Appendix H: Terms of Admittance to The University of East London IMPORTANT: The following form part of the contract between the University of East London and its students throughout their programme of study. 1. STUDENT STATUS: Students are expected to enrol by the first day of each academic session, or other starting date appropriate to their programme of study. There is no guarantee that their place will be held open beyond this date. Anyone who fails to complete her / his (re)enrolment (including the payment of fees) by the due date, as published in the fees policy, may forfeit student status and all rights attaching to that status, including attendance and use of university facilities. This shall apply whether or not a letter of exclusion is issued. If you are on a student visa and do not enrol by the final enrolment date for your programme we are required to report this to UK Border Agency (UKBA) 2. PROOF OF QUALIFICATIONS: Students are required, before they begin their studies, to produce evidence of having satisfied the entry requirements for their programme. Such evidence must be in the form of the original certificates or, in the case of GC(S)Es, certified notifications of results from the examining body. All qualifications must be in English or supported by an official translation. Anyone discovered to have falsified or misrepresented her / his entry qualifications and/or other associated information is liable to expulsion from the University. 3. SUPPLEMENTARY TUITION: In addition to the normal curriculum requirements of a programme of study, students who are considered to need supplementary tuition in order to pursue their programme will be required to take additional study as prescribed by the university. 4. UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS, POLICIES AND RULES: Students must agree to abide by the various regulations, policies and rules applicable to them which are in force at the time of their (re)enrolment and as amended throughout the duration of their programme of study. Key documents * are available on the website: others specific to particular areas ** will be distributed as students begin to use the relevant facilities. The examples that follow are not exhaustive i.e. 1. *Manual of General Regulations (incorporating, inter alia, regulations on attendance, procedures for academic appeals, assessment offences, complaints, disciplinary action, professional suitability); fees policy (including late payment charges and installment payments); equality and diversity policy statement; race equality scheme; disability equality scheme; gender equality scheme; personal dignity policy; network security policy; no-smoking policy; Student Charter UK Border Agency (UKBA) reporting requirements 2. ** Specific programme requirements for attendance, assessment and additional charges: library rules; laboratory and workshop codes of practice). 5. DATA PROTECTION: It is the responsibility of students to supply and update promptly any change(s) to the data required for official recording and external reporting purposes including the requirement that the University must have at all times a student’s current address. By accepting the terms of admittance students consent to the processing of such data for any purposes connected with their studies or for health and safety reasons or for any other legitimate reason. Information held regarding students will only be released under the terms of the university’s notification under the Data Protection Act. These terms are consistent with our commitment to prevent fraud and the abuse of public funds. 6. CHANGES TO SCHEDULED PROGRAMMES: We reserve the right to modify and develop our advertised programmes (including the location of delivery) and to cancel a proposed programme if we reasonably consider this to be necessary. If the programme to which the student has been admitted is cancelled, the student may withdraw from the university without any liability for fees, or transfer to another programme on which a place is available and for which the student is suitably qualified. International students must seek advice from the International Student Advice team in the International Office in relation to any visa implications. 7. DISRUPTION OF SCHEDULED ACTIVITIES: We will endeavour to provide the services and functions described in our communications.. However, we cannot be held accountable for frustrations of these services and functions which occur through circumstances outside our control. 8. FUNDING ARRANGEMENTS FOR UK AND EU FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE (AND PGCE) STUDENTS THESE DO NOT APPLY TO INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS: Student loans are part of the Government's financial support package for students in higher education. For details on how to apply for financial support, please go to www.studentsupportdirect.co.uk/. You will also find information on the financial support available on the Student Money Advice & Rights Team web page at www.uel.ac.uk/smart.
    • Programme Handbook: Film & Video 2009/10 9. STUDENTS ON A STUDENT VISA: Such students must comply with the terms of their student visa and with all University’s policies arising from our duties/obligations as UKBA sponsor licence holder. IN CONSULTATION WITH STUDENTS AND STAFF, THE UNIVERSITY HAS ADOPTED A POLICY OF NOSMOKING. STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO COMPLY WITH THIS POLICY
    • Programme Handbook: Film & Video 2009/10 Appendix I Staff contact details Staff Contact Details Andrew Deborah EB. 2.20 x7022 d.andrew@gmail.com Andrews Molly EB. 1.58 x2792 m.andrews@uel.ac.uk Aldred Rachel EB. 1. 111 x4289 r.e.aldred@uel.ac. Ashman Sam EB. 2.21 x2350 s.j.ashman@uel.ac.uk Atkins Tim EB. 2.19 x7144 t.atkins@uel.ac.uk Ball Diane EB. 1.60 x2770 d.m.ball@uel.ac.uk Bandyopadhyay Nanda EB. 1.49 x4280 n.bandyopadhyay@uel.ac.uk Barnfield Graham EB. 2.36 x6244 g.barnfield@uel.ac.uk Bernstock Penny EB. 2.55 x2795 p.bernstock@uel.ac.uk Blackford Cathy EB. 2.39 x2764 c.m.a.blackford@uel.ac.uk Blake Andrew EB. 1.107 x7298 a.j.blake@uel.ac.uk Blakemore Helena EB. 2.49 x2377 h.c.blakemore@uel.ac.uk Bore Lucy EB. 1.60 x4257 l.bore@uel.ac.uk Breed Ananda EB. 2. 38 x2748 a.breed@uel.ac.uk Bresheeth Haim EB. 3.02 x2758 h.bresheeth@uel.ac.uk Briggs Steve EB. 201D x2675 s.briggs@uel.ac.uk Brown Fred WB. 1.35 x7436 f.w.a.brown@uel.ac.uk Burnett Judith EB. 1.109 x2778 j.burnett@uel.ac.uk Calcutt Andrew EB.1.35 x4242 a.calcutt@uel.ac.uk Cannon Robert EB. 2.67 x6228 r.j.cannon@uel.ac.uk Carson Fiona EB. 2.47 x6243 f.d.carson@uel.ac.uk Cassidy Jules EB.1.30 x4238 j.cassidy@uel.ac.uk Cawkwell Yumi EB. 1.14 x 7043 y.cawkwell@uel.ac.uk Chapman David EB. 2.70 x7405 d.m.chapman@uel.ac.uk Chaudhry Safiyyah EB. 1.60 x2855 s.chaudhry@uel.ac.uk Chikunkhuzeni Francis EB. 2.22 x2542 f.chikunkuzeni@uel.ac.uk Chui James EB. 2.64 x2794 j.chui@uel.ac.uk Clare Pat EB.3.13a X7148 p.clare@uel.ac.uk Clegg Christine EB. 2.61 x2755 c.clegg@uel.ac.uk Cohen Sue EB. G. 04 x7641 s.cohen@uel.ac.uk Craig Linda EB. 2.52 x2244 l.j.craig@uel.ac.uk Cudworth Erika EB. 1.110 x7662 e.calvo@uel.ac.uk Dale Katherine EB. 2.19 x7711 katherine.dale@uel.ac.uk Dane Julia EB 2.68 X7647 j.k.dane@uel.ac.uk Daniels Jill EB.2.54 x7483 j.daniels@uel.ac.uk Dave Paul EB. 2.21 x7245 p.dave@uel.ac.uk David Caroline EB. 1.60 x2175 c.david@uel.ac.uk
    • Programme Handbook: Film & Video 2009/10 Davis Maya EB. G. 04 x7303 maya.davis@uel.ac.uk De Angelis Massimo EB. 1.54 x2254 m.deangelis@uel.ac.uk De Miranda Alvaro EB. 3.01 x7696 a.t.demiranda@uel.ac.uk Diamond Nicola EB. 2.26 x2543 n.diamond@uel.ac.uk Dona Giorgia EB. 1.15 x2791 g.dona@uel.ac.uk Dorrington David EB. 1.35 x2596 d.dorrington@uel.ac.uk Ducker Anne-Marie EB. 2.48 X7177 a.ducker@uel.ac.uk Durkee David EB.2.34 x2757 d.durkee@uel.ac.uk Eastwood Steven WB. 1.14 x2759 eastwood@uel.ac.uk Ellis Darren EB.1.30 x2935 d.ellis@uel.ac.uk Fabos Anita EB. 2.58 x2595 a.fabos@uel.ac.uk Filtzer Donald EB. 2.27 x2781 d.a.filtzer@uel.ac.uk Flusfeder David EB. 2.20 x7022 d.l.flusfeder@uel.ac.uk Garrett Roberta EB. 2.52 x2934 r.garrett@uel.ac.uk Gilbert Jeremy EB. 2.60 x7643 j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk Goodman Steve WB.1.14 x7438 s.goodman@uel.ac.uk Gormley Paul EB. 2.57 x2936 p.gormley@uel.ac.uk Griffith Jon EB. 3.14 x4206 j.griffith@uel.ac.uk Hails Barry WB. G.06 x7446/7515 b.hails@uel.ac.uk Hails Trevor WB. 1.33 x7455 t.hails@uel.ac.uk Hall Peter WB. 1.33 x7518 p.j.hall@uel.ac.uk Hall Tim EB. 2.64 x2794 t.w.hall@uel.ac.uk Halstead Narmala EB. 1.16 x4229 n.halstead@uel.ac.uk Hanson Careen EB. 2.19 x2688 c.a.hanson@uel.ac.uk Hardy Jonathan EB. 2.71 x6266 j.hardy@uel.ac.uk Harrison Barbara EB. 3.01 x2771 b.harrison@uel.ac.uk Higorani Dominic EB. 1.14 x7622 d.hingorani@uel.ac.uk Hobden Steve EB. 1.17 x7256 s.c.hobden@uel.ac.uk Hodgkin Kate EB. 2.35 x2934 k.hodgkin@uel.ac.uk Hudson Sylvia EB. 160 x2768 s.hudson@uel.ac.uk Humm Maggie EB. 2.31 x2749 m.humm@uel.ac.uk Hunter Mark EB. 1.14 X7043 m.hunter@uel.ac.uk Hyde Dave EB. 2.22 x7689 d.hyde@uel.ac.uk Hyrbowicz Maciek WB. 1.25 x7406 m.hrybowicz@uel.ac.uk Ikoniadou Eleni EB. 2.20 x7022 e.ikoniadou@uel.ac.uk Jeffers Sydney EB. 1.111 x7733 s.jeffers@uel.ac.uk John Linda WB. 1.12 x2680 l.john@uel.ac.uk Johns Robert EB. 2.01D x2241 r.g.johns@uel.ac.uk Jones David EB. 1.57 x2799 d.jones@uel.ac.uk Jones Lurraine EB. 1.50 x7426 l.f.jones@uel.ac.uk Joseph Marie EB. 2.01A x2115 m.joseph@uel.ac.uk Kempadoo Roshini EB. 2.70 x7706 r.kempadoo@uel.ac.uk Khan Naheed EB.3.05 x4245 n.khan@uel.ac.uk Knight Christopher EB. 1.21 x2789 chris.knight@uel.ac.uk Korac-Sanderson Maja EB. 2.28 x7248 m.korac@uel.ac.uk Kulothungan Gladius EB. 2.30 x4558 gladius@uel.ac.uk Langstone Delia EB. 1.47 x7622 delia@uel.ac.uk Lambert Angela EB.3.13a x4233 a.lambert@uel.ac.uk
    • Programme Handbook: Film & Video 2009/10 Lauder Steve WB. 1.33 x2558 s.lauder@uel.ac.uk Lawrence Conan EB. 1.14 x7043 c.lawrence@uel.ac.uk Lawrence Tim EB. 2.29 x7484 t.lawrence@uel.ac.uk Leader Tracey EB. 1.60 x7454 t.leader@uel.ac.uk Loshitzky Yosefa EB. 2.53 x2176 y.loshitzky@uel.ac.uk Luddick Dawn EB. 2.23 x2777 d.ludick@uel.ac.uk Lynn Simon EB. 2.19 x2775 s.b.lynn@uel.ac.uk Madgin Rebecca EB. 3.14 x7822 r.m.madgin@uel.ac.uk Malatesta Allyson EB. 2.20 x7022/7632 a.malatesta@uel.ac.uk Martin Neil WB. 1.33 X2558 n.martin@uel.ac.uk Macdonald John EB. 1.60 x2740 j.w.macdonald@uel.ac.uk Macrury Iain EB. 2.69 x7530 i.m.macrury@uel.ac.uk Maddison Stephen EB. 2.63 x6240 s.maddison@uel.ac.uk Makinwa Lola WB.G.07 x7418 l.c.makinwa@uel.ac.uk Marfleet Phil EB. 3.03 x7690 p.marfleet@uel.ac.uk Marriott John EB. 2.37 x2756 j.w.marriott@uel.ac.uk McBride David WB.1.35 x7440 d.macbride@uel.ac.uk McGovern John EB. 2.66 x2253 j.b.mcgovern@uel.ac.uk McWatt Tessa EB. 1.20 x7237 t.a.mcwatt@uel.ac.uk Minnion Andy WB. 1.35 x2447 a.t.minnion@uel.ac.uk Mitchell Grethe EB. 1.108 x7421 g.r.mitchell@uel.ac.uk Mitchell Jacqui EB. 1.47 x4248 j.mitchell@uel.ac.uk Moore Carol EB. 3.05 x2743 c.moore@uel.ac.uk Morey Peter EB. 2.50 x7693 p.g.morey@uel.ac.uk Mukasa Miriam EB. 1.27 x4267 m.w.mukasa@uel.ac.uk Murray Millie EB. 1.106 X2763 m.murray@uel.ac.uk Mutter Robin EB. 2.01B X7826 R.Mutter@uel.ac.uk Myles John EB. 2.56 x7695 j.f.myles@uel.ac.uk Nassari John EB. 2.58 x2595 j.nassari@uel.ac.uk Nava Mica EB. 2.33 x2762 m.nava@uel.ac.uk Nelmes Jill EB. 2.52 x7483 j.nelmes@uel.ac.uk Newlands Maxine EB. 2.22 x7825 m.newlands@uel.ac.uk Newman Mary EB. 1.47 x4231 m.newman@uel.ac.uk Nijhawan Amita EB. 1.14 x7622 a.nijhawan@uel.ac.uk Nowicka Gosia EB. 2.20 x7632 g.m.nowicka@uel.ac.uk O'Thomas Mark EB. 1.13 x7250 m.othomas@uel.ac.uk Parfitt Trevor EB. 2.34 x2757 t.w.parfitt@uel.ac.uk Parkes Michael EB. 1.22 DK2810,DH2338 m.parkes@uel.ac.uk Parkinson Clare EB. 2.01C x2240 c.p.parkinson@uel.ac.uk Perkins Gill EB. 3.07 x4215 g.s.perkins@uel.ac.uk Perry Arthur WB. 1.31 x4235 a.r.perry@uel.ac.uk Phelan Jennifer EB. 1.60 x6238 j.phelan@uel.ac.uk Pick Anat EB. 2.19 x7335 a.pick@uel.ac.uk Pogoda Stacey EB. 1.29 x2488 s.l.pogoda@uel.ac.uk Pomeroy Christina EB. 2.10E x2981 c.pomeroy@uel.ac.uk Powell Helen EB. 2.54 x2100 h.l.powell@uel.ac.uk Power Camilla EB. 1.25 x2796 c.c.power@uel.ac.uk Poynter Gavin EB. 3.01 x7706 g.poynter@uel.ac.uk
    • Programme Handbook: Film & Video 2009/10 Prasad Sylvie WB. 1.14 x2561 s.e.prasad@uel.ac.uk Price Heather EB. 2.23 x2777 h.s.price@uel.ac.uk Rabikowska Marta EB. 1.108 x2960 marta@uel.ac.uk Rabinowicz Ellen EB. 2.01E x2932 e.rabinowicz@uel.ac.uk Radstone Susannah EB. 2.25 x2751 s.radstone@uel.ac.uk Rees Philip EB. 3.05 x2151 p.a.rees@uel.ac.uk Reddington Helen EB 2.68 x2788 h.l.reddington@uel.ac.uk Robbins Derek EB. 2.66 x2173 d.m.robbins@uel.ac.uk Rustin Michael EB. 3.01 x2771 m.j.rustin@uel.ac.uk Sampson Alice EB. 3.14 x4202 a.sampson@uel.ac.uk Sampson Tony EB. 1.31 x7149 t.d.sampson@uel.ac.uk Senft Terri EB. 1.108 x4255 t.senft@uel.ac.uk Sharma Ash EB. 2.65 x2761 a.sharma@uel.ac.uk Sharrier Diane EB. 1.60 x2155 d.sharrier@uel.ac.uk Shaw Debra EB. 1.18 x7474 d.shaw@uel.ac.uk Sherman Jo eb.3.13a x4216 j.c.sherman@uel.ac.uk Silver Ruth EB. 1.60 x2767 r.silver@uel.ac.uk Sims Lionel EB. 1.23 x2784 l.d.sims@uel.ac.uk Sims Martin WB.1.14 x7244 m.sims@uel.ac.uk Sivan Eyal EB. 2.32 x7696 e.sivan@uel.ac.uk Smith Gary EB. 1.60C x4241 gary.smith@uel.ac.uk Smith Mary Library x7261 m.k.smith@uel.ac.uk Squire Corinne EB. 1.59 x2686 c.squire@uel.ac.uk Staples Pat WB. 1.35 x7535 p.staples@uel.ac.uk Stein Josephine EB. 1.55 x4249 j.a.stein@uel.ac.uk Stepulevage Linda EB. 1.35 x4246 l.stepulevage@uel.ac.uk Stokes Jane EB. 1.56 x6309 j.c.stokes@uel.ac.uk Storr Merl EB. 1.26 x2263 M.J.Storr@uel.ac.uk Stow Anne EB. G. 04 x7631 a.l.stow@uel.ac.uk Stubbs Olive EB. 2.62 x6265 o.m.stubbs@uel.ac.uk Szereto Mitzi EB. 2.20 x7022 m.szereto@uel.ac.uk Talbot Linda EB.3.13a x2800 l.s.talbot@uel.ac.uk Tamboukou Maria EB. 1.110 x2783 m.tamboukou@uel.ac.uk Taylor Barbara EB. 2.59 x7692 b.taylor@uel.ac.uk Thomas Graham EB. 1.11 x4247 g.s.thomas@uel.ac.uk Thomas Joanne EB. 2.38 x2386 j.m.thomas@uel.ac.uk Tiwari Meera EB. 1.24 x7422 m.tiwari@uel.ac.uk Tomlinson Penda EB. 1.29 x2488 p.tomlinson@uel.ac.uk Trevillion Steve EB.3.13 x4213 s.p.trevillion@uel.ac.uk Turner Eva EB. 1.51 x4234 e.turner@uel.ac.uk Ugba Abel EB. 2.24 x7368 a.ugba@uel.ac.uk Valentine Paul EB. 1.19 x7089 p.valentine@uel.ac.uk Vitali Valentina EB. 2.38 x3342 v.vitali@uel.ac.uk Voela Angie EB. 1.32 x7426 a.voela@uel.ac.uk Von Schelling Vivien EB. 2.22 x2542 Vivian@uel.ac.uk Walker Kathy EB. 1.53 x4244 k.m.walker@uel.ac.uk Ward Adrian EB. 2.21 x7711 A.Ward@uel.ac.uk Wells Marianne EB. 1.33 x2540 m.wells@uel.ac.uk
    • Programme Handbook: Film & Video 2009/10 Wiley Cheryl EB. 160 x6229 c.wiley@uel.ac.uk Wilkes Karen EB. 2.48 x7197 k.wilkes@uel.ac.uk Yates Candy EB1.52 x2785 c.yates@uel.ac.uk Yoon Hyunsun Catherine EB 1.28 x7697 c.h.yoon:@uel.ac.uk Yuval-Davis Nira EB. 3.04 x2632 n.yuval-davis@uel.ac.uk Visiting Lecturers Room EB.2.20 X7022 Visiting Lecturers Room EB 2.48 x7177