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Film

  1. 1. SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL BA (HONS) FILM AND VIDEO: THEORY AND PRACTICE SCIENCES 2009-2010
  2. 2. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 1 WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS Welcome and Introduction to UEL, Image Welcome to School of Humanities and Social Sciences Image Welcome to the New Media programmes Image Contacts: Programme Leaders: Dr Anat Pick and Dr Steven Eastwood: a.pick@uel.ac.uk eastwood@uel.ac.uk Important The information in this handbook maybe out of date and have changed. For the latest version please visit: www.uel.ac.uk/HSS/handbook 2 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  3. 3. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film & Video: Theory and Practice Handbook: Contents About the School 4 General Enquiries 5 Enrolment 5 Programme and Module related enquiries 5 Student support 5 Student Enquiries Desk 6 General University Services 6 UEL direct 6 Equal opportunities 6 Introduction to Film & Video at UEL 7 Programme structure 8 Graduate opportunities 8 The Film & Video team 9 Useful contacts and web sites 9 Programme aims and outcomes 10 Programme duration and modes of study 10 Delivery, Employability, Skills curriculum 11 Programme specifications 11 Programme Structure 12 Brief Module descriptions 13 Understanding and selecting your modules 16 The modular system at UEL 18 Core and option modules, Levels 1-3 20-78 UEL programme operation and student registration 79 Enrolment 79 Induction 79 Teaching methods 80 Student practice 81 Assessment criteria and fairness 81-83 Essay writing guidelines 84-88 Grade performance tables and Benchmark criteria 89-94 Submitting coursework 95 Extenuating circumstances 96-99 Appeals against decisions 99 Notification of results 100 Reassessment and assessment offences 101 Feedback 101 Plagiarism and collusion 102-3 Programme management and Programme committee 104 Module Feedback 104 Student satisfaction 104 Student support: further information 105 Disabilities and dyslexia 105 English language support / The Writing Centre 105 The Student Union 106 Other resources 106 The Library 107 MultiMedia Production Centre (MPC) 107 Academic Appeals 108 3 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  4. 4. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Complaints 108 Appendices 110-134 4 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  5. 5. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 1.1 School of Humanities and Social Sciences: key roles and contact details1: Introduction School of Humanities & Social Sciences University of East London, 4-6 University Way London E16 2RD Welcome to the Film & Video Programmes Phone: 0208 223 7631 / 7641 / 7303 at the University of East London’s Docklands Fax: 020 8223 2898 campus. 0208 223 + ext: Student Enquiry Desk EB.G.04 Atrium This Programme Handbook is intended as a Sue Cohen s.cohen@uel.ac.uk 7641 ready source of information and advice as Anne Stowe a.l.stowe@uel.ac.uk 7631 you work towards completing your degree. Maya Davis maya.davis@uel.ac.uk 7303 This handbook provides key information about the school and contact details for Dean of School programme teaching team and other key Steve Trevillion s.p.trevillion@uel.ac.uk staff. Associate Deans of School The handbook provides programme Andrew Blake a.j.blake@uel.ac.uk information; describing the content of the Vacant Post modules, how they are taught and assessed. The handbook and its appendices provide SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 4241 detailed advice and information to help you Registrar Gary Smith gary.smith@uel.ac.uk make the most of the programme and of Quality & Compliance Manager : Vacant Post 2175 your studies as you work towards achieving Senior Administrator (QA) Caroline David c.david@uel.ac.uk 2155 your award. Senior Administrator (Collaborative) Diane Sharrier d.sharrier@uel.ac.uk UEL is committed to ensuring you have a rewarding academic experience here. We aim to provide an environment offering an Anthropology, Politics & International Development enjoyable, engaging and challenging higher (AI) 2784 education experience. This will, we hope, Field Leader: Lionel Sims l.d.sims@uel.ac.uk 2770 provide a platform for your future personal Administrator: Diane Ball d.m.ball@uel.ac.uk and career development. Cultural Studies & Creative Industries (CC) Across the range of its programmes, UEL Field Leader: Stephen Maddison S.Maddison@uel.ac.uk 6240 takes pride in providing excellent teaching, Administrators: Tracey Leader t.leader@uel.ac.uk 7454 nurtured by excellent research. Supporting Vacant Post these activities, we also promise our students clarity and consistency in the administration of programmes and high Media, Communications & Screen Studies (MS) levels of support and pastoral guidance Field Leader: Paul Gormley (MS) p.gormley@uel.ac.uk 2936 throughout the period of their studies. Administrators: John McDonald j.mcdonald@uel.ac.uk 2743 Vacant Post UEL is fully supportive of the Students’ Union and University’s Equal Opportunities Performing Arts (PA) policy. No student or member of staff Field Leader: Mark O’Thomas (PA) m.othomas@uel.ac.uk 7250 should be disadvantaged due to matters of Administrator: Vacant Post 2767 ‘race’, class, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation or disability, and that all members of the UEL community are entitled Social Work, Policy & Psychosocial Studies (PS) to be treated with courtesy according to Field Leader: David Jones (PS) d.jones@uel.ac.uk 2799 these consensual norms of mutual respect Administrators: Sylvie Hudson s.j.hudson@uel.ac.uk 2768 and understanding. Cheryl Wiley c.wiley@uel.ac.uk 6229 Sociology & Innovation Studies (IS) Field Leader: Penny Bernstock P.Bernstock@uel.ac.uk 2795 Administrator: Lucy Bore l.bore@uel.ac.uk 4257 Combined Honours Leader, Olive Stubbs o.m.stubbs@uel.ac.uk 6265 MPC Administration & Enquiries mpcadmin@uel.ac.uk 2680 1 (Please see Appendix I for current full staff list with full email, room and telephone details) 5 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  6. 6. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Field Leaders Field Leaders are each responsible for the management of staff in the field, ensuring compliance with School policy and representing the interests of programmes and subject panels on the School Management Team. Field Leaders will not normally be in a position to deal with student problems directly. That duty lies with Module Leaders, Programme Leaders and/or Personal Tutors. Programme Leaders Programme Leaders coordinate the day-to-day business of programmes with responsibility for students on that programme. Programme Leaders enjoy the confidence of Field Leaders, assuming daily charge of programmes and student matters on behalf of the School. Programme Leaders naturally possess close knowledge of the programme aims and objectives and will have an intellectual commitment to and understanding of the subject. As such they are ideally placed to advise and officiate on day-to-day student matters and to represent the academic and collegial interests of the programme and subject panel on the HSS Programme Leaders’ Committee. Module Leaders If a problem arises in a particular module, e.g., you wish to change your seminar group or you would like further reading on one of the topics appearing in the module, you should consult the relevant Module Leader who is responsible for the overall operation of the module. In most cases, however, you may find it more convenient to approach your seminar tutor who will normally be prepared to answer queries on behalf of the Module Leader. Be sure to define your problem as precisely as possible to ensure that the guidance given will be as effective as possible. Personal Tutors Personal Tutors are members of academic staff trained to provide tailored academic advice and counsel. Meeting with their tutees at regular intervals, with the cooperation of students, personal tutors will keep up-to-date records through the course of their tutees’ studies and in compact with tutees, will track and ‘profile’ personal development and academic progress. If experiencing difficulties with your programme, students should discuss these problems with their Personal Tutor at the earliest opportunity. S/he will be able to give you advice about your programme and academic progress, including assistance in compiling a programme of study. Equally, if having personal problems that may be adversely affecting your studies, your personal tutor will be able to offer guidance as to how to best to address whatever the problem might be. Their advice may involve referring you to specialist sources of counsel and support, if appropriate. New students will be advised of the identity of their personal tutor at the commencement of the teaching period. A complete list of personal tutors is posted-up in the SED. Details are also on UEL Direct. 1.2 General Enquiries & Communications 1.2.1 IMPORTANT: Enrolment at University It is essential that you complete the process of enrolment on-line before (re)commencing your studies. If you fail to enrol as a UEL student, your Local Education Authority will not pay the fees due. Nor will you be eligible for a student loan or be able to receive an email account or Student Card, without which you will not be able to access key facilities, such as the Library. Where required, assistance with enrolment for new students will be available during Induction week. 6 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  7. 7. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 1.2.2 Programme and module-related Enquiries Programme enquiries should be directed to either the Programme leader, or to your personal tutor. Enquiries about your work on individual modules should, in the first instance, be referred to your module leader or your seminar tutor. Student support in Humanities & Social Sciences Information and support are available from a variety of places and publications. Further general information may be found in, The Essential Guide to UEL. Enquiries about enrolment, fees, student loans, Access and Hardship funds, Learning Difficulties, Counselling (including immigration matters), Careers, Healthcare, Sports & Fitness, should be directed to the Student Information Centre (SIC) in the Student Services building. Other initial codes (AI, MS, PA etc.) refer to times/slots primarily set aside for students from programmes in other fields. Anthropology, Politics & International Development (AI) Cultural Studies & Creative Industries (CC) Media, Communications & Screen Studies (MS) Performing Arts (PA) Social Work, Policy & Psychosocial Studies (PS) Sociology & Innovation Studies (IS) Student Enquiries Desk Commonly the first point of contact for students making general enquiries about their studies, the Student Enquiry Desk (SED) is located on the Atrium by the blue stairwell in the East Building. SED staff will often be able to answer general enquiries on the spot about programme-related matters (module registration, change of pathways, handing-in assignments, making appointments with personal tutors or module leaders, etc.) or they may, depending on the nature of the enquiry, find it necessary to refer you onto the another department within the University. The specified functions and areas of responsibility of the Student Enquiry Desk are: • General enquiries, making appointments with academic staff • the handing-in and return of coursework assessment • source of surplus module guides • distribution of blank forms – module registration, pathway change form, etc.. Details of Room Bookings and timetabling of modules Opening Hours for the SED : 10.00 am – 4.00 pm during semester 10.00 am – 12.00 pm & 2.00– 4.00 pm during vacations General (University Services) Enquiries General enquiries should be directed to the Student Information Centre (SIC) in the Student Services building on the square on the Docklands campus. Student Services incorporates and handles enquiries relating to: enrolment status, careers, counselling (including immigration matters), healthcare, student finance and disability & dyslexia. The UELSU offices are also housed in the same location. 7 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  8. 8. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 ONLINE COMMUNICATION WITH UEL: IMPORTANT - How to Use UEL Direct UEL Direct is used increasingly as the principal and preferred means of communicating with the student community.2 Details of Assessment deadlines, re-assessment requirements, and exam results are now all routinely published via UEL Direct. At present, you can use UEL Direct to: • check which modules you are registered for in student records (DELTA); • update your address details in DELTA; • view coursework and exam marks; • access re-assessment requirements; • access your e-mails; • link to other online services such as UEL+ and the Learning Support Services web pages. Accessing UEL Direct Using an internet browser (e.g., Microsoft Internet Explorer) follow these steps to access UEL Direct: • Go to the UEL home page: www.uel.ac.uk • Click on the 'UEL Direct link' - it is on the left of the screen. Enter your login ID (i.e. your full 7 digit student number prefixed by the letter 'u' e.g. u0123456). Enter your password. Your initial password is your date of birth in the form dd-mmm-yy (e.g., 01-apr-81 for 1st April 1981). Equal Opportunities UEL is fully supportive of the Students’ Union and University’s Equal Opportunities and anti-harassment policy, insisting that members of the student community ‘treat all staff and students in a polite and mature way.’ We will never accept prejudice, intolerance, aggression or violence. No student or member of staff should be disadvantaged due to matters of ‘race’, class, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation or disability. All members of the UEL community are entitled to be treated with courtesy according to these consensual norms of mutual respect and understanding. FILM AND VIDEO THEORY AND PRACTICE Programme Leaders Anat Pick EB. 2.19 7335 a.pick@uel.ac.uk Steven WB 1.14 2759 eastwood@uel.ac.uk Eastwood Enquiries Student Support Atrium DL x2502 studentsupport.ssmcs@uel.ac.uk Office The Film and Video: Theory and Practice programme presents an original interdisciplinary combination of film theory and practice. Students study cinema and film history, theory, analysis and film and video practice as it has emerged in different parts of the world in both the past and the present. They will have the scope to experiment with and reflect on the properties of different formats including digital imaging systems and more traditional 16mm film. These experiments and reflections will be guided by their studies just as their studies will be given a focused urgency by their projects. 2 8 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  9. 9. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 In theory and through film and video practice, students will study the character and conditions of cinema and film, locating the significance of motion pictures in the long-view of their historical development. Examining how film form (including patterns of film narrative, visual style, thematic motifs) and genre (including popular fiction, documentary cinema, and film animation) have been adapted in a range of international contexts, Film & Video questions the universalist assumptions of traditional models of film history and theory. Film & Video: Theory & Practice offers students the opportunity to develop the craft skills of cinematic production by evolving and realising production projects where the aim, overall, is to acquire critical skills grounded in practical knowledge of the media of film and video. At the same time and in parallel with their practical studies, students will develop skills of textual analysis situated within the frame of a geopolitical understanding of cinema and film studies. The intellectual and formal fusion of Film & Video characterises the programme’s distinctive approach. Programme Structure – Single & Combined Honours Level 1 of the single honours programme provides a foundation of core concepts and the critical tool-kit for doing Film Studies as well as a grounding in film and video technique. On this basis, Level 2 core modules develop and deepen skills and knowledge of film analysis, production, history and theory. Around this core students choose from among a group of specialist studies, giving them the opportunity to follow up in greater detail areas of the course that are of particular importance to them. Level 3 of the programme is marked by the opportunity to complete an independent major research project in film history, film theory and studies, or in production mode. Film may also be studied in combination with another subject towards the award of a Combined Honours Degree where Film Studies occupies either two thirds of the degree (we call this a ‘major’ programme), one half (a ‘joint’), or one third (a ‘minor’). PRODUCTION MODULES ARE NOT PART OF A COMBINED ROUTE. Programme Aims & Learning Outcomes Aims: o To provide students with the knowledge of the content and character of cinema and film - institution and form; o To provide understanding of the main theories and methods of study currently constituting the field of film and cultural studies; o To introduce, develop and combine practical and critical skills in the technologies and techniques of film and video production; o To provide the opportunity to undertake work-based learning in the film or related culture industries within the frame of a ‘critical vocational’ understanding of industry practices - by which is meant, the activity and experience of a work placement is situated in the context of a grounded analytical awareness of the structures and organising logics of the cinematic medium; o to provide innovative, interdisciplinary studies that may enable students to become critical practitioners in the creative, knowledge-based economy. Upon completion of the Film & Video degree programme students should be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes: o detailed knowledge of film and cinema through applied use of an appropriate range of critical approaches to their studies; o critical skills in the study of film-texts and have developed complementary strategies for learning and personal development; o skills of expression and analysis, synthesis, evaluation and argument in assignments and in oral forms of expression; 9 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  10. 10. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 o key production skills appropriate to their programme of study in analogue and digital-video film making processes (scripting, storyboarding, cinematography, editing, lighting, etc.), in addition to resource and time management; o the ability to work effectively, individually and in groups, to find information, pursue research, solve problems, manage projects. (For information, it should be noted that each of the above may of course be equally well-expressed in terms of an ‘employability’ agenda and as key transferable skills.) Graduate Opportunities Film & Video: Theory & Practice prepares students for many different parts of the contemporary job market. The student work placement module offers experience of the cinema and film industries in London and the programme will help students reflect on this experience in the light of their work on the degree and in terms of their own assessment of possible further directions they might wish to take upon leaving UEL. Such ‘employability’ skills will help those students interested in negotiating the complexities of this particular area of the contemporary media industries. Equally, these degree programmes will seek to offer, across the range of its modules, critical skills that can be used to gain admission to and insights on other related areas of the media and creative industries as well as developing the general ‘transferable’ skills associated with graduate level study. Our graduates have the skills to take up work in film, television, and the creative industries. Some of our Film & Video students go on to postgraduate degrees in film, and film schools. 10 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  11. 11. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Academic Staff Haim Bresheeth (rm 3203 x2758) Head of Research and Professor of Cultural and Media Studies, film maker and author of numerous works on middle Eastern and world cinema. Teaches Documentary Cinema module. David Chapman (rm 3208 x7405) Video Film maker, lecturer in media production. Teaches on production strand of the Film & Video programme. Research interests include documentary practice in the digital age. Paul Dave (rm 2230 x7245) Joint programme leader. Teaches ‘primitive cinema’ and throughout the programme. Research interests include English film culture, film history and theory, documentary studies. Jill Daniels Teaches video production. Research interests include documentary and fiction. Steven Eastwood (WB 1.14 x2759). Programme Leader, video and filmmaker, senior lecturer. Research interests include experimental fiction, documentary, cinematic essay and artists' moving image. Paul Gormley (rm 2312 x2936). Teaching and research interests include relationships between film, identity and contemporary cultural theory. Modules include Urban Film: Race, Nation & the Cinematic. Yosefa Loshitzki (rm 2308 x2176) Professor of Film. Publications include The Radical Faces of Godard and Bertolucci and Spielberg's Holocaust: Critical Perspectives on Schindler's List. Jill Nelmes (rm 2309 x2259) Historian, critic of film, scriptwriter. Teaching and research interests include classical cinema, national cinemas, the processes of script writing. Anat Pick (EB.2.19 x 7335) Programme Leader, teaching throughout the Film & Video programme. Research interests include documentary cinema, Critical Theory, especially ethics, posthumanism, eco-critical approaches to cinema, and animals. Susannah Radstone (rm 2234 x2751) Teaching and research interests include Film and Memory, film historiography, psychoanalysis and film. Has published widely on these topics. Eyal Sivan (rm EB.2.32 xt 7696) Senior Lecture Media Studies. Filmmaker, producer and essayist. Valentina Vitali (rm EB 2.38 xt 3342) Senior Lecturer in Film Studies. Research includes Indian and Mexican cinemas, the action and fantasy film, national cinema, film as history and image-based work by women. Some useful film & video related web sites: www.vertigomagazine.co.uk www.shootingpeople.org www.lux.org.uk www.mandy.com www.shortfilms.org.uk www.film-philosophy.com www.explodingcinema.org www.filmlondon.org.uk www.filmwaves.co.uk www.riocinema.ndirect.co.uk www.secretcinema.co.uk www.richmix.org.uk www.bfi.org.uk www.thehorsehospital.com www.no-w-here.org.uk www.team-online.co.uk www.sohofilmlab.co.uk www.fourcornersfilm.co.uk www.widescreen-centre.co.uk www.vet.co.uk www.ubu.clc.wvu.edu www.animateprojects.org www.wallflowerpress.co.uk www.hi-beam.net www.artsadmin.co.uk 11 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  12. 12. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film and Video Programme 2009-10 Pre- Combined Code Slot Title Requisi Excluded Single Major Joint Minor te LEVEL 1 Semester A MS1200 Th PM Introduction to Film Studies ♣ All other study skills core core option N/A modules MS1201 Mn Cinematics 1 core N/A option N/A PM MS1202 Tu PM Early and Silent Cinema, 1895-1929 Core core core core Semester B MS1203 Th PM Cinematics 2 core option option N/A MS1204 Fr PM Hollywood Cinema core option option core MS1402 Fr AM Media Meanings core option option N/A MS1406 Th PM Film Analysis N/A core core N/A LEVEL 2 Semester A MS2204 Th PM Film and Critical Theory 1 core core core core MS2201 Wd Screenwriting 1 option option option N/A PM MS2202 Cinematics 3: Projecting History core option option N/A MS2203 Tu AM Documentary Cinema option option option Option CC2501 Tu PM Understanding the Culture Industries N/A option option N/A ¶ Semester B CC2508 Fr PM Working in the Culture Industries All other core core option N/A employabilit * y modules MS2205 TH PM Film and Critical Theory 2 core MS2202 Tu PM Cinematics 4: Screen Visions MS1201 option N/A option N/A MS1203 MS2404 Wd Reading Film option core core core AM LEVEL 3 Semester A MS3000 Th AM Final Project/ Thesis Core MS3407 Th PM Film & Memory option MS3406 Tu PM Beyond Science Fiction option MS3202 Tu AM British Cinema option MS3203 Mon European Cinema: New Waves to Now option PM CC3101 TH AM On the Screen (Screenwriting) MS220 option 1 MS3404 Media Production 5 option Semester B MS3000 Final Project/ Thesis Core MS3205 Fri PM World Cinema option MS3204 Fri PM Asian* option MS3405 Tu PM Urban Film option * Options year by year. Check which options are running before registering. ♣ Study Skills module 12 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  13. 13. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Understanding your degree Programme If you want to do well in your degree it is very useful to develop a close working knowledge of the contents, aims and structure of the programme you are studying. You are strongly encouraged to study the following pages carefully. This is helpful at the start of your course, especially during induction. Use the guide later on too, at the end of level 1 and when you register for your modules in the following year (level 2); and then as you approach the end of your studies, and select your final year modules. The information included here is detailed and accurate at time of printing, but should be treated as indicative and subject to change and alteration. We will, of course, advise when any such changes are introduced, and when information in this guide is superseded. Please be alert to such changes. It is your responsibility to keep up to date with information relevant to your programme. INTRODUCTION TO THE FILM AND VIDEO: THEORY AND PRACTICE PROGRAMME PROGRAMME STRUCTURE FOR SINGLE HONOURS AT A GLANCE Students take six modules in each level of their studies made up of a combination of compulsory (in bold) and optional modules Semester A Semester B LEVEL 1 MS1200 Introduction to Film Studies MS1402 Media Meaning MS1202 Early/Silent Cinema MS1204 Hollywood Cinema MS1201 Cinematics 1: Introduction MS1203 Cinematics 2: Narrative Experiments LEVEL 2 MS2204 Film & Critical Theory 1 MS2205 Film & Critical Theory 2 MS2203 Documentary Cinema CC2508 Working in the Cultural Industries MS2206 Cinematics 3: Projecting History MS2201 Screenwriting MS2405 Documenting the Self MS2202 Cinematics 4: Screen Visions LEVEL 3 MS3407 Film & Memory MS3405 Urban Film MS3406 Beyond Science-Fiction MS3204 Asian Cinema MS 3202 British Cinema MS3205 World Cinema MS3203 European Cinema MS3000 Project/Thesis double module MS3000 Project/Thesis double module MS3403 Media Production 5 CC3103 Screenwriting 2 N.B. Italicized modules are offered by other programmes. BA (Hons) Film and Video: Theory and Practice The programme presents an original interdisciplinary combination of film theory and practice. Students study cinema and film history, theory, and film & video production as it has emerged in different parts of the world in both the past and the present. They will have the scope to experiment with and reflect on the properties of different formats, including digital imaging systems and more traditional 16 mm film. We believe in the vital exchange between theory and production, treating production as theoretically engaged, and theory as a productive form of film practice. Students study the character and conditions of cinema and film, locating the significance of motion pictures in the long-view of their historical development. Film & Video questions the universalist assumptions of traditional models of film history and theory, examining how film form and genre (including popular fiction, documentary, and experimental film) have been adapted in a range of international contexts, 13 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  14. 14. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film & Video: Theory & Practice offers students the opportunity to develop the craft skills of cinematic production by evolving and realising production projects. The aim, overall, is to acquire critical skills grounded in practical knowledge of the media of film & video. In parallel with their practical studies, students develop skills of textual analysis situated within the frame of a geopolitical understanding of cinema and film studies. About the Programme: Innovations We have introduced a number of innovative changes to the structure and content of the BA (Hons) film & video programme at UEL. Our motivation has been to offer students additional practical opportunities and to create practice-theory integrated modules. This new structure increases connectivity between module content across theory, production and history, and proposes several modules that actively merge these disciplines. A range of modules introduce students to the historical development of the cinema and the diversity of theoretical frameworks currently and historically applied to it, in order to advance understandings of the cinema as a political, psychological, phenomenological and aesthetic form. Film & Critical Theory I and II amongst other modules ground the student in the cinema lexicon, covering such areas as semiotics, identity politics and the deconstruction of the moving image. Concurrent production modules take students through the clear progression of Cinematics 1-4. These classes induct students into the various technical disciplines and conceptual approaches to moving image production then focus on experimenting with narrative forms, critiquing the way factual representations are made in the documentary, examining a range of avant-garde processes, and writing screenplays. A double module in level 3 offers students the choice to produce a written dissertation or to work on a research-intensive film/video production. Production: In terms of production, students now pass through the clear progression of the core modules Cinematics 1-3, with the options of Cinematics 4 or Screenwriting 1. Cinematics 1 is an introduction to the various technical disciplines and conceptual approaches to moving image production. Cinematics 2 allows students to experiment with narrative forms. Cinematics 3 encourages students to critique the way factual representations are made in the documentary, and to locate their practice both politically and historically. Cinematics 4 offers students the chance to experiment with moving image by examining a range of avant- garde processes and would be of particular interest to students wishing to develop their aesthetic, technical and conceptual skills. Screenwriting 1 is designed as an intensive writing workshop for students wishing to become writer/directors and who plan to work with narrative drama in their final year. Students are advised to consult the programmer leaders when deciding between Cinematics 4 and Screenwriting 1. MS3000, the level 3 double module final project (Semesters A and B) remains essentially the same, although there is greater emphasis on production structuring and research, and, most significantly, there is the proposed additional output of the cinematic essay, where students can opt to research and produce a dissertation in video (or film) form. Students have the option of taking the additional production module: Level 3, CC3103 Screenwriting 2 On the Screen, offered by CC. 14 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  15. 15. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Brief Module Descriptors The below information provides a brief and indicative outline of each of the modules you will take on the programme. These brief module descriptors are designed to give you an overview of the aims and content of the module, as well as outlining the assessments you will need to take. More detailed module information is available from the module guide – issued when you begin the module, and in the formal module specification (typically included in the module guide). Time table and module leadership information is provisional, and may be subject to change. We will, of course notify you of any such changes as soon as we are able. Level One MS1200: Introduction to Film Studies This module offers an introduction to the understanding of the ‘language’ of cinema. By learning to analyse specific aspects of filmic narration, including elements of the mise en scène, cinematography, editing and sound, students will acquire the skills to examine how films present facts and events, ‘tell’ stories and, above all, shape the spectator’s attitudes, opinions and feelings about the objects and events given to be seen on the screen. MS1201 – Cinematics 1: an intro to the disciplines An introduction to the various technical disciplines, cultural practices and conceptual approaches applied in the production of moving images. A carousel system inducts students to digital video, digital sound and non- linear editing software. The unit establishes the film & video degree programme as uniquely located between cultural studies, the industry film school model of TV and Film production, and the art school system of negotiated studio practice. MS 1202 Early and Silent Cinema The module will provide an introduction to fundamental formal, historical and theoretical issues involved in the study of silent cinema from 1895-1930. We will be principally covering the following subjects: the ‘early cinema of attractions’ from 1895-1906; modernism and experimental film in the 1920s; American silent directors such as D.W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton; German cinema of the 1920s including the work of Fritz Lang and F.W. Murnau, and early Russian and Soviet Cinema, including the work of the Eisenstein and Pudovkin.. One of the central issues that the module will address is – what challenges does the writing of the history of a mass medium like the cinema present? MS1203 – Cinematics 2: Experiments with Narrative Recognising that a high proportion of students wish as filmmakers to tell fictional stories, this module enables students to work together in a production group on a researched and developed narrative project. The unit will increase critical thinking in terms of how narrative operates in the cinema. It encourages the students to experiment with the existing structures for screen storytelling. MS 1204 Hollywood Cinema This module examines the history, techniques and theories of the ‘classical’ Hollywood studio system as well as the development of that system from the post-war moment to the present. The module will consider the social, economic and technological development of Hollywood as well as its formal and stylistic features. We will also be looking at key critical concepts that have been developed in the context of the Hollywood studio system – including film ‘authorship’ and the notion of ‘genre’. MS1402 Media Meanings Students critically analyze media texts, using the range of ideological critiques that interpret the gender, race, and class specificity of media discourse and images, including Semiotics, Marxism and post-Marxism, Psychoanalysis and gender, Race representation and Postmodernism. Level Two 15 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  16. 16. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 MS2206 – Cinematics 3: Projecting History This module has been specifically written to address factual production. It looks at issues of representation, identity, history and politics through the lens of producing authored documentary. The unit intends to encourage debate and discussion regarding the specific forms we value and require for the factual depiction of the ever changing world, with a view to stimulating opinions, ideas and personal expression within the student as filmmaker. MS2204 Critical Theory I This module aims to provide an examination of the central principles and methods of film and critical theory and it will seek to explore theoretical issues that are integrated as closely as possible with areas of student practice. Specifically it will seek to familiarise students with theorisations of the following issues: the relationship between film and ‘reality’ in silent and sound cinema; theorisations of the ‘essence’ of film and cinema; and psychoanalytic, semiotic, feminist and deconstructionist theorisations of the cinematic spectator and the film ‘text’. MS2203 Documentary Cinema This module looks at the history of documentary film cinema from 1895 to the present, covering key moments and movements in documentary, including “actualities,” City films of the 1920s, state-sponsored film of the 1930s; the British Documentary Movement; Free Cinema, docu-dramas; American documentary; Black-audio; Direct cinema and observational tradition. It examines issues of documentary “truth” and the relationship between fiction and nonfiction film. MS2404: Reading Film (combined studies) The aim of this module is to enable students to acquire an understanding of, and familiarity with some of the core question that have the shaped film theory and history during the last fifty years. Each of the twelve lectures explores different but connected ways in which film and cultural historians have sought to theorize a film’s relation to the specific historical (economic, social and political) context which generated the film and which the film, in turn, helped shaping. MS2205 Critical Theory II This module aims to develop the examination of the central principles and methods of film and critical theory studied in Film and Critical Theory 1. The module will seek to explore theoretical issues that are integrated as closely as possible with areas of their practice. It will seek to familiarise students with theorisations of the following issues: cognitivism and questions of ‘Grand’ theory: postmodernism/postmodernity and film, cultural theory approaches to film (including feminist film theory; ‘race’ and post-colonial theory, and queer theory); questions of cinematic affect and the body MS2202 – Cinematics 4: Screen Visions This optional module is a revised form of the previously run MS2202, concerning avant-garde film and video practices. It enables students to further develop their conceptual and aesthetic skills by studying avant- garde material practices, specifically, the use of 16mm film and digital video post-production, in line with current proliferation of film and of tape media in the gallery. MS 2201 Screenwriting 1 This module will provide the necessary skills required to produce two short fiction screenplays. It will examine screenwriting in a global, international sense and include discussion and analysis of art film, experimental film and screenplays from other national cinemas, such as Hong Kong, Iran and France. There will be some reference to the study of conventional narrative screenplays but a core part of the course will emphasise the potential for the short screenplay to break with filmic conventions and to develop the student’s own voice. Level Three MS3000 Thesis by dissertation or production Students devise, develop, plan and produce two appropriate, independent research projects, either as a written dissertation or using video and/or film. Under relevant subject-specialist supervision and through a 16 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  17. 17. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 process of drafting & revision, students will be grounded in methods of study and conceptual formulation, as dictated by the scope and character of the research undertaken. MS3202 Contemporary British Cinema The module considers the development of the British film industry and culture since 1979. It seeks to provide a critical and contextual understanding of these changes along with an introduction to the principal academic debates and issues that have arisen in the field of contemporary British cinema. General topics will include: the connections between changing economic, institutional, political and social contexts and film practices since the late 1970s; shifting representations of nationality, 'race', class, gender and sexuality in specific genres and within institutional forms of British cinema. Areas that are examined in detail will include the ‘heritage’ film and art house cinema; documentary and experimental film and video; the 1980s workshop and film co-operative movement; 'style culture’, and contemporary romantic comedies. MS3203 European Cinema To trace major developments within European cinema concentrating first on the post WWII period, referring to Italian Neo-Realism and the French New Wave, and then to look at more contemporary cinemas from Spain and Germany, analysing them in the light of the earlier developments and in the contexts of their particular societies. Ultimately it will give an overview of movements particularly within Western European cinema. MS3205: Film Form in World Cinema This module offers the opportunity to engage with the historicity of a cinema’s aesthetics by exploring a range of national cinemas. Students will be encouraged to familiarise themselves with aspects of production, distribution and exhibition in different national film industries, and to relate those historically specific modes of operation to the generic categories and stylistic features of the film these industries produced at different times in their development. Students will also be expected to engage with the socio- cultural history of diverse geographical areas and to consider how the films examined relate to those broader contexts. MS3406 Film and Memory This module has three aims: to help students familiarize themselves with the growing number of contemporary films concerned with screening memory, including ‘home movies’ that commemorate and remember significant moments in life, contemporary history films, science fiction, and what is now being called ‘trauma cinema’. The second aim of the course is to familiarise students with the approaches used by film critics in their discussions of cinema and memory. The third aim is to employ film & video practice (specifically image and sound editing of existing video/found footage) as a tool for students to gain an applied knowledge of how the cinema produces archives and constructs memory sequences. Students will be provided with creative guidance in and critical feedback on the post-production of a short video. This third aim will provide students with a deeper understanding of the link between theory and practice, through a practice experience. MS 3405 Urban Film The course will explore the urban crime film and its geo-political implications by tracing the historical development of the genre and changes in U.S. national cultural identity, cinematic affect and the construction of the cinematic body. The unit will also present a history of the urban crime film conceived in terms of the mimetic relations between African American and white American culture. Key urban crime films including the classic gangster film, film noir, the blaxploitation film, the conspiracy film, the nostalgia crime film, the ‘hood film and the contemporary “new-brutality” film. MS3204 Transformations in Asian Cinema This module examines the transformations in Asian cinematic forms and genres in the context of modernity, nationalism, capitalism and globalization. It seeks to understand the relationship between film aesthetics 17 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  18. 18. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 and the politics of gender, class and identity. Students will analyse specific Asian films using a range of global film theories. MS3206 Beyond Science Fiction: the Posthuman in Cinema This module draws on new and important areas of criticism: eco-criticism, environmentalism, and “animal studies,” to address a range of classical and non-traditional science fiction, fantasy, and horror films that deal with ideas about “humanity” and the non- or posthuman. 18 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  19. 19. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Module title and code: Level: Module Leader: Day (MTWThF): Semester (A /B): Credits: Pre-requisite: Pre-cursor: Session (Am/Pm): Campus: DL Co-requisite: Excluded combinations: Main aim(s) of the module and indicative key topics/approaches: Assessment Information Assessment Type (e.g. essay / exam/ Word length/duration Weighting elements production/performance) 1 2 3 Brief indicative reading and other resources for the module Core: Recommended: Check the School Timetable for actual timetabled slot and the web address below for updates to the school handbook and module descriptions. Understanding and selecting the modules in your programme A module is a separate identifiable block of learning which is credit-rated, with credit allocated on the basis of 10 hours of study for each credit. Standard modules are 20 credits in size for undergraduate programmes (indicating 200 hours of student study) or 30 credits in size for postgraduate programmes (indicating 300 hours of student study). Pre-Requisite modules must be passed before a student can be registered on a module. Precursor modules must have been attempted (e.g. awaiting a resit.) before a student can be registered on a module. Excluded modules may not be taken in combination with a module that lists it as excluded. . Modules are usually 20 credits Please ensure you are selecting a module that is appropriate – at undergraduate level. Some i.e. a core or a suitable option module at the right level. Check modules are ‘double’, e.g. 40 against the programme grid above/ the programme A unique module level is specification. associated with each module. This is level 0, 1, 2, 3, or M (and P for placement modules), reflecting the level of The module Please check published timetable updates achievement expected in order to leader works with to times/dates. AM / PM pass (i.e. be awarded credit) in seminar tutors the module. and a teaching Modules Basic indicative are run topics and aims: See within module guides for semester more detailed A or B. 19 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  20. 20. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 A module is a prerequisite module for another module if HSS modules a student must have passed are normally the prerequisite module (i.e. at Docklands been awarded credit) in order to study on the other module. A module is a precursor module for another module if a student must register on the precursor module (and Each component will remain registered for the contribute to a specified %age duration of that module) in of the overall module mark. order to study subsequently See assessment guidelines for on the other module. details on passing/failing components. An agreed maximum: word-length, duration A component of a module is or other measure of the ‘amount’ of assessment. a separate part of a module, as identified in the module specification. Your module assessments might be include a combination of Whole number marks are types of task: essays, exams, performance, production etc. Please check Module Guide. awarded for each component of a module. A Indicative only: A more useful and fuller guide to reading, online resources and other materials is provided via the module guide. 20 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  21. 21. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 A basic outline to show the underlying structure of programme levels and components towards completion of your degree at UEL. Credits (accumu A programme leads to a university award. This degree programme requires students to pass a specified number and lated combination of modules. Please refer to the above grid to ensure you register for the correct modules. You should ensure you credits are familiar with the programme specification for your degree. Programmes are usually composed of two types of module: Core and Option modules. A core module for a programme is a module which a student must have passed (i.e. been awarded credit) in order to achieve the relevant named award. Core modules are indicated in the programme specification. An Option module for a programme is a module selected from a range of modules specified in the programme specification. University Wide Options – A maximum of 2 University wide options (40 credits) may be taken as part of a programme with only one University wide option (20 credits) taken per1 level. Module timetable slots are indicative and option modules may not be running Level 1 60 Semester A 60 Semester (120) B Re-enrol and register for appropriate modules – please refer to grid and to ensure you select appropriate modules for your level and programme 60 Level 2 (180) Semester A 60 Semester (240) B Re-enrol and register for appropriate modules – please refer to grid to ensure you select appropriate modules for your level and programme. Note: Progression to Level 3 study is conditional upon prior completion of all Level 1 core modules. Level 3 60 (300) Semester A 60 Semester (360) B Graduation 21 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  22. 22. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Other module resources Module Guides are a valuable resource. They provide a weekbyweek breakdown of lecture and seminar topics, coursework requirements, and provide detailed primary and secondary reading lists. Typically, they also provide a comprehensive list of all the study materials you will require within the context of the module in question. Module Leaders normally distribute module guides in the first week of teaching. If you would like to see a copy of a particular Module Guide before registering for a module, contact its Module Leader and s/he may be able to provide you with one. The Module Guide provides the definitive statement on how the module is assessed in any given year. If there is any discrepancy between it and any other source, the statement of terms in the Module Guide shall prevail. Set Texts Where appropriate, modules provide a list of ‘set texts’ which students are expected to purchase. Most of these are available from the bookshop on the Docklands campus. You will also find them in the Docklands Library. Module Readers As well as ‘set texts’, modules will generally make extensive use of journal articles, book chapters and extracts that may not be available in multiple copies in the Library. In order to make these latter materials readily available to students, module leaders often compile Module Readers that may be purchased from the bookshop or made available electronically in UEL+ (check with your module leader). Photocopied materials related to the administration of modules (Module Guides, seminar exercises, essay questions and the like) will be distributed free of charge. 22 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  23. 23. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 FILM & VIDEO MODULE SPECIFICATIONS Cinematics: Production 1 Module Title: Module Module Leader: Steven Eastwood Film & Video - Production 1 Code: MS 1201 Additional Tutors: Level: 1 Credit: 20 Pre-requisite: none Excluded Combination: Main Aim(s) of the Module: • To provide an overview of the many aspects of moving image working practices, including broadcast television, documentary, commercial Hollywood, artists’ moving image, as well as inter-disciplinarity between these terms. • To introduce students to the reciprocal relationship between practice and theory and develop conceptual and theoretical skills. • To induct students into a range of technical apparatus, including digital video, lighting for video, sound recording, final cut software and DVD authoring. • To develop collaborative skills from working in production groups. Main Topics of Study: This is an introductory module designed as a carousel of production techniques, inducting students into the technical aspects of digital video, sound recording, lighting for video, along with digitising and basic editing on final cut pro software, and DVD authoring. The class will also go over storyboarding, listing your shots and production planning. Weekly sessions will be divided into lectures and screenings, student led seminars, tutorial sessions and intensive practical workshops. Students will be placed in groups of 4-5 and required to conceive, plan and complete a video project of 3-5 minutes. This might be a diary film or slice of life documentary, a short narrative, a fictional sequence or scene from a larger project idea, or merely an experiment with the media you have been introduced to. In addition to this, students are to individually produce a sound piece of not more than 2 minutes that might be designed to work with the group video, or conceived as a stand-alone project. The emphasis is on gathering material and utilising the skills you have acquired. Assessment Criteria: • To develop and demonstrate competence in the use of digital video and sound recording, and video post-production software. • To demonstrate the ability to effectively plan and organise a group production and post- production project. • To indicate a critical, reflective and imaginative engagement with the medium of video in relation to its many cultural practices. • To indicate an understanding of your practice in relation to other relevant media forms and contexts of production and consumption. 23 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  24. 24. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the Module By the completion of the module the student will be able to: Knowledge 1. Illustrate knowledge of moving image languages. Thinking skills 2. Critically assess theirs and others’ audio-visual work. 3. Critically research and plan production and post-production of a video project. Subject-based practical skills 4. Demonstrate technical competence in use of technologies and software appropriate to the scope and limits of the video project. 5. Show basic competences in digital video and sound recording, and in post-production equipment. 6. Execute a short video group project and made an individual sound project. Skills for life and work (general skills) 7. Effectively manage time, working relationships, and resources. 8. Work effectively and cooperatively in groups Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, screenings, seminar critique sessions, practical workshops, written assignments, independent learning/production, tailored skills provision and supervision. Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning Weighting: outcomes for the module: Project 1 Group video project (including production folder) 70% All Project 2 Individual sound project 30% 1,3, 4,5,7. Indicative Reading for this Module: Core Steven Ascher and Edward Pincus (2007). The Filmmaker's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for the Digital Age (Plume). Cantine, John, Howard, Susan, Lewis, Brady (2000). Shot by Shot, A Practical Guide to Filmmaking, (Pittsburgh Filmmakers). Recommended Lapsley, Robert & Westlake, Michael (1988). Film Theory: An Introduction (Manchester University Press). 24 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  25. 25. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Manovich, Lev (2000). The Language of Digital Media (MIT Press). Ohanian, Thomas A. (1996). Digital filmmaking: the changing art and craft of making motion pictures (Focal Press). Rush, Michael (1999). New Media in Late 20th-Century Art (Thames & Hudson). Indicative Activity Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): Student/Tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work etc) Contact Time: lectures, workshops, project supervision 36 hours Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ group work/portfolio/diary etc ) 164 hours independent research, planning and production total: 200 25 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  26. 26. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 MS1203 Cinematics 2: Experiments in Narrative Module Title: Module Module Leader: Cinematics 2: Code: Steven Eastwood Experiments with narrative MS 1203 Additional Tutors: Level 1 Credit: 20 Pre-requisite: MS1201 Excluded Combination: Main Aim(s) of the Module: • To offer creative guidance and provide students with the necessary team skills and logistic skills for pre-production, production and post-production of a short video that experiments with narrative. • To enable students to demonstrate the ability to effectively plan and organize group video production projects. • To enable students to develop a critically reflective and an imaginative engagement with the moving image, showing the ability to experiment, play, and take risks in your ideas. Main Topics of Study: Participants in the module will come together in groups to devise a story outline where the emphasis is on experimenting with narrative structure. As a group you will then co-write a treatment and script, generate storyboards, a shot list and schedule, which you will then use to produce a 3-5 minute video project. The first assessment point is a project pitch based on detailed, individually assembled pre- production folders. The second assessment point is the screening of the completed short film made by your group. For the duration of the module, students will be placed in collaborative production groups of approximately 4-5. Your roles within the production groups will rotate and change between Director, Production manager, Sound Recordist and Lighting Camera Operator. Each weekly session will commonly begin with a lecture, followed by a seminar or workshop session, where students are given conceptual and technical guidance in their production groups. Class sessions will involve both playfully and rigorously dismantling existing production structures such as the screenplay, casting and rehearsing a script, creating mise-en-scène, adhering to principles of continuity and working to diegetic order during the edit. By unpacking these systems we will learn about how conventional and unconventional cinema stories are constructed. 26 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  27. 27. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Learning Outcomes for the Module By the completion of the module the student will be able to: Knowledge 1. Illustrate an understanding of feature film production skills and discourses, from narrative structures to editing conventions. Thinking skills 2. Critically assess their own and others’ audio-visual work. 3. Demonstrate imagination and creative capacity in the researching, planning, production and post- production of a video project: working within and against narrative film conventions. Subject-based practical skills 4. Produce a short video, indicating knowledge of cinematic languages, especially in terms of narrative structure. 5. Illustrate a range of comprehension, communication, presentation and teamwork skills through individual and collaborative work with other students. 6. Have intermediate competences in digital video and sound recording, and in post-production equipment. 7. Plan and execute a short video group project and effectively compile a detailed dossier of all pre- production text and image materials. Skills for life and work (general skills) 8. Effective time-management skills and resources management. 9. Work effectively and cooperatively in groups. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, screenings, seminar critique sessions, practical workshops, written assignments, independent learning/production, tailored skills provision and supervision. Assessment methods which enable student to demonstrate the learning Weighting: outcomes for the Unit: Project 1 Production Folder (incl. script, storyboards, schedule) 30% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ,7, 8 Project 2 Group video production 70% 1, 4, 5,6, 7, 8, 9. 27 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  28. 28. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Indicative Reading for this module: Core Robert Lapsley and Michael Westlake (2006). Film Theory: An Introduction (Manchester UP). Bresson, R. (1987) Notes on the Cinematographer (Quartet Books). Hayward, S. (2006), Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts (Routledge). Recommended Mamet, David (1992). On Directing Film (Penguin). Ondaatje, M. (2004) The Conversations: Walter Murch and the Art of Editing Film (Knopf). Christopher Vogler (1992) The Writer's Journey (Michael Wiese Film Productions). Cantine J. (2000). Shot by Shot, A Practical Guide to Filmmaking (Pittsburgh Filmmakers). Suggested Viewing Sherlock Jnr (Keaton 1924) Vertigo (Hitchcock 1958) La jetee (Marker 1962) Don’t Look Now (Roeg 1973) Visions of Light (Glassman, McCarthy, Samuels 1992) Tokyo Story (Ozu) The Idiots (Lars Von Trier) Memento (Christopher Nolan) Orlando (Sally Potter) Me/We/Okay/Gray (Eija Liisa Ahtila 1993) Lost Highway (Lynch 1996) Punch Drunk Love (PT Anderson 2003) Hidden (Haneke 2005) Indicative Activity Teaching and Learning Time (10 hrs per credit): 28 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  29. 29. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Student/Tutor Activity: (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work etc) Contact Time: 36 hours Lectures, workshops, project supervision Student Learning Activity: (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background Time: reading/ group work/portfolio/diary etc ) 164 hours independent research, planning and production Total: 200 29 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  30. 30. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Introduction to Film Studies Module Title: Module Code: MS1200 Module Leader: Valentina Vitali Introduction to Film Studies Level: 1 Credit: 20 Last Updated: April 2008 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: N/A Pre-cursor: Co-requisite: MS1202, MS1201, MS1204, Excluded combinations: MS1402 MS1203 Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? Yes University-wide option: No (study skills module) Location of delivery: UEL Docklands Campus Main aim(s) of the module: - To introduce and develop the understanding of film aesthetics - To develop tools of film analysis - To introduce theoretical frameworks for the critical understanding of film-making techniques - To develop study skills Main topics of study: - Forms of film narration, including notions of the shot and other elements of the mise en scène, of continuity editing and of the relation between image and sound; - Learning skills for academic study, including engagement with selected literature, bibliographic skills, essay structuring and writing. Learning Outcomes for the module At the end of the module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Demonstrate knowledge of key formal concepts of filmmaking and film narration. 2. Demonstrate knowledge of key techniques of film analysis. Thinking skills 3. Evaluate critically central aspects of film-making through the close analysis of different types of films. 4. Recognise the relationship between specific film techniques and the production of meaning in cinema. 5. Engage and evaluate critically sources of information on filmmaking and theory. Subject-based practical skills Skills for life and work (general skills) 30 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  31. 31. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 6. Précis, paraphrase, reference and quote correctly from selected literature. 7. Plan for and produce specific types of assessment. 9. Access effectively the resources available in the LRC. 10. Illustrate competence in the retrieval, evaluation and processing of information from a broad range of academic sources. 11. Produce the type of written work appropriate to the programme. 12. Reference sources properly in a written academic essay. 13. Write a Personal Development Plan. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures Small group seminar discussions Individual/paired tutorial work Screenings Independent study using learning materials Personal Development Planning (through Workbook) Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate Weighting: Learning the learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated CW1: Film analysis (800 words) 40% 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11. CW2: Essay (1200 words) 40% 1-12. CW3: Guided Study Skills Workbook: Typically including: lecture and reading notes, film-viewing notes, seminar preparation, research and coursework planning. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 20% 11, 13. Reading and resources for the module: Core Bordwell, D. and Thompson, K. (1996) Film Art: An Introduction London: McGraw Hill. Cook, P. and Bernink, M. (eds.) (1999) The Cinema Book 2nd Edition. London: BFI Cotterell, S, Study Skills, 4th Ed, (Pergammon, 2004) Hill, J. and Church Gibson, P. (eds.) (1998) The Oxford Guide to Film Studies Oxford: OUP. Nowell-Smith, G. (ed.), (1996) The Oxford Guide to World Cinema Oxford: OUP. Recommended Aumont, J. et al. (1992). Aesthetics of Film. Transl. by R. Neupert. Austin: University of Texas Press. Hayward, S. (ed.) (1996). Key Concepts in Cinema Studies. London and New York: Routledge. Indicative Activity learning and Contact teaching time Independent and group study 31 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  32. 32. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 (10 hrs per Preparing for assessment credit): 1. Student/tutor interaction: 2 hour whole group + 2 hour workshop per week 48 hours Tutor groups on 4 occasions 2. Student learning time: Heavily activity based either group work or work book activities to bring to The balance of: workshops for peer review and preparation for assessment 128 hours to include assessment Total hours 200 32 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  33. 33. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Media Meanings Module Title: Module Code: Module Leader: MS1402 Media Meanings Level: 1 Dr Terri Senft Credit: 20 Last Updated: ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: N/A Pre-cursor: Rise of the Mass Media (for Media Studies Students only). Co-requisite: Excluded combinations : Is this module part of the Skills Curriculum? University-wide option: Yes/No (please delete as Yes/No (please delete as appropriate) No appropriate) Yes Location of delivery: UEL/Other (please delete as appropriate) If ‘Other’ please insert location here: UEL, Docklands Main aim(s) of the module: Introduction of key theoretical texts in semiotics and cultural theory. The module covers a range of approaches to, mainly, visual media, and examines central concepts in media, film, and cultural theory. Main topics of study: Semiotics (Saussure; Barthes) Marxism and post-Marxism Psychoanalysis and gender Race representation Postmodernism Learning Outcomes for the module Please use the appropriate headings to group the Learning Outcomes. While it is expected that a module will have LOs covering a range of knowledge and skills, it is not necessary that all four headings are covered in every module. Please delete any headings that are not relevant. You should number the LOs sequentially to enable mapping of assessment tasks. At the end of this module, students will be able to: Knowledge 1. Show an understanding of key concepts in semiotic theory. 2. Illustrate knowledge of key theorists in cultural theory. 3. Apply semiotics and cultural theory to examples of visual media. 4. Identify and apply the concepts of race, gender, and class in the context of media examples and cultural discourse. Thinking skills 5. Critically analyze media texts, using the range of ideological critiques that interpret the gender, race, and class specificity of media discourse and images. Subject-based practical skills 33 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  34. 34. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Skills for life and work (general skills) 6. Essay writing skills: developing an argument; structuring an essay; using critical tools to interpret and analyze particular case studies; using theorist and critics to formulate and support a written argument. Teaching/ learning methods/strategies used to enable the achievement of learning outcomes: Lectures, seminars, one-to-one tutorials. Lectures and seminars alike make use of media examples. Lectures regularly integrate clips and visual images to illustrate the theory. Seminars includes discussions, group work, and exercises. Courseworks are returned individually, and include a one-to-one feedback session with each student. Assessment methods which enable students to demonstrate the Weighting: Learning learning outcomes for the module: Outcomes demonstrated CW1: Semiotic textual analysis of a media image (1,200 words) 30% 1-3, 6 CW2: Essay (2000 words) 70% All 34 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  35. 35. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Reading and resources for the module: These must be up to date and presented in correct Harvard format unless a Professional Body specifically requires a different format Core Stuart Hall. Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices (London: Sage, 1997). Images: A Reader. Sunil Manghani, Arthur Piper And John Simons, eds. (London: Sage, 2006) Tolson, Andrew. Mediations: Text and Discourse in Media Studies (London: Arnold, 1996). Media and Cultural Theory. James Curran and David Morley, eds. (London: Routledge, 2006). Recommended Barry, Peter. Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. (Manchester: Manchester UP, 2002). Branston, Gill and Stafford, Roy. The Media Student’s Book. (London: Routledge, 1996) Marris, Paul & Sue Thornham, eds. Media Studies: A Reader. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1999). Strinati, Dominic. An Introduction to the Theories of Popular Culture. (London: Routledge, 1995). Indicative Activity learning and teaching time (10 hrs per credit): 1. Student/tutor Activity (e.g. lectures/seminars/tutorials/workshops/studio work/moderated online interaction, some discussions, online chat etc): of which may be online: Lectures: 18 hours (1.5 hours per lecture, 12 weeks) Seminars: 12 hours. 40 Tutorials: 10 2. Student Activity (e.g. seminar reading and preparation/assignment preparation/ background learning time: reading/ on-line activities/group work/portfolio/diary, studio work etc): Seminar reading Background reading Assignment preparation 160 Total: 200 Total hours (1 200 and 2): 35 School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  36. 36. Programme Handbook: Film and Video: theory and practice 2009/10 Film & Critical Theory 1 Module Title: Module Code: MS2204 Module Leader: Paul Dave Film and Critical Theory 1 Level: 2 Date Modified: April 2008 Credit: 20 ECTS credit: Pre-requisite: MS1406; MS1402 Pre-cursor: Co-requisite: Excluded combinations (e.g. skills modules): Skills module: No University-wide option: No Location of delivery: UEL Main aim(s) of the module: This module aims to provide an examination of the central principles and methods of film and critical theory and it will seek to explore theoretical issues that are integrated as closely as possible with areas of student practice. Specifically it will seek to familiarise students with theorisations of the following issues: the relationship between film and ‘reality’ in silent and sound cinema; theorisations of the ‘essence’ of film and cinema; and psychoanalytic, semiotic, feminist and deconstructionist theorisations of the cinematic spectator and the film ‘text’. Main topics of study: The module examines the application of key theoretical traditions on a range of film texts and different models of the cinema. These theoretical traditions include references to the work of Freud, Saussure, Peirce, Volosinov, Althusser, Barthes, Lacan. Specific film theorists covered will include: Munsterberg, Balazs, Epstein, Kracauer, Bazin, Arnheim, Eisenstein, Wollen, Metz, Baudry, Mulvey and McCabe. 36 School of Humanities and Social Sciences

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