Apps4Android PowerPoint Presentation

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  • There are many market forces driving the design of more accessible E&IT. Some market forces are directly motivated by adding something positive to a company’s bottom line as are these market forces. For the purpose of this presentation we refer to these market forces as being “demand-pull.” Companies willingly embrace [pull close to them by demand] these market forces. There are other market forces that are not, necessarily, profit motivated. On occasion companies are compelled, for reasons other than making a profit, to react to them. We refer to these market forces as being supply-push.

Transcript

  • 1. Accessibility of Android Smartphones by: Steve Jacobs, CEO Apps4Android, Inc. [email_address] Android Accessibility Project: http://accessibility- android.info
  • 2. Making Smartphones Accessible Supply-Push Market Model
    • Is not self-sustainable without an ongoing push from government and society.
    • Supply-push market forces that COMPEL wireless service providers and telecommunications equipment manufacturers to enhance the accessibility of their products and services include:
      • C ultural
      • O rganizational
      • M oral
      • P olitical
      • E thical
      • L egal
  • 3. Making Smartphones Accessible Demand-Pull Market Model
    • Is self-sustainable so long as demand and revenue exist;
    • Demand-pull market forces that INSPIRE wireless service providers and telecommunications equipment manufacturers to enhance the accessibility of their products and services include:
      • I ncome
      • N ew Customers
      • S ales
      • P rofits
      • I nnovation
      • R evenue
      • E arnings
  • 4. Why an Android Accessibility Wizard?
    • "to make it easy and intuitive for wireless service providers, telecommunications equipment manufacturers, wireless retail store personnel and wireless service provider customers to eyes-free and/or screenreader enable their smartphones"
  • 5. About Apps4Android, Inc. (1 of 5)
    • URL: http:// www.apps4android.org /
    • Mission: to develop low/no cost applications that enhance the accessibility of Android devices.
    • Incorporated: January, 2009;
    • Developed and currently market six applications with more on the way;
  • 6. About Apps4Android, Inc. (2 of 5)
    • Over one million downloads in the past year;
    • Over two million downloads if you include Google's eyes-free applications Apps4Android calls from its applications;
    • 550,000+ users in 28 countries; and,
    • Majority stockholder in Onymous Heroes, another Android development company.
  • 7. About Apps4Android, Inc. (3 of 5)
    • Major Investors:
      • IDEAL at NCR Corporation
      • IDEAL at Teradata
    • Better Voices for Cupcake High-quality voices for Android Cupcake (V1.5) smartphones. Languages include English (US & UK), Italian, German, French, and Spanish.
    • Ask Eindroid Ask your Android smartphone a question using your voice and it will speak the answer. Smartphones just got smarter!
  • 8. About Apps4Android, Inc. (4 of 5)
    • Speaking Pad A talking notepad for Android. This notepad speaks what you type.
    • iAugComm i DEAL Group's Aug mentative Comm unication application is designed to enhance the communications abilities of people who are unable to speak.
    • SMSpeaker Reads SMS messages out loud.
  • 9. About Apps4Android, Inc. (5 of 5)
    • Talking Caller ID Speaks caller ID information.
  • 10. Objective of our Android Accessibility Project (1 of 2)
    • to make it easy and intuitive for wireless service providers, telecommunications equipment manufacturers, wireless retail store personnel and wireless service provider customers to enhance the accessibility of their Android devices
  • 11. Objective of our Android Accessibility Wizard (2 of 2)
    • To benefit Android smartphone users who:
      • are blind/have low vision;
      • have other types of print disabilities;
      • are 65+ years of age;
      • never learned to read;
      • use English as a second language;
      • use languages other than English as their native language; and,
      • wish to use their smart devices in an eyes-free environment.
  • 12. Guidelines and Checklists
    • Problems Encountered by Individuals with Disabilities and Members of the Aging Population when using Smartphones
    • Checklist (in text format ) for Smartphones
    The information above was developed by the RNIB Digital Accessibility Team (DAT) and repurposed by IDEAL Group, Inc. Click here to see the original checklist.
  • 13. Problems Encountered by Individuals with Disabilities and the Aging Population
    • People who are blind, have low-vision and individuals with other print disabilities:
      • The decreasing size of handsets has brought advantages to many users but at the expense of small keypads, limited side tones, and small visual displays that people with visual disabilities find inaccessible.
      • People with visual impairments often cannot locate or identify controls or input slots or operate controls that require sight.
      • Some people are unable to distinguish between certain color combinations used on mobile telephone screens and keypads.
  • 14. Problems Encountered by Individuals with Disabilities and the Aging Population
    • People who are deaf and/or have a hearing impairment:
      • Users of hearing aids experience disturbances due to electromagnetic interference (EMI) from digital mobile phones. The rapid pulsation of radio signals from digital mobile telephones can give rise to a buzzing, humming, squealing or squelch inside the hearing aid.
      • Hearing impaired users cannot locate or identify controls that require hearing (e.g. a voice-based interactive mobile telephone that can be controlled only by listening to menu items and then pressing buttons).
  • 15. Problems Encountered by Individuals with Disabilities and the Aging Population
    • People with mobility disabilities:
      • With the advent of smaller mobile telephones, people who have physical impairments may find it hard to hold and activate the buttons on a phone.
    • People with speech disabilities:
      • Communicating using a mobile telephone in general and speaking clearly to activate functions by voice commands is not always possible.
  • 16. Problems Encountered by Individuals with Disabilities and the Aging Population
    • People with cognitive disabilities:
      • People with cognitive or learning impairments may experience problems with the operating systems of complicated mobile telephones.
    • People who are aging:
      • Older individuals often experience a range of difficulties with mobile telephones, such as those stated above: from the screen being too small to see; incompatibility with a hearing aid and too many complicated specialized functions.
  • 17. Why Mobile UI Design is Important
    • Smartphones ≠ Desktop Computers
      • Smaller screen size
      • Different usage scenarios
      • Different use cases
      • Different input modalities
    • Smartphone users are mobile, and multitasking
    • Wide, and varied, group of smartphone users, including persons with disabilities
    Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 18. Top 10 Best Practices for Accessible & Usable Mobile User Interface Design
  • 19.
    • Description:
      • Render screens using UI objects found in the native component set wherever possible/feasible
    • Benefits:
      • Shorter development time
      • Feel like a native app
      • Interoperate with Assistive Technology
    1. Use Native UI Components Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 20.
    • Description:
      • Do not create absolute, application-specific font settings
      • Inherit system/user defined settings
    • Benefits:
      • ‘ Look’ like a native app
      • Enable use by persons who may need specific settings
    2. Inherit Global Font Settings Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 21.
    • Description:
      • Maximize color contrast levels between background, foreground and adjacent UI objects (7:1 or greater)
    • Benefits:
      • Enable use in high glare scenarios
      • Enable use by persons with visual impairments
    3. Manage Color & Contrast Usage Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 22.
    • Description:
      • Maximize interactive target and hit size parameters for use on touch screen devices
    • Benefits:
      • Increase accuracy of controls activation
      • Decrease task time
      • Enable use by persons with large fingers, multi-taskers, stylus users
    4. Manage Touch Target Sizes Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 23.
    • Description:
      • Enable your users to interact with your application in a way that is similar to existing platform interaction method
    • Benefits:
      • Decrease interaction discovery and learning
      • ‘ Feel’ like a native application
      • Maximize user recall
    5. Align Interaction Methods Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 24.
    • Description
      • Provide users with explicit identification of the error, how to resolve, and prompt resolving action
    • Benefit
      • Efficient error recovery
      • Minimized support
      • Enable use by customers with cognitive/intellectual difficulties
    6. Use Effective Error Messages Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 25.
    • Description
      • Communicate information in multiple presentation modalities (vibration, visual, auditory)
    • Benefit
      • Enable one modality to reinforce another, maximizing recognition
      • Support use by the widest possible audience
    7. Leverage Multiple Modalities “ You have new mail” Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 26.
    • Description:
      • Provide customers with a consistent user experience across the application
      • Align with device conventions where possible
    • Benefits:
      • Decrease support calls
      • Improve utility of application
      • Decrease orientation time
    8. Maintain Consistency Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 27.
    • Description:
      • Support multiple information foraging methods and provide users with multiple ways to complete a task
    • Benefits:
      • Efficient error recovery
      • Decrease task time
      • Enable users to do more in less time
    9. Provide Multiple Ways Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 28.
    • Description:
      • Conduct formative and summative usability studies with prospective customers, including persons with disabilities
    • Benefits:
      • Learn user mental models
      • Identify opportunities for improvement
      • Improve application success
    10. Get in the Wild! Source: Research In Motion http:// www.rim.com
  • 29. Variables
    • Variables make it difficult for end-users to figure out what applications to download and install in order to make their Android smartphones more accessible. For example, the following variables need to be considered when determining which Android smartphone to purchase:
      • User’s personal preferences
      • Version of firmware
      • Hardware configuration
      • Versions of Eyes-Free Applications
  • 30. 1. User's Personal Preferences
    • Carrier
    • Manufacturer of smartphone
    • Model of smartphone
    • Features of the smartphone
  • 31. 2. Version of Firmware
    • Pre-Cupcake v1.0
    • Cupcake v1.5
    • Donut v1.6
    • Eclair v2.0
    • Eclair v2.0.1
    • Eclair v2.1
    • Froyo
    • Variants of the above
  • 32. 3. Hardware Configuration
    • Thumbwheels vs. D-Pads vs. no physical scrolling controls (the touch-screen serves this purpose).
    • Physical Call/End Call buttons vs. no physical Call/End Call buttons. (the touch-screen serves this purpose).
    • Keyboards vs. no keyboard (onscreen keyboards)
    • Spacing and ability to differentiate one key from another on physical smartphone keyboards
    • Location of touch-screen controls
    • Different screen sizes
  • 33. 4. Versions of Apps4Android Applications
    • Eyes-Free Configuration Manager
    • Eyes-Free Shell
    • Text-To-Speech Extended
    • KickBack
    • SoundBack
    • Speaking Pad
    • TalkBack
    • Talking Compass
    • Talking Dialer
  • 34. Eyes-Free Shell (1 of 6)
  • 35. Eyes-Free Shell (2 of 5)
  • 36. Eyes-Free Shell (3 of 6)
  • 37. Eyes-Free Shell (4 of 6)
  • 38. Eyes-Free Shell (5 of 6)
  • 39. Eyes-Free Shell (6 of 6)
  • 40. Talking Dialer and Address Book (1 of 9)
  • 41. Talking Dialer and Address Book (2 of 9)
  • 42. Talking Dialer and Address Book (3 of 9)
  • 43. Talking Dialer and Address Book (4 of 9)
  • 44. Talking Dialer and Address Book (5 of 9)
  • 45. Talking Dialer and Address Book (6 of 9)
  • 46. Talking Dialer and Address Book (7 of 9)
  • 47. Talking Dialer and Address Book (8 of 9)
  • 48. Talking Dialer and Address Book (9 of 9)
  • 49. Minimum Setup For individuals who are blind
    • Must have a thumbwheels or a D-Pad somewhere on the device;
    • Must have a keyboard
    • Firmware Version 1.6 (Donut) or greater
    • Current Version TalkBack
  • 50. Recommended Setup For individuals who are blind (1 of 2)
    • Thumbwheel or a D-Pad accessible without sliding out the KB
    • Physical call and hang-up buttons
    • Keyboard spacing enable user to differentiate one key from another;
    • All buttons should be actual hardware buttons and not capacitive buttons
    • KB arranged as a standard QWERTY KB (numbers should have distinct row from letters).
  • 51. Recommended Setup For individuals who are blind (2 of 2)
    • Firmware Version 1.6 (Donut) or greater
    • Current Version TalkBack
    • Current Version KickBack
    • Current Version SoundBack
    • Current Version Eyes-Free Apps
  • 52. Minimum Setup For individuals who have low vision
    • Must have a thumbwheels or a D-Pad somewhere on the device;
    • Firmware Version 1.5 (Cupcake) or greater
    • Current Version Eyes-Free Apps
  • 53. Recommended Setup For individuals who have low vision (1 of 2)
    • Thumbwheel or a D-Pad accessible without sliding out the KB
    • Physical call and hang-up buttons
    • Camera that has a macro-zoom feature (i.e. Nexus)
    • Keyboard spacing enable user to differentiate one key from another;
    • All buttons should be actual hardware buttons and not capacitive buttons
    • Keyboard arranged in standard QWERTY format.
    • Numbers should be across a row
  • 54. Recommended Setup For individuals who have low vision (2 of 2)
    • Firmware Version 1.6 (Donut) or greator
    • Current Version of TalkBack
    • Current Version of KickBack
    • Current Version of SoundBack
    • Current Version of Eyes-Free Apps
  • 55. Text-to-Speech Options (1 of 7)
  • 56. Text-to-Speech Options (2 of 7)
  • 57. Text-to-Speech Options (3 of 7)
  • 58. Text-to-Speech Options (4 of 7)
  • 59. Text-to-Speech Options Standard Google TTS Voices (not high-quality) (5 of 7)
    • Afrikaans
    • Bosnian
    • Chinese (Cantonese)
    • Chinese (Mandarin)
    • Bulgarian, Croatian
    • Czech
    • Dutch
    • English (American)
    • English (British)
    • Esperanto
    • Finnish
    • French
    • German
    • Greek
    • Hindi
    • Hungarian
    • Icelandic
    • Indonesian
  • 60. Text-to-Speech Options Standard Google TTS Voices (not high-quality) (6 of 7)
    • Italian
    • Kurdish
    • Latin
    • Macedonian
    • Norwegian
    • Polish
    • Portuguese
    • Romanian
    • Russian
    • Serbian
    • Slovak
    • Spanish
    • Spanish (Latin America)
    • Swahili
    • Swedish
    • Tamil
    • Turkish
    • Vietnamese
    • Welsh
  • 61. Text-to-Speech Options PICO Google TTS Voices ( high-quality female voices ) (7 of 7)
    • English (American)
    • English (British)
    • Italian
    • German
    • French
    • Spanish
  • 62. Hearing Aid Compatibility
    • HAC rating of M3, and if possible, M4
    • HAC rating of T3, and if possible, T4
  • 63. Additional Features and Compatibility
    • TTY Support
      • Full mode
      • VCO mode
      • HCO mode
  • 64.
    • Thank You!!
  • 65. Contact Information
    • Steve Jacobs, CEO
    • Apps4Android, Inc.
    • Phone: (614) 777-0660
    • E-mail: [email_address]
    • URL: http://apps4android.org
    • Android Accessibility Project: http://accessibility- android.info