Model Basic BTW Presentation
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Model Basic BTW Presentation

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A good basic model presentation for Business and Technical Writing courses at Rutgers University.

A good basic model presentation for Business and Technical Writing courses at Rutgers University.

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  • Newark is amongst the leaders of cities in the United States tackling the issue of child lead poisoning.

Model Basic BTW Presentation Model Basic BTW Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • By: XXX
  • OVERVIEW Problem: The difficulty in eradicating lead poisoning. Population: The lead poisoned patients of The University Hospital. Models:  Newark Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Program  The Treatment of Lead-Exposed Children Clinical Trial Plan: A monthly community workshop for lead poisoned University Hospital patients and their families. Patron:  The University Hospital’s Lead Poisoning Program Price: $18,200
  • Where does lead poisoning comefrom? Today exposure to the toxin is due to paint and dust. Lead’s use in paint was not prohibited by the government until 1978. A vast amount of American homes are over 100 years old. (Mahoney, 1990)
  • Who is affected? The majority of lead poisoning cases are known to be in poor areas consisting of low-income families and devastating housing.  Areas like these lack the money not only for lead removal but also for nutrition and legal action.  Calcium for example has the ability to block lead absorption. However children living in poor areas lack sufficient calcium intake. (Bruening, 1999) Children are more affected by lead than adults are.  Why?  hand-to-mouth activity  A child’s gut absorbs lead more readily than an adult’s.  The developing CNS is less tolerant of toxicants than the mature CNS.  The mere exposure of kids to lead paint surroundings, without the child necessarily eating paint chips, can cause lifelong affliction. (Needleman, 2003)
  • Effects of Lead Poisoning neurological damage mental retardation cerebral palsy seizures visual-motor deficiencies behavioral problems (Mahoney, 1990, p.50). Lead poisoned children are more likely to do poorly in or drop out of school. (Needleman, 2003)
  • Negative teachers’ ratings in relation to dentin lead concentrations 45 40 35 % Reported by Teachers 30 <5.1 (ppm) 25 5.1-8.1 (ppm) 20 8.2-11.8 (ppm) 11.9-17.1 (ppm) 15 17.2-27.0 (ppm) 10 >27.0 (ppm) 5 0 Distractible Day Dreamer Low Overall Functioning (Needleman, 2003)
  • Remove all lead paint. This is the best and only way to eradicate lead from homes. However it would cost a great deal to do so.  The removal of lead paint needs to be done professionally.  Temporary housing would need to be supplied for families during the process.  Total costs are therefore in the thousands per household. Implementation of a law in order to speed up the process of lead removal has been an issue because the government does not know whether a law should be enforced on the tenant, owner or the tax payers. (Mahoney, 1990)
  • Besides prevention what otheroption is there? The medical approach CDC’s Action Level for uses children as the Blood Lead in Children lead detectors. 70  Medical action is not considered 60 until children test positive for lead. 50 ug/dL 40 30 20 10 Children must meet 0 CDC standards in order to be treated. (U.S. Department of Human Services, Public Health Service Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry, 1992)
  • Let us take a look atNewark. Newark has been tackling the issue of lead poisoning since 1969. The Newark Lead Poisoning Prevention and Control Program (1972-1980) The Treatment of Lead-Exposed Children clinical trial (1994-2003) Lead Poisoning Program at The University Hospital
  • The Newark Lead PoisoningPrevention and ControlProgram Admission Rates by Year of First  It failed due to Admission per 10,000 Newark Children 1-6 Years of Age budget cuts and 30 Newark’s increase in25 poverty level. Admission 20 Rate 15 10 5 0(Schneider & Lavenhar, 1986) Year of Admission
  • Treatment of Lead-ExposedChildren (TLC) It was conducted in 4 total cities showing the highest rate of success in Newark. The following six guidelines are why the trial was a success in Newark. 1. Be accessible 2. Relate to the patient 3. Offer the patient consolation 4. Educate the patient 5. Keep the patient up to date 6. Implement a change in the patient’s lifestyle
  • Plan Start a monthly community workshop for lead poisoned University Hospital patients and their families. More efficient than hiring individual social workers. Patients’ and their families will be able to offer consultation, advice and friendship to one another. They are also more likely to relate to one another than to a social worker.
  • Costs 12 Workshops/year Facilitators……………………$12,000 Refreshments………………..$1,200 Activity Essentials…………...$5,000 Space…………………………$0  Provided by the city of Newark TOTAL: $18,200 (estimations made based on 100 workshop members)
  • Patron The Lead Poisoning Program at The University Hospital headed by Dr. Steven M. Marcus The addition of the workshop would complete the 6 guidelines for the lead poisoning program and therefore improve treatment outcomes.