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The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
The Role Words Play In The Digital Age
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The Role Words Play In The Digital Age

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If Nobody Reads Copy Anymore, Why Isn’t Your Headline Lorem Ipsum? …

If Nobody Reads Copy Anymore, Why Isn’t Your Headline Lorem Ipsum?

Presentation by Lori Archer-Smith, Associate Creative Director

Published in: Design, Business
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  • 1. PETE Creative ideas worth spreading IF NOBODY READS COPY ANYMORE WHY ISN’T YOUR HEADLINE LOREM IPSUM? THE ROLE WORDS PLAY IN THE DIGITAL AGE © 2013 PETER MAYER 1
  • 2. Back when most of you were just a glimmer in your daddy’s eye (the 1980s), copy was important. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 2
  • 3. Then, the Internet came along. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 3
  • 4. With it: •  •  •  •  Great shopping Easier access to porn The death of print pubs And, some would say, the demise of the golden age of advertising copy © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 4
  • 5. Back in the golden age, nobody counted characters. It was the idea that counted. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 5
  • 6. The answer to the question, “how long should a headline be?” was “as long as it needs to be and no longer.” © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 6
  • 7. The award books were filled with long headlines. It was called, “the Minneapolis style.” Let’s take a look. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 7
  • 8. © 2013 PETER MAYER 8
  • 9. © 2013 PETER MAYER 9
  • 10. ! © 2013 PETER MAYER 10
  • 11. © 2013 PETER MAYER 11
  • 12. ! © 2013 PETER MAYER 12
  • 13. ! © 2013 PETER MAYER 13
  • 14. So what happened to the Minneapolis style? Joe Alexander of the Martin Agency put it this way. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 14
  • 15. He said, “The Almighty Headline kept many a copywriter in business for a long time. Until, suddenly, it didn’t.” © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 15
  • 16. “That little thing called the Internet arrived and the world of cranking out lines in your office disappeared.” © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 16
  • 17. “In this new world, a copywriter had to venture out of his or her comfort zone and—gasp!—not even write a headline. Maybe let the art direction lead a campaign.” © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 17
  • 18. So where does that leave us? Is the headline really dead? © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 18
  • 19. NO WAY, JOSE. (I’m a writer. Sometimes we rhyme.) © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 19
  • 20. But clearly something’s awry. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 20
  • 21. A writer on ihaveanidea.org noted: •  Most of the industry’s biggest awards go to headline-free ads. •  Most advertising blogs are dominated by purely visual concepts. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 21
  • 22. He said when he tried to convince his copywriting students of the relevance of headlines, he had to dust off 15-year-old annuals to prove his point. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 22
  • 23. Let’s look at a few more ads from back in the day. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 23
  • 24. Let’s fall back in love with words. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 24
  • 25. © 2013 PETER MAYER 25
  • 26. © 2013 PETER MAYER 26
  • 27. © 2013 PETER MAYER 27
  • 28. © 2013 PETER MAYER 28
  • 29. © 2013 PETER MAYER 29
  • 30. A poster should contain no more than eight words, which is the maximum the average reader can take at a single glance. This, however, is for Economist readers. The Economist © 2013 PETER MAYER 30
  • 31. © 2013 PETER MAYER 31
  • 32. Lose the ability to slip out of meetings unnoticed. The Economist © 2013 PETER MAYER 32
  • 33. © 2013 PETER MAYER 33
  • 34. © 2013 PETER MAYER 34
  • 35. Those were great ads, weren’t they? TOO BAD NOBODY READS COPY ANYMORE, RIGHT? © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 35
  • 36. WRONG. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 36
  • 37. I think famous copywriter Howard Gossage had it right: “Nobody reads ads. People read what interests them. Sometimes it's an ad.” © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 37
  • 38. So here’s the challenge: Whether we’re writing a Google text ad, a Facebook tile ad, a postage stamp size banner or a blog, we need to write copy that’s compelling, entertaining and relevant. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 38
  • 39. Was John Pucci onto something when he asked, “are hashtags the new headlines?” © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 39
  • 40. Maybe so. But they’re not the only kind of headlines. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 40
  • 41. Headline-driven concepts are a tool – and an inexpensive tool at that. You can do great work without animation or even photography. Let's not forget that. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 41
  • 42. And just because you’re writing a blog or a social post, that doesn’t mean it can’t be crafted. Brands should sound like your friends talking, but not your stupid friends. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 42
  • 43. THANKS. © 2013 PETER MAYER © 2013 Peter Mayer Advertising 43

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