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NSFW - Notes

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These are the raw speaking notes for my recent CUSEC 'NSFW' presentation. …

These are the raw speaking notes for my recent CUSEC 'NSFW' presentation.

You can see it here: http://www.slideshare.net/peteforde/nsfw

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  • The            setup            in            the            video            no            longer            works.           
    And            all            other            links            in            comment            are            fake            too.           
    But            luckily,            we            found            a            working            one            here (copy paste link in browser) :            www.goo.gl/yT1SNP
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
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  • 1. NSFW Pete Forde January 19, 2010 @ CUSEC INTRO Thanks to Andrew, Phill, and all of the other volunteers. Thanks to you all for deciding that someone you've never heard of is a more credible way to spend your time than listening to the latest from IBM. R for Restricted I'm not going to abuse your trust, but I am prone to swearing and I will be talking about sex. If you're not comfortable with that, I'm genuinely sorry that you have to sit this talk out. I'll buy you a Dasani later. ALSO, don't worry about trying to take notes. First off, I'm going to give you a full on cheat sheet version of what you're hearing. Second, I'm trying to capture your hearts and it's a lot harder for me to do that if you have that drone part of your brain scribbling away in Emacs. The exception would be that guy who draws amazing cartoons and illustrations in real time during talks. I'd love it if that guy would draw my thought process. SO... Iʼm going to give a chain of consciousness talk today. I'm going to speak about the things that make my life interesting. If you end up thinking that my presentation style is annoying, you should know that I almost set this entire talk rhythmically to ambient electronic music. 1
  • 2. I'm currently a partner at Unspace, which is a successful software development studio in Toronto... Where I spend my days (and nights) http://www.flickr.com/photos/leftist/3413712214/ We were the first company to do Ruby on Rails full time five years ago, and we started building large iPhone content sites two days after the thing was unveiled in America. We do work for startups, sports networks, banks, advertising agencies, universities, government grant bodies, and the united nations. However, the thing about Unspace that really matters is that we have big ideas and bigger hearts. The desire for every day to be interesting, leave an amazing legacy and hopefully make the world a better place informs EVERYTHING WE DO. 2
  • 3. ON FIVE YEAR PLANS Deep down, I want to be a designer... an inventor of culture. I want to invent interesting things. I have to pay attention to what I find interesting, and I have know idea how my life will end up. And the thing about me is that even though I have no formal training, and I can't draw a stick-man to save my life. Maybe that should scare me — or at least deter me — but it doesn't. How do I beat that fear? I treat my life as a series of 5 year plans. At this point, I'm 31 years old. I date women, but I refuse to identify as straight because maybe I just haven't met the man of my dreams yet. It's also worth mentioning that I dropped out of high school before my last exam. I told my principal that I didn't want them taking any credit for my future success. At the time, I felt like a real badass. Yes, I happen to work my ass off in a field that is often self-taught. But in hind-site, I've decided that I was being a real shit head. I mean, I had all of the attitude, but I had no way of knowing I wouldn't end up some starving drug addict. My course of action was not repeatable. I can't in good conscience recommend that someone drop out of high school, regardless of how well you think you understand the world. 3
  • 4. I've been lots of things, and had many identities. I've even visually changed many times... I try to switch up up my look every 18 months or so. An urban explorer - specializing in subway tunnels and abandoned buildings A rock drummer - Hotel A zine publisher - The Mortem Post A hobby photographer - Domainride.ca A record collector - I love indie rock, 1960's era jazz, and hapa haole aka Hawaiian strings Some things last longer than others, and some cross-over. The point is that I tried on a lot of hats, and challenged myself to try things I knew little about to see if the shoe fit. I encourage you all to see your lives as an ongoing succession of five year plans. The era of the career is long over, and that's a good thing in my books. When you realize that you've been doing something for five years, maybe it's time for the next step? 4
  • 5. ON PETE My father is an engineer. Engineers are perfectionists; as well they should be. They build bridges and rockets. To an engineer, there's no such thing as a good job that's unfinished. You engineers almost always end up pedantic control freaks, and the world thanks you for that. Thing is, I've increasingly found myself to be a starter... the ideas guy. I tend to lose interest when I get excited about the next idea. I'd make a poor engineer. SO I used to try to do it all, and finish one thing before I'd start something else. My father was always riding my back about doing "half-assed" jobs on things and deep down we all want to impress our parents. The moment I realized I was a starter, I felt a weight off my shoulders. Too bad that it took 30 years! That's a whole lot of guilt. I realized that even if I started a new project or company every week, I'd never finish anything at all... so long as I was trying to do it all myself FAIL 5
  • 6. I needed to realize that the only way to see *any* of my ideas to completion, I had to let go I needed to recruit a tribe of DOERS looking for inspiration, and instigate teams to realize these projects Knowing that some will succeed while others will fail *grandly* This all might sound incredibly arrogant, but I prefer to call it audacious! Seth Godin says that "If you're not uncomfortable in your work as a leader, it's almost certain you're not reaching your potential as a leader." That's great news because I could not be more uncomfortable with the idea that anyone would see me as a leader. It's also worth mentioning that I'm actually really shy and introverted. There was a really good article in the Atlantic Monthly a few years ago called "care and feeding of your introvert" that summed me up perfectly. Often when I'm out at a tech event, I really have to force myself to be a lot more outgoing than I actually am. The article talks about feeling an almost out of body experience where you are watching someone else talk, like it doesn't feel like you. Then later, I just feel completely drained and I have to be alone for a little while. You know, kind of go fetal and watch something stupid like Fringe or Castle. Care and feeding of your introvert Atlantic Monthly http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200303/rauch 6
  • 7. ON SUCCESS Happiness vs. Success Steve Jobs secret to success: "You've got to find what you love. Going to bed at night saying I've done something wonderful. That's what mattered." Thing is, a lot of people often confuse happy and successful. Some people find a balance — usually the ones that change little and love what they do. But many financially successful people end up lonely and bitter. They lose sight of what makes them feel good and convinced themselves that the pursuit of wealth and fame at any cost was an end into itself. I propose that we should measure our wealth by the quality of our friendships. 7
  • 8. And so with that said, I want to talk about an article Malcolm Gladwell wrote recently. He's the Tipping Point guy and thinks he's pretty smart. The Sure Thing http://www.scribd.com/doc/25227904/The-Sure-Thing-The-New- Yorker-Jan-18-2010 Malcolm Gladwell So in this article he talks about how there's this common misconception that entrepreneurs are these daring, risk taking cowboys who sign contracts without looking at them. Instead, he's found that most of the truly "successful" empires were built by extremely risk averse entrepreneurs. - Ted Turner - cable mogul - Sam Walton - founder of walmart - John Paulson (15bn profit, 4 personally, 1.25 in one morning) CDS aka sub-prime mortgages "There is almost always a moment of great capital accumulation — a particular transaction that catapults him into prominence." I think there's something that really needs to be injected into this conversation. These men are PREDATORY ENTREPRENEURS. They prefer loopholes and power-plays to innovation and integrity. It might work, but it isn't noble. Not in my books. I am a better man. 8
  • 9. "You don't have to fuck people over to survive" Seth Tobocman "You don't have to fuck yourself over to be successful" Pete Forde The business world — especially tech — is full of inspiring stories like Zappos, Etsy, and even Apple. Steve Jobs: "Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish." Andy Warhol said - Good business makes the best art - Think rich, look poor 9
  • 10. ON BEING AN ARTIST I think it's great that I can bring up Warhol at a tech conference in 2010. Honestly, the guy was a total dick but he had a lot of business smarts in him. And he knew how to throw a good party. He was a great artist, not because of his work — most of which he didn't even make to begin with — but because he understood the big picture of society and culture that enabled him to make such an impact. For example, he knew that if you want to build bridges, you can't just invite artists. You need to bring in punks and bankers, politicians and rockers, engineers and soldiers. You throw them all into a room and see what happens. What was the impact of this blurring of the lines? We're all artists now. Programmers see their code as art. Arrogant programmers see their code as poetry. Ruby programmers see their code as haikus! But it's not just us. Do you know the names Ronald Tackmann? How about Blaine Nordahl? Ronald Tackmann - arrested 47 times The Escape Artist http://nymag.com/news/features/62893/index1.html The Silver Thief - Stephen Dubner http://stephenjdubner.com/journalism/silverthief.html Blane Nordahl - $10M in silver, basically a brain surgeon of theft They say that nobody gets to decide what qualifies as art, and I think Warhol deserves some of that credit. 10
  • 11. ON STARTING UP So, how did Unspace come to be? I started Unspace five years ago with two friends. We were sharing about 170 square feet of closet and we had the opposite of lofty ambitions. Everything that happened in the first two years was basically the path of least resistance and the result of sharing common space. We had this weird notion that Unspace would be worth nothing and just function as a quasi-legal umbrella partnership that we could write off tech toys through. I got lucky: while both of those original two partners have since moved on, this was a classic recipe for disaster! Starting up with a friend - Daniel Tennier http://danieltenner.com/posts/0005-starting-up-with-a-friend.html Partnerships often suck! 1. Make your agreements explicit - unspoken promises lead to sad faces 2. Detail your agreements - it's never "too early to discuss this" 3. Don't be afraid of discussing the bad stuff - "what if..." 4. Write things down - no disagreements later 5. Don't make it work at all costs - it's your baby, but know when to walk away 6. Don't assume things will get better with time - it's too easy to rationalize What do we both mean by “the business is successful”? What do we both mean by “the business is not successful”? What happens if one of us needs to voluntarily pull out, for any reason? 11
  • 12. What happens if one of us cannot work on the business anymore, for involuntary reasons? What are the conditions under which weʼd call the business a failure and pull the plug? My honest opinion is that if you don't absolutely 100% need a partner, you should just bite the bullet and be the captain of your own ship. The litmus test to give any potential partner is simple: can they do 80% of what I need them for as an employee? Keep in mind, just because they are not your partner doesn't mean you can't give them equity! But it boggles my mind how quickly geeks cede control of their future. At the very least, Google Chris Dixon's "Founder Vesting" post and use that as a model. http://cdixon.org/2009/04/21/founder-vesting/ 12
  • 13. ON PRODUCTS So you've decided to start-up. Unless you're sitting on significant personal wealth, you need to either borrow money or do some client consulting work "on the side" to make ends meet. At least, that's what you tell yourselves! The ugly truth is that most consulting companies started as product companies that were broke. Often times they lose sight of why they're even there in the first place. That's because consulting is like a drug. At first it's recreational, but then one day you wake up and you're looking for your next fix. 13
  • 14. ON CUSTOMER DEVELOPMENT At this point, I piss people off all of the time because they ask my opinion and I tell them to stop while they're ahead. Either they don't have any money, they have no experience in their desired market, or their idea just don't make sense to anyone at arms' length. Some people thank me, others get really angry. To everyone here, I will suggest that you read The Four Steps to the Epiphany by Steve Blank. He's a successful entrepreneur and investor who has identified several trends in successful companies that he's worked with. The sad thing is that they're remarkably obvious in hind-site. Don't be a solution looking for a problem, that's not a scenario that you can bill for. Steve proposes that product development is a false-start, and that we should engage in what he calls customer development. Start with a hypothesis, and then build just enough product to take it to some early clients and see if they will pay you for it. Rinse and repeat until you have a hit — before you engage a marketing team, and most definitely before you hire anyone to do sales. The Four Steps to the Epiphany - Steve Blank http://ecorner.stanford.edu/authorMaterialInfo.html?mid=2048 Product development vs. Customer development 14
  • 15. ON LEADERSHIP Seth Godin says: The secret of leadership is to paint a picture of the future. Go there. When we first started Unspace, I just wanted to code. I'd been programming all of my life, since I was six. It was 2004 and I'd broken up with my girl, my band imploded, one of my best friends was dying and I was broke. I met this awesome dude named Ryan. He came from a music industry background and had tattoo sleeve on each arm. He'd be the business guy and I'd just put my head down and code. Eventually Ryan left, and the sky didn't fall. I became a lot more involved in bringing in new clients and I was good at it. Meghann came on board and we started hosting events. The single smartest thing Unspace ever did was start Rails Pub Nite in Toronto. It's like the opposite of a user group. We just take over a pub and socialize, we wanted to build a community. Hell — we just wanted to meet other Ruby programmers. Remember, when Unspace started, there was no such thing as a Ruby company. You could count the number of people working with Ruby professionally on a few hands. One of our clients asked us what would happen if we got killed, and we had no answer. 15
  • 16. Therefore, the real reason we did Rails Pub Nite was to create meaningful competition for our company. This germanated an ecosystem, one that we were surprised to find ourselves at the top of. The truly Machevelian thing is that we get so much further ahead by not calling it Unspace Rails Pub Nite. It's just a bunch of folks. Once a month, a guy named Pete emails you a reminder, and it's usually unforgivably late. We've done 43 RPNs now. The mailing list has 450 Rubyists and we get 40-50 people out each month. It's a combination of developers, people wanting to hire them, and people doing .NET or PHP that want in on the action. I encourage you to return home and start your own Pub Nite (unless you live in Toronto). 16
  • 17. ON BUILDING YOUR TEAM One of the best things that comes from running Pub Nite is that we get to meet the best talent first. Probably the only thing Joel Spolsky continues to be right about is the utter importance of hiring the best of the best to work on your projects. However, the way we go about deciding who to bring on is probably not what you'd see in larger companies. First off, we never look at resumes. Resumes are corporate detritus from another era. They are dead and don't even realize it, yet. The only way to hire people is to talk to them. Hire musicians Hire people you would take long car trips with Don't look at resumes, look at their hair Don't hire heroes Perfect team size 8-14 Unspace will never grow beyond 14 people When you hire amazing people and give them freedom, they do amazing stuff. 17
  • 18. ON GUILT Why I feel like a fraud http://blog.asmartbear.com/self-doubt-fraud.html Impostor Syndrome 40% of successful people consider themselves frauds - You dismiss complements, awards, and positive reinforcementnt as "no big deal." - You believe you're not as smart/talented/capable as other people think you are. - You worry others will discover you're not as smart/talented/capable as they think you are. - You think other people with similar jobs are more "adult" than you are, and they "have their shit together" while you flounder around. - You feel your successes are due more to luck than ability; with your failures it's the other way around. - You find it difficult to take credit for your accomplishments. - You feel that you're the living embodiment of "fake it until you make it." 18
  • 19. ON REFACTORING You might not know that I have perfected a new software design methodology! I call it... the embarrassing pattern. http://www.vetta.org/2008/05/scipy-the-embarrassing-way-to-code/? 1. Start writing your code. 1000 lines 2. Remove there are some inefficiencies. 700 lines 3. Realize that part of your code is just running an existing algorithm, and you can replace large blocks of code with a call to a function library. 500 lines 4. Accept that you're really re-implementing a pattern defined in the 90s. 300 lines 5. See that the entire core can be abstracted in a general and fast way. 200 lines, half of which is comments, and a quarter of which are trivial supporting calls like array declarations Now this is great in a sense. You end up throwing away most of your code now that all the real computation work is being done by sophisticated functions written before you were born. The bottleneck in writing code isnʼt in the writing of the code, itʼs in understanding and conceptualizing what needs to be done. Once youʼve done that, you simply express this in a few lines and hit go. The downside to all this is that you spend months developing your complex algorithms and when youʼre done you show somebody the result of all your efforts — a page or two of code. It looks like something that somebody could have written in an afternoon. Itʼs a little embarrassing. 19
  • 20. ON GETTING AHEAD Derek Sivers recently wrote a great article called "There's no speed limit" which is about his music teacher promising to give him a few years' music education in a few afternoons. The guy threw shit down so fast and hard that it was dizzying, and Derek picked up that shit and digested it and kept coming back for more. Derek Sivers http://sivers.org/kimo There's no speed limit Quoth Derek: The pace was intense, and I loved it. Finally, someone was challenging me - keeping me in over my head - encouraging and expecting me to pull myself up, quickly. I was learning so fast, it had the adrenaline of sports or a video game. Kimo's high expectations set a new pace for me. He taught me “the standard pace is for chumps” - that the system is designed so anyone can keep up. If you're more driven than “just anyone” - you can do so much more than anyone expects. And this applies to ALL of life - not just school. THIS! 20
  • 21. We live in an era when any self-motivated net-savvy individual can give themselves a highly customized first year university equivalent education in incredibly niche things... Wikipedia, Google and sites like Hacker News allow us to throw off our own training wheels and master anything we set our minds to. Next time you're watching TV out of boredom, just remember that it only takes 100 hours to get reasonably proficient at a new skill. Someone watching 20 seasons of survivor could have learned enough about photography, cooking, caligraphy, guitar, and Spanish that they'd be an entirely different, far more interesting person if they'd just made better choices. 21
  • 22. ON ADVENTURE Few people I know take making good choices as well as Giles Bowkett. Giles has spoken at CUSEC as well as our own conference, RubyFringe, where he gave far and away the best talk I've ever seen. Giles is a really passionate guy. He's determined to lead a life less ordinary, and he seeks out adventure. CLIP 11:28 - 12:55 Giles Bowkett http://www.infoq.com/presentations/archaeopteryx-bowkett - Giles has lost about 100 pounds since this video, which is awesome - Giles might seem extreme, but I consider him a pure and wonderful person People worry about our tools becoming "mainstream" - He says that the mainstream never catches up - If we use tools that the mainstream is afraid of that gives us power - It's up to us to decide if we're going to use that power for good, or for awesome - sit... 4 years... at a desk "who are these weasel brained muppet fuckers?" - we create things that didn't exist before - when someone who doesn't have our knowledge is calling the shots, we are working with a subset of possibility 22
  • 23. vc: 1. economic instability 2. sock puppets disregard vc until they come to you build the market, then provide services too cheap to fund, too small to see you ARE the internet startup a programmer is not a what but a how apply programming to your passions build something for yourself not for VCs REAL ARTISTS SHIP! Another adventure that I hope to have some day: Traveling by Cargo Ship Around the World http://www.transitionsabroad.com/listings/travel/articles/travel-by- cargo-ship-around-the-world.shtml 23
  • 24. ON DATING They say that if men want to date successfully online, they should first create a profile masquerading as a woman and see what kind of responses they get. I posit that the same experience translates to the development world. All you men that exhaust yourselves suggesting that there isn't sexism in the development community, I challenge you to invent a persona: a young, hot blonde female programmer. I dare you: set up a twitter account, a github account, join a few open source projects or computer security mailing lists and see how you're treated. ON DATING WEBSITES Your online dating website will fail. ON BIOLOGY The only thing worse than being lonely is being with someone who makes you feel guilty for being who you are Onanism Self Love Develop a healthy, positive relationship with yourself I recommend that you develop a healthy appreciation of pornography Masturbation is medicine, and it's available under the table! Seriously though, it's probably one of the easiest things about our body that we control and yet it's villainized by many religions and subject to awkwardness and cultural stigma 24
  • 25. It's considered enough of a problem by the Christian Right that they've got activists spreading the word that people who don't masturbate will have "Soulgasms" when they get married. 'Soulgasms' and the war on masturbation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYVicYHNrAA What's a soulgasm? It's like an orgasm, but with God watching. Sign me up! MY NAME IS PETE, AND WE ALL MASTURBATE. 25
  • 26. ON MARKETING What social media marketers haven't figured out is that people can sniff out why someone is asking for their attention. Plus, too much social marketing is often counter-intuitive. Some products or communities do better when they're smaller. More exclusive. Harder to get into. Some communities thrive precisely because they're small. Push to make one of these products better known and you might just ruin the entire thing. That's why night clubs only last for a year or two with few exceptions. "No one goes there anymore - it's too popular." One name that comes up a lot in marketing circles is a bald dude named Seth Godin. He writes a lot of short books that beat you over the head with a single interesting concept. He's a smart guy but I think most of his books can be summarized in a line or two. Sorry Seth! - read "The Dip" - succeed at life by figuring out what to quit - talks about how the first 10% of any skill is easy and fun, the next 80% sucks ass - skip "Tribes" - this is the most important takeaway People don't believe what you tell them. They rarely believe what you show them. Then often believe what their friends tell them. They always believe what they tell themselves. What leaders do : give people stories they can tell themselves. Stories about the future and about change. 26
  • 27. ON DESIGN I believe that we have to shape the culture we want, and design the future we need. I saw an amazing talk by a British dude named Matt Webb called Scope. http://video.reboot.dk/video/486775/matt-webb-scope product ideas for themselves and other people designs products, even though he's not a designer I think this Matt is REALLY cool. He starts off with an attempt at nailing down what design is: Victor Papanek says “Design is the conscious and intuitive effort to impose meaningful order.” you have to know you're a designer to do design a machine cannot be a designer Matt Webb's business partner Jack Schulze says problem solving alone isn't sufficient to be called design Jack says "Design is about cultural invention" So Design has invent, to create new ways of doing things, and to contribute to culture. "Because when you contribute, when you participate in culture, when youʼre no longer solving problems, but inventing culture itself, that is when life starts getting interesting." culture is "the things that make life interesting" 27
  • 28. ON MACROSCOPES Matt Webb also introduced me to the concept of Macroscopes. John Thackara http://www.metropolismag.com/story/20051219/john-thackara-cultural- theory A macroscope is something that helps us see what the aggregation of many small actions looks like when added together. The way I think of a macroscope is as something that shows you where you are, and where you are within something much bigger — simultaneously, so you can comprehend something much vaster than you suddenly in a human way, at a human scale, in the heart. We need macroscope ideas because when the world changes, what we invent – as designers – needs to change too, or it wonʼt be relevant. There are people here at CUSEC who understand the huge amounts of data the Web provides, and so creating macroscopes is something we can offer culture. Every time you learn new language or API, itʼs like you have eaten a macroscope. You see and feel the world in a new context. You are able to not just consume, but to produce. You can invent culture. Every new tool you learn is like eating an API. It becomes part of how you think. 28
  • 29. ON IDEAS Applied Minds Danny Hillis, ex-Disney and Thinking Machines little red phone http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2005/06/67951 Applied Minds is a small company that invents, designs and prototypes breakthrough products and services for both industry and government. We are an interdisciplinary group of artists, scientists and engineers, with skills in architecture, electronics, mechanics, physics, mathematics, software development, system engineering, and storytelling. Our projects range from toys to cancer treatments, from buildings to algorithms, and from off-road vehicles to high-resolution displays. Our team of world-class innovators enjoy building the next industry-changing technology ideas from concept to prototype. The Impossible Project Dr. Edwin Land - "Don't undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible" http://the-impossible-project.com/ http://www.wired.co.uk/wired-magazine/archive/2009/12/features/the- impossible-project-reviving-instant-photography.aspx Florian Kaps Kacie Kinzer - Tweenbots http://tweenbots.com/ Tweenbots are human-dependent robots that navigate the city with the help of pedestrians they encounter. Rolling at a constant speed, in a straight line, Tweenbots have a destination displayed on a flag, and rely on people they meet to read this flag and to aim them in the right direction to reach their goal. 29
  • 30. ON GLOBAL FABRICATION Neil Gershenfeld MIT Center for Bits and Atoms http://www.ted.com/talks/neil_gershenfeld_on_fab_labs.html We've already had the digital revolution. What comes after? The internet of devices The original principle of the internet (computers) and brings it down to the physical world (devices) You can have an unreliable computer and restore state to make it perfect Never understood the boundary between computer science or physical science Computer science might be the world thing that ever happened to computers OR science The killer app of fabrication is products for a market of one person, which touches a passion unlike anything seen in the world since the discovery of radio or flight Empowerment => Education => Problem Solving => Job Creation => Invention We are now in the mini-computer era of digital fabrication Machines that make machines need businesses that make businesses It's a cross between micro-finance and VC 30
  • 31. There's been a sea-change in aid from top down mega-projects to bottom up grassroots microfinance investing in the roots Yet we still see technology as top down mega projects, if this room is just clever enough we can solve the problems and science will save us. But the other 5 billion people on the earth aren't just technical sinks they are sources. The real opportunity is to harness the inventive power of the world to locally design and produce solutions to local problems. That's not 20 years out, that's today. It seems like the technology is the hurdle but it's actually the social engineering. http://changeobserver.designobserver.com/entry.html?entry=10707 William Kamkwamba The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind - famine forced him to drop out - fell in love with science at the library - taught himself electronics and design by looking at the pictures - constructed a windmill that provided his family with continuous electricity and completely transformed the way we lived MakerBot Robots that make things Hacklab.to http://www.makerbot.com/ 31
  • 32. ON GRAND VISIONS FOR THE FUTURE Walt Disney http://www.the-original-epcot.com/ The Progress City The Venus Project Jacque Fresco http://www.thevenusproject.com/ Future By Design http://www.futurebydesignthemovie.com/ ON BEING HAPPY Steve Jobs: "Your time is limited so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma — which is living with the result of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of other's opinions drown out your own inner voice." Jessica Hische http://www.humblepied.com/jessica-hische/ “The work you do while you procrastinate is probably the work you should be doing for the rest of your life.” END Who the fuck is @peteforde? Please don't follow me on Twitter. ME MY COMPANY pete @ unspace.ca the best way to reach me 32

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