Is that an iPhone in
your pocket, or are you
 just happy to see me?
      Pete Forde / @peteforde
        Unspace Interact...
Are you ready?
Are you ready for yet
another Gradient-themed
  Keynote presentation?
You’d best get pumped.
Pete
Partner
Unspace
$$$$$
Rails
Guy Kawasaki
25,000 Applications!
$160 Million dollars!
Why develop for
   iPhone?
Why develop for
        iPhone?


• Roughly 18-20 million iPhones sold to date
Why develop for
        iPhone?

• Roughly 18-20 million iPhones sold to date
• 30 million if you include iPod Touch
Why develop for
        iPhone?

• Roughly 18-20 million iPhones sold to date
• 30 million if you include iPod Touch
• iTu...
Why develop for
        iPhone?
• Roughly 18-20 million iPhones sold to date
• 30 million if you include iPod Touch
• iTun...
Why develop for
   iPhone?




Because it’s awesome.
Lim Ding Wen
Age 9
This is his 20th project.
So, you want to develop
 an iPhone application...
SDK free to the curious, but a developer
          membership is $99.

 You only need it if you plan to publish.
Submitting an app costs nothing.
Apps can be free

or sold for $0.99 to $999.99
Apple takes 30% of the gross profits, and
  they pay out at irregular intervals.

                Slowly.
[By comparison, people freak out when
 credit card processors charge 1-4%.]
Apple recently announced in-app billing,
     which will enable swarms of
   micropayment business models.
Killer start-up idea #452:

“You want my digits? Pair with my iPhone
 and pay $200. Show me your Bluetooth.”
There will be no in-app micro-payments
             for free apps.

That means no Trialware business model.
Other business models


• Embedded ad networks (AdMob)
Other business models


• Embedded ad networks (AdMob)
• Paid ads or exchange ads
Other business models


• Cydia: an alternative app store for jail-
  broken phones
Other business models


• Cydia: an alternative app store for jail-
  broken phones
• Everyone’s a criminal
Other business models

• Cydia: an alternative app store for jail-
  broken phones
• Everyone’s a criminal
• Australia
Other business models

• Cydia: an alternative app store for jail-
  broken phones
• Everyone’s a criminal
• Australia
• 1...
2 Development Paths


• Standards HTML + CSS + Javascript web
  apps running in Mobile Safari
2 Development Paths


• Standards HTML5 + CSS3 + Javascript web
  apps running in Mobile Safari
• Native apps written in O...
2 Development Paths

In the beginning, Apple told us that there
would be no SDK and all applications would
be Ajax applica...
Web Apps


• No need to learn a new toolkit
Web Apps


• No need to learn a new toolkit
• Safari supports CSS3 and fast Javascript,
  plus access to GPS and the accel...
Web Apps

• No need to learn a new toolkit
• Safari supports CSS3 and fast Javascript,
  plus access to GPS and the accele...
Web Apps
• No need to learn a new toolkit
• Safari supports CSS3 and fast Javascript,
  plus access to GPS and the acceler...
Web Apps


• No direct hardware access
Web Apps


• No direct hardware access
• Can’t be sold in iTAS
Web Apps

• No direct hardware access
• Can’t be sold in iTAS
• Users must type URLs
Web Apps

• No direct hardware access
• Can’t be sold in iTAS
• Users must type URLs
• Subject to server availability
Native Apps


• Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS)
Native Apps


• Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS)
• Faster, compiled code which can be sync’d
Native Apps

• Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS)
• Faster, compiled code which can be sync’d
• Apps have icons and ...
Native Apps

• Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS)
• Faster, compiled code which can be sync’d
• Apps have icons and ...
Native Apps

• Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS)
• Faster, compiled code which can be sync’d
• Apps have icons and ...
Native Apps


• XCode IDE and debugging tools
Native Apps


• XCode IDE and debugging tools
• Must learn Objective-C, Cocoa
Native Apps

• XCode IDE and debugging tools
• Must learn Objective-C, Cocoa
• Must port to other platforms
Native Apps

• XCode IDE and debugging tools
• Must learn Objective-C, Cocoa
• Must port to other platforms
• Apple can re...
Native Apps

• XCode IDE and debugging tools
• Must learn Objective-C, Cocoa
• Must port to other platforms
• Apple can re...
Now, there is another way...
Hybrid Applications
Hybrid Web/Native Apps



• Wrap Safari in a Site Specific Browser (SSB)
Hybrid Web/Native Apps

• Wrap Safari in a Site Specific Browser (SSB)
• quot;A site specific browser (SSB) is a software
  ...
Hybrid Web/Native Apps
• Wrap Safari in a Site Specific Browser (SSB)
• quot;A site specific browser (SSB) is a software
  a...
Case Study:
TheScore iPhone Edition
TheScore iPhone Edition



• First commercial iPhone app in Canada
TheScore iPhone Edition


• First commercial iPhone app in Canada
• Rails app which processes and caches a
  seriously evi...
TheScore iPhone Edition

• First commercial iPhone app in Canada
• Rails app which processes and caches a
  seriously evil...
TheScore iPhone Edition

• First commercial iPhone app in Canada
• Rails app which processes and caches a
  seriously evil...
TheScore iPhone Edition


• Announcement of App Store presented a
  dilemma: stick with proven tech
  investment, or follo...
TheScore iPhone Edition

• Announcement of App Store presented a
  dilemma: stick with proven tech
  investment, or follow...
TheScore iPhone Edition
• Announcement of App Store presented a
  dilemma: stick with proven tech
  investment, or follow ...
TheScore iPhone Edition



• Content easily re-purposed for other
  mobile platforms such as Blackberry
TheScore iPhone Edition


• Rails’ lets us implement features faster,
  which means cheaper
• Content easily re-purposed f...
TheScore iPhone Edition

• Rails’ lets us implement features faster,
  which means cheaper
• Content easily re-purposed fo...
TheScore iPhone Edition

• Rails’ lets us implement features faster,
  which means cheaper
• Content easily re-purposed fo...
Business Models,
   Revisited


   Scenario #1
Business Models,
    Revisited
 You sell 25k copies of an app for $1.95.

That'd be $50k, except Apple takes 30% so
      ...
Business Models,
     Revisited
 That means that you'd have to have 1.2
million people consider buying your app, or
 about...
Business Models,
   Revisited

    Scenario #2
aka “The 37signals”
Business Models,
    Revisited

Customers subscribe to a web service for
           $5/m ($60/year).

You need about 1000 ...
Business Models,
     Revisited

    Oh, and in year two... it’s all profit.

With a one-time purchase, there is no year
 t...
Business Models,
   Revisited


iPhones feature the most sophisticated
    mobile web browser in history
Business Models,
     Revisited


   Full support for CSS3 transitions and a
lightning-fast compiled Javascript interpreter
Business Models,
     Revisited

Are you still so convinced that people need
to click on an icon to consider a service to
...
Business Models,
    Revisited

  Publish your app as a web service for
  iPhone. Potentially you could support
    Androi...
Business Models,
   Revisited



   Pay Apple $0 overhead.

        Win at life.
Business Models,
   Revisited


 Perhaps it could even have push
notifications, if they ever launch it.
Case Study:
iWik => Wikipedia
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
•   Employee #1 at Unspace
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
•     Employee #1 at Unspace

• Creator of Haml, the most
    popular Rails template engine
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
•     Employee #1 at Unspace

• Creator of Haml, the most
    popular Rails template engine

• An o...
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
•     Employee #1 at Unspace

• Creator of Haml, the most
    popular Rails template engine

• An o...
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
• iWik was created because
 Wikipedia looked like shit on
 iPhone, and was hard to use
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
• iWik was created because
 Wikipedia looked like shit on
 iPhone, and was hard to use

• Hampton’s...
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
• iWik sold well over 60,000
    copies at $0.99 a copy
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
• iWik sold well over 60,000
     copies at $0.99 a copy

• The first version was built in
 three da...
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
• iWik sold well over 60,000
     copies at $0.99 a copy

• The first version was built in
 three da...
Meet Hampton
   Catlin
• Wikipedia offered to buy iWik,
    instead of harassing him

• In addition, they brought him in
o...
What Apple doesn’t want you to do.
“Again I say to you, it is easier for a camel
 to go through the eye of a needle, than
 for a rich man to enter the kingdo...
“Not gonna lie... it'd be easier to get
Steve Ballmer using an iPod, than for you
 to get a straight answer on why Apple
 ...
Secret Laws
•   This is John Gilmore

•   Sun employee #5, and
    co-founder of the EFF

•   Unsuccessfully sued the
    ...
• I assumed that Apple would be pretty
  liberal in their curation of iTAS
• I assumed that Apple would be pretty
  liberal in their curation of iTAS

• I was wrong
• I assumed that Apple would be pretty
  liberal in their curation of iTAS

• I was wrong
• Any guesses on the first app I ...
“Pull my finger” was
 rejected for being
      indecent
Eventually, they decided to
allow flatulent expression.
Today, there are over 83 fart
   applications on iTAS.

One of them hit #7 on the
  paid application list.
Apple has a long list of
 banned application
      concepts.
You can’t make anything
 similar to an existing
   Apple application.
Sadly, the reverse doesn’t seem to apply to Apple.
No swearing.
No nudity or adult
    content.
No tethering (sharing
3G with your laptop)
No VoIP on 3G
One company had their
 critical update delayed
  because their features
list said “more dragons”
“What dragons are you
 referring to? There is
no evidence of dragons
  in your application.”
It turns out that there
   are so many apps
rejected that there’s a
  deadpool for them.
   http://boredzo.org/killed-ipho...
Apple was worried that
this app, which “broke” the iPhone
  when touched, would confuse
          their customers.

      ...
The Lyrics app by
Moop.me has been
 rejected 4 times.
Each time, an Apple auditor loads their
app, searches for the word “fuck,” finds it
 in the 700k song database, and rejects...
Of course, 99% of those songs are
   available for sale on iTunes.

Apple will not directly respond to
    requests for cl...
Magic Bullets
The iPhone SDK allows
  the registration of
   custom protocol
 handlers which start
  helper applications.
To some degree, this
 allows a developer to
introduce “impossible”
 features into the mix.
The most dramatic
 example is Alocola,
which enables passing
 GPS coordinates to
  Safari web apps

 http://alocola.com/
There’s also several
Twitter apps, and even
  an Authorize.net
  payment gateway
      processor.
Check out a list of
custom protocol apps
        at:

http://applookup.com/
Ch-ch-changes
iPhone OS v3.0
• Native apps will be able to expose an
  interface to the new Spotlight functions
• Native apps will be able to expose an
  interface to the new Spotlight functions

• Connect to Mail, Calendar, iPod
• Native apps will be able to expose an
  interface to the new Spotlight functions

• Connect to Mail, Calendar, iPod
• Sa...
• Native apps will be able to expose an
  interface to the new Spotlight functions

• Connect to Mail, Calendar, iPod
• Sa...
• Native apps will be able to expose an
  interface to the new Spotlight functions

• Connect to Mail, Calendar, iPod
• Sa...
• External device control
• External device control
• Embedded maps, turn-by-turn directions
• External device control
• Embedded maps, turn-by-turn directions
• Voice communication, audio recording
• External device control
• Embedded maps, turn-by-turn directions
• Voice communication, audio recording
• Rumbling
• External device control
• Embedded maps, turn-by-turn directions
• Voice communication, audio recording
• Rumbling
• Acc...
None of this is what
 gets me excited,
     though.
Javascript
iPhone OS v2.2: 8-22x faster than v1.0.1
Javascript
iPhone OS v3.0: 3-10x faster than v2.2
Strong speculation that
  v3.0 will feature the
native-code generating
Squirrelfish interpreter
The Future
Rhodes: An open source framework that
lets you write a mobile app in Ruby, feed
 it through a processor, and output code
 ...
Canvas: The HTML5 canvas tag supported
   in every major browser except IE. It
 supports powerful vector drawing and
shadi...
Tools
Tools

•   Best iPhone developer blog: MobileOrchard.com

•   Best free iPhone research and case study:
    theamazingipho...
Thanks!

I will be posting the
   URLs from this
  presentation on:

rethink.unspace.ca


 pete@unspace.ca
   @peteforde
Is that an iPhone in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Is that an iPhone in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?

5,478 views
4,742 views

Published on

http://rethink.unspace.ca/2009/04/07/meshu-wrap-up

Here are the slides from my talk at MeshU on April 6th, 2009.

Published in: News & Politics, Technology
4 Comments
7 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,478
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
908
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
109
Comments
4
Likes
7
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide








































































































































































































































































































  • Is that an iPhone in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?

    1. Is that an iPhone in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me? Pete Forde / @peteforde Unspace Interactive
    2. Are you ready?
    3. Are you ready for yet another Gradient-themed Keynote presentation?
    4. You’d best get pumped.
    5. Pete
    6. Partner
    7. Unspace
    8. $$$$$
    9. Rails
    10. Guy Kawasaki
    11. 25,000 Applications!
    12. $160 Million dollars!
    13. Why develop for iPhone?
    14. Why develop for iPhone? • Roughly 18-20 million iPhones sold to date
    15. Why develop for iPhone? • Roughly 18-20 million iPhones sold to date • 30 million if you include iPod Touch
    16. Why develop for iPhone? • Roughly 18-20 million iPhones sold to date • 30 million if you include iPod Touch • iTunes Application Store (iTAS)
    17. Why develop for iPhone? • Roughly 18-20 million iPhones sold to date • 30 million if you include iPod Touch • iTunes Application Store (iTAS) • Indirect marketing through association
    18. Why develop for iPhone? Because it’s awesome.
    19. Lim Ding Wen
    20. Age 9
    21. This is his 20th project.
    22. So, you want to develop an iPhone application...
    23. SDK free to the curious, but a developer membership is $99. You only need it if you plan to publish.
    24. Submitting an app costs nothing.
    25. Apps can be free or sold for $0.99 to $999.99
    26. Apple takes 30% of the gross profits, and they pay out at irregular intervals. Slowly.
    27. [By comparison, people freak out when credit card processors charge 1-4%.]
    28. Apple recently announced in-app billing, which will enable swarms of micropayment business models.
    29. Killer start-up idea #452: “You want my digits? Pair with my iPhone and pay $200. Show me your Bluetooth.”
    30. There will be no in-app micro-payments for free apps. That means no Trialware business model.
    31. Other business models • Embedded ad networks (AdMob)
    32. Other business models • Embedded ad networks (AdMob) • Paid ads or exchange ads
    33. Other business models • Cydia: an alternative app store for jail- broken phones
    34. Other business models • Cydia: an alternative app store for jail- broken phones • Everyone’s a criminal
    35. Other business models • Cydia: an alternative app store for jail- broken phones • Everyone’s a criminal • Australia
    36. Other business models • Cydia: an alternative app store for jail- broken phones • Everyone’s a criminal • Australia • 1.7 million iPhones with Cydia installed
    37. 2 Development Paths • Standards HTML + CSS + Javascript web apps running in Mobile Safari
    38. 2 Development Paths • Standards HTML5 + CSS3 + Javascript web apps running in Mobile Safari • Native apps written in Objective-C
    39. 2 Development Paths In the beginning, Apple told us that there would be no SDK and all applications would be Ajax applications. There was much rejoicing from web geeks and much angry shouting from 3D game programmers.
    40. Web Apps • No need to learn a new toolkit
    41. Web Apps • No need to learn a new toolkit • Safari supports CSS3 and fast Javascript, plus access to GPS and the accelerometer
    42. Web Apps • No need to learn a new toolkit • Safari supports CSS3 and fast Javascript, plus access to GPS and the accelerometer • Developers can target a single device with a specific screen size
    43. Web Apps • No need to learn a new toolkit • Safari supports CSS3 and fast Javascript, plus access to GPS and the accelerometer • Developers can target a single device with a specific screen size • Updates occur instantly on the server
    44. Web Apps • No direct hardware access
    45. Web Apps • No direct hardware access • Can’t be sold in iTAS
    46. Web Apps • No direct hardware access • Can’t be sold in iTAS • Users must type URLs
    47. Web Apps • No direct hardware access • Can’t be sold in iTAS • Users must type URLs • Subject to server availability
    48. Native Apps • Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS)
    49. Native Apps • Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS) • Faster, compiled code which can be sync’d
    50. Native Apps • Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS) • Faster, compiled code which can be sync’d • Apps have icons and can be sold in iTAS
    51. Native Apps • Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS) • Faster, compiled code which can be sync’d • Apps have icons and can be sold in iTAS • Access to iPod, Calendar, Address Book...
    52. Native Apps • Direct hardware access (3D, Camera, GPS) • Faster, compiled code which can be sync’d • Apps have icons and can be sold in iTAS • Access to iPod, Calendar, Address Book... • XCode IDE and debugging tools
    53. Native Apps • XCode IDE and debugging tools
    54. Native Apps • XCode IDE and debugging tools • Must learn Objective-C, Cocoa
    55. Native Apps • XCode IDE and debugging tools • Must learn Objective-C, Cocoa • Must port to other platforms
    56. Native Apps • XCode IDE and debugging tools • Must learn Objective-C, Cocoa • Must port to other platforms • Apple can reject your application at whim
    57. Native Apps • XCode IDE and debugging tools • Must learn Objective-C, Cocoa • Must port to other platforms • Apple can reject your application at whim • Relatively few Objective-C coders around
    58. Now, there is another way...
    59. Hybrid Applications
    60. Hybrid Web/Native Apps • Wrap Safari in a Site Specific Browser (SSB)
    61. Hybrid Web/Native Apps • Wrap Safari in a Site Specific Browser (SSB) • quot;A site specific browser (SSB) is a software application that is dedicated to accessing pages from a single website. SSBs typically simplify the web browser by excluding the menus, toolbars and browser chrome that are external to the workings of a the site.quot;
    62. Hybrid Web/Native Apps • Wrap Safari in a Site Specific Browser (SSB) • quot;A site specific browser (SSB) is a software application that is dedicated to accessing pages from a single website. SSBs typically simplify the web browser by excluding the menus, toolbars and browser chrome that are external to the workings of a the site.quot; • The best of both worlds.
    63. Case Study: TheScore iPhone Edition
    64. TheScore iPhone Edition • First commercial iPhone app in Canada
    65. TheScore iPhone Edition • First commercial iPhone app in Canada • Rails app which processes and caches a seriously evil XML feed and presents a customized iPhone user experience
    66. TheScore iPhone Edition • First commercial iPhone app in Canada • Rails app which processes and caches a seriously evil XML feed and presents a customized iPhone user experience • http://iphone.thescore.com/
    67. TheScore iPhone Edition • First commercial iPhone app in Canada • Rails app which processes and caches a seriously evil XML feed and presents a customized iPhone user experience • http://iphone.thescore.com/ • #1 iPhone sports web application
    68. TheScore iPhone Edition • Announcement of App Store presented a dilemma: stick with proven tech investment, or follow the hype and re-write
    69. TheScore iPhone Edition • Announcement of App Store presented a dilemma: stick with proven tech investment, or follow the hype and re-write • After experimentation, we realized that we could create a SSB and potentially add additional features
    70. TheScore iPhone Edition • Announcement of App Store presented a dilemma: stick with proven tech investment, or follow the hype and re-write • After experimentation, we realized that we could create a SSB and potentially add additional features • “Native” app a huge success, no waiting for approvals on changes or bug fixes
    71. TheScore iPhone Edition • Content easily re-purposed for other mobile platforms such as Blackberry
    72. TheScore iPhone Edition • Rails’ lets us implement features faster, which means cheaper • Content easily re-purposed for other mobile platforms such as Blackberry
    73. TheScore iPhone Edition • Rails’ lets us implement features faster, which means cheaper • Content easily re-purposed for other mobile platforms such as Blackberry • Facilitates iterative development and experimenting with subsets of users
    74. TheScore iPhone Edition • Rails’ lets us implement features faster, which means cheaper • Content easily re-purposed for other mobile platforms such as Blackberry • Facilitates iterative development and experimenting with subsets of users • Most users have no idea it’s hybrid
    75. Business Models, Revisited Scenario #1
    76. Business Models, Revisited You sell 25k copies of an app for $1.95. That'd be $50k, except Apple takes 30% so we'll sell 36,500 copies. Let's assume a 3% conversion rate from people reading about the app to sales.
    77. Business Models, Revisited That means that you'd have to have 1.2 million people consider buying your app, or about 5% of the total number of iPhone owners. That seems unrealistic without a marketing budget.
    78. Business Models, Revisited Scenario #2 aka “The 37signals”
    79. Business Models, Revisited Customers subscribe to a web service for $5/m ($60/year). You need about 1000 customers, once you factor in payment and infrastructure costs.
    80. Business Models, Revisited Oh, and in year two... it’s all profit. With a one-time purchase, there is no year two. There’s not necessarily a reason for them to give you any more money.
    81. Business Models, Revisited iPhones feature the most sophisticated mobile web browser in history
    82. Business Models, Revisited Full support for CSS3 transitions and a lightning-fast compiled Javascript interpreter
    83. Business Models, Revisited Are you still so convinced that people need to click on an icon to consider a service to be useful? Why not take the power back?
    84. Business Models, Revisited Publish your app as a web service for iPhone. Potentially you could support Android, and other platforms, too. Provide an optional Site Specific Browser.
    85. Business Models, Revisited Pay Apple $0 overhead. Win at life.
    86. Business Models, Revisited Perhaps it could even have push notifications, if they ever launch it.
    87. Case Study: iWik => Wikipedia
    88. Meet Hampton Catlin • Employee #1 at Unspace
    89. Meet Hampton Catlin • Employee #1 at Unspace • Creator of Haml, the most popular Rails template engine
    90. Meet Hampton Catlin • Employee #1 at Unspace • Creator of Haml, the most popular Rails template engine • An outspoken queer developer
    91. Meet Hampton Catlin • Employee #1 at Unspace • Creator of Haml, the most popular Rails template engine • An outspoken queer developer • Wrote iWik on a dare
    92. Meet Hampton Catlin • iWik was created because Wikipedia looked like shit on iPhone, and was hard to use
    93. Meet Hampton Catlin • iWik was created because Wikipedia looked like shit on iPhone, and was hard to use • Hampton’s app took requests and used public APIs to fetch the data, which was then scrubbed and reformatted for the iPhone
    94. Meet Hampton Catlin • iWik sold well over 60,000 copies at $0.99 a copy
    95. Meet Hampton Catlin • iWik sold well over 60,000 copies at $0.99 a copy • The first version was built in three days while visiting home
    96. Meet Hampton Catlin • iWik sold well over 60,000 copies at $0.99 a copy • The first version was built in three days while visiting home • A hybrid web app, all it does is format something freely available
    97. Meet Hampton Catlin • Wikipedia offered to buy iWik, instead of harassing him • In addition, they brought him in on contract to run their mobile division on a nice retainer • Wikipedia is his dream job
    98. What Apple doesn’t want you to do.
    99. “Again I say to you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.” Matthew 19:24
    100. “Not gonna lie... it'd be easier to get Steve Ballmer using an iPod, than for you to get a straight answer on why Apple rejected your app.” @peteforde http://twitter.com/peteforde/status/1461939233
    101. Secret Laws • This is John Gilmore • Sun employee #5, and co-founder of the EFF • Unsuccessfully sued the US Supreme Court to force them to demonstrate which law kept him from flying anonymously
    102. • I assumed that Apple would be pretty liberal in their curation of iTAS
    103. • I assumed that Apple would be pretty liberal in their curation of iTAS • I was wrong
    104. • I assumed that Apple would be pretty liberal in their curation of iTAS • I was wrong • Any guesses on the first app I heard about being rejected?
    105. “Pull my finger” was rejected for being indecent
    106. Eventually, they decided to allow flatulent expression.
    107. Today, there are over 83 fart applications on iTAS. One of them hit #7 on the paid application list.
    108. Apple has a long list of banned application concepts.
    109. You can’t make anything similar to an existing Apple application. Sadly, the reverse doesn’t seem to apply to Apple.
    110. No swearing.
    111. No nudity or adult content.
    112. No tethering (sharing 3G with your laptop)
    113. No VoIP on 3G
    114. One company had their critical update delayed because their features list said “more dragons”
    115. “What dragons are you referring to? There is no evidence of dragons in your application.”
    116. It turns out that there are so many apps rejected that there’s a deadpool for them. http://boredzo.org/killed-iphone-apps/
    117. Apple was worried that this app, which “broke” the iPhone when touched, would confuse their customers. Golly.
    118. The Lyrics app by Moop.me has been rejected 4 times.
    119. Each time, an Apple auditor loads their app, searches for the word “fuck,” finds it in the 700k song database, and rejects their application.
    120. Of course, 99% of those songs are available for sale on iTunes. Apple will not directly respond to requests for clarification.
    121. Magic Bullets
    122. The iPhone SDK allows the registration of custom protocol handlers which start helper applications.
    123. To some degree, this allows a developer to introduce “impossible” features into the mix.
    124. The most dramatic example is Alocola, which enables passing GPS coordinates to Safari web apps http://alocola.com/
    125. There’s also several Twitter apps, and even an Authorize.net payment gateway processor.
    126. Check out a list of custom protocol apps at: http://applookup.com/
    127. Ch-ch-changes iPhone OS v3.0
    128. • Native apps will be able to expose an interface to the new Spotlight functions
    129. • Native apps will be able to expose an interface to the new Spotlight functions • Connect to Mail, Calendar, iPod
    130. • Native apps will be able to expose an interface to the new Spotlight functions • Connect to Mail, Calendar, iPod • Safari remembers web login credentials
    131. • Native apps will be able to expose an interface to the new Spotlight functions • Connect to Mail, Calendar, iPod • Safari remembers web login credentials • Peer-to-peer Bluetooth
    132. • Native apps will be able to expose an interface to the new Spotlight functions • Connect to Mail, Calendar, iPod • Safari remembers web login credentials • Peer-to-peer Bluetooth • Push notifications
    133. • External device control
    134. • External device control • Embedded maps, turn-by-turn directions
    135. • External device control • Embedded maps, turn-by-turn directions • Voice communication, audio recording
    136. • External device control • Embedded maps, turn-by-turn directions • Voice communication, audio recording • Rumbling
    137. • External device control • Embedded maps, turn-by-turn directions • Voice communication, audio recording • Rumbling • Access music library, Core Data API
    138. None of this is what gets me excited, though.
    139. Javascript iPhone OS v2.2: 8-22x faster than v1.0.1
    140. Javascript iPhone OS v3.0: 3-10x faster than v2.2
    141. Strong speculation that v3.0 will feature the native-code generating Squirrelfish interpreter
    142. The Future
    143. Rhodes: An open source framework that lets you write a mobile app in Ruby, feed it through a processor, and output code to run on multiple platforms. http://github.com/rhomobile/rhodes
    144. Canvas: The HTML5 canvas tag supported in every major browser except IE. It supports powerful vector drawing and shading... and with advances in Javascript speed, could pose a serious threat to Flash, which doesn’t work on the iPhone.
    145. Tools
    146. Tools • Best iPhone developer blog: MobileOrchard.com • Best free iPhone research and case study: theamazingiphone.com • Cool library to connect your apps to Rails: ObjectiveResource: iphoneonrails.com/
    147. Thanks! I will be posting the URLs from this presentation on: rethink.unspace.ca pete@unspace.ca @peteforde

    ×