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The Controversial Menlo Park New El Camino Downtown (aka Specific Plan)

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This is the controversial city development and zoning plan that was passed June of 2012. These new property development regulations were created under a cloud of conflict of interest - with Menlo …

This is the controversial city development and zoning plan that was passed June of 2012. These new property development regulations were created under a cloud of conflict of interest - with Menlo Park hiring long-time Stanford land management consultants to write the regulations. In fact, it was later found that these consultants were getting paid by Stanford to represent them on several other large developments with the goal of maximizing Stanford's land rights.

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  • 1. MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL/DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANCITY OF MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIAJuly 12, 2012
  • 2. PREPARED BY:PERKINS+WILLIN ASSOCIATION WITHSTRATEGIC ECONOMICS | FEHR & PEERS | BKF | HDR/THE HOYT COMPANY | ESACITY OF MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIAJuly 12, 2012MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL/DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN
  • 3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSCITY OF MENLO PARKCITY COUNCILRichard ClineAndrew CohenKelly FergussonKirsten KeithPeter OhtakiJohn Boyle (Council Member 2006-2010)Heyward Robinson (Council Member 2006-2010)CITY COUNCIL SUBCOMMITTEERichard ClineKirsten KeithJohn Boyle (Council Member 2006-2010)KEY CITY PERSONNELThomas Rogers, Project Manager and AssociatePlannerArlinda Heineck, Community Development DirectorVanh Malathong, Technical Service CoordinatorAlex D. McIntyre, City ManagerGlen Rojas (former City Manager)Starla Jerome-Robinson, Assistant City ManagerCherise Brandell, Community Services DirectorCarol Augustine, Finance DirectorChip Taylor, Public Works DirectorAtul Patel, Senior Transportation EngineerKent Steffens (former Public Works Director)David Johnson (former Business DevelopmentManager)Many others on staff contributed to the success of thecommunity workshops, review and refinement of draftconcepts, and the production of documents.CONTRACT ATTORNEYBarbara Kautz, Goldfarb Lipman, AttorneysPLANNING COMMISSIONVincent BresslerBen EirefKatie FerrickJohn KadvanyJohn O’MalleyHenry RiggsPeipei YuKirsten Keith (former Commissioner)Melody Pagee (former Commissioner)CITY COMMISSIONSBicycle CommissionEnvironmental Quality CommissionFinance and Audit CommitteeHousing CommissionParks and Recreation CommissionTransportation CommissionOVERSIGHT/OUTREACH COMMITTEECharlie BournePatty BoyleKristi BreischVincent BresslerCharles CatalanoRick CiardellaBen EirefSteve ElliottJohn FoxBill FrimelJ. Michael GullardTom HilligossClark KeplerBud KohnElizabeth LazenskyReginald RiceHenry RiggsDouglas ScottTodd TempleJeff WarmouthElizabeth Weiss…And the thousands of community members who didthe real work of the Specific Plan by providing directionfor their community for the next 20 to 30 years. Theirdedication to working in a constructive, collaborative wayto create a plan that will make our community the best itcan be is an admirable testament to our ability to achievethe vision set forth in the Specific Plan.
  • 4. CONSULTANT TEAMPERKINS+WILLPrakash Printo, Principal-in-ChargeMark Hoffheimer, Project Manager and Senior PlannerKaren Alschuler, Participating PrincipalGeeti Silwal, Urban DesignerPatrick Vaucheret, Urban DesignerSaba Ghole, Urban PlannerPoonam Narkar, Urban PlannerSTRATEGIC ECONOMICSNadine Fogarty, PrincipalSujata Srivastava, PrincipalSarah Graham, Senior AssociateDerek Braun, AssociateFEHR & PEERSJane Bierstedt, Principal-in-ChargeJoe Fernandez, Project ManagerNicole Nagaya, Project PlannerGregory Ripa, Project EngineerIan Moore, Senior Bicycle PlannerCarrie Nielson, Bicycle PlannerKatherine Spencer, Graphic Artist and GIS AnalystBKF ENGINEERSDaniel Schaefer, PrincipalEric Girod, Associate/Project ManagerHDR/THE HOYT COMPANYPeter Castles, Outreach Project ManagerTammy Nguyen, Community Relations Coordinator
  • 5. CONTENTSA PLAN OVERVIEWB PLAN CONTEXTC PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMD PUBLIC SPACEE LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERF CIRCULATIONG IMPLEMENTATIONH APPENDIX
  • 6. LIST OF FIGURESA. PLAN OVERVIEWFig. A1 Illustrative Site Plan ....................................................................................................... A3Fig. A2 Regional Map ................................................................................................................. A6Fig. A3 Plan Area Map ............................................................................................................... A7Fig. A4 “Project North” ............................................................................................................... A10Fig. A5 Types of Information Found in Specific Plan .................................................................. A11B. PLAN CONTEXTFig. B1 Site Context ................................................................................................................... B4Fig. B2 Site Character ............................................................................................................... B5Fig. B3 Opportunities and Constraints ....................................................................................... B9Fig. B4 Peak Period Intersection Level of Service in Plan Area ................................................ B17Fig. B5 Pedestrian Facilities in Plan Area .................................................................................. B18Fig. B6 Bicycle Facilities in Plan Area ........................................................................................ B19Fig. B7 Transit Service in Plan Area .......................................................................................... B21C. PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMFig. C1 Concept Diagram ........................................................................................................... C7Fig. C2 El Camino Real South ................................................................................................... C11Fig. C3 Opportunities and Constraints ....................................................................................... C15Fig. C4 Detail of Downtown Public Space Program ................................................................... C16Fig. C5 Downtown ...................................................................................................................... C17Fig. C6 Illustrative Plan .............................................................................................................. C21D. PUBLIC SPACEFig. D1 Public Space Framework ............................................................................................... D3Fig. D2 Connected + Walkable Downtown and Station Area Concept ....................................... D4Fig. D3 Green + Shaded Downtown and Station Area Concept .................................................. D5Fig. D4 Bicycle Network + Access Downtown and Station Area Concept ................................... D6Fig. D5 El Camino Real South Concept ..................................................................................... D7Fig. D6 Downtown Public Space Plan with Major Public Space Improvements ......................... D8Fig. D7 Concept Plan of Key Public Spaces Downtown ............................................................. D9Fig. D8 Sidewalk Section ........................................................................................................... D12Fig. D9 Section through Santa Cruz Avenue ............................................................................. D13Fig. D10 Concept Plan of Santa Cruz Avenue with Major Streetscape Improvements .............. D13Fig. D11 Section through Santa Cruz Ave Central Plaza, with Median Trees Preserved ............ D17Fig. D12 Concept Plan of the Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza ................................................ D17Fig. D13 Concept Plan of Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza and the Chestnut Paseo .............. D19Fig. D14 Concept Plan of South Parking Plazas Pedestrian Link .............................................. D23Fig. D15 Concept Plan of Station Area ...................................................................................... D29Fig. D16 Concept Plan of Ravenswood Gateway ...................................................................... D35Fig. D17 Typical Section / Plan at El Camino Real North between Valparaisoand Oak Grove Avenues ............................................................................................................. D39
  • 7. Fig. D18 Typical Section / Plan at El Camino Real Downtown between Oak Groveand Menlo Avenues ....................................................................................................................... D40Fig. D19 Typical Section / Plan at El Camino Real South of Roble Avenue ................................ D41Fig. D20 Typical Intersection Improvement .................................................................................. D43E. LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERFig. E1 Land Use Designations .................................................................................................. E3Fig. E2 Development Intensity / Density ....................................................................................... E14Fig. E3 Maximum Building Height and Maximum Façade Height ............................................... E19Fig. E4 Heights, Setbacks and Building Profile ........................................................................... E20Fig. E5 Building and Architectural Projections ............................................................................ E22Fig. E6 Building and Architectural Projection Standards ............................................................ E22Fig. E7 Building Front and Corner Side Setbacks ...................................................................... E23Fig. E8 Allowable Building Projection Area ................................................................................. E24Fig. E9 Minimum Building Break Requirements in El Camino Real (ECR) SE District .............. E27Fig. E10 Vertical Façade Modulation and Upper Floor Façade Length ...................................... E29Fig. E11 45-Degree Building Profile for Floors Above the Maximum Allowable Façade Height ... E29Fig. E12 45-Degree Building Profile Set at Minimum Setback Line ............................................ E29Fig. E13 Raised Residential Unit Entries .................................................................................... E31Fig. E14 Clearly Articulated Ground-Floor Bays ......................................................................... E33Fig. E15 Retail Entries at a Maximum of Every 50-Feet ............................................................. E34Fig. E16 Key Map of Zoning Districts .......................................................................................... E45Fig. E17 Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE-L) District ..... E47Fig. E18 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East – Low Density(ECR NE-L) District ....................................................................................................................... E48Fig. E19 El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE) District Required Setback ................................. E51Fig. E20 Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE) District ........ E52Fig. E21 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE) District ....... E53Fig. E22 El Camino Real North East (ECR NE-R) District Required Setback ............................... E56Fig. E23 Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North East (ECR NE-R) District E57Fig. E24Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East – Residential Emphasis(ECR NE-R) District ..................................................................................................................... E58Fig. E25 El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) District Required Setback ................................. E61Fig. E26 Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) District ......... E62Fig. E27 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) District ....... E63Fig. E28 Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW) District ...... E67Fig. E29 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW) District ..... E68Fig. E30 El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW) District Required Setback ............................... E71Fig. E31 Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW) District ..... E72Fig. E32 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW) District ..... E73Fig. E33 Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area East (SA E) District ............................. E77Fig. E34 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Station Area East (SA E) District ........................... E78Fig. E35 Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area East (SA E) District – Alma Street East E79Fig. E36 Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area West (SA W) District ............................ E83Fig. E37 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Station Area West (SA W) District ........................... E84LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
  • 8. Fig. E38 Mixed Use Residential Projects in Downtown (D) District .............................................. E88Fig. E39 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Downtown (D) District ............................................. E89Fig. E40 Parking Garage Project in Downtown (D) District ......................................................... E90Fig. E41 Downtown Adjacent (DA) District Required Setback ...................................................... E93Fig. E42 Mixed Use Residential Projects in Downtown Adjacent (DA) District ............................ E94Fig. E43 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Downtown Adjacent (DA) District ........................... E95F. CIRCULATIONFig. F1 Vehicular Circulation ...................................................................................................... . F3Fig. F2 Pedestrian Improvements .............................................................................................. F5Fig. F3 Bicycle Facilities ............................................................................................................. F11Fig. F4 Transit Service ................................................................................................................ F15Fig. F5 Parking Areas ................................................................................................................. F21Fig. F6 Proposed Public Parking Downtown .............................................................................. F25G. IMPLEMENTATIONFig. G1 Proposed Public Improvements .................................................................................... G18Fig. G2 Storm Drainage ............................................................................................................. G29Fig. G3 Sanitary Sewer .............................................................................................................. G31Fig. G4 Water Supply and Delivery ............................................................................................ G33LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
  • 9. LIST OF TABLESC. PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMTable C1 Guiding Principles Matrix ............................................................................................. C3E. LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E1 Land Use Designations and Allowable Uses ............................................................... E6-7Table E2 Development Standards by Zoning Districts ................................................................. E15Table E3 Required Building Breaks in the Zoning Districts ......................................................... E26Table E4 Required Building Breaks in the El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) Zoning District E26Table E5 Summary of Green Building Requirements .................................................................. E41Table E6 Development Standards for El Camino Real North East–Low Density(ECR NE-L) District ....................................................................................................................... E49-50Table E7 Development Standards for El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE) District.................. E54-55Table E8 Development Standards for El Camino Real North-East–ResidentialEmphasis (ECR NE-R) District .................................................................................................... E59-60Table E9 Development Standards for El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) District ................ E64-65Table E10 Development Standards for El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW) District ............ E69-70Table E11 Development Standards for El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW) District ............ E74-75Table E12 Development Standards for Station Area East (SA E) District ................................... E80-81Table E13 Development Standards for Station Area West (SA W) District ................................ E85-86Table E14 Development Standards for Downtown (D) District .................................................. E91-92Table E15 Development Standards for Downtown Adjacent (DA) District ................................. E96-97F. CIRCULATIONTable F1 Bicycle Parking Requirements ....................................................................................... F13Table F2 Parking Rates ................................................................................................................ F19Table E3 Existing and Future Downtown Parking Supply ............................................................. F24G. IMPLEMENTATIONTable G1 El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan/City of Menlo Park General PlanConsistency Analysis ..................................................................................................................... G4-13Table G2 Potential Funding Sources, Financing Alternatives and Participating Parties ............... G19Table G3 Potential Funding Strategies ......................................................................................... G20Table G4 Public Space Improvements and Public Parking Spaces Displaced ............................. G27
  • 10. PLAN OVERVIEWA.A.1 SUMMARYA.2 SETTING AND BACKGROUNDA.3 SCOPE OF SPECIFIC PLANA.4 HOW TO USE THIS DOCUMENTA.5 PLANNING PROCESSA.6 VISION PLAN GOALSA2A5A8A10A12A17
  • 11. A2MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANA.1 SUMMARYThe El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan establishesa framework for private and public improvements on ElCamino Real, in the Caltrain station area and in downtownMenlo Park for the next several decades. The plan’s focusis on the character and extent of enhanced public spaces,the character and intensity of private infill development andcirculation and connectivity improvements. It includes astrategy for implementation of public space improvements,such as wider sidewalks and plazas, and otherinfrastructure improvements.The overall intent of the El Camino Real/Downtown SpecificPlan is to preserve and enhance community life, characterand vitality through public space improvements, mixeduse infill projects sensitive to the small-town character ofMenlo Park and improved connectivity. As discussed laterin more detail, the Specific Plan reflects the outcome of anextensive community outreach and engagement process.Illustrated in Figure A1, the El Camino Real/DowntownSpecific Plan: Encourages infill development of vacant andunder-utilized lots along El Camino Real throughincreased intensities, coupled with strict buildingmodulation and ground-floor setback and buildingprofile requirements that both attenuate the massand scale of larger buildings and create widerpublic sidewalks; Retains the existing “village” character downtownby keeping buildings low and requiring variedbuilding massing, including through building profileand façade modulation requirements; Increases downtown activity, foot traffic and transituse through enhanced public spaces, mixed-useinfill projects (including residential uses) and higherintensities of development near the commuter railstation; Enhances community life through an integratednetwork of widened sidewalks, promenades,pocket parks and public gathering spaces; and Enhances east-west connectivity across ElCamino Real through crosswalk and sidewalkimprovements, while accommodating north-southvehicular through-traffic, and across the railroadtracks through grade-separated pedestrian andbicycle connections.“We need to do something.”- Workshop #1 Participant
  • 12. CaltrainParkingP P PPPCaltrainParkingCCaCatalalttraiinPParkinltrainPaarkiinngnggPPPP PPP PPPPPPPPPPPPPPPALMAMIDDLEFIELDLAURELELCAMINOREALELCAMINOREALMIDDLEOAK GROVEISABELLAYALEENCINALPARKWATKINSSANTA CRUZVALPARAISOCOLLEGECREEKROBLEEMILIEMILLSGLENWOODPINECAMBRIDGEARBORFREMONTLIVE OAKRAVENSWOODALEJANDRAALTOLINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXUNIVERSITYPRINCETONHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCEEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEVICTORIALEONCLAIRELEEMILLIELANEALICEMARCUSSENSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEMAC BAINWAVERLEYPRIORMCCORMICKCORNELLSANANTONIOBAY LAURELBRITTONMOREYMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNREBECCADOYLEBLAKESHERWOODHOPKINSCURTISWESTFIELDMALONEYBARRONMICHAELSNEALON PARKJACK W. LYLEMEMORIAL PARKFREMONT PARKBURGESS PARKCIVIC CENTERKENWOODKENTSAXONCASTLECLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORHOMEWOODSURREYHOWARDELIZABETHCHATEAUFENNWOODVERSAILLESBASSETTCREEKPLSUSSEXMANORBLAKECREEKCURTISUNIVERSITYCRANEWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODRAVENSWOODROBLEARBORMENLOCURTISEnhanced pedestrian crossings on ElCamino Real at Oak Grove, SantaCruz and Menlo AvenuesEl Camino Real East PromenadeCivic Plaza / Entry FeatureBurgess Park Linkage /OpenSpace Plaza / Retail NodeEnhancedStreetscape onSanta Cruz AvenueMarket PlacePPPPParking / Flexible SpaceHotelDowntownEl Camino RealStation AreaCivic CenterExisting Buildings NotIncluded in Opportunity SitesPotential Opportunity SitesProposed / Approved ProjectsSurface Parking LotPublic Plazas / Open SpaceParksPlan Area BoundaryRailroadMenlo Park City LimitP0 200 400 FeetA3CHAPTER A PLAN OVERVIEWFigure A1. Illustrative Site Plan
  • 13. A4MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANThe illustrative plan, as shown in Figure A1, depicts how theplan area could potentially build out over the next severaldecades in conformance with the overall planning principlesand within the land use and development regulations anddesign guidelines contained in subsequent chapters. It isimportant to emphasize that the illustrative plan indicatesonly one potential development concept and that the actualbuild-out will likely vary from the initial projection.As envisioned, the full build-out of the plan area could resultin up to approximately 330,000 square feet of additionalretail and commercial development, 680 new residentialunits and 380 new hotel rooms, resulting in 1,357 new jobsand 1,537 additional residents.It is important to emphasizethat the illustrative planindicates only one potentialdevelopment concept andthat the actual build-out willlikely vary from the initialprojection.Rendering of El Camino Real at Ravenswood, looking north
  • 14. A5CHAPTER A PLAN OVERVIEWdowntown’s main street, provide convenient parking fordowntown visitors and employees. Extensive streetscapeand sidewalk improvements on Santa Cruz Avenue,constructed in the 1970’s, with additional improvements inlater decades, lend a distinct character and pleasant treecover to the street. The street’s sidewalks, however, tendto be narrow and lack adequate social space and spill-outspace for adjacent retailers that many in the communitystrongly desire.The historic train station, currently providing commuter railservice to San Francisco and San Jose, is one block off ElCamino Real opposite downtown. There is a relatively weakconnection between the train station area and downtown,with limited foot traffic and activities that would otherwisegenerate more vibrancy in the area. In addition, the railline, in combination with El Camino Real, run north-south,making east-west connectivity for vehicular, pedestrian, andbicycle movement challenging.In 2007, the City initiated a two-phase planning process toenhance and plan for the long-term success of El CaminoReal, the Caltrain station area and downtown. As discussedin section A.5, Phase I established an overarching vision forthe project area (discussed below). Phase II, this SpecificPlan, refines the vision and establishes an implementationframework for future improvements to the area.Rendering of El Camino Real at Partridge, looking northThe City of Menlo Park is located approximately 30miles south of San Francisco on the Peninsula. Home toapproximately 30,000 residents, Menlo Park is part of astring of communities connected to San Francisco andSan Jose via El Camino Real (an historic road and StateHighway), Caltrain rail service and Interstates 101 and 280.Figure A2 illustrates Menlo Park’s regional context.El Camino Real, the Caltrain rail station, and downtown,along with the nearby Civic Center, constitute the historiccore of Menlo Park. Figure A3 illustrates the Specific Plan’splan area, which encompasses El Camino Real, the railstation area and downtown.An historic route, El Camino Real is now State Highway 82,an active arterial roadway and commercial corridor. It wasonce home to a number of automobile dealerships, mostof which are vacant today. Stanford University, the largestprivate land owner in the project area, owns 12.8 acreson the east side of El Camino Real south of downtown,encompassing most of the former automobile dealershipsand the active Stanford Park Hotel.Menlo Park’s downtown includes relatively few historicbuildings but retains its historic fabric of small parcels andlocal-serving, independent street-front retail businesses.Surface parking lots behind Santa Cruz Avenue,A.2 SETTING AND BACKGROUND
  • 15. San FranciscoSausalitoDaly CitySouth San FranciscoSan Francisco BayPacificOceanSan BrunoMillbraePacificaBurlingameSan Mateo Foster CityBelmontSan CarlosRedwood CityHalf Moon BayMenlo ParkEast Palo AltoPalo AltoMountain ViewNewarkFremontUnion CityHaywardSan LorenzoDublinPleasantonSan RamonSan LeandroAlamedaPiedmontBerkeleyEl CerritoWalnut CreekDanvilleOaklandCastro ValleySunnyvaleSanta ClaraCupertinoSaratogaSan JoseMilpitas808805805806808806802802802801110110128018282El CaminoReal101El CaminoRealFreeway / HighwayRailroadEl Camino RealFigure A2. Regional MapA6MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN
  • 16. A7CHAPTER A PLAN OVERVIEWMIDDLEFIELDLAURELLAURELMIDDLEISABELLAYALEENCINALPARKWATKINSCOLLEGECREEKROBLEEMILIEMILLSPINECAMBRIDGEARBORFREMONTLIVE OAKRAVENSWOODALEJANDRAALTOLINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXPRINCETONHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCEEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEVICTORIALEONCLAIRELEEMILLIELANEALICEMARCUSSENSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEMAC BAINWAVERLEYPRIORCORNELLSANANTONIOBAY LAURELBRITTONMOREYMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNREBECCADOYLEBLAKESHERWOODHOPKINSCURTISWESTFIELDMALONEYBARRONMICHAELSKENWOODKENTONTLECLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORCHESTNUTHOMEWOODSURREYHOWARDELIZABETHCHATEAUFENNWOODVERSAILLESBASSETTEKPLSUSSEXMANOROAK GROVE PLAZABLAKECHESTNUTCREEKCURTISCRANEWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODWILLOWJOHNSONROBLEARBORCURTISAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AveMenloRavenswoodElCaminoRealN0 300 600 1200FeetDowntown Menlo ParkEl Camino RealStation AreaStanford University PropertySanta Cruz AvenueCaltrainWAVERLEYPlan AreaCivic CenterFigure A3. Plan Area Map
  • 17. A8MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANA.3 SCOPE OF SPECIFIC PLANThe El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan establishesthe location and character of streetscape and public spaceimprovements; the character and intensity of commercialand residential development; and the circulation pattern(vehicular, pedestrian, bicycle and transit) and parkingstrategy to support businesses and overall vitality, andenhance east-west connectivity. The Specific Planincludes standards and guidelines for public and privateenhancements to the area, and it offers strategies forfinancing and implementing public improvements.In general, a specific plan is a tool for the systematicimplementation of the general plan. It effectively establishesa link between implementing policies of the general planand the individual development proposals in a definedarea. A specific plan may be as general as setting forthbroad policy concepts, or as detailed as providing directionto every facet of development from the type, location andintensity of uses to the design and capacity of infrastructure;from the resources used to finance public improvements tothe design guidelines of a subdivision.Rendering of Santa Cruz Avenue
  • 18. A9CHAPTER A PLAN OVERVIEWAccording to California law, Section 65451 of theGovernment Code mandates that a specific plan containthe following:(A) A specific plan shall include a text and a diagram ordiagrams which specify all of the following in detail:(1) The distribution, location, and extent of theuses of land, including open space, within the areacovered by the plan;(2) The proposed distribution, location, and extentand intensity of major components of public andprivate transportation, sewage, water, drainage,solid waste disposal, energy, and other essentialfacilities proposed to be located within the areacovered by the plan and needed to support theland uses described in the plan;(3) Standards and criteria by which developmentwill proceed, and standards for the conservation,development, and utilization of natural resources,where applicable; and(4) A program of implementation measuresincluding regulations, programs, public worksprojects, and financing measures necessary tocarry out paragraphs (1), (2), and (3).(B) The specific plan shall include a statement of therelationship of the specific plan to the general plan.The El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan builds uponthe El Camino Real/Downtown Vision Plan, unanimouslyaccepted by the Menlo Park City Council on July 15, 2008.In addition to the Specific Plan, the planning effort includesan associated Environmental Impact Report (EIR), fiscalimpact analysis (FIA) and revisions to the Menlo ParkGeneral Plan and Zoning Ordinance to make this specificplan fully operational.The sketches and photographs in the El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan are meant only to relay particularconcepts as described in the text or make reference topertinent precedents and should not be considered exactmodels. Also, the Specific Plan provides standards andguidelines for private and public development, but does notinclude detailed plans.The El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Planbuilds upon the El CaminoReal/Downtown Vision Plan,unanimously accepted by theMenlo Park City Council onJuly 15, 2008.The sketches andphotographs in the ElCamino Real/DowntownSpecific Plan are meant onlyto relay particular conceptsas described in the text ormake reference to pertinentprecedents and shouldnot be considered exactmodels. Also, the SpecificPlan provides standards andguidelines for private andpublic development, but doesnot include detailed plans.
  • 19. A10MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANA.4 HOW TO USE THIS DOCUMENTThe El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan conveys anoverarching vision for enhancements in the plan area forcommunity residents, business and property owners, Citystaff and developers. It provides guidance for those makingpublic and private improvement in the plan area.The Specific Plan includes the following chapters. A. Plan Overview B. Plan Context C. Plan Principles, Framework + Program D. Public Space E. Land Use + Building Character F. Circulation G. Implementation H. AppendixThe first three chapters provide an overview, context andbroad principles and concepts for the plan area, providingall readers with a broad framework within which individualimprovements should be made. Chapters D, F and Gfocus on public improvements, including their character,associated standards and guidelines, and implementationstrategies. Chapter E provides the regulatory frameworkfor private development, including allowable buildingheights, allowable development intensities, setbackrequirements and other standards and guidelines. Thischapter is the major focus for property owners and privatedevelopers, and it is used by City staff when reviewingprivate development proposals. Note: building diagrams inChapter E are intended to illustrate how different standardsare measured, and are not intended to necessarilydictate the placement of different uses or parking within adevelopment.Although each chapter presents information differentlybased on its focus, Figure A5 illustrates the types ofinformation found within this Specific Plan.Figure A4. “Project North” - Although El Camino Realand the Caltrain line do not run in a precisely north-southdirection within Menlo Park, they are overall north-southcorridors and are considered by the community as such.Directional references in this document use this convention.NNProjectNorthView of Project AreaOriented to Project NorthTrueNorthNNNProjectNorthView of Project AreaOriented to True NorthTrueNorth
  • 20. D10MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANWidened sidewalks providing ample space for sitting andoutdoor dining (City of Santa Cruz, California)Santa Cruz Avenue SidewalksThe Specific Plan calls for improving the pedestrianrealm on Santa Cruz Avenue, increasing street activityand enhancing the image of downtown by wideningsidewalks, providing ample space for informal gathering,sitting and outdoor dining and introducing new streetscapeimprovements. The plan establishes sidewalk functionalzones, ensuring a pedestrian clear zone and more pleasantand functional sidewalks. It redistributes the right-of-waybetween traffic lanes, on-street parking and sidewalks inorder to focus on an enhanced pedestrian experience whilestill accommodating vehicular circulation and on-streetparking.IntentEncourage walking and increase levels of streetactivity with wider, more functional sidewalks.Renew the image of downtown with updatedstreetscape elements.CharacterTree canopy with clear visibility to storefronts.Median trees retained, which are iconic features ofdowntown.ImprovementsRetain existing median trees and integrate theminto new streetscape design.Replace diagonal parking with parallel parking, anduse reclaimed width to widen sidewalks.On the side with diagonal parking, replace thediagonal parking with parallel parking, narrowtravel lane and widen sidewalk.On the side with parallel parking, retain parallelparking, narrow travel lane and widen sidewalk.Integrate street trees into on-street parking zones,particularly where sidewalks are narrowest.Upgrade streetscape elements, such as benches,seating, trash receptacles, newspaper racks,paving, and street lighting.Existing Santa Cruz Avenue sidewalk (Menlo Park, California)“Encourage restaurants andshops to utilize sidewalks andstorefronts for public spacegathering, dining, resting”- Workshop #1 Participant“I would absolutely tradeparking spaces on SantaCruz and El Camino forwell-designed parkinggarages with safe, pleasantpedestrian paths!”- Workshop #1 ParticipantD11CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACE12’ wide sidewalk (Palo Alto, California)Illustration of 19’ wide sidewalkImplement and evaluate Santa Cruz Avenuesidewalk improvements on a trial basis, beforemoving forward with a permanent installation. Thetrial period shall be the basis for the review andconsideration of a permanent installation.StandardsD.2.01 Streetscape improvements on Santa Cruz Avenueshall retain existing median trees to the extent possible.GuidelinesStreetscape improvements on Santa Cruz Avenue shouldinclude the following:D.2.02 Provide widest sidewalk possible while retaining on-street parallel parking.D.2.03 Introduce safe pedestrian crossings by usingelements such as marked crossings, clear signage,supplementary lighting, and curb extensions.D.2.04 Introduce street trees in parking zone to maximizesidewalk width, particularly in those areas where a 12 footminimum sidewalk dimension cannot be achieved.D.2.05 Coordinate with streetscape improvements in thestation area.D.2.06 Consider the following as criteria for streetscapefurnishing selection: timeless, functional, easy maintenance,durability and sustainability.D.2.07 Achieve safe lighting for vehicular circulation andcomfortable lighting for pedestrians; consider additionaldecorative lighting for nightscape.“I like the wider sidewalks onSanta Cruz”- Workshop #3 ParticipantRenewed/memorable image for downtown (San Jose,California)D13CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEChestnutSectionCutCurtis10’ 30’ 60’Figure D10. Concept Plan of Santa Cruz Avenue with Major Streetscape Improvements. This plan does not feature the Central Plaza described inthe next section.Figure D9. Section through Santa Cruz Avenue, showing two traffic lanes with parallel parking, median trees retained, diagonal parking removed,one moderately-sized sidewalk and one wide sidewalk75’19’ 11’12’ 5’11’ 8’ 11’8’ 7’Pedestrian Thru Zone12’Pedestrian Thru Zone5’8’11’7’11’8’11’A11CHAPTER A PLAN OVERVIEWABFCDEA. OVERALL DESCRIPTION / INTENT: Each section /sub-section typically begins with an overall descriptionthat outlines the general objectives and intent.B. QUOTES / COMMENTS: Quotes / comments fromthe community workshops appear in the sidebar tohighlight the voices of the participants. The workshopnumber indicates where the quote / comment wascollected. Occasionally, important points of emphasisalso appear in the sidebar.C. PHOTO: Photos that appear in the sidebar areintended to relay general principles and not serve asexact models.D. STANDARDS: These are the aspects that mustbe implemented (strict requirements) for public andprivate development.E. GUIDELINES: These are the aspects that shouldbe implemented (not strict requirements) for publicand private development.F. CONCEPT DRAWINGS: Conceptual drawings serveas examples of one potential design, to be refined ifand when the improvement is to be built.Figure A5. Types of Information Found in Specific Plan
  • 21. A12MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANA.5 PLANNING PROCESSThe El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan is the resultof a multi-year process designed to evolve a communityjudgment about the future of the plan area. Communityjudgment, as opposed to public opinion, is a sharedconclusion based on beliefs, values and factual informationthat results in a legitimate, lasting and implementableoutcome. Community judgment consists of a shared andcommon sense of public priorities but is not the samething as consensus. This public judgment emergedthrough a two-phase process involving thousands ofcommunity members (over 950 on the regular email updatelist alone); representatives of key stakeholder groupssuch as downtown and El Camino Real business andproperty owners; an Oversight and Outreach Committeethat included representatives of important stakeholdergroups such as residents and business/property owners;City Commissions; and the Menlo Park City Council.The process was supported by an extensive communityoutreach campaign through both phases that includedproject newsletters and postcards to every Menlo Parkpostal address (including both residential and commercialproperties); stories in the Menlo Park quarterly newsletterthat also went to all households and businesses; newsreleases, posters, fliers and an extensive email updatesystem; and one-on-one outreach to stakeholders byCouncil Members, Oversight and Outreach CommitteeMembers and staff.“I think the emerging planstrikes a good ‘reasonable’balance between characterand progress…by allowingreasonable development”- Workshop #3 Participant“I think the overall processhas been a very constructiveplanning process!”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 22. A13CHAPTER A PLAN OVERVIEWPhase I: Vision PlanAs is typical of planning processes designed to developcommunity judgment, the El Camino Real/DowntownSpecific Plan began with a community visioning processconducted in 2007 and 2008. This step included aneducational speaker series, walking tours, three communityworkshops, one Planning Commission workshop andtwo City Council meetings. The visioning process wasstructured to gather together the core values, hopes anddreams the community has for the area so that when morespecific decisions have been made later in the process,they are grounded in the community’s decision about whatis most important for the future.The visioning effort was promoted by five city-widemailings (including two return surveys), which were sentto all residential and commercial properties and whichgenerated approximately 2,600 total returns. The outreacheffort also included one-on-one outreach by the Oversightand Outreach Committee to members of their stakeholdergroups, such as downtown businesses and residents. TheCity Council unanimously accepted the Vision Plan on July15, 2008, and the Plan serves as the values base for theSpecific Plan. The following section, Section A.6, lists theVision Plan’s twelve principal goals.Phase II: Specific Plan ProcessAs recommended in the Vision Plan, the City subsequentlycommenced work on a Specific Plan, to contain elementssuch as detailed land use regulations, design guidelinesand implementation measures. As was the case with PhaseI, the Phase II process has been a community-orientedplanning project, with unprecedented levels of publicoutreach and participation. The Specific Plan processhas strived to result in a community judgment, as definedearlier.The Specific Plan process included meetings, worksessions and workshops at critical project milestones: Interviews with Project Stakeholders at thebeginning of the project; Meetings with the Oversight and OutreachCommittee; Meetings/work sessions with the PlanningCommission; Meetings/work sessions with the City Council; and Three Community Workshops. Detailed review of the Draft Specific Plan and EIRCommunity WorkshopsThree community workshops, each attended by over 100people, engaged members of the community in facilitated,interactive activities designed to move from the values andgoals of the vision phase to an informed judgment aboutthe detailed elements of the Specific Plan. This requiredworkshop participants to learn about the current conditionsin the area, generate ideas about what could be done toimprove those conditions in order to realize the communityvision, understand and weigh the impacts of those ideasand improvements, and make choices about which ideasto include in the plan based on deliberation with othercommunity members.Phase I visioning process
  • 23. A14MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANWorkshop #1 on April 16, 2009.The purpose of the first workshop was to help thecommunity confirm the Phase I vision and goals,to understand existing conditions, constraints andopportunities and to consider the primary issues and thepossible positive and negative outcomes related to futurepotential changes in the plan area. The workshop wasorganized around four subject areas: connectivity, vibrancy,public space and character, all of which were based on theapproved vision.Community Workshop #1
  • 24. A15CHAPTER A PLAN OVERVIEWWorkshop #2 on June 18, 2009The purpose of the second workshop was to build uponthe discussion from the first workshop and to begin todiscuss the impacts of the various plan elements thatwere emerging. The process involved a presentation anddiscussion, in break-out sessions, of alternative conceptsfor connectivity, vibrancy, public space and character, basedon comments from the first workshop, feedback from theOversight and Outreach Committee, Planning Commissionand City Council and analyses conducted by the consultantteam. The analyses included preliminary fiscal information,diagrams of site character and opportunities/constraints anda preliminary study of the impacts of potentially tunnelingEl Camino Real. It included preparation and considerationof various plan concepts, massing options andphotomontages, street sections, development scenariosand public space improvements.Community Workshop #2
  • 25. A16MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANWorkshop #3 on September 17, 2009The purpose of the third and final Community Workshopwas to present an Emerging Plan developed fromCommunity Workshops #1 and #2, to gain critical feedbackon the Emerging Plan and to help decide on revisionsto the Emerging Plan. Attendees were able to weigh inon proposed public improvements, including expandedpublic spaces, wider sidewalks on Santa Cruz Avenueand enhanced crossings of El Camino Real. Attendeesalso considered a preferred direction for the use, size andcharacter of private development, with its associated trafficand fiscal implications and potential public benefits.Draft Specific Plan and EIRFollowing the Community Workshop process, the DraftSpecific Plan was published on April 7, 2010, and the DraftEIR was published on April 29, 2011. Both documents werereleased to strong community interest. Following the DraftEIR comment period (discussed fully in the Final EIR),the Planning Commission and City Council were originallyscheduled to hold one meeting each to provide direction onthe Draft Specific Plan. However, both bodies expressed aninterest and willingness to hold additional meetings in orderto more fully explore and address comments, questions,and potential concerns, both from the Commission/Counciland the public. The aim of this detailed review was toprovide clear and specific direction on improvements andrefinements to the plan.The Planning Commission held five meetings in July-August 2011, and the City Council followed with fourmeetings in August-October 2011. Concurrent with thePlanning Commission and City Council’s review, theHousing, Transportation, and Bicycle Commissionsconducted sessions on the Draft Specific Plan. Each ofthese Commissions recommended moving forward withthe El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan process,subject to specific recommendations that were consideredby the Planning Commission and City Council. All of thesemeetings benefited from diverse public input.The City Council concluded its review on October 4, 2011with direction for substantive improvements to the DraftSpecific Plan, which have been incorporated as appropriateinto this Final Specific Plan.Community Workshop #3
  • 26. A17CHAPTER A PLAN OVERVIEWA.6 VISION PLAN GOALSThe El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan builds uponthe Phase I Vision Plan, as unanimously accepted by theCity Council on July 15, 2008. The Vision Plan’s twelvegoals are:Maintain a village character unique to Menlo Park.Provide greater east-west, town-wide connectivity.Improve circulation and streetscape conditions on ElCamino Real.Ensure that El Camino Real development is sensitive toand compatible with adjacent neighborhoods.Revitalize underutilized parcels and buildings.Activate the train station area.Protect and enhance pedestrian amenities on Santa CruzAvenue.Expand shopping, dining and neighborhood services toensure a vibrant downtown.Provide residential opportunities in the Vision Plan Area.Provide plaza and park spaces.Provide an integrated, safe and well-designed pedestrianand bicycle network.Develop parking strategies and facilities that meet thecommercial and residential needs of the community.Section C.1 of this plan further describes the relationshipbetween these goals and the guiding principles of theSpecific Plan.Phase I visioning process
  • 27. PLAN CONTEXTB.B.1 OVERVIEWB.2 SITE CONTEXT AND CHARACTER B.3 OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS B.4 CIRCULATION OVERVIEW B.5 MARKET OVERVIEW B2B2B8B16B23
  • 28. B2MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANB.1 OVERVIEWLocated on the Peninsula south of San Francisco, the planarea for the El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan is thehistoric center of Menlo Park. The plan area consists of anarterial corridor, a pedestrian-scale downtown and a transitcenter providing commuter rail service to San Franciscoand San Jose.This chapter summarizes the following aspects of the planarea:• Site Context and Character;• Opportunities and Constraints;• Circulation Overview; and• Market Overview.B.2 SITE CONTEXT ANDCHARACTERFigure B1 identifies major features of the area, including theEl Camino Real corridor, Caltrain station area, downtowncore, major roadways, the adjacent Civic Center andmajor parks, schools and landmarks in the area. Featurebuildings, as shown, are those buildings that are highlyvisible and memorable, have historic or cultural value orcontain uses that have large local and regional draws. Theirinclusion in the figure helps orient the reader.Figure B2 illustrates some of the defining characteristics ofthe El Camino Real corridor, station area and downtown. Itfocuses on the visual quality and definition of the area bythe way buildings orient to the street, with varying buildingsetbacks; the effect of underutilized lots on street character;the provision and location of public parking plazas; and thearea’s landscape character. It identifies familiar “landmark”buildings, which help orient visitors to the area, and placeswith a higher degree of activity, such as Draeger’s Marketand the public library.In general, some of the most successful and memorablestreets, in terms of character and activity, are ones wherebuildings address and frame the street with active groundfloor uses and articulated façades; where pedestrians havea comfortable and welcoming place to walk; and where aconsistent use of landscape treatment, through street trees,street lamps and other furnishings, create a welcome andunifying image.
  • 29. B3CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTBuilding CharacterBuildings on El Camino Real vary in size and style, fromautomobile showrooms (many empty) and car repair shopsto larger commercial buildings, office buildings up to fourstories tall and smaller scale commercial buildings closerto downtown. Most buildings are one and two stories tall,although others are taller.El Camino Real, for the most part, lacks a clear definitionof a built edge due to inconsistent building setbacks andnumerous parking lots along the street. This detracts fromthe visual appeal of the corridor. In some cases, buildingswith a strong built edge face away from the street and torear parking lots, thereby detracting from street character.The stretch of El Camino Real between Valparaiso Avenueand Roble Street exhibits a better definition because mostbuildings have a consistent, minimum setback from thestreet, consistent with the historic center of Menlo Park, andbecause of the landscaped median.Santa Cruz Avenue has a consistent building characterbetween El Camino Real and University Drive, with allbuildings aligned to the sidewalk/lot line and most buildingsalong Santa Cruz Avenue being one and two stories tall.This provides very clear street definition and strong visualquality to the street by providing clear distinction of thepublic and private realm with active edges of doors andwindows opening onto the street. The street consists ofsmall, distinct storefronts, creating a visual interest topassersby.Secondary street frontage on Oak Grove and MenloAvenues adjacent to Santa Cruz Avenue, and othersmaller streets perpendicular to it, play an important rolein providing uses and services that support the downtown.The Oak Grove and Menlo Avenue corridors have a rangeof existing building types, including some three-storystructures.Menlo Center and the Caltrain Station are notable buildingsand function as local landmarks, with the PresbyterianChurch, Draeger’s Market, Trader Joe’s, Safeway, BurgessPark and the public library serving as “activity nodes” orplaces attracting significant numbers of people and creatingactivity within the plan area.Santa Cruz Avenue has a small-town character, withstorefronts that face the street and a median planted withstately trees (Menlo Park, California)Parking lot interfacing with El Camino Real, creating an edgecondition that lacks clear definition (Menlo Park, California)Caltrain Station is a local landmark (Menlo Park, California)
  • 30. B4MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANFigure B1. Site ContextMenloCollegeMenlo SchoolDraeger’sSafewayTrader Joe’sTheaterCivic CenterBurgess ParkFremont ParkTheaterNealon ParkJack W. LyleMemorial ParkMenlo CenterEncinalElementaryEl Camino ParkSt. Raymond’sCatholic Churchand SchoolSacred HeartSchoolsSan Francisquito CreekHolbrook Palmer ParkMenlo ParkPresbyterianChurchCaltrain StationFig 5: Site ContextRailwayEl Camino RealPrimary Streets in PlanAreaDowntown CoreSchools and ReligiousInstitutionsOpen SpaceCivic SpaceCaltrain StationFeature BuildingsPlan Area BoundaryMenlo Park City LimitStation AreaEl Camino RealEl Camino RealDowntownALMAMIDDLEFIELDLAURELELCAMINOREALMIDDLEOAK GROVEYALEENCINALWATKINSSANTA CRUZVALPARAISOCOLLEGECREEKROBLEMILLSGLENWOODPINECAMBRIDGEARBORFREMONTLIVE OAKALEJANDRAALTOLINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXUNIVERSITYPRINCETONHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCEEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEVICTORIALEONCLAIRELEEMILLIELANEALICEMARCUSSENSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEWAVERLEYPRIORCORNELLSANANTONIOBAY LAURELMOREYMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNREBECCADOYLEBLAKESHERWOODHOPKINSCURTISWESTFIELDMALONEYBARRONKENWOODKENTCLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORCHESTNUTHOMEWOODSURREYELIZABETHCHATEAUFENNWOODVERSAILLESBASSETTCREEKPLSUSSEXMANOROAK GROVE PLAZABLAKECHESTNUTCREEKCURTISUNIVERSITYCRANEWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODRAVENSWOODJOHNSONROBLEARBORMENLOCURTISWILLOWEl Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo ParkN0 300 600 1200Feet18 June 2009Fehr & PeersStrategic EconomicsBKF EngineersESAHDR/The Hoyt Company
  • 31. B5CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTALMAMIDDLEFIELDLAURELELCAMINOREALMIDDLEOAK GROVEYALEENCINALWATKINSSANTA CRUZVALPARAISOCOLLEGECREEKROBLEMILLSGLENWOODPINECAMBRIDGEARBORFREMONTLIVE OAKALEJANDRAALTOLINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXUNIVERSITYPRINCETONHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCEEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEVICTORIALEONCLAIRELEEMILLIELANEALICEMARCUSSENSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEWAVERLEYPRIORCORNELLSANANTONIOBAY LAURELMOREYMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNREBECCADOYLEBLAKESHERWOODHOPKINSCURTISWESTFIELDMALONEYBARRONKENWOODKENTCLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORCHESTNUTHOMEWOODSURREYELIZABETHCHATEAUFENNWOODVERSAILLESBASSETTCREEKPLSUSSEXMANOROAK GROVE PLAZABLAKECHESTNUTCREEKCURTISUNIVERSITYCRANEWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODRAVENSWOODJOHNSONROBLEARBORMENLOCURTISWILLOWLMADraeger’sSafewayTrader Joe’sTheaterCivic CenterPublic LibraryBurgess ParkFremont ParkCaltrain StationTheaterMenlo CenterPresbyterianChurchOasis BeerGardenSite CharacterRailwayLandmarkActivity NodeParking PlazaLandscape BufferOpen SpaceStreet DefintionEl Camino RealCrosstown ConnectorLack of Building Edge /Unifying Character /Consistent BuildingOrientationProject Area BoundaryMenlo Park City LimitMedian Street TreesEl Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo ParkN0 300 600 1200Feet18 June 2009Fehr & PeersStrategic EconomicsBKF EngineersESAHDR/The Hoyt CompanyFigure B2. Site Character
  • 32. B6MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANThe plan area also includes a number of gateways, anentrance “expression” that heralds the approach of newlandscape and defines the arrival point as a destination.The minimum building setbacks and median trees, whichstart at Valparaiso Avenue, create a sense of entry orgateway to downtown heading south. Other gatewaysinclude El Camino Real at the Menlo Park/Palo Alto citylimit, heading north, and Santa Cruz Avenue at El CaminoReal and at University Drive heading into the center ofdowntown.El Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo Park29 April 2009Fehr & PeersStrategic EconomicsBKF EngineersESAFig 24: Streetscape Study - Santa Cruz Avenue South (between El Camino Real and Evelyn)RONIMACLERUZLIVE OAKYTISREVINUHOOVERMERRILLNYLEVEROSEAKNARCMILLIENLOELYODSITRUCYENOLAMRYANSTUNTSEHCELIZABETHOAK GROVE PLAZAEKALBCHESTNUTENARCJOHNSONBLEMENLOSITRUCCurtisChestnutChestnutCraneDoyleCurtisJohnsonLn.ElCaminoRealDoyleCraneEvelynStreetscape - Downtown (Menlo Park, California); Santa Cruz Avenue consists of small, distinct storefronts, in one- and two- story buildings, thatline and define the streetPeet’s Coffee at the corner of Santa Cruz Avenue andUniversity Drive (Menlo Park, California)
  • 33. B7CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTsMILNALLEYRAVENSWOODStreetscape CharacterStreetscape character is created by features such aslandscaping, sidewalk design and street furniture andamenities. Along El Camino Real, the landscaping variesin design, quality and maturity, resulting in a range ofexperiences for pedestrians. Some areas such as thesection between Roble and Ravenswood Avenues includemature street trees, providing a high quality experience forpedestrians. Areas with less mature landscaping are not ascomfortable. Overall, the series of street trees and mediantrees, especially ones that are more mature, help lessenthe impact of traffic along El Camino Real and make it morecomfortable for pedestrians.The sidewalk dimension on El Camino Real varies in widthand in a few locations narrows down to a size that makesit an uncomfortable pedestrian experience. In addition,several intersections along El Camino Real have beencompromised by infrastructural elements (such as signage,light posts and utility boxes) or restrict pedestrian circulationin favor of vehicular circulation (especially in locationswhere there is a high frequency of vehicular turning). Theexisting intersections have been designed for vehicularspeeds and do little to provide assistance for pedestrians.Typically Santa Cruz Avenue is comprised of a traffic lane ineach direction, parking on both sides (sometimes parallel,sometimes angled), 10-foot sidewalk and one- to two- storybuildings that have no setback from the street. The streetis identifiable by a median planting of London Plane treesthat average 30 to 35 feet tall. Additionally, trees of varyingtypes and sizes are planted irregularly in the sidewalk andplanting areas.Santa Cruz Avenue has been designed with a great dealof emphasis on the pedestrian. A strong effort has beenmade to separate pedestrian circulation from vehiculartraffic as well as provide street furnishings and amenities.The existing streetscape design, built over the pastfew decades, is intended to serve pedestrians, yet alsocreates constraints by reducing the effective space forcirculation and social interaction and, at times, beingvisually disruptive. In several locations, benches are fixedin location back-to-back, limiting informal use by largergroups. Much of the sidewalk space has been organizedusing low concrete walls and planting areas, which providea perception of increased protection from vehicles, but limitthe usable space of the sidewalk.Back-to-back benches (Menlo Park, California)
  • 34. B8MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANB.3 OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTSDraeger’s is a local activity node (Menlo Park, California)The plan area offers ample opportunities and constraintsfor improvements, particularly as they relate to thecommunity’s desires for enhanced pedestrian amenitiesand public spaces, a revitalized El Camino Real, an active,vibrant downtown and improved pedestrian and bicycleconnections. Illustrated in Figure B3, the following sectionsdescribe the area’s opportunities and constraints.“Improving conditions for both(vehicles and pedestrians)should be the goal throughwider sidewalks with greenareas between traffic andsidewalks”- Workshop #1 Participant“Need for good streetscapeand ground floor design –pedestrian friendly”- Workshop #1 Participant
  • 35. ALMAMIDDLEFIELDLAURELELCAMINOREALMIDDLEOAK GROVEYALEENCINALWATKINSSANTA CRUZVALPARAISOCOLLEGECREEKROBLEMILLSGLENWOODPINECAMBRIDGEARBORFREMONTLIVE OAKALEJANDRAALTOLINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXUNIVERSITYPRINCETONHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCEEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEVICTORIALEONCLAIRELEEMILLIELANEALICEMARCUSSENSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEWAVERLEYPRIORCORNELLSANANTONIOBAY LAURELMOREYMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNREBECCADOYLEBLAKESHERWOODHOPKINSCURTISWESTFIELDMALONEYBARRONKENWOODKENTCLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORCHESTNUTHOMEWOODSURREYELIZABETHCHATEAUFENNWOODVERSAILLESBASSETTCREEKPLSUSSEXMANOROAK GROVE PLAZABLAKECHESTNUTCREEKCURTISUNIVERSITYCRANEWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODRAVENSWOODJOHNSONROBLEARBORMENLOCURTISWILLOWMenloCollegeMenlo HighSchoolCivic CenterPublic LibraryBurgess ParkFremontParkCaltrainStationNealon ParkArbor RdParkEncinalElementaryEl Camino ParkSt. Raymond’sElementary SchoolSan Francisquito CreekHolbrook Palmer ParkPresbyterianChurch Downtown5MinuteWalkingRadiusProject Area BoundarySchool AreaCivic AreaPark SpaceMenlo Park City BoundaryDowntown/Station AreaHigh Impacted /High Traffic Volume IntersectionCaltrain Railway(Limits E-W Connectivity)OpportunitiesConstraintsEl Camino Real Corridor(Limits E-W Connectivity)Improve Pedestrian Routes -Opportunity for connectingexisting and new civic usesImprove Pedestrian/BicycleConnectivityUnderutilized and VacantLandStanford University OwnershipEnhance GatewaysPublic Parking Plazas -Opportunities for ImprovedParking ManagementIntensify development neardowntown/train stationSite Opportunities and ConstraintsEl Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo ParkN0 300 600 1200Feet29 April 2009Fehr & PeersStrategic EconomicsBKF EngineersESAHDR/The Hoyt CompanyB9CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTFigure B3. Opportunities and Constraints
  • 36. B10MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANOpportunitiesThe Specific Plan recognizes opportunities forenhancements within the plan area. The following sectionsdiscuss these opportunities in more detail:• Improve Underutilized and Vacant Lands.• Improve Stanford University-Owned Property.• Focus Higher Density Development in Proximity tothe Train Station Area.• Build on Downtown Character.• Improve and “Leverage” Existing Public ParkingPlazas.• Improve Pedestrian Amenities and Overall StreetCharacter.• Improve East/West Pedestrian and BicycleConnectively.• Improve Linkages between Open Spaces and CivicUses.Improve Underutilized and Vacant ParcelsVacant and under-utilized parcels in the plan areaprovide opportunities for mixed use development. Newdevelopment would also help transform the streetscapecharacter along El Camino Real by encouraging street levelactivity and enhancing the pedestrian environment. Severalof the parcels have approved or pending projects that willserve these purposes as well as provide the potential forrevenue generation and increase housing opportunities.Additionally, hotel uses have the potential to generateneeded tax revenue for the city.Improve Stanford University-Owned PropertyStanford University owns a large contiguous stretch ofland of approximately 12.8 acres on the eastern side ofEl Camino Real just north of San Francisquito Creek. Theland is suitable for multi-family residential, commercial andmixed use development. This single ownership allows for acomprehensive approach to redevelopment of this portionof El Camino Real, which is currently underutilized. It alsoprovides an opportunity for an east-west pedestrian andbicycle linkage near Middle Avenue.Vacant and under-utilized parcels along El Camino Real(Menlo Park, California)Large, contiguous stretches of land along El Camino Real(Menlo Park, California)“Let’s really plan for a 50-yearnon-auto environment”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 37. B11CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTFocus Higher Density Development in Proximityto the Train Station AreaVibrancy is achieved by a rich mix of uses, includingresidential and public amenities, arranged in a compactmanner, in close proximity to transit. This mixed-usepattern supports pedestrian circulation and transit use whilereducing relative vehicular trips in comparison to standaloneprojects of the same size. Also, clustering developmentnear transit can potentially help justify improvements toexisting transit.The intersection of Santa Cruz Avenue and El Camino Realis the “center” of Menlo Park’s commercial and historiccore, the confluence of the city’s commercial corridor,downtown “Main Street” and transit station area. Thiscentral location is the logical place for increased intensityof mixed-use development. As shown in Figure B3, thereis an opportunity to focus development within a five minutewalking radius from this “center”.Build on Downtown CharacterDowntown Menlo Park is a walkable district with smallblocks with most of the retail uses concentrated alongSanta Cruz Avenue. The buildings in downtown are oneor two stories with relatively small floor area. Enhancingthe walkability in downtown by improving pedestrianmovement along Santa Cruz Avenue and along the side-streets perpendicular to Santa Cruz Avenue will reinforcethe village character. Opportunities exist to create limitednew social spaces in the public parking plazas and throughwidening of sidewalks, which will further enhance thedowntown character. As discussed above, intensifyingmixed use development around the intersection of SantaCruz Avenue and El Camino Real will also contributeto a vibrant downtown by increasing foot traffic and byenhancing pedestrian orientation of downtown.Existing downtown character consisting of small blocks,mostly retail uses and one to two story buildings with smallfloor areas (Menlo Park, California)Existing mixed use activity at Menlo Center (Menlo Park,California)
  • 38. B12MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANImprove and “Leverage” Existing PublicParking PlazasThe downtown parking plazas provide needed parkingfor downtown stores and services. However, their currentconfiguration is inefficient, with narrow drive aisles andsub-standard spaces in some cases. The city-ownedparking plazas provide opportunities for possible limitedinfill development including modest new retail/restaurantuses, public open space and structured parking, enhancingthe vitality and vibrancy of downtown. Such changescan enhance downtown character without reducing theinventory of available parking spaces. The opportunitieslisted will enhance foot traffic through increased patronageand support of local retail businesses downtown, in turnleading to increased sales. The parking plazas also provideopportunities for improved parking management, such asby relocating longer-term parking to garages and improvingshort-term parking opportunities elsewhere.Improve Pedestrian Amenities and OverallStreet CharacterOpportunities exist to improve pedestrian amenities (streetfurniture, widened sidewalks), and overall street character,in downtown, particularly along Santa Cruz Avenue, thenorth-south streets, and on downtown parking plazas. Insome places, on-street parking may be reconfigured andaccommodated elsewhere to provide room for pedestrianimprovements.El Camino Real offers its own challenges, with the arterialright-of-way needing to accommodate vehicular movement,on-street parking in some places and pedestrianmovement. Buildings along the corridor are often built up tothe property lines and sidewalks tend to be narrow, placingthe pedestrian near fast-moving traffic. Opportunities, albeitlimited, exist to improve the pedestrian experience bynarrowing traffic lanes while maintaining the same numberof lanes and expanding the sidewalk and by introducing andexpanding sidewalks and publicly-accessible open spaceon adjacent properties.Opportunity to widen sidewalks along Santa Cruz Avenue(Menlo Park, California)Buildings along El Camino Real built up to the property lineswith narrow sidewalk condition (Menlo Park, California)“We could walk more if wehad good parking structuresoff downtown”- Workshop #1 Participant“If there were less parking andmore activity, I would walk todowntown”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 39. B13CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTImprove East/West Pedestrian and BicycleConnectivityThe El Camino Real corridor and parallel railroad tracksimpede safe and accessible east/west connections.There are opportunities to improve existing connections,particularly between downtown and the train station area,through enhanced pedestrian and bicycle amenitiesand managing traffic movements. Opportunities for newpedestrian and bicycle connections under or over therailroad tracks exist at the Caltrain station and at MiddleAvenue, connecting through to Burgess Park. There is alsoan opportunity to improve existing pedestrian crossings atOak Grove, Santa Cruz, and Menlo Avenues for enhancedeast-west connectivity with high-visibility crosswalks withenhanced pavement, median islands/pedestrian refugesand other crossing improvements.Improve Linkages between Open Spaces andCivic UsesSome notable civic uses and parks in the vicinity ofdowntown include the Civic Center and Public Library,Caltrain Station, Menlo Park Presbyterian Church,Fremont Park, Nealon Park and Burgess Park. Improvingpedestrian and bicycle routes between these civic usesprovides an opportunity to create safe linkages and improveaccessibility.Parallel railroad tracks impede safe and accessible east/westconnections (Menlo Park, California)Poor accessibility and linkages between key spaces (MenloPark, California)
  • 40. B14MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANConstraintsThe following sections discuss these constraints in theproject area in more detail:• Railroad Line Limits East/West ConnectivityOpportunities.• Arterial Function and Caltrans Jurisdiction of ElCamino Real Limits Improvement Opportunities.• Ravenswood/Menlo/El Camino Real IntersectionCongestion.• Funding for Public Improvements.• Financing Given the Current Market Situation.Railroad Line Limits East/West ConnectivityOpportunitiesThe railroad tracks are a barrier that limits east-westconnectivity, although they also buffer taller buildings on ElCamino Real from adjacent neighborhoods. Implementingattractive and safe connections across the tracks remains areal challenge in the project area. Future high speed rail isalso planned for the Peninsula, and it requires track grade-separation. With high speed rail and its grade separations,east-west transportation connections can be enhanced.However, it will act as a visual barrier if the tracks are abovegrade.Arterial Function and Caltrans Jurisdiction of ElCamino Real Limits Improvement OpportunitiesUnder the California Department of Transportation(Caltrans) jurisdiction, El Camino Real is a major arterialroadway that must accommodate regional throughtraffic. While there is potential to improve the pedestrianenvironment, and street character, along the El CaminoReal right of way, Caltrans has final authority and decisionmaking power in this regard. Deviations from Caltranspolicy or standards to meet community requests mayrequire approval of an exception to a policy or nonstandardfeature.Railroad line limiting east/west connectivity opportunities(Menlo Park, California)Arterial function of El Camino Real limiting improvementopportunities (Menlo Park, California)
  • 41. B15CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTRavenswood/Menlo/El Camino Real IntersectionCongestionThis intersection is the only one in the project area thatcurrently operates at an unacceptable level of service forvehicular traffic under existing conditions (discussed inSection F.2 “Vehicular Circulation”). Accordingly, increaseddevelopment and improving pedestrian and bike crossings,while accommodating traffic flows, remains a challenge inthe area.Funding for Public ImprovementsDue to fiscal constraints being experienced by all levels ofgovernment, including the City of Menlo Park, the fundingavailable for public improvements is limited. It is unlikelythat the General Fund will be a significant source of fundingfor public improvement projects. Therefore, the City willneed to identify other revenue sources to pay for proposedimprovements. A wide variety of other funding sourcesand financing mechanisms, including Benefit AssessmentDistricts, Grants, and Development Impact Fees, areavailable for public improvements, but their applicabilityto Menlo Park varies substantially because of statutoryconstraints and political challenges, including the need forvoter approval in some cases. Development Impact Feesand other contributions from developers will be limited bythe amount of new development allowed in the specificplan area and, at least in the short-term, by the currentreal estate market conditions. The ultimate mix of fundingsources and financing mechanisms for the proposedimprovements will be subject to the larger priorities of theCity. Please see Chapter G “Implementation” for moreinformation on specific funding sources.Financing Given the Current Market SituationThe current market situation is characterized by constrainedcredit markets and a broader economic downturn that hasimpacted the potential for real estate development. Whilecurrent market conditions, wherein home prices and thevolume of sales have both declined, are not conducive toreal estate development at this time, the market for realestate tends to be cyclical in nature. It is difficult to predictwhen the market will improve; however it is unlikely thatnew projects in the plan area will be constructed andoccupied until 2012–2013, at the earliest.
  • 42. B16MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANB.4 CIRCULATION OVERVIEWThe circulation system in the Specific Plan project areaaccommodates, to varying degrees, vehicular movement,pedestrian movement, bicycle circulation and transit use.This section summarizes the following aspects of theexisting circulation system:• Policy Context.• Transportation Conditions.• Opportunities.More detailed discussion of the circulation system iscontained in Chapter F “Circulation”.Policy ContextThere are a number of agencies whose policies apply tothe Specific Plan area, including the City of Menlo Park,the San Mateo City/County Association of Governments (C/CAG), the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC),the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), SanMateo County Transit District (SamTrans) and the Town ofAtherton. Moreover, the City of Menlo Park’s General Planprovides a blueprint for growth within the City, and sets thegoals, policies, and programs that apply to the Specific Planarea.The General Plan specifies that the minimum acceptablelevel of service1(LOS) for roadways is LOS D, and includespolicies supporting the development of an equitabletransportation network supporting transit, bicycles, andpedestrians. Caltrans controls El Camino Real, whereit strives for operations at LOS C or better, but Caltransdocuments note that there is flexibility in the application ofits standards to accommodate community goals.1Level of Service (LOS) is a quantitative description of roadway opera-tions from the perspective of a vehicle driver. The LOS of a roadwayfacility can range from LOS A, with free-flow operations and little or nodelay, to LOS F where traffic volumes exceed roadway capacity result-ing in stop-and-go operations and excessive delays. LOS E representsat-capacity conditions, LOS D represents below-capacity conditionswhere delays are tolerable for most driversTransportation ConditionsRoadway SystemThe roadway system in Menlo Park is comprised ofrelatively short and discontinuous north-south and east-west roadways. This layout limits the amount of regionaltraffic on the roadways but creates circuitous traffic routingsfor people who live, work, and visit Menlo Park. Trafficcongestion in the project area occurs primarily alongEl Camino Real, which carries regional traffic, and itsintersections. The highest levels of congestion occur duringthe morning and evening peak commute hours, causingextensive queuing. About half of the traffic on El CaminoReal in the downtown area is regional in nature, with anorigin and destination outside of the project area.Pedestrian and Bicycle FacilitiesPedestrian and bicycle facilities support attractive modesof travel in Menlo Park as nearly six percent2 of work tripsare made by bicycle or on foot, well above both state andnational averages. Pedestrian and bicycle accommodationsare provided throughout much of the City. However, thereare many gaps and deficiencies. While sidewalks areprovided along most roadways in the plan area, El CaminoReal and the Caltrain tracks serve as a barrier to east-westtravel, and there are discontinuities in the sidewalk systemleading into the downtown area. El Camino Real and theCaltrain tracks serve as a barrier to east-west bicycle travelas well and there are discontinuities in the bicycle networkespecially for north-south travel.22000 Census journey to work dataDiscontinuities in bicycle network for north-southtravel (Menlo Park, California)
  • 43. B17CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTèqètqètqètqètqètqètqètqètqèètqètqSpruce AveWatkins AveBuckthorn WayPartridge AveRoble AveCraneStVictoriaDrAlmaLnMiddle AveCreek DrOak Grove PlzCollege AveUniversityDrCambridge AveHarvard AveEncinal AveStone Pine LnLive Oak AveMillsStSanAntonioAveForest LnCornellRdMenlo AveNoelDrChestnutStJohnsonLnGarwoodWayEvelynStCurtisStAltoLnMaloneyLnOak Grove AveMerrillStElCaminoRealValparaiso Ave Glenwood AveSanta Cruz AveAlmaStOak Grove AveAlmaStRavenswood Ave0 250 500 750 1,000125FeetEl Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo Park14 April 2009Source: City of Menlo Park Traffix model,Fehr & Peers field observations (March & April, 2009)N·|}þ82·|}þ82Traffic ObservationsFigure 9PM congestion backsup through Roble Ave,but clears in one cycle.AM and PMcongestion spills backthrough Santa CruzCongestion observed,but clears quicklyMinimal congestionobserved on OakGrove AM and PMA number of vehicleturning movement/bicycle/pedestrianconflicts atRavenswood/AlmaPM congestion on Menlo Avetakes 2-3 cycles to clearCongestion fromRavenswood spillsback to Caltrain tracksèEmilePlan AreaCaltrainMenlo Park City LimitsAM PMètq= A-B= C= D= E-Fètqtqètqètq > 30002000 - 30001000 - 2000500 - 1000< 500Level of Service: Average Peak Hour VolumeètqètqqètqqqCruzFigure B4. Peak Period Intersection Level of Service in Plan Area
  • 44. B18MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!úúúúÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýSpruce AveWatkins AveBuckthorn WayPartridge AveRoble AveCollege AveVictoriaDrAlmaLnMiddle AveCreek DrRyans LnOak Grove PlzCambridge AveUniversityDrHarvard AveMillsStEncinal AveStone Pine LnLive Oak AveSanAntonioAveForest LnCornellRdMenlo AveNoelDrDoyleStChestnutStJohnsonLnGarwoodWayEvelynStCurtisStDerry LnAltoLnMaloneyLnOak Grove AveMerrillStCraneStValparaiso Ave Glenwood AveSanta Cruz AveAlmaStOak Grove AveRavenswood AveAlmaStMiddlefieldAveLaurelStElCaminoRealLegendú Bicycle & Pedestrian Bridgeú Planned Bicycle &Æý Pedestrian SignalComplete Sidewalk onPartial Sidewalk on at! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!! !! Informal PathProject AreaCaltrainMenlo Park City Limits0 250 500 750 1,000125FeetPedestrian Facilities Inside Study AreaFigure 7El Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo Park15 April 2009Source: City of Menlo Park Sidewalk Master Plan (August 11, 2008),Fehr & Peers field observations (March 2009)N·|}þ82·|}þ82Pedestrian Tunnel*Least One Side of StreetBoth Sides of StreetNext to Rail Road Tracks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Average Pedestrian CrossingTime in Seconds¤¤¤¤¤¤ ¤¤¤¤¤&&98 sec* Exact Location Subject to FurtherReviewÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýÆýElCaminoRealDoyleStJohnsonLnMaloneyLnMerrillSt¤¤¤¤¤¤ ¤¤¤¤¤&&100 sec¤¤¤¤¤¤ ¤¤¤¤¤&&102 sec¤¤¤¤¤¤ ¤¤¤¤¤&&100 sec¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤&&91sec¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤&&92sec¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤&&90sec¤¤¤¤¤¤ ¤¤¤¤¤&&99 sec¤¤¤¤¤¤ ¤¤¤¤¤&&98 sec¤¤¤¤¤¤ ¤¤¤¤¤&&90 sec¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤&&92sec¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤&&91sec¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤¤&&101secInset 1Average C rossing Times (Sumof wait time plus walking time)Wait Time = 0-150 secondsfor pedestrians duringAM & PM peak periodsFigure B5. Pedestrian Facilities in Plan Area, from Field Observations and the “Menlo Park Comprehensive Bicycle Development Plan, 2005”
  • 45. B19CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!úúúGlenwood AveSanta Cruz AveAlmaStValparaiso AveOak Grove AveRavenswood AvelLaurelStElCaminoRealWatkins AveBuckthorn WayPartridge AveRoble AveVictoriaDrAlmaLnMiddle AveCreek DrRyans LnOak Grove PlzUniversityDrEncinal AveStone Pine LnLive Oak AveForest LnCornellRdMenlo AveNoelDrSpruce AveDoyleStChestnutStJohnsonLnGarwoodWayEvelynStCurtisSt Derry LnAltoLnMaloneyLnOak Grove AveMerrillStCraneStCollege AveCambridge AveHarvard AveMillsStSanAntonoiAve!0 260 520 780 1,040130FeetBicycle FacilitiesEl Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo Park14 April 2009Source: Menlo Park Comprehensive BicycleDevelopment Plan (January, 2005)N·|}þ82·|}þ!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!82AmaStúIsabellaEmileMac BainBrittondrawoHClass II Bike LaneClass III Bike RoutePlanned Class III Bike RoutePlanned Bicycle & PedestrianTunnel *Informal Path Next to RailRoad TracksPlanned Class II Bike LaneClass I Bike PathBicycle & Pedestrian BridgeProject AreaCaltrainMenlo Park City Limits* Exact Location Subject to further review! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!úúFigure B6. Bicycle Facilities in Plan Area, from Field Observations and the “Menlo Park Comprehensive Bicycle Development Plan, 2005”
  • 46. B20MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANTransitTransit service is provided by San Mateo County TransitDistrict (SamTrans), Caltrain, and shuttles operated by theCity of Menlo Park. Caltrain daily boardings at the MenloPark station have increased steadily from under 900 in1992 to over 1,400 in 20093. Planning is currently underwayfor a High Speed Rail (HSR) corridor connecting LosAngeles with San Francisco, which is discussed in moredetail in Section D.3 “Station Area”. As planned, the HSRwould pass through Menlo Park along the Caltrain right-of-way. All HSR crossings with roadways would be gradeseparated. Figure B7 illustrates transit service in the planarea.ParkingParking is provided in a mixture of on-street spaces andboth public and private lots. Over 1,500 public parkingspaces are provided downtown. Short-term parking is free,but most of the public spaces have time restrictions of oneor two hours, with some 15-minute zones on Santa CruzAvenue. Parking Plazas 1 and 5 allow for longer-term paidparking, with on-site meter payment. The peak parkingdemand occurs mid-day on weekdays, when about 80%of the available on- and off-street spaces are occupied,according to the Downtown Menlo Park Parking Study(May 2010).  The City’s Municipal Code specifies minimumparking requirements, which are higher than averagefor commercial uses when compared to neighboringjurisdictions.3Caltrain ridership data posted on their websiteTransit service provided by SamTrans, Caltrain and City ofMenlo Park shuttles at the Menlo Park station (Menlo Park,California)“Parking structures off ofSanta Cruz to remove carsfrom walking areas makesdowntown more attractive.”- Workshop #1 Participant
  • 47. B21CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXThSpruce AveWatkins AveBuckthorn WayPartridge AveRoble AveCraneStVictoriaDrAlmaLnMiddle AveCreek DrRyans LnOak Grove PlzCollege AveUniversityDrCambridge AveHarvard AveEncinal AveStone Pine LnLive Oak AveMillsStSanAntonioAveForest LnCornellRdMenlo AveNoelDrDoyleStChestnutStJohnsonLnGarwoodWayEvelynStCurtisSt Derry LnAltoLnMaloneyLnOak Grove AveMerrillStValparaiso Ave Glenwood AveSanta Cruz AveAlmaStOak Grove AveAlmaStRavenswood AveLaurelStElCaminoReal0 250 500 750 1,000125FeetTransit ServiceFigure 3El Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo Park14 April 2009Source: SamTrans, CaltrainN·|}þ82·|}þ82Project AreaCaltrainMenlo Park City LimitsTransit StationBus StopsKX - SamTrans Express83 - SamTrans85 - SamTrans295 - SamTrans296 - SamTrans390 - SamTransMP Midday ShuttleFigure B7. Transit Service in Plan Area
  • 48. B22MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANOpportunitiesA number of potential opportunities are apparent basedon this review of existing conditions. The plan area iswell served by transit, is pedestrian and bike friendly inmany places and enjoys a mix of uses in the downtown.The proximity of the downtown to the Caltrain station andthe existing intensities in the plan area could allow forincreased intensity and infill development with less newtraffic compared to similar amounts of development in otherlocations or areas not served by transit.The City-owned parking plazas currently provide freeshort-term parking for visitors and employees, along withsome options for longer-term paid parking. These plazasconstitute the largest City-owned parcels in the project area,and could be converted to limited infill development, pocketparks and/or parking garages. Parking garages wouldconsolidate parking to more central locations, reducing theamount of “cruising” as people search for a parking spaceand creating more orderly traffic patterns. If spread over twoplazas, the garages would also disperse garage traffic overseveral locations versus one location. Parking garages canalso provide a concentrated location for all-day employeeparking for downtown businesses, helping free up spacesin surface lots for retail customers. (See Chapter F, SectionF.9 “Downtown Parking” for more details).“Allow super-high density neartrain station”- Workshop #1 Participant“Need more housing on ElCamino Real. People bringvibrancy.”- Workshop #1 ParticipantThere is also an opportunity to reduce the minimum parkingrequirements for some types of development to accountfor the accessibility of the downtown to non-automobileusers and the potential for shared parking. Different useshave different parking demand characteristics, with someuses (like offices) peaking during the day on weekdays andother uses (like housing) peaking in the evenings and onweekends. Providing parking spaces that can be sharedbetween these uses is a more efficient usage of the limitedamount of available parking.The plans for High Speed Rail (HSR) could also presenttransportation opportunities for the plan area, particularlyby improving east-west connectivity. The grade separationrequired for the HSR project would eliminate the at-gradecrossings that currently exist at four locations withinthe project area. The removal of the railroad crossingat Ravenswood Avenue near Alma Street would likelybenefit traffic operations at El Camino Real as well as thepedestrian crossing at Alma Street. The reconstruction ofthe railroad right-of-way could also provide an opportunityfor a bicycle/pedestrian path improving north-southconnectivity in the project area without forcing riders ontoEl Camino Real. These potential benefits should be viewedin concert with potential negative attributes of HSR, suchas creating a visual barrier through communities along thePeninsula, construction impacts, noise and vibration, treeremovals, and property takings.
  • 49. B23CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTB.5 MARKET OVERVIEWBased on an examination of major demographic, economicand market conditions, the market overview addressesthe mid- to long-term potential for residential, retail, office,and hotel and conference space uses in the plan area.The overview encompasses key findings by StrategicEconomics, which analyzed the economic and marketcontext for this Specific Plan study in May 2009.This section briefly describes the major market findings forresidential, retail, office and hotel land uses.
  • 50. B24MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANResidential MarketThe plan area is well positioned within the region to capturehousing demand from a variety of groups.The plan area is located near employment centers, regionaltransportation options, educational institutions, anddowntown’s walkable retail core. The availability of nearbyservices and amenities are likely to attract a wide range ofhouseholds including single professionals, students, smallfamilies, and seniors. These household types demanda wide range of housing types, including small-lot singlefamily homes, townhouses, condominiums, and rentalapartments. Attached multi-family housing is likely to attractseniors “downsizing” from larger single-family homes inthe Peninsula, single professionals, and families with nochildren. Allowing for a variety of housing types will alsohelp to accommodate households at a range of incomelevels.While demand is strong for a variety of housing types,what is marketable in any given location will depend onsite-specific characteristics. Within the project area, thereare different physical contexts that will determine thehousing types likely to be built. Properties fronting on ElCamino Real are better suited to higher-density housing,while properties facing the residential streets parallel to ElCamino Real are better suited to townhouses and small-lotsingle-family homes. Properties near the Caltrain stationare ideal locations for higher-density transit-orienteddevelopment, and properties within downtown may besuitable for medium-density apartments, condominiums,and townhouses, at a scale that is sensitive to thedowntown village character.
  • 51. B25CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTExisting multi-family housing and retail mixed-usedevelopment near the Menlo Park station (Menlo Park,California)Key Residential Market Findings• The plan area has a major opportunity to tap intoSan Mateo County’s strong pent-up demand forhousing.• The large number of jobs accessible at other transitstations on the corridor enhances the desirabilityof downtown Menlo Park as a place to live. Newhousing in the station area will offer residents theopportunity for a car-free commute to downtownSan Jose, San Francisco, Palo Alto, San Mateo,or other major employment destinations within theregional transit system.• Demand for Menlo Park housing is primarily drivenby the highly regarded schools, robust publicamenities, sense of community, and proximity toemployment centers.• The Menlo Park housing market experiencesstrong demand for all types of residential units.• Families drive the majority of housing demand withsecondary demand from empty-nesters.
  • 52. B26MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANRetail MarketThe plan area is comprised of two distinct retail districts:El Camino Real and downtown Menlo Park. El CaminoReal retail is geared toward more destination orientedretailers that benefit from convenient auto access, suchas those at the Safeway shopping center and Staples andBig 5 Sporting Goods at Menlo Station. El Camino Realis also the location of one larger hotel and several smallerhotels/motels that contribute to City revenue in the form oftransient occupancy taxes. El Camino Real’s advantagesfor retailers are strong linkages to other communities onthe Peninsula, strong demographics, good visibility, andhigh traffic counts, which are desirable to many nationaland regional retailers. El Camino Real also contains anumber of key redevelopment opportunities on vacantand underutilized sites. Nevertheless, many of the lotdimensions on El Camino Real are challenging for standardretail configuration and parking ratios.Downtown Menlo Park is a pedestrian-oriented “MainStreet” shopping district that has evolved over time toinclude a range of independent retailers, including grocerystores, home furnishings stores, women’s apparel, specialtyretail stores and dining establishments. Downtown MenloPark has not traditionally attracted a great number ofnational and regional retailers, in part because thesetypes of retailers are already located in Stanford ShoppingCenter and University Avenue in Palo Alto, and franchiseagreements would typically not allow for another storewithin such close proximity. Furthermore, downtown MenloPark is tucked away from major freeways, and does notoffer the type of direct regional automotive access found inother Peninsula communities along the US-101 Highway.If additional housing is developed in the project area,downtown Menlo Park has the opportunity to attract storesand restaurants targeting young people and families withchildren, as well as senior households. Streetscape andpedestrian improvements and additional downtown housingor office uses would also enhance the success of projectarea retail and draw shoppers and diners.Flegel’s Home Furnishings, a major independent retailerlocated downtown at the corner of Santa Cruz Avenue andEvelyn Street (Menlo Park, California)“Like to see more street fair-type vendors on weekends”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 53. B27CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTBased on comments from the three community workshops,community preferences for types of retail uses includeindependent, small retailers and those that invite moreactivity in the evening hours, including restaurants andcafes, particularly downtown. Community preferences alsoinclude a concentration of stores, restaurants and cafesalong Santa Cruz Avenue, rather than financial and otherservices, that are apt to be closed at night.Key Retail Market Findings• Retail sales in the project area remained relativelysteady from 2003 to 2007; however sales havedeclined during the current economic downturn.Neighborhood-serving retail generates the mostsales of all categories for both El Camino Real anddowntown. Neighborhood-serving retail includesfood and beverage stores, such as grocery stores,hardware stores, and health and personal carestores, such as pharmacies. These types of storesare oriented toward nearby residents’ daily andweekly needs.• Although both areas have a high share ofneighborhood-serving retail sales, downtownMenlo Park has a higher share of sales in specialtyretail and home furnishings, whereas El CaminoReal has a higher share of sales in restaurants anddining. Specialty retail draws patrons from a widertrade area and may include comparison shoppingfor larger items like electronics. Other specialtystores include book and music stores, sportinggoods, apparel stores, and gift stores.• Even though most of the sales in the El CaminoReal corridor and in downtown are fromneighborhood-serving retail, specialty retail makesup a larger share of total stores.“Stores open in the evening toinvite post-dining patrons tostay in the village”- Workshop #3 Participant“Entertainment and morespecialty retail would get medowntown”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 54. B28MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANOffice MarketMenlo Park is a desirable location for office uses due toits central location on the Peninsula and good accessto major highways and bridges. Stanford University, theventure capital industry, and the local residential populationbase are the primary sources of demand for office space,attracting small and mid-size companies in real estate,venture capital, attorneys, and medical/dental, as well ashigh-tech and internet companies.In the short-term, there is demand for additional medicaloffice space in the project area. Brokers report that theyare seeing a high level of demand for medical space in theproject area because of plans to demolish some medicalbuildings as part of the new Stanford Medical Center.Demand for medical office space is slightly higher in thedowntown than on El Camino Real due to the high qualitypedestrian environment and retail amenities. However,there is some community concern with medical office usesin the project area since they tend to generate trips but notrevenue.In the mid- to long-term there will likely be demand foradditional office space in the project area. Because ofthe economic downturn, most office users are currentlynot looking to relocate or expand. But as the economyrecovers, demand for office space in the project areawill likely be high, especially in downtown. Proximity toCaltrain and the walkability and amenities of downtown aresignificant draws for office tenants.Construction of new office space in the project area isconstrained by difficulties in providing parking on typically-small parcel sizes. Revision of the parking requirement,particularly for non-medical office uses, may facilitate officebuilding development in the project area.Existing 4-story office space along El Camino Real (MenloPark, California)Existing office space at 1600 El Camino Real (Menlo Park,California)
  • 55. B29CHAPTER B PLAN CONTEXTKey Office Market Findings• In both the plan area and the City of MenloPark the majority of office employment is in theprofessional, scientific, and technical servicesindustries.• The plan area attracts mostly small and mid-size companies in real estate, venture capital,attorneys, and medical/dental. Downtownalso attracts a small number of high-tech andinternet companies.• The Menlo Park office market is strongerthan the Peninsula office market as a whole,achieving higher rents and lower vacancyrates.Existing 3-story retail / office space along El Camino Real(Menlo Park, California)
  • 56. B30MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANHotel MarketMenlo Park and the greater market area have seen asteady increase in occupancy and room rates over the pastseveral years, driven by a combination of both businessand leisure travelers. The subarea is particularly wellpositioned to attract hotel development because of itsproximity and access to Stanford University, Sand Hill Roadbusinesses, and the Silicon Valley region. The marketanalysis projected demand for both a conference hotelprimarily targeting business travelers and groups, as wellas demand for a smaller, limited-service boutique hoteltargeting tourists and other leisure visitors. The El CaminoReal corridor is more suited for a conference hotel, whilethe downtown is more appropriate for a boutique hotel givenits pedestrian-friendly environment, amenities and services.However, given trends in occupancy rates, room rates, andovernight visits in the market area, there is demand for onlyone conference hotel by 2015, and a smaller boutique hotelin the mid- to long-term, from 20 to 30 years. The ability ofthe project area to capture these hotel rooms will largelydepend on the availability of parcels of the right size anddimension, the amount and scale of hotel development inneighboring communities, as well as the capacity of themarket and economy to support hotel development.Key Hotel Market Findings• In the market area, approximately 60 percent ofhotel occupancy comes from leisure travelers and40 percent comes from business travelers.• Ten hotels in the market area, or 21 percent of allhotels, have meeting or conference space.• Compared to the hotel market overall, interviewswith hotel managers suggest that hotels with asignificant amount of conference and meetingspace derive a higher share of their occupancyfrom business travel, likely 60 to 70 percent.• Hotels are a desirable use for the City from a fiscaland economic development perspective. Hotelsgenerate transient occupancy taxes, an importantsource of local revenue that is independentof the state budget crisis. Hotel guests alsogenerate spending at nearby businesses such asrestaurants and retail stores. A conference hotelcan also provide an important amenity to some ofthe City’s larger businesses.
  • 57. PLAN PRINCIPLES,FRAMEWORK +PROGRAMC.1 OVERVIEWC.2 GUIDING PRINCIPLESC.3 URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORKC.4 SUB-AREA CONCEPTSEl Camino RealStation AreaDowntownC.5 SUSTAINABILITYC.6 ILLUSTRATIVE PLAN + DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMC.C2C2C6C10C10C14C16C19C20
  • 58. C2MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANC.1 OVERVIEWBased on the Phase I Vision Plan, the Menlo Park ElCamino Real/Downtown Specific Plan establishes guidingprinciples and an Urban Design Framework for publicand private enhancements to the plan area. This chaptercontains the following sections: Guiding Principles; Urban Design Framework; Sub-Area Concepts; Sustainability; and Illustrative Plan and Development Program.A more detailed discussion of the plan’s proposedenhancements, such as widened sidewalks, activegathering spaces and new mixed use infill development, isprovided in the chapters following.C.2 GUIDING PRINCIPLESBuilding on the Phase I Vision Plan, the El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan establishes five key guidingprinciples for the plan area. A principle is an assumptionor fundamental rule that underlies the concepts, policies,standards and guidelines of the Specific Plan.The Specific Plan’s guiding principles are: Enhance Public Space; Generate Vibrancy; Sustain Menlo Park’s Village Character; Enhance Connectivity; and Promote Healthy Living and Sustainability.As illustrated in Table C1, the guiding principles are directlyrelated to the goals of the Phase I Vision Plan. They bringstructure to the Phase I Vision Plan goals, resulting in acomprehensive strategy for expressing and implementingthe community’s vision and setting the foundation for theplan’s Urban Design Framework, which introduces thegeneral approach and broad concepts for the plan area.“I like the way the citychanges gradually as newdevelopments come along,and older, tired buildings arereplaced or rebuilt.”- Workshop #1 Participant
  • 59. C3CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMEnhancePublic SpaceGenerateVibrancySustain MenloParks VillageCharacterEnhanceConnectivityPromoteHealthy LivingandSustainability1 Maintain a village character unique to Menlo Park. X X X2 Provide greater east-west, town-wide connectivity. X X3Improve circulation and streetscape conditions on El CaminoReal.X X X X4Ensure that El Camino Real development is sensitive to andcompatible with adjacent neighborhoods.X X5 Revitalize underutilized parcels and buildings. X X6 Activate the train station area. X X X X7Protect and enhance pedestrian amenities on Santa CruzAvenue.X X X X X8Expand shopping, dining and neighborhood services to ensurea vibrant downtown.X X X9 Provide residential opportunities in the Vision Plan Area. X X10 Provide plaza and park spaces. X X X X11Provide an integrated, safe and well-designed pedestrian andbicycle network.X X X12Develop parking strategies and facilities that meet thecommercial and residential needs of the community.X XPhaseIVisionGoalsSpecific Plan Guiding PrinciplesTable C1. Guiding Principles Matrix
  • 60. C4MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEnhance Public SpaceThe Specific Plan establishes an expansive “public realm”,an integrated network of public spaces, including widenedsidewalks, plazas and parks, that invites strolling and publicgathering and allows for community life, identity and senseof place. The plan’s comprehensive public space networksupports a more active, vibrant downtown and healthierliving by encouraging walking, biking and social gathering.Generate VibrancyThe Specific Plan acknowledges the community’s desirefor a more active, vibrant downtown and station area, witha mix of retail, residential and offices uses that complementand support one another and bring vitality, includingincreased retail sales, to the area. In addition, the SpecificPlan establishes standards and guidelines that encouragedevelopment of underutilized and vacant land on El CaminoReal while ensuring a building character that is modulatedand in keeping with Menlo Park’s small-town character. TheSpecific Plan focuses on creating new connected placesof activity and social life that enhance community life andcontribute to a vibrant downtown.Sustain Menlo Park’s VillageCharacterThe Specific Plan recognizes and builds upon the uniquequalities of downtown Menlo Park and El Camino Real, inparticular its small town character of lower-scale buildingsand diverse and local neighborhood-serving businesses.The Specific Plan accommodates future development inways that complement the area’s existing character, usingdesign controls and guidelines to regulate building form andscale.“As much public / gatheringspace as possible!”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 61. C5CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMEnhance ConnectivityThe Specific Plan enhances connectivity and walkabilitythroughout the plan area. The plan provides a north-southconnection with a wider, more comfortable and continuoussidewalk on the east side of El Camino Real. The planintegrates downtown, the Caltrain station area and the CivicCenter with one another through widened sidewalks onSanta Cruz Avenue, Alma Street and El Camino Real. East/west connectivity is enhanced with a number of intersectionimprovements along El Camino Real, including enhancedcrosswalks and new and improved grade-separatedpedestrian/bicycle crossings of the railroad tracks.Promote Healthy Living andSustainabilityThe Specific Plan recognizes and promotes healthy livingand activity by encouraging walking, biking and accessto transit as alternatives to vehicular use, supported bywidened sidewalks and new bicycle facilities; enhancedpublic spaces; development intensity focusing on the stationarea; and a greater mix and diversity of uses. The SpecificPlan takes a comprehensive approach to sustainability andcarbon emissions reduction, utilizing standards integratedwith best practices and guidelines for both public andprivate improvements. The Specific Plan also encouragesdevelopment sensitive to the character of Menlo Park.“Bike-ability and safety,permeable pavements andgreen roofs!”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 62. C6MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANC.3 URBAN DESIGN FRAMEWORKPublic spaces and pocket parks as part of overall pedestriannetwork (Cambridge, Massachusetts)Expanding on the Specific Plan’s guiding principles, theUrban Design Framework introduces the general approachand concepts for the plan area. It emphasizes the followingelements: Distinct and Connected Areas; Integrated Corridor; Walking and Connected Community; Sensitive Infill and Living Downtown; and Mobility Options and Accessibility.More detail regarding the Urban Design Framework followsin later chapters.Distinct and Connected AreasIllustrated in Figure C1 (next page), the Urban DesignFramework recognizes El Camino Real, the Caltrain stationarea and downtown as distinct areas with their own uniquecharacter, activities, places and connections with oneanother and the surrounding community. The frameworkalso recognizes the Civic Center, which is outside theplan area, as a distinct place that plays a major role incommunity life.The Urban Design Framework reinforces the connectionbetween downtown and the station area via Santa CruzAvenue, which serves as a central east-west spine. Thestation area focuses on and straddles the Caltrain stationand its right-of-way, and it provides a critical linkage tothe Civic Center. On a north-south axis, the northern andsouthern portions of El Camino Real are distinct areas that“bookend” the portion of El Camino Real in the downtownarea.“The plan is varied enoughto add vitality with additionalgreenery with the pocketparks, wider sidewalks andadditional parking”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 63. C7CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMALMADLEIFELDDIMLERUALLAERONIMACLEMIDDLEOAK GROVEYALEENCINALWATKINSSANTA CRUZVALPARAISOCOLLEGECREEKROBLEMILLSGLENWOODPINECAMBRIDGEARBORTNOMERFLIVE OAKALEJANDRAOTLALINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXYTISREVINUNOTECNIRPHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCENYLEVEROSEOAKENARCAIROTCIVLEONERIALCEELMILLIELANEALICENESSUCRAMSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEWAVERLEYPRIORLLENROCOINOTNANASBAY LAURELYEROMMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNACCEBERELYODEKALBSHERWOODSNIKPOHSITRUCWESTFIELDYENOLAMNORRABKENWOODKENTCLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORTUNTSEHCDOOWEMOHSURREYELIZABETHUAETAHCFENNWOODSELLIASREVBASSETTCREEKPLSUSSEXMANOREKALBCREEKSITRUCYTISREVINUENARCWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODRAVENSWOODJOHNSONROBLEARBORMENLOSITRUCWILLOWCREEKHEHHCANEBAY L UREA LMIDDLESSOSOIARAPLAVASEENNCC NNAALLRAVENSWOODALMMAWOWLWILWJOJJOYEOOOTTTLLLLTTTTTAAALAERONIMACLESTOALLEYALLEYALLEYMEMERRILLMERRILLERJOHNJOHOOAK GROVEOVSANTA CRUZTTNNYYLLYYYYEEVVEELYODSSSIITTRRUUCCRRRYYYANSANSAAN SYYYYYTTUUNNTTSSEEHHCCCEENNAARRRCCCMENMENLLOOCCRRAANNEESAAOAOOOONNEEMMAK GROVEOOOEELLYYOODDYENOLAMMHNSONHNSONOHNSONBURGESSBURGESS1/4 Mile (5 Minute) WalkingRadiusStation AreaCivic Center/Burgess ParkElCaminoRealSouthElCaminoRealNorthElCaminoRealCaltrainR.O.WCivic PlazaStationLibrary/City HallBurgess ParkNealon ParkJack W. LyleMemorial ParkCreekFremont ParkSanta Cruz AvenueBike NetworkCentral Plaza/Paseo/Market PlaceMiddle AvenueOpen Space / Retail NodeDowntownEl Camino RealDowntown/Station AreaFigure C1. Concept Diagram
  • 64. C8MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANIntegrated CorridorWhile recognizing the distinct character of differentportions of El Camino Real, including building andstreetscape character and proximity to different adjacentneighborhoods, including downtown and the station area,the Urban Design Framework unifies the corridor, andenhances its character, through streetscape improvements,street trees and paving.Walking and Connected CommunityThe Urban Design Framework takes a holistic approachto pedestrian improvements throughout the plan area.It envisions a reinvigorated, more pedestrian-friendly ElCamino Real corridor intersecting a highly pedestrian-oriented, vibrant and connected downtown and station area.Adding to the identify and vibrancy of downtown, apedestrian and public space network connects downtown,the station area and the Civic Center, creating a cleareast-west pedestrian “sequence” from Fremont Park to theCivic Center area. A series of public spaces punctuates thesequence: Santa Cruz Avenue Center Plaza, paseo andmarket place; the station area Civic Plaza; and Civic Centergateway plaza at Ravenswood Avenue. The frameworkincorporates additional east-west connections throughcrosswalk improvements at key intersections on El CaminoReal and grade-separated crossings of the railroad tracks.It incorporates improved pedestrian comfort and safety withwider sidewalks on El Camino Real, including an expansivepromenade on the east side of El Camino Real south ofRavenswood Avenue and north of Oak Grove Avenue.Sensitive Infill and Living DowntownThe Urban Design Framework takes into account theexisting building character and pattern, and sensitivelyresponds to various locations and their respective characterand scale, with appropriate development controls. Theframework emphasizes mixed-use residential infill near andin downtown and the station area to enhance vibrancy andsupport transit use.Highly walkable, vibrant, and interconnected downtown(Seattle, Washington)Sensitive infill development responding to existing characterand scale (Santa Cruz, California)New buildings and streetscape will reinvigorate El CaminoReal corridor
  • 65. C9CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMExtended Mobility Options andAccessibilityThe Urban Design Framework concentrates development,particularly residential uses, in the train station area, bothcapitalizing on and supporting transit use. It expands thebicycle network and facilities. It continues convenient publicparking to support downtown businesses. The frameworkpursues designs that enhance accessibility ensuring publicspaces remain friendly and available to all.Development concentrated near and supporting transit anddowntown businesses (Pasadena, California)“A traffic-free space to sit, letchildren play, etc. Let coffeeshops expand outside intomini-parks”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 66. C10MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANC.4 SUB-AREA CONCEPTSThe Urban Design Framework establishes concepts for theplan area’s three principal sub-areas: El Camino Real; Station Area; and Downtown.It is important to emphasize that the descriptions belowpresent the broad concepts for the three areas. A fullerexplanation of proposed enhancements may be found inthe chapters following. It is also important to emphasizethat the concept sketches and bird’s-eye views, as shown,convey and illustrate key elements of the framework for thethree areas, and that the actual build-out will undoubtedlyvary from what is shown.El Camino RealThe Urban Design Framework for the El Camino Realcorridor recognizes the street’s role as both a local-servingand a regional-serving arterial roadway. The concept for ElCamino Real enhances overall street character, east-westconnection opportunities and pedestrian and bicyclist safetyand comfort. It recognizes and addresses the character ofvarious areas along the corridor. The concept of El CaminoReal embraces the following strategies. Provide continuity and consistency along thecorridor with coordinated streetscape elementsand regular street tree planting as privateimprovements take place. Improve pedestrian crossings at key intersections. Provide wider sidewalks and more comfortablewalking zones, where possible, within developmentsetbacks. Provide a continuous bike route along the length ofthe corridor, with the potential for a dedicated bikelane in future years. Establish development controls and guidelines forbuildings that address various conditions along thecorridor and enhance building character.It is important to emphasizethat the concept sketchesand bird’s-eye views,as shown, convey andillustrate key elements ofthe framework for the threeareas, and that the actualbuild-out will undoubtedlyvary from what is shown.Active public gathering spaces (San Jose, California)
  • 67. C11CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMEl Camino Real at Partridge looking northFigure C2. El Camino Real SouthMixed-use ResidentialEl Camino RealMixed-use ResidentialMixed-use CommercialHotelBurgess Park Linkage /Open Space Plaza /Retail NodeEl Camino Real EastPromenade
  • 68. C12MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANThe concept for El Camino Real includes streetscapeenhancements along the length of the corridor,including additional street trees, median enhancementsconsistent with existing median treatment and crosswalkenhancements to improve pedestrian crossing of thecorridor.El Camino Real NorthThe concept for El Camino Real north of Oak GroveAvenue allows for higher development intensities to supportviable investment opportunities while keeping developmentcharacter compatible with adjacent areas on both sidesof the corridor. On the east side, it enhances pedestriancomfort with wider sidewalks, using setback areas asneeded. On the west side, guidelines for new constructionrecognize and address the existing character of narrowparcels and minimal setbacks, introducing the characterof downtown to travelers from the north. The conceptencourages residential uses, particularly in those areasclosest to downtown and the station area.El Camino Real/Downtown/Station AreaAs El Camino Real intersects the downtown area betweenOak Grove Avenue and Menlo Avenue, the corridor’scharacter changes and reflects both the higher intensity ofthe station area and the vibrancy of downtown. The conceptfor this area, where vehicular traffic is already limited to fourtravel lanes, emphasizes the public realm, incorporatingwider sidewalks within setback areas, bike facilities andadditional street trees. Buildings have relatively minimalsetbacks and address the street, consistent with thecharacter of the historic downtown. With a higher intensityof uses, particularly residential, ground-floor retail benefitsand stimulates further pedestrian and sidewalk activity.Future developments will address various conditions alongthe corridor (Palo Alto, California)
  • 69. C13CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMEl Camino Real SouthThe southern part of El Camino Real offers substantialdevelopment opportunities as well as improved east-westconnectivity. The concept for El Camino Real south ofMenlo and Ravenswood Avenues recognizes the differentconditions on the west and east side of the corridor. On thewest side, development is compatible with the characterof adjacent residential neighborhoods, both in scale ofbuildings and transition of building massing to adjacentareas. Figure C2 illustrates the concept for enhancementsto the El Camino Real south area.On the east side, the concept for El Camino Real takesadvantage of larger parcel sizes and fewer property owners(including Stanford University) by incorporating publicly-accessible open spaces and a grade-separated pedestrian/bicycle linkage across the railroad tracks to Burgess Parkand Alma Street. As part of the redevelopment of theparcels, a continuous, expansive pedestrian promenadefronts El Camino Real from Ravenswood Avenue south tothe southern city limits. While allowing for higher intensityof development, including residential uses, standards anddesign guidelines modulate building massing, avoidingmonolithic projects and complementing Menlo Park’s small-town character.Rendering of Burgess Park Linkage/Open Space Plaza
  • 70. C14MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANStation AreaThe Urban Design Framework for the station areaestablishes a strong civic presence and statement at thetrain station, creates an important arrival point into MenloPark and emphasizes a higher intensity of uses. Theconcept’s Civic Plaza, associated with the Caltrain station,provides a central public space and vehicular pickup anddrop-off area. Its design offers an opportunity for a verticalcivic element (for example a sculpture, clock tower, fountainor flagpole) as a major landmark for visitors and railpassengers at the terminus of Santa Cruz Avenue. FigureC3 illustrates the concept for enhancements to the stationarea.Through enhanced sidewalks, the Civic Plaza engagesMenlo Center plaza and integrates connections todowntown and to the Civic Center. The connection acrossthe railroad tracks is grade-separated from the tracks,with its configuration dependent on the final configurationof the proposed high speed rail (i.e. underground orelevated). The linkage to the Civic Center continues alongan enhanced sidewalk to small plazas at the corner ofAlma Street and Ravenswood Avenue, which serves as agateway to both the station area and Civic Center.The concept for the station area includes new higher-intensity residential development, both to the west of therailroad tracks and along Alma Street to the east of therailroad tracks, to maximize transit use and to enhancethe station area and downtown activity and vibrancy.Development massing is modulated, providing a sensitivetransition to adjacent areas. Retail on ground floorsactivates key public spaces. Potential Bus Rapid Transit(BRT) service on El Camino Real enhances access to thearea and supports downtown businesses and rail service.“ECR needs far more publicspaces”- Workshop #3 Participant“Additional residential is good,especially with proximity totrain station and retail”- Workshop #3 Participant“The area around thetrain station needs to beexpanded as public spacein conjunction with transit-oriented housing”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 71. C15CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMEl Camino Real at Ravenswood looking northFigure C3. Station AreaRetail / Mixed-useMixed-useResidentialRetail / Mixed-useEl Camino RealMenlo Center PlazaMenlo CenterRavenswood GatewayAlma Street Civic WalkMixed-use ResidentialCivic PlazaCaltrain RailroadRight-of-Way
  • 72. C16MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANDowntownThe Urban Design Framework establishes a more vibrantand active downtown through enhanced pedestrianpathways, active gathering spaces and new mixed-use infilldevelopment, including residential uses. The concept fordowntown emphasizes the existing small-town character,ensuring a variety of public spaces and smaller-scalebuildings complementary to the existing character of thearea. The downtown concept celebrates Santa Cruz Avenue,enhances its character and functionality, and positions it for asuccessful future through wider, more comfortable sidewalksand a refreshed streetscape. Figures C4 and C5 illustrate theconcept for enhancements to downtown.Proposed improvements include the Santa Cruz AvenueCentral Plaza and market place, linked by a pedestrianpaseo on Chestnut Street. These enhancements create asense of village center - a “place du village” - in the heartof downtown, which establishes a new destination andreinforces downtown’s image and identity. At the center ofSanta Cruz Avenue, the Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plazaaccommodates vehicular circulation, although it may beclosed temporarily for special events. The market placeconcept, which describes a range of options including apavilion of small retail and food vendors, frames the Chestnutpaseo and functions in conjunction with the Santa CruzAvenue Central Plaza and the weekly Farmer’s Market.It also complements the established grocers in the area.Careful design and programming of such a facility, along withrequirements for trial implementation, will ensure that suchan amenity complements, and does not compete with, theFarmer’s Market and other food retailers downtown.Adding to the public space programming options, thedowntown concept envisions modifying the two parkingplazas west of the market place into “flex space,” whichaccommodates both parking, as exists today, and largertemporary events, such as the Farmer’s Market, eveningmovie screenings and summer art and community festivals.On the north side of downtown, two pocket parks provideplaces to sit and relax. They also serve as “gateways” to theSanta Cruz Avenue Central Plaza and center of downtown.A smaller network of improved sidewalks provides additionalaccess from public parking areas and connectivity betweenkey public spaces. Bicycle parking facilities at key locationsEnhanced character and functionality through wider, morecomfortable sidewalks and refreshed streetscape(Santa Cruz, California)Figure C4. Detail View of Downtown Public Space ProgramMarket PlaceParking Plaza AccessSanta Cruz AvenueCentral PlazaSouth Parking PlazasPedestrian LinkFlex Space/Public Parking“Interested in the outsidemarket idea, imagine thatas becoming retail spaceof some kind, analogous tohaving a Sunday market butall week long”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 73. C17CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMFigure C5. DowntownSanta Cruz Avenue at Curtis Santa Cruz Avenue from El Camino RealPotential Parking GarageFlex Space / Public ParkingSanta Cruz AvenueWidened SidewalkPotential ParkingGaragePocket ParksSanta Cruz Avenue Central PlazaPotential Parking GarageSanta Cruz AvenueMarket PlaceChestnut PaseoRetail / Mixed-useNote: The Specific Plan allows for up to two parking garages on downtown parking plazas
  • 74. C18MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANencourage use of this alternative transportation and accessmode to downtown.The concept for downtown continues to provide convenientshared parking at public parking plazas. To accommodatepublic space enhancements and to support downtownbusinesses and future parking demand, the concept locatesup to two parking garages, with one to one and a half levelsbelow-grade and up to four levels above, on a combinationof Parking Plazas 1, 2, and 3 north of Santa Cruz Avenue.Public parking continues at parking plazas south of SantaCruz Avenue.The downtown concept reinforces and enhances the overalltree canopy to provide shade and to mitigate for heat islandeffects. It retains the existing median trees in streetscapeenhancements of Santa Cruz Avenue.Central Plaza accomodating pedestrians, active uses andvehicular circulation (San Jose, California)“Create plazas that are usedfor music festivals. Moreopen space and specialtyretail.”- Workshop #3 Participant“My family and I would walkdowntown in the evening ifthere were a plaza wherepeople congregated…something to look at like afountain where kids couldplay”- Workshop #1 Participant“You could use the parkingplazas to create a small parkif you built a classy parkinggarage on a parking plaza”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 75. C19CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMC.5 SUSTAINABILITYIn addition to the Guiding Principles, Urban DesignFramework and Sub-Area Concepts, the Specific Plansupports and advances the principles of sustainability. Assummarized below, the Specific Plan incorporates into itsconcepts and guidelines sustainability strategies reflectedin the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Designfor Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) rating systemcredits, developed by the U.S. Green Building Council.These strategies are listed below. Reduce automobile dependence by improvingwalkability, bicycle facilities and access to publictransportation, and by providing a greater mix ofuses. Create a bicycle network and storage by proposingan enhanced bicycle network and facilitiesdowntown. Support housing and job proximity by proposing infilldevelopment and encouraging residential mixed-useopportunity for living and working downtown. Establish walkable streets by proposing widersidewalks, enhanced public spaces, overallstreetscape improvements and active ground-floorretail. Promote compact development by optimizingavailable land made through encouragement of newinfill development and higher intensity development. Reduce parking footprint by limiting the amountof space dedicated to surface parking, providingshared parking facilities and integrating parkingwithin development footprints. Encourage transit use by enhancing the train stationarea and increasing development intensity in thetransit station area. Establish tree lined and shaded streets bypreserving the extensive existing canopy wherepossible and replacing or adding to current cover aspublic or private improvements occur. Develop certified green buildings by requiringcertification for new buildings as well as retrofit ofexisting structures. Improve stormwater management with bestpractices and application of existing requirementsfor private developments as well as new publicspaces and parks. Reduce heat island effects by reducing the amountof land dedicated to surface parking lots or bymitigating with tree canopy or other shading device,and by advocating green roofs through developmentguidelines.
  • 76. C20MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANC.6 ILLUSTRATIVE PLAN AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMIt is important to emphasizethat the Illustrative Planindicates only one potentialdevelopment concept andthat the actual build-out willlikely vary from the initialprojection over 20 to 30years.The previous Sub-Area Concepts figures and the IllustrativePlan of Figure C6 depict how the plan area could potentiallybuild out over the next 20 to 30 years in conformance withthe Guiding Principles, Urban Design Framework andthe land use and development regulations and designguidelines of the Specific Plan. It is important to emphasizethat the Illustrative Plan indicates only one potentialdevelopment concept and that the actual build-out will likelyvary from the initial projection over 20 to 30 years.The sites shown as opportunity sites in the IllustrativePlan are derived from the sites shown as “proposeddevelopment” in the Phase I El Camino Real/DowntownVision Plan. Some locations were selected by virtue ofbeing vacant or underutilized, and others were chosento provide geographic diversity. As stated above, theIllustrative Plan shows how development could takeplace. It is highly unlikely that all opportunity sites shownin the Illustrative Plan will be the exact sites undergoingredevelopment in the plan area.As envisioned in the Illustrative Plan (Fig. C6, next page),the full build-out of the project area over time could result inthe following net new development: Residential 680 Units Retail Space 91,800 Square Feet Commercial Space 240,820 Square Feet Hotel 380 Rooms Parking Spaces 3,670 Spaces(net new public + private) Resident Population 1,537 New Residents Employment 1,357 New Jobs
  • 77. C21CHAPTER C PLAN PRINCIPLES, FRAMEWORK + PROGRAMCaltrainParkingP P PPPCaltrainParkingCCaCatalalttrainPParkinltrainPaarkiinngggPPPP PPP PPPPPPPPPPPPPPPALMAMIDDLEFIELDLAURELELCAMINOREALELCAMINOREALMIDDLEOAK GROVEISABELLAYALEENCINALPARKWATKINSSANTA CRUZVALPARAISOCOLLEGECREEKROBLEEMILIEMILLSGLENWOODPINECAMBRIDGEARBORFREMONTLIVE OAKRAVENSWOODALEJANDRAALTOLINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXUNIVERSITYPRINCETONHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCEEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEVICTORIALEONCLAIRELEEMILLIELANEALICEMARCUSSENSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEMAC BAINWAVERLEYPRIORMCCORMICKCORNELLSANANTONIOBAY LAURELBRITTONMOREYMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNREBECCADOYLEBLAKESHERWOODHOPKINSCURTISWESTFIELDMALONEYBARRONMICHAELSNEALON PARKJACK W. LYLEMEMORIAL PARKFREMONT PARKBURGESS PARKCIVIC CENTERKENWOODKENTSAXONCASTLECLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORHOMEWOODSURREYHOWARDELIZABETHCHATEAUFENNWOODVERSAILLESBASSETTCREEKPLSUSSEXMANORBLAKECREEKCURTISUNIVERSITYCRANEWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODRAVENSWOODROBLEARBORMENLOCURTISMixed Use In llMixed Use In llMixed Use / Residen alHotelMixed Use / Residen alMixed Use / Residen alDowntownEl Camino RealStation AreaCivic CenterExisting Buildings NotIncluded in Opportunity SitesPotential Opportunity SitesProposed / Approved ProjectsSurface Parking LotPublic Plazas / Open SpaceParksPlan Area BoundaryRailroadMenlo Park City LimitP0 200 400 FeetN O R T HFigure C6. Illustrative Plan
  • 78. C22MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANThis program summary reflects those developments shownin brown in the Illustrative Plan and labeled as opportunitysites. It excludes proposed and approved projects in theplan area as of November 2009, as shown in blue.The program summary is supported by this plan’s marketanalysis, as summarized in Chapter B “Plan Context”.The Illustrative Plan and program summary reflects thescale of development that could be developed under thisplan’s regulations and guidelines. The exact sites to beredeveloped, the timing of redevelopment and the finalprogram mix will be determined by a number of factors,including market conditions, construction costs, land costs(i.e. opportunity costs) and lot size and configuration,among others.
  • 79. D.1 OVERVIEWD.2 DOWNTOWND.3 STATION AREAD.4 EL CAMINO REALD.5 GENERAL GUIDELINESD.6 SUSTAINABLE PRACTICESPUBLIC SPACED.D2D8D28D37D47D48
  • 80. D2MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAND.1 OVERVIEWAs introduced in the Urban Design Framework in ChapterC, the Specific Plan proposes a comprehensive publicspace and pedestrian/bicycle network that enhancescommunity life and establishes safe and attractivepedestrian, bicycle and vehicular connections throughout.Figure D1 illustrates the enhanced network of pedestrian-and bicycle-friendly linkages between downtown, the stationarea, the Civic Center, and along and across El CaminoReal.The key unifying concepts for public space in the projectarea include: Connected + Walkable Downtown and StationArea; Green + Shaded Downtown and Station Area; Bicycle Network + Access Downtown and StationArea; and El Camino Real + East-West Connectivity.This section also includes standards, general guidelinesand sustainable practices for streetscape and publicspace improvements in the downtown, station areaand along El Camino Real. For each improvement(e.g. Santa Cruz Avenue), the section provides a shortoverarching description of the improvement, the intent ofthe improvement, its character and specific elements, andapplicable standards and guidelines. These descriptions,standards and guidelines are to be used by those makingpublic improvements in the area, including public agenciesand private property owners.Comprehensive public space with generous pedestrianamenities (Vancouver, Canada)
  • 81. Civic CenterALMAMIDDLEFIELDLAURELELCAMINOREALMIDDLEOAK GROVEISABELLAYALEENCINALPARKWATKINSSANTA CRUZVALPARAISOCOLLEGECREEKROBLEEMILIEMILLSGLENWOODPINECAMBRIDGEARBORFREMONTLIVE OAKRAVENSWOODALEJANDRAALTOLINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXUNIVERSITYPRINCETONHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCEEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEVICTORIALEONCLAIRELEEMILLIELANEALICEMARCUSSENSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEMAC BAINWAVERLEYPRIORMCCORMICCORNELLSANANTONIOBAY LAURELMOREYMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNREBECCADOYLEBLAKESHERWOODHOPKINSWESTFIELDMALONEYBARRONMICHAELSKENWOODKENTAXONASTLECLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORHOMEWOODSURREYHOWARDELIZABETHCHATEAUFENNWOODVERSAILLESBASSETTCREEKPLSUSSEXMANORBLAKECREEKCURTISUNIVERSITYCRANEWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODRAVENSWOODROBLEARBORMENLOCURTISALMAMIDDLEFIELDLAURELELCAMINOREALMIDDLEOAK GROVEISABELLAYALEENCINALPARKWATKINSSANTA CRUZVALPARAISOCOLLEGECREEKROBLEEMILIEMILLSGLENWOODPINECAMBRIDGEARBORFREMONTLIVE OAKRAVENSWOODALEJANDRAALTOLINFIELDFELTONHARVARDARDENBURGESSJOHNSONPARTRIDGENOELALLEYGARWOODLENNOXUNIVERSITYPRINCETONHOOVERMERRILLSPRUCEEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEVICTORIALEONCLAIRELEEMILLIELANEALICEMARCUSSENSTONE PINEWERTHFLORENCEMAC BAINWAVERLEYPRIORMCCORMICCORNELLSANANTONIOBAY LAURELMOREYMENLODOUGLASMOULTONBUCKTHORNREBECCADOYLEBLAKESHERWOODHOPKINSWESTFIELDMALONEYBARRONMICHAELSKENWOODKENTAXONASTLECLAREMONTCHERRYRYANSFORESTMALLETTUDORHOMEWOODSURREYHOWARDELIZABETHCHATEAUFENNWOODVERSAILLESBASSETTCREEKPLSUSSEXMANORBLAKECREEKCURTISUNIVERSITYCRANEWAVERLEYARBORSHERWOODRAVENSWOODROBLEARBORMENLOCURTISBurgess ParkFremontParkNealon ParkJack W. LyleMemorialParkProposed ParkPlaza / Paseo SidewalkPromenade / CrossingMarket PlaceProject Area BoundaryPotential Railroad Linear ParkImproved/Enhanced PedestrianCrossing on El Camino RealPublic ParkingMajor East-West ConnectionMenlo Park City BoundaryExisting ParkFlexible Space / Public ParkingPrivatePublicly-accessibleEl Camino Real East PromonadePPNode/GatewayOpen Space BreakFlexible Space /Public ParkingMarket Place andChestnut Street PaseoSanta Cruz AvenueStreetscapeImprovements / WidenedSidewalks + DecreasedOn-street ParkingCivic Plaza / Entry FeaturePotential Linear ParkPlaza at Menlo CenterAlma Street Civic WalkGateway / Linkage to Civic CenterBurgess Park Linkage / PlazaEl Camino Real East PromenadeOpen Space BreaksP PPPP P PPocket ParksCentral PlazaEl Camino Real East PromenadeYY0 200 400 FeetD3CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEFigure D1. Public Space Framework
  • 82. Figure D2. Connected + Walkable Downtown and Station Area ConceptCivic PlazaCivic CenterStationAreaCentral PlazaPaseoMarket PlacePocket ParksFlexible Space/Public ParkingMenlo Center PlazaFremont ParkSanta Cruz AvenueElCaminoRealUniversityUniversityAlmaStreetRavenswoodDowntownD4MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANConnected + Walkable Downtown andStation AreaThe Specific Plan establishes a rich, unifying andcoordinated network of enhanced sidewalks, a pedestrianpaseo (a public path designed for walking), plazas andparks, connecting Fremont Park to the west to the stationarea and Civic Center to the east (See Figure D2).Connected and walkable downtown (San Francisco,California)
  • 83. Figure D3. Green + Shaded Downtown and Station Area ConceptCivic CenterCentral PlazaPaseoMarket PlacePocket ParksFlexible Space/Public Parking Menlo Center PlazaFremont ParkSanta Cruz AvenueElCaminoRealUniversityUniversityAlmaStreetRavenswoodStation AreaCivic PlazaShaded ParkingShaded ParkingShaded ParkingDowntownD5CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEGreen + Shaded Downtown andStation AreaIn certain areas of downtown and the station area, such asin the median of Santa Cruz Avenue, the existing tree coveris strong and mature. However, in other areas, such as sidestreets and parking plazas, the tree cover is inconsistent.The Specific Plan recognizes the quality of the existingtree cover and proposes to build upon it with new trees,creating substantial shaded pathways to encourage walkingand completing tree canopy or shade where possible (SeeFigure D3).Green and shaded downtown (Victoria, British Columbia)“(Trees) are a traffic-calmingmeasure, they add to thereduction of GHG emissionsand they contribute to apedestrian scale”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 84. Figure D4. Bicycle Network + Access Downtown and Station Area ConceptD6MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANBicycle Network + Access Downtownand Station AreaThe Specific Plan builds upon, connects and expands thebicycle network outlined in the Menlo Park ComprehensiveBicycle Development Plan, 2005, creating a denser bicyclenetwork in the downtown area with links to the station areaand El Camino Real corridor. It proposes bicycle parkingthroughout downtown (See Figure D4 and Chapter F“Circulation” for more detail).Bicycle network and access downtownCivic CenterCentral PlazaClass II Bike LaneClass III Bike RoutePaseoMarket PlacePocket ParksFlexible Space/Public ParkingFuture Class II /Minimum Class IIIFuture Class II /Minimum Class IIIFutureClass II /MinimumClass IIIMenlo Center PlazaFremontParkSanta Cruz AvenueElCaminoRealUniversityUniversityAlmaStreetRavenswoodStationAreaCivicPlazaClassIII BikeRouteDowntown
  • 85. D7CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEEl Camino Real + East-WestConnectionsWhile opportunities exist to enhance pedestrian crossingsof El Camino Real along the entire corridor, the greatestopportunities for both north-south and east-westconnections exist on the east side of El Camino Real southof Ravenswood Avenue, an area principally owned bythree entities, including Stanford University. The SpecificPlan establishes guidelines for an expansive promenadealong El Camino Real and several east-west breaks, witha pedestrian/bicycle connection across the rail tracksbetween Middle Avenue and Burgess Park (See FigureD5). The plan also locates another prominent pedestrian/bicycle connection across the railroad tracks at the easternterminus of Santa Cruz Avenue, connecting downtown, thestation area and Civic Center with one another.Figure D5. El Camino Real South ConceptEl Camino RealEast PromenadeFrontageBreaksBurgess Park Linkage/Open Space PlazaCivic PlazaBurgessParkCivicCenterStationAreaRavenswoodBurgessSanta Cruz AvenueNealon ParkMenloMiddleCambridgeHarvardCollegeWillowElCaminoRealAlmaStreetPartridge
  • 86. Figure D6. Downtown Public Space Plan with Major Public Space ImprovementsCaltrainParking5 level parkinggarageparkinggaragePPPPPP5 level parkinggarage LAURELELCAMINOREALSANTA CRUZROBLEMILLSLIVE OAKJOHNSONNOELALLEYUNIVERSITYHOOVERMERRILLEVELYNROSEOAKCRANEMILLIEMENLODOYLECURTISMALONEYFREMONT PARKCIVIC CENTERCRYANSELIZABETHBLAKEUNIVERSITYCRANERAVENSWOODROBLEMENLOCURTISChestnutPaseoMarket PlaceFlexible Space /Public ParkingPocket ParksPotentialParking GaragePotentialParking GarageCrane StreetconnectorPedestrian LinkCivic Plaza inStation AreaSanta CruzAvenue CentralPlazaSidewalksParkingNorthPathwaysSanta Cruz AvenueChestnutStreetConnectorD8MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAND.2 DOWNTOWNThe Specific Plan establishes a comprehensive network ofpublic spaces downtown that enhance the civic and sociallife of the community and support downtown businesses.Because there is no existing civic plaza or vacant publicland, the Specific Plan relies on existing public rights-of-way and public parking plazas to create much-needed civicand social spaces. The plan establishes a recognizablecenter in downtown, a central nexus of public spaces andlocus of activity -- a Central Plaza -- at the intersection ofSanta Cruz Avenue and Chestnut Street. This central area,accompanied by an improved streetscape and widenedsidewalks on Santa Cruz Avenue, elevates the character ofdowntown’s “main street.” In combination with enhancedpedestrian linkages, activity nodes and pocket parks, theimprovements create a comprehensive, connected networkof civic and social spaces.Illustrated in Figures D6 and D7, the public spaceimprovements in downtown consist of: Santa Cruz Avenue Sidewalks; Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza; Chestnut Paseo; Market Place; South Parking Plazas Pedestrian Link; Flex Space/Parking (Parking Plazas 5 and 6); Crane Street and Chestnut Street/Oak GroveAvenue Pocket Parks; and Other Street/Alley Improvements.
  • 87. D9CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEFigure D7. Concept Plan of Key Public Spaces DowntownChestnut/OakGrove PocketParkChestnut StreetConnectorParking NorthPathwaysPotentialParkingGarageTraderJoe’sAreaClosed toTrafficSanta Cruz AvenueCentral Plaza (opento traffic, with optionto close to traffic forcommunity events)Flexible SpacePublic ParkingFarmer’s MarketLocationCurtisChestnutSanta Cruz AveMenlo Ave.Oak GroveCraneCraneChestnutPaseoMarketPlaceSouthParkingPlazasPedestrianLinkCranePocket ParkPotentialParkingGarageCrane StreetConnectorPotentialParkingGarage
  • 88. D10MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANWidened sidewalks providing ample space for sitting andoutdoor dining (Santa Cruz, California)Santa Cruz Avenue SidewalksThe Specific Plan calls for improving the pedestrianrealm on Santa Cruz Avenue, increasing street activityand enhancing the image of downtown by wideningsidewalks, providing ample space for informal gathering,sitting and outdoor dining and introducing new streetscapeimprovements. The plan establishes sidewalk functionalzones, ensuring a pedestrian clear zone and more pleasantand functional sidewalks. It redistributes the right-of-waybetween traffic lanes, on-street parking and sidewalks inorder to focus on an enhanced pedestrian experience whilestill accommodating vehicular circulation and on-streetparking.Intent Encourage walking and increase levels of streetactivity with wider, more functional sidewalks. Renew the image of downtown with updatedstreetscape elements.Character Tree canopy with clear visibility to storefronts. Median trees retained, which are iconic features ofdowntown.Improvements Retain existing median trees and integrate theminto new streetscape design. Replace diagonal parking with parallel parking, anduse reclaimed width to widen sidewalks. On the side with diagonal parking, replace thediagonal parking with parallel parking, narrowtravel lane and widen sidewalk. On the side with parallel parking, retain parallelparking, narrow travel lane and widen sidewalk. Integrate street trees into on-street parking zones,particularly where sidewalks are narrowest.Existing Santa Cruz Avenue sidewalk (Menlo Park, California)“Encourage restaurants andshops to utilize sidewalks andstorefronts for public spacegathering, dining, resting”- Workshop #1 Participant“I would absolutely tradeparking spaces on SantaCruz and El Camino forwell-designed parkinggarages with safe, pleasantpedestrian paths!”- Workshop #1 Participant
  • 89. D11CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACE12’ wide sidewalk (Palo Alto, California)Illustration of 19’ wide sidewalk Upgrade streetscape elements, such as benches,seating, trash receptacles, newspaper racks,paving, and street lighting. Implement and evaluate Santa Cruz Avenuesidewalk improvements on a trial basis, beforemoving forward with a permanent installation. Thetrial period shall be the basis for the review andconsideration of a permanent installation.StandardsD.2.01 Streetscape improvements on Santa Cruz Avenueshall retain existing median trees to the extent possible.GuidelinesStreetscape improvements on Santa Cruz Avenue shouldinclude the following:D.2.02 Provide widest sidewalk possible while retaining on-street parallel parking.D.2.03 Introduce safe pedestrian crossings by usingelements such as marked crossings, clear signage,supplementary lighting, and curb extensions.D.2.04 Introduce street trees in parking zone to maximizesidewalk width, particularly in those areas where a 12 footminimum sidewalk dimension cannot be achieved.D.2.05 Coordinate with streetscape improvements in thestation area.D.2.06 Consider the following as criteria for streetscapefurnishing selection: timeless, functional, easy maintenance,durability and sustainability.D.2.07 Achieve safe lighting for vehicular circulation andcomfortable lighting for pedestrians; consider additionaldecorative lighting for nightscape.“I like the wider sidewalks onSanta Cruz”- Workshop #3 ParticipantRenewed/memorable image for downtown (San Jose,California)
  • 90. D12MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANSidewalk improvements on Santa Cruz Avenue shouldinclude the following:D.2.08 Organize sidewalks according to best practicefunctional zones: frontage zone (if space allows), pedestrianthru zone, furnishings zone and curb/parking zone.Illustrated in Figure D8, each zone should accommodate aspecific function.D.2.09 Incorporate a frontage zone, if space allows. Afrontage zone lies between the adjacent building andpedestrian thru zone, assuming the sidewalk dimensionallows for it, and it may accommodate outdoor seating andplanting.D.2.10 Incorporate a pedestrian thru zone, which allows forunimpeded pedestrian circulation, free of all obstruction,including utility boxes and fences for outdoor dining. Thepedestrian thru zone should have a minimum width of 12feet.D.2.11 Incorporate a furnishings zone, which provides abuffer between the pedestrian thru zone and street traffic.The furnishings zone accommodates public amenities suchas street trees, street lamps, benches, bike racks, kiosks,news racks, mailboxes, transit shelters, public art, plantings,utility poles and utility boxes. In some cases, the furnishingszone is also used for outdoor seating and dining by shops,cafes and restaurants. The furnishings zone should have aminimum width dimension of 5 feet.D.2.12 Incorporate a curb/parking zone, which is theinterface between the roadway and sidewalk andaccommodates vehicular parking (See Figures D9 andD10).D.2.13 Optimize flexibility and space for outdoor seating.D.2.14 Avoid cluttering of sidewalk with excessive orencumbering streetscape elements.D.2.15 Preserve good visibility of retail storefronts.Sidewalk organized according to best practice functionalzones: building edge, pedestrian thru zone, furniture zoneand curb / parking zone (San Jose, California)Figure D8. Sidewalk section. The qualities of the sidewalkmay vary, but all should exhibit certain characteristics,including a Furnishings Zone, Pedestrian Thru Zone, andBuilding Frontage Zone (where possible)Good visibility of retail storefronts (San Jose,California)BuildingFrontageZonePedestrianThru ZoneSidewalkCurbParkingZoneFurnishingZone
  • 91. D13CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEChestnutSectionCutCurtis10’ 30’ 60’Figure D10. Concept Plan of Santa Cruz Avenue with Major Streetscape Improvements. This plan does not feature the Central Plaza described inthe next section.Figure D9. Section through Santa Cruz Avenue, showing two traffic lanes with parallel parking, median trees retained, diagonal parking removed,one moderately-sized sidewalk and one wide sidewalk75’19’ 11’12’ 5’11’ 8’ 11’8’ 7’Pedestrian Thru Zone12’Pedestrian Thru Zone5’8’11’7’11’8’11’
  • 92. D14MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANSanta Cruz Avenue Central PlazaThe Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza provides a centralpublic space on Santa Cruz Avenue between ChestnutStreet and Crane Street. In this area, the street remainsopen to traffic but on-street parking is removed, providingfor wider sidewalks. The street surface is raised to be flushwith the sidewalks, and a unified pavement treatment frombuilding to building across the street creates a seamlesspublic space. On special occasions, this portion of SantaCruz Avenue can be closed to traffic for events or festivals(see Figures D11 and D12).Intent Provide downtown with a new, central anddistinctive public plaza located in the centralportion of Santa Cruz Avenue.Character Plaza for public gathering and ample seating. Distinctive enhanced treatment. Flexible use with vehicular circulation or closed totraffic for special events or festivals.Improvements Create a differentiated and enhanced pedestrian-oriented treatment on Santa Cruz Avenue betweenCrane and Chestnut Streets. Eliminate on-street parking in this area to createexpansive sidewalks. Implement and evaluate Santa Cruz AvenueCentral Plaza improvements on a trial basis, beforemoving forward with a permanent installation. Thetrial period shall be the basis for the review andconsideration of a permanent installation.Active public plaza, a place for public gathering with ampleseating (Emeryville, California)No on-street parking, expansive sidewalks and flush surface(San Jose, California)“Create plazas that are usedfor music festivals. Moreopen space and specialtyretail.”- Workshop #1 Participant
  • 93. D15CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEIllustration of Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza
  • 94. D16MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANGuidelinesThe design of the Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza shouldinclude the following:D.2.16 Afford flexible use.D.2.17 Allow for the area to be open or closed to traffic.D.2.18 Provide a unifying overall treatment from buildingedge to building edge.D.2.19 Consider a flush surface by raising the roadway tosidewalk level, creating a seamless, walkable space whilealso serving as a traffic calming device.D.2.20 Incorporate and ensure continuity of the pedestrianthru zone as established for the length of Santa CruzAvenue.D.2.21 Consider incorporating additional landscapingmaterials within widened sidewalk areas.D.2.22 Consider a civic art installation.“Add site-specific sculptural /architectural focus elementssuch as a thematic waterfeature”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 95. D17CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEFigure D11. Section through Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza with Median Trees PreservedFigure D12. Concept Plan of the Santa Cruz Avenue Central PlazaPLAZA - 250’19’11’11’27’7’19’ 11’ 11’ 27’7’75’PLAZAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ - 250’9999999999199111111119’9’9’9’’9’19’19’919’9’19’1919’19’19’19’19’19’19191919’19’9’19’’9’919’9’19’199’1919’19’19’19’19’19’19’199’1999919919199999999999919999999199999191999919919199999999991999919199991999191999191919199191919919991999199999199919199999199111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111’11’11’11’11’11’11’11’1111’1’1’11’11’11’11’11’11’11’11’11’11’1’11’11’1’1’11’11’11’111’1’1’1’’11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111’11’’’’’’’’11’11’1’’’’’’11’1’’’1111’11’11’’11’1’11’11’’11’111’’’11’1111’’1111’111’’1’1111’1111’111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111117272727’2727’27’27’727’7’’27’27’’27’27’’27’7’’27’27’27’’7’7’’’’’’7’7’27’27’27’7’7’7’’7’27’7’7’’’’’27’27’727’2727’27’’’7’’’727’27’27’’’7’7’27227’’27’27’27’’’7’277’27’27’27’’7’27’2727272727277777272772727277727277727272727777727777277772772727727777777727777777772777277277277272772727277722727777277272727277727272727277722222222222222222222222222222222222222222222’’’’’’’’’7’’77’’’’’’’’’7’’’77’7’7’’7’7’7’777’7’7’7’7’77’7’77’7’77’7’7’’7’7’7’7777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777777710’ 30’ 60’SectionCut
  • 96. D18MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANChestnut PaseoThe Specific Plan proposes to convert Chestnut Streetsouth of Santa Cruz Avenue into a pedestrian paseo,extending the Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza experiencesouth toward the market place and flex space/parking area(discussed below). Closed to regular traffic, the paseoprovides space for temporary vendors, such as jewelry orcrafts sellers, benches, additional landscaping and a flushsurface for pedestrian comfort and great space functionality.The paseo works synergistically with the Farmer’s Market,adjacent ground floor retail and the market place, and itoffers a unique environment away from motor vehicles.The paseo remains accessible to emergency vehicles andallows access to the Parking Plazas 6 and 7, at the southend of Chestnut Street (See Figure D13).Intent Create a pedestrian-only public space connectingSanta Cruz Avenue with the market place and theflex space/parking area.Character Pedestrian-only street with flush surface andenhanced landscaping.Improvements Close Chestnut Street to regular vehicular trafficbetween Santa Cruz Avenue and the southdriveway of the parking plazas. Enhance streetscape character. Implement and evaluate Chestnut Paseoimprovements on a trial basis, before movingforward with a permanent installation. The trialperiod shall be the basis for the review andconsideration of a permanent installation.Pedestrian-only Paseo (Paris, France)
  • 97. Flexible SpacePublic ParkingFarmer’s MarketLocationD19CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEStandardsD.2.23 Allow for emergency vehicular access throughout.GuidelinesThe design of the Chestnut Paseo should include thefollowing:D.2.24 Allow for flexible use.D.2.25 Provide a unifying overall treatment, with enhancedpaving, the width of the right-of-way.D.2.26 Provide a flush surface by raising the roadway tosidewalk level, creating a seamless, walkable space.D.2.27 Consider additional landscaping and a civic artinstallation.D.2.28 Consider providing additional shade with permanentlight tensile structure (i.e. structured, open-air, tent-likestructure).D.2.29 Coordinate treatment with Santa Cruz AvenueCentral Plaza and market place.Figure D13. Concept Plan of Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza and the Chestnut PaseoMarket PlaceChestnut PaseoSanta CruzAvenue CentralPlazaSouthParkingPlazasPedestrianLinkSaSSSSSaSaSaSaSaSaSaSaSaSSSSSSSaSSaSSSSSaSSSSaSSSaSSSSaaSSSSaaaaSSaaaSSaaaaaSaaaaaSSSSSSSSSSSSSaSSSSaSSSSSSSSSSSSSaSSSaSSSSaSaSaSSSSaaSSS nntnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa CCCCCCrCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC uzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAvenueChChChChChCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCeseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeentntnnntnnnnnnnnnnttuttutttttttuttttttttutttttttttttttttttttttttuttCurtisCrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrannnnnnneeeeeeeeeeee
  • 98. D20MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANMarket PlaceDescribed in more detail in Chapter E “Land Use +Building Character”, the market place concept reinforcesand activates this area as the center of downtown, inconjunction with the Central Plaza, Chestnut Paseo andflex space (described below), and increases foot trafficfor downtown retailers. It complements and does notcompete with the existing Sunday Farmer’s Market, and itcan reinforce the Farmers Market’s identity in Menlo Parkand the region. The market place can be designed witha range of uses, such as small-to-mid-sized retailers andrestaurants, to be determined through a review processby the City. In particular, consideration should be givento existing Menlo Park merchants for the market place.Located at Parking Plazas 6 and 7, framing the ChestnutPaseo, the market place concept embodies a flexible ideaof its physical design with multiple potential scenarios: aplaza expanding the Paseo; a pavilion structure creatinga covered and shaded plaza for a portion of the Farmer’sMarket or other events, such as a band shell for concerts;kiosks, or small enclosed building(s) providing permanentstalls for vendors. Such a structure or building couldstraddle and cover a portion of the Chestnut Paseo.Whether using structured, open-air, tent-like or otherfeatures, the market place should consider ways to providefor flexible spaces. Part of Parking Plaza 6 is currentlyunder private ownership, so the City will need to eitherreach agreement with the current owner for alternate use ofthis space, or potentially acquire the parcel.Intent Reinforce and activate the area as the center ofdowntown, in conjunction with the Central Plaza,the Chestnut Paseo and the flex space/parkingarea. Complement the existing Sunday Farmer’s Marketand nearby Trader Joe’s and Draeger’s markets.Character Small scale pavilions or buildings for permanentor temporary vendors or sheltered plaza related tothe Farmer’s Market and flex space/parking areaactivities.Outdoor market (San Francisco, California)Local vendors in market space (Vancouver, Canada)Street market (Portland, Oregon)“Like to see more street fair-type vendors on weekends”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 99. D21CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEImprovements Construct sheltered plaza and/or small scalepavilions or buildings. Implement and evaluate the Market Placeimprovements on a trial basis, before movingforward with a permanent installation. The trialperiod shall be the basis for the review andconsideration of a permanent installation.StandardsThe design of the market place shall include the following.D.2.30 Preserve and integrate into the concept the existingheritage oak tree.D.2.31 Retain automobile access to and from ParkingPlazas 6 and 7, toward the south end of Chestnut Street.D.2.32 Provide clear space as needed for emergencyvehicles.GuidelinesD.2.33 Programming of the market place should contributeto the Farmer’s Market identity and presence in the region.D.2.34 The market place improvement could be aroofed structure, an enclosed building(s), an extensionof the paseo or a combination of the above. It could bedisconnected structures or other improvements along eitherside of the Chestnut Paseo, or it could potentially straddlethe Paseo. The market place could have an approximatesize of 4,000 square feet.The design of the market place should include the following.D.2.35 Be oriented to activate the Chestnut Paseo,Farmer’s Market and flex space during events.D.2.36 Consider establishing a visual landmark from SantaCruz Avenue and the parking plazas.D.2.37 Coordinate treatment with the Chestnut Paseo andadjacent flex space/parking area.Public market building (Vancouver, Canada)Heritage oak tree off Chestnut Street to be preserved (MenloPark, California)“Interested in the outsidemarket idea, imagine thatas becoming retail spaceof some kind, analogous tohaving a Sunday market butall week long”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 100. D22MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANSouth Parking Plazas Pedestrian LinkAlong the south sides of the buildings on Santa CruzAvenue on the northern edge of Parking Plazas 4 through8, a promenade provides a safe and welcoming pedestrianpathway, connecting the parking plazas with rear storeentries, the market place, the Chestnut Paseo andother streets leading to Santa Cruz Avenue (See FigureD14). Such an improvement encourages people to walkdowntown rather than drive and park in multiple places.In some cases, the pedestrian promenade replacesexisting parking spaces. In cases with existing diagonalor perpendicular spaces, proposed improvements includethe pedestrian promenade and parallel parking in placeof diagonal or perpendicular spaces. (See Chapter F“Circulation” for the quantity of spaces affected).Intent Create a safe and comfortable east-westpedestrian pathway on the northern edge ofParking Plazas 4 through 8, connecting the parkingplazas to rear business entrances, key publicspaces and streets.Character Tree-lined, well-lit promenade.Improvements Establish a continuous shaded pathway on thesouth side of the buildings bordering south parkingplazas. Adjust parking layout to accommodate the newpathway.Pedestrian promenade (Portland, Oregon)
  • 101. D23CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEGuidelinesThe design of the pedestrian promenade should include thefollowing:D.2.38 Be continuous between University Drive andDoyle Street, incorporating pedestrian crosswalks acrossintersected streets.D.2.39 Incorporate a 6-foot clear minimum pedestrian thruzone.D.2.40 Be tree-lined for shade and properly lit for pedestriansafety.D.2.41 Coordinate style and materials with the ChestnutPaseo.D.2.42 Consider special paving treatment, including publicart inlays or other creative use of the surface as well assustainable materials such as permeable paving.D.2.43 Consider special treatment of trash bins, utilities,etc. to create a more pleasing environment.Figure D14. Concept Plan of South Parking Plazas Pedestrian LinkMarket PlaceChestnut PaseoSouth ParkingPlazas PedestrianLinkSanta CruzAvenue CentralPlazaRendering of South Parking Plazas Pedestrian LinkSaSaSaSSSaSaSaSaSaSaSaSSSaSSaSaSaSaSaSSSaSaSSaSaSaSaaaSSaSaSSSaSSaSSSSaSSSSSaSaSSaSaSSSSSSSaSSSSaSaSSaSSaSSSaSSaSSaaSaSSaSSaaaaSaSSSSaaSSSaaaaSSSSaaSaSaaSSSSSSSaannntnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa CCCCCCCCCrCrCCrCCCCrCCCCrCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCrCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC uzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAvenueChChhChChChhhhChChhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhChChhhhChhChCCCCCCCCCCCCCCsssssssssssssssssssssssssesesetntnntnttttttttttutututtttuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuCurtisCrCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCaneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeFlexible SpacePublic ParkingFarmer’s MarketLocation
  • 102. D24MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANFlex Space/Parking Area (ParkingPlazas 5 and 6)Due to their size and configuration, downtown parkingplazas offer opportunities for public assembly and events.They are also major paved, impervious areas that could beimproved with new sustainable practices. The Specific Planproposes modifying and improving Parking Plazas 5 and 6,two surface parking lots south of Santa Cruz Avenue andadjacent to the Chestnut Paseo and market place, to allowfor more flexibility in their usage. These flexible spaceswould continue to provide parking during most times,but they would also be able to stage special communityevents, such as festivals, movie screening and the existingFarmer’s Market.Intent Improve treatment of Parking Plazas 5 and 6,while ensuring they continue to serve as parkinglots, to create a flexible programmable space toaccommodate varied types of events in downtown.Character Flexible/multiuse landscaped parking plazaincorporating sustainable practices.Improvements Enhance treatment of Parking Plazas 5 and 6to create a flexible, programmable space forcommunity events, including the Farmer’s Market. Use sustainable design strategies.Flexible parking plaza offering opportunities for publicassembly and events
  • 103. D25CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEGuidelinesThe design for improvements to Parking Plazas 5 and 6should include the following:D.2.44 Optimize layout and functionality, includingintegration of the portion of Crane Street between theparking plazas and the pedestrian promenade on thenorthern edge of the parking plazas.D.2.45 Preserve existing trees to the extent possible.D.2.46 Provide the same number of parking spaces (ormore) as exist today to the extent possible.D.2.47 Consider opportunities for sustainable practicessuch as augmenting the permeability of surfaces, mitigatingthe heat island effect and producing renewable energy.D.2.48 Consider creative lighting of the space, such asin-ground lights, to create identity and unique evening/nightscape experience.Unique evening/nightscape experience (Baltimore, Maryland)Sustainable design of parking lot using permeable surfaces(Baltimore, Maryland)Parking plaza designed according to sustainable practicessuch as augmenting the permeability of surfaces, mitigatingheat island effect and producing renewable energy (Malmo,Sweden)
  • 104. D26MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANCrane Street and Chestnut Street/OakGrove Avenue Pocket ParksTwo pocket parks serve as an alternate destination forpedestrians, both local residents and downtown shoppers.They extend the palette of downtown public spaces withtwo intimate small green open spaces for respite andgathering. Their locations function as small gateways todowntown from the north side parking areas and streets.Intent Provide smaller, more intimate open spaces northof Santa Cruz Avenue as part of downtown’s publicspace network.Character Green and shaded, predominantly softscape,seating areas.Improvements Provide two small parks north of Santa CruzAvenue: one on Crane Street and one at the cornerof Chestnut Street and Oak Grove Avenue. Implement and evaluate Pocket Parkimprovements on a trial basis, before movingforward with a permanent installation. The trialperiod shall be the basis for the review andconsideration of a permanent installation.GuidelinesThe design of the pocket parks should include the following.D.2.49 Convey a ‘soft’ character with ample use ofsoftscape materials (e.g., grass and planting).D.2.50 Provide shade and seating.D.2.51 Consider use of seasonal plant materials and publicart installation.D.2.52 Emphasize safety and comfort for all users.Smaller, more intimate open spaces (Palo Alto, California)Green and shaded (softscape) seating areas (Boston,Massachusetts)
  • 105. D27CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEOther Street / Alley ImprovementsOn the north side of Santa Cruz Avenue, the Specific Plancalls for enhanced and welcoming connections betweenthe proposed parking garages, pocket parks, Santa CruzAvenue and the Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza. Theseimprovements consist of the Chestnut Street connector,Crane Street connector and parking north pathways.Intent Provide clear and comfortable connections fromthe proposed parking garages and pocket parks onthe north side of downtown to Santa Cruz Avenueand the Central Plaza.Character Tree-lined pathways/sidewalks.Improvements Widen and enhance the Chestnut Street westsidewalk and the Crane Street east sidewalkleading to the pocket parks. Enhance the pathways and crosswalks connectingthe proposed parking garages to the ChestnutStreet and Crane Street connectors.GuidelinesThe design of the pedestrian connectors should include thefollowing:D.2.53 Incorporate an 8-foot clear pedestrian zone.D.2.54 Be tree-lined for shade and properly lit for pedestriansafety.D.2.55 Provide safe crosswalks on Chestnut and CraneStreets for continuity of the network of connections.D.2.56 Include way-finding signage.D.2.57 Coordinate treatment with pocket parks and overallstreetscape palette for Santa Cruz Avenue.Clear and comfortable connections from street to pocketparks (San Luis Obispo, California)Enhanced and welcoming connections for parking northpathways (Mountain View, California)Wide, tree-lined pathways/sidewalks connecting facilities(Portland, Oregon)
  • 106. D28MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAND.3 STATION AREAThe Specific Plan focuses on improving the Caltrain Stationarea as a major arrival and departure point within MenloPark. The plan establishes a central Civic Plaza at theintersection of the east end of Santa Cruz Avenue and theCaltrain Station as a unifying public space that organizessurrounding spaces and pedestrian and vehicular traffic.Other major public improvements in this area include MenloCenter Plaza, Alma Street Civic Walk and RavenswoodGateway, all of which support the centrality of the CivicPlaza and create stronger connections to the plaza anddowntown.One significant unknown is the future configuration of theproposed high speed rail line (HSR) within the Caltrainright-of-way. The Specific Plan’s public space concept forthe station area is meant to be flexible, accommodating anyrail configuration, either below-grade, at grade, or elevated.Illustrated in Figure D15, the public space improvements inthe station area consist of: Civic Plaza; Menlo Center Plaza; Alma Street Civic Walk; Ravenswood Gateway; and Railroad Tracks/High Speed Rail Open Space.Central Civic Plaza used to organize surrounding spacesand pedestrian and vehicular traffic (Los Angeles, California)
  • 107. D29CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEFigure D15. Concept Plan of Station AreaMenlo Park ExistingStationOak GrovePedestrian LinkageMenlo Center PlazaRavenswoodGatewayStation Area CivicPlaza and East-WestPedestrian LinkagesFinal crossingconfiguration willdepend on finalhigh speed railconfiguration.“Civic Walk” Linkageto Civic CenterPotential Mixed-useDevelopment alongAlma StreetMenloCenterLibraryExistingBuildingRavenswowood AvenueElCaminoRealAlAlAlAlAlAlAlAlllAlAlAlAlAllAlAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAmamammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmSStreeeetSiteforPotentialDevelopment(withParkingBelow)RailroadRight-of-WayMerrillStreet
  • 108. D30MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANCivic Plaza + Santa Cruz AvenueAt the eastern end of Santa Cruz Avenue, the Civic Plazacelebrates the arrival to the City at the Caltrain station.It serves multiple purposes -- as a landmark space andgateway to downtown and Menlo Park, a pick-up and drop-off locale for motorists and transit users and a civic publicspace integrating the historic train station and enhancedpedestrian linkages and plazas to downtown, Menlo Centerand Civic Center.Intent Create an improved arrival/departure transit plazafor the station and iconic civic plaza for downtown.Character Landmark civic space that celebrates the stationand Santa Cruz Avenue arrival.Improvements Implement streetscape improvements thatcelebrate the station area and sense of arrival. Provide enhanced connections to the easternneighborhoods and Civic Center across therailroad tracks, via a grade-separated connection,and to Menlo Center plaza. Install iconic trees, such as native oak trees,maples, sycamores, or redwoods, that aredifferentiated from the surrounding landscape,including El Camino Real and Santa Cruz Avenue,and create a unique sense of civic space. Improve Santa Cruz Avenue northern sidewalkfor greater connection to El Camino Real anddowntown. Improve Merrill Street sidewalk for greaterconnection to Oak Grove Avenue. Provide enhanced connections and integrate withMenlo Center.Landmark civic space (Portland, Oregon)
  • 109. D31CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEStandardsThe design of the Civic Plaza shall include the following:D.3.01 Preserve and highlight the existing historic trainstation building.D.3.02 Accommodate bus turning and drop-off/pick-up ofpassengers.GuidelinesThe design of the Civic Plaza should include the following:D.3.03 Provide a unifying treatment across the Plaza.D.3.04 Allow for integrated vehicular circulation through thespace.D.3.05 Organize the plaza around, and integrate into itsoverall design, a central civic feature such as a fountain orsculpture; the major element should be located in a waythat optimizes visibility from downtown, in particular fromSanta Cruz Avenue.D.3.06 Consider use of iconic trees to create a uniquesense of civic space, such as native oak trees, maples,sycamores, or redwoods, that are distinctive from generalsurrounding landscaping but already featured at the station.D.3.07 Incorporate lighting fixtures and decorative lightingto create a memorable space.D.3.08 Accommodate various connection options across theCaltrain right-of-way depending on the final configuration ofthe high-speed rail line.D.3.09 Provide 15 foot tree-lined sidewalk on the northernside of Santa Cruz Avenue, coordinated with improvedsidewalks for the main part of the avenue downtown.D.3.10 Optimize the interface with Menlo Center andconnection to its plaza.D.3.11 Improve the pedestrian linkage to Oak GroveAvenue.
  • 110. D32MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANMenlo Center PlazaThe Specific Plan proposes improvements to Menlo CenterPlaza that make the plaza more functional as a civic space,integrate the plaza more fully with El Camino Real andcreate stronger connections to the Civic Plaza and CivicCenter. The Specific Plan recognizes that these proposalsare for improvements on private property, and that the Citycan exercise only limited influence in this area.Intent Improve treatment of Menlo Center Plaza andits connections with the station Civic Plaza andthe Civic Center, and emphasize the presence ofMenlo Center Plaza on El Camino Real.Character Paved gathering space with seating and diningareas, shaded and tree-lined.Improvements Enhance connection to the Civic Plaza. Enhance connections to the Civic Center via southof Menlo Center Plaza and Ravenswood Streetedge. Provide for visual access to the plaza from ElCamino Real.GuidelinesEnhancements to the Menlo Center Plaza should includethe following:D.3.12 Coordinate with enhancements to El Camino Realstreetscape and Civic Plaza.D.3.13 Include benches or other seating furniture.D.3.14 Provide a direct connection with the station CivicPlaza.Existing Menlo Center (Menlo Park, California)Existing Menlo Center (Menlo Park,, California)
  • 111. D33CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEAlma Street Civic WalkPart of the overall east-west pedestrian linkage network, theAlma Street Civic Walk provides an improved connectionfrom the Station Area to the Civic Center. The Civic Walkenhances the pedestrian environment and walkability alongthe eastern side of Alma Street to the corner of the publiclibrary. By providing a stronger link to the active CivicCenter, the Civic Walk helps increase the vitality of thestation area and downtown.Intent Create a comfortable and inviting pedestrianconnection from the station area to the CivicCenter, thereby enhancing the connection betweenthe Civic Center and downtown.Character Pedestrian-oriented, tree-lined, and safely-litsidewalk.Improvements Optimize Alma Street right-of-way width, withparking layout and lane distribution, to create awider enhanced sidewalk on the east side. Create a safe pedestrian crossing from the CivicWalk to the train station, and extend Civic Walkacross Ravenswood Avenue with an improved andsafe pedestrian crossing. Enhance sidewalk by making it tree-lined. Provide ample shade and tree line to create acomfortable pedestrian environment.GuidelinesThe design of the Alma Street Civic Walk should include thefollowing:D.3.15 Take into consideration the final configuration of theproposed high speed rail.D.3.16 Provide a 15 foot minimum tree-lined sidewalkon the east side of Alma Street between the station areaand Ravenswood Avenue, with an 8 foot wide minimumpedestrian thru zoneD.3.17 Be safely lit to reinforce the pedestrian experience.D.3.18 Coordinate with other improvements in thestation area, creating a greater sense of connectivity andcontinuity.D.3.19 Provide a safe pedestrian crosswalk between CivicWalk and the train station/Civic Plaza, depending on thefinal configuration of the proposed high speed rail andconsistent with the guidelines for the Civic Plaza.D.3.20 Incorporate a safe and upgraded pedestriancrossing at Ravenswood Avenue. Potential crossingimprovements are discussed in more detail in section F.3.D.3.21 Include pedestrian way-finding signage.D.3.22 Preserve to the extent feasible heritage and othersignificant trees.
  • 112. D34MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANRavenswood GatewayThe Specific Plan recognizes the intersection ofRavenswood Avenue and Alma Street as an opportunity tocreate a sense of gateway into downtown and the MenloPark Civic Center and Public Library area. Streetscapeimprovements at the Ravenswood Gateway establish aconnection between the Civic Center and the Station Area.The improvements also focus on providing better definitionof the southeast corner of the intersection as an identifiableentrance and “front door” to the Library and Civic Center(See Figure D16).Intent Create a sense of gateway to Civic Center anddowntown at the Alma/Ravenswood intersection.Character Streetscape and landscape civic character thatrelates to the station’s Civic Plaza.Improvements Provide streetscape and landscape improvementsat the northeast and southeast corners of Alma/Ravenswood intersection to create a sense of civicgateway. Provide a wider and safe pedestrian crossingcoordinated with the Alma Street Civic Walk. Install a landmark sign (distinct from way-findingsignage) or art element.Civic gateway with landmark signage and streetscape andlandscape improvements (Redwood City, California)
  • 113. D35CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEGuidelinesThe design of the Ravenswood Gateway should include thefollowing:D.3.23 Coordinate streetscape and landscape designimprovements with Alma Street Civic Walk and station CivicPlaza.D.3.24 Coordinate crossing treatment with Alma StreetCivic Walk.D.3.25 Consider use of iconic trees to create a uniquesense of civic space, such as native oak trees, maples,sycamores or redwoods, that are distinctive from thegeneral surrounding landscaping but are already featured inthe area.D.3.26 Integrate lighting to achieve gateway and civiccharacter.D.3.27 Include a landmark sign or art element.D.3.28 Include pedestrian way-finding signage.Alma StreetCivic WalkLibraryRavenswood AvenueAlmaStreetFigure D16. Concept Plan of Ravenswood GatewayPedestrian CrossingCoordinated with AlmaStreet Civic WalkRavenswood AvenueStreetscape& LandscapeImprovements
  • 114. D36MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANRailroad Tracks/High Speed RailOpen SpaceGuidelinesD.3.29 If high speed rail is placed underground, the Cityshould encourage a final configuration that includesCaltrain tracks. Such a configuration should be capped,with the roof of the tunnel able to accommodate publicuse, such as a linear park, at-grade.D.3.30 If high speed rail is placed underground asdescribed above, a linear public park, accommodatingpedestrians and bicyclists, should be considered forplacement above ground as well as other appropriatecommercial uses.D.3.31 If high speed rail is elevated, the City shouldencourage a final configuration that includes Caltraintracks. With such a configuration, the City shouldencourage a structure that provides maximum“porosity” with maximum visual and/or physical accessunderneath (e.g. elevated Bart tracks in the East Bay).The tracks should be elevated enough to allow for at-grade passage underneath for vehicles, bicyclists andpedestrians. An earthen embankment or stark wallsshould be avoided. Wherever possible, an elevatedconfiguration should incorporate landscaping to softenthe visual impact.D.3.32 If high speed rail is elevated as describedabove, the City should consider maximizing east-west pedestrian and bicycle connections underneath,in addition to those in the Specific Plan, whereappropriate. The spaces should be safe andwelcoming.The Specific Plan recognizes that the existing railroadtrack configuration will change if and when high speed railservice between southern California and San Francisco isimplemented. The Specific Plan’s proposed improvementsapply regardless of the final track configuration. However,the improvements’ final design will depend on the finalconfiguration of the high speed rail alignment, particularlyfor those elements closest to the tracks. It is assumedthat high speed rail will generally fall within and follow theexisting Caltrain right-of-way. Expansions of the right-of-way could be required, particularly in the Station Area, aswell as between Glenwood Avenue and Oak Grove Avenue,where the current right-of-way is narrowest.At this time, three rail track configurations for high speedrail are under consideration: locating the train tracksunderground, elevating the railroad tracks, or keeping thetracks at grade and lowering the cross streets. All threeconfigurations achieve a fundamental requirement that thetracks be grade-separated and completely separate fromother trains and all other modes of transit (i.e. vehicular,bicycle and pedestrian). Under the current proposal, highspeed rail will not stop at Menlo Park. However, Caltrain willcontinue to provide commuter rail service to Menlo Park. Ifhigh speed rail is placed in a tunnel, it is unclear at this timeif Caltrain would also be placed in a tunnel, remain at-gradeor have some other configuration.
  • 115. D37CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACED.4 EL CAMINO REALEl Camino Real is a major arterial roadway extendingthrough the downtown area and connecting MenloPark to surrounding cities. The Specific Plan proposesenhancements that strengthen the image of the streetand create a continuous and unified experience whilerecognizing the distinct areas that the corridor passesthrough. The improvements also create strong east-westlinkages with surrounding areas and districts. The proposedenhancements are consistent with the Grand BoulevardInitiative’s Multi-Modal Strategy & Context-Sensitive DesignGuidelines.The public space improvements for El Camino Real consistof North-South Walkability and East-West Connectivity.
  • 116. D38MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANIntent Encourage walking and pedestrian activity alongEl Camino Real with improved walkability andcomfort.Character Tree-lined, pedestrian-oriented, paved, and safelylit sidewalks.Improvements Use building setbacks as needed to createwider sidewalks (private development-relatedimprovements). Enhance sidewalks with consistent paving, streettrees and street furnishings.GuidelinesThe design of the sidewalks along El Camino Real, whetherwithin the El Camino Real corridor or within adjacentsetback areas, should include the following:D.4.01 Take into consideration recommended criteria of theGrand Boulevard Initiative’s Multi-Modal Access Strategy &Context-Sensitive Design Guidelines.D.4.02 Be 15 feet wide, at a minimum, on the east side ofEl Camino Real, inclusive of a 10-foot-wide clear pedestrianthru-zone, north of Oak Grove Avenue and south of MenloAvenue.D.4.03 Be 12 feet wide, at a minimum, on the east of ElCamino Real, inclusive of an 8-foot-wide clear pedestrianthru-zone, in the downtown area between Oak GroveAvenue and Menlo Avenue.D.4.04 Be 12 feet wide, at a minimum, on the west side ofEl Camino Real, inclusive of an 8-foot-wide clear pedestrianthru-zone.D.4.05 Incorporate a coordinated set of streetscapeimprovements, including street trees, paving and lighting.North-South WalkabilityThe Specific Plan proposes streetscape improvements onEl Camino Real that help unify the street experience byusing a common language of trees, paving materials andlighting elements. It provides a pedestrian promenade onthe eastern side of the street.The existing dimensions of the street and the need to serveas an arterial roadway create constraints on wideningsidewalks in the area. Pedestrian improvements to theportions of El Camino Real north of Oak Grove Avenueand south of Menlo/Ravenswood Avenues are achieved, inpart, within setback areas as adjacent development occurs.Under these circumstances, the greatest opportunity foran expansive pedestrian promenade is on the eastern sideof El Camino Real between Ravenswood Avenue and thePalo Alto city limits, an area controlled primarily by threeproperty owners, including Stanford University (see ChapterE “Land Use + Building Character” for more detail).Figures D17, D18 and D19 illustrate proposed typicalimprovements for El Camino Real for portions north ofdowntown, in the downtown area and south of downtown,respectively.It is important to note that street sections for El CaminoReal north of downtown (Figure D17) and within downtown(Figure F18) have four travel lanes rather than six travellanes as shown south of downtown (Figure D19). While thecurb-to-curb width north of downtown and within downtowncould accommodate a change to six travel lanes byremoving on-street parking (approximately 40 spaces), theSpecific Plan proposes a four-lane street section in theseareas rather than six-lanes for a number of reasons. Withsix lanes, only slight improvements in traffic/intersectionoperations would be realized as the added lanes wouldbe created by converting right-turn lanes, not by addingnew lanes. In addition, parking removal decreases thepedestrian and retail environment. Building setbacks wouldneed to be increased substantially to provide sufficientsidewalk width to buffer pedestrians from moving traffic.Further setbacks would be needed to accommodate bicyclelanes.
  • 117. D39CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEFigure D17. Typical Section/Plan at El Camino Real North between Valparaiso Avenue and Oak Grove Avenue12’-16’99’Right of Way11’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 10’-20’SetbackEastPromenadePropertyLinePropertyLine7’-8’ 8’ 5’ 7’ 5’5’-8’ 6’-8’Setback BikeParking BikeBufferAlternative plan with sidewalk extension (i.e. bulb-outs) at intersectionSection and plan without sidewalk extension (i.e. bulb-outs) at intersection
  • 118. D40MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANFigure D18. Typical Section/Plan at El Camino Real Downtown between Oak Grove Avenue and Menlo Avenue.99’Right of WaySetbackSetback BikeParking ParkingBike7’-8’5’-8’ 5’-8’11’ 11’ 11’14’ 11’ 7’-8’8’ 5’ 5’ 8’PropertyLinePropertyLineAlternative plan with sidewalk extension (i.e. bulb-outs) at intersectionSection and plan without sidewalk extension (i.e. bulb-outs) at intersection
  • 119. D41CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEFigure D19. Typical Section/Plan at El Camino Real south of Roble Avenue99’11’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 7’ 10’-20’5’-7’7’-12’ 5’-8’Right of WayPropertyLinePropertyLineEastPromenadeSetback Setback5’3’BikeBuffer5’ 3’Bike BufferAlternative plan with sidewalk extension (i.e. bulb-outs) at intersectionSection and plan without sidewalk extension (i.e. bulb-outs) at intersection
  • 120. D42MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEast-West ConnectivityEl Camino Real, in addition to the Caltrain railroad tracks,is both a real and perceived barrier between the east andwest sides of town, including downtown and the stationarea. Long crossing distances make traversing the streeton foot inconvenient. The Specific Plan recognizes keyintersections along El Camino Real and improves crossingconditions at these locations. In addition, the plan proposestwo potential pedestrian/bicycle grade-separated crossingsof the railroad tracks: one at the terminus of Santa CruzAvenue in the station area (discussed in Section D.3“Station Area”) and one on Stanford University propertyat Middle Avenue. Done in conjunction with intersectionimprovements, the latter one would be undertaken byStanford University when it redevelops and/or in conjunctionwith High Speed Rail improvements.El Camino Real CrossingsThe Specific Plan proposes improvements to mostintersections on El Camino Real. Section F.3 “PedestrianImprovements” identifies the locations and nature of thoseimprovements. In most cases, the improvements allowfor sidewalk extensions (i.e. bulb-outs) for at least onecorner depending on traffic flow requirements. Figure D20illustrates what an improved intersection might look like onEl Camino Real in the downtown area.Intent Minimize the El Camino Real barrier effect andimprove connectivity across El Camino Real byimproving pedestrian crossing conditions.Character Pedestrian-oriented design.Improvements Create special crossing treatments at keyintersections as identified in Chapter F“Circulation”.
  • 121. D43CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEFigure D20. Typical Intersection ImprovementCoordinate street trees,lighting, paving and otherkey streetscape elementsthroughout the Specific PlanareaSidewalk extension (i.e.bulb-outs) at intersection toshorten pedestrian crossing(other improvements notedin plan above)Median refuge at locationswith no left hand turn laneOptimize safety andcomfort with appropriatestriping, ramps and warningpavers; pedestrian signalenhancement and otheraccessibility requirementsSpecial paving treatment atintersectionsAlternative plan with sidewalk extension (i.e. bulb-outs) at intersectionPlan without sidewalk extension (i.e. bulb-outs) at intersection
  • 122. D44MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANGuidelinesThe design of intersection improvements on El CaminoReal should include the following:D.4.06 Take into consideration recommended criteria of theGrand Boulevard Initiative’s Multi-Modal Access Strategy &Context-Sensitive Design Guidelines.D.4.07 Optimize crossing time by reducing curb-to-curbdistance to the extent feasible.D.4.08 Optimize safety and comfort with appropriatestriping, ramps and warning pavers and other accessibilityrequirements.D.4.09 Integrate additional landscaping and “low impactdevelopment” (LID) materials, such as pervious materials tomanage storm water, where possible.D.4.10 Incorporate special treatment for intersections inthe downtown/station areas (i.e. Oak Grove Avenue, SantaCruz Avenue and Menlo Avenue) to enhance connectionsbetween the two areas.D.4.11 Coordinate street trees, lighting, paving and otherkey streetscape elements with other streetscape elementsof El Camino Real above.Coordinated street trees/landscaping, paving, furniture,signage and other streetscape elements(Emeryville, California)
  • 123. D45CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACEBurgess Park Linkage/Open Space PlazaExplained in more detail in Section E.3 “DevelopmentStandards + Guidelines,” the Specific Plan identifies twolocations for publicly-accessible open space and grade-separated pedestrian and bicycle linkage across therailroad tracks. One is in the station area at the terminusof Santa Cruz Avenue (discussed above in Section D.3“Station Area”) and the other is at the terminus of MiddleAvenue. The latter connects the western neighborhoodswith Burgess Park and neighborhoods to the east.Described in Section E.3.4 “Massing and Modulation,”the plaza at Middle Avenue provides additional openspace amenity to both the community and the privatedevelopment. The open space plaza should integrate withboth the pedestrian promenade along El Camino Real andlinkages to the east side of the Caltrain tracks. Adjacentbuildings should activate the plazas with ground floor uses,such as cafes and small stores, as discussed in SectionE.2.3 “Special Land Use Topics.” The guidelines for thisopen space amenity are below.Because this open space and linkage amenity is locatedpartly on Stanford University property, it should be part ofdevelopment review with the City when Stanford Universitychooses to redevelop the land. The rail crossing itselfshould be undertaken in conjunction with High Speed Railimprovements.Intent Provide publicly-accessible open space amenitieson the east side of El Camino Real at theintersection of Middle Avenue. Provide a grade-separated pedestrian and bicyclelinkage across the railroad connecting the MiddleAvenue plaza with Alma Street/Burgess Park. Thefinal configuration of such a linkage will depend onthe final configuration of the high speed rail.Character Publicly-accessible open space/plaza providingseating and places for small informal gatherings. Pedestrian and bicycle connection associated withpublicly-accessible open space.Publicly-accessible pedestrian connection and open spaceelement (Portland, Oregon)
  • 124. D46MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANImprovements Create a welcoming, publicly-accessible openspace plaza at the terminus of Middle Avenue,integrated with the pedestrian promenade along ElCamino Real, that provides seating and shade andallows for small, informal gatherings. Provide pedestrian and bicycle linkage across therailroad tracks between El Camino Real, the newopen space and Alma Street at Middle Avenue. Theprecise configuration of such a linkage will dependon the final configuration of the high speed rail.GuidelinesThe design of the open space plaza and pedestrian/bicyclelinkage should include the following:D.4.12 Visually extend Middle Avenue.D.4.13 Allow for seating and informal gatherings.D.4.14 Provide green space and shaded areas.D.4.15 Integrate with vehicular access needs andassociated development.D.4.16 Provide a pedestrian and bicycle linkage betweenEl Camino Real, the new open space and Burgess Parkat Middle Avenue; this linkage would involve a gradeseparated crossing if tracks remain at grade.D.4.17 Emphasize safety and comfort for all users.Pedestrian/bicycle tunnel linkage (Palo Alto, California)Grade separated pedestrian/bicycle linkage (Palo Alto,California)
  • 125. D47CHAPTER D PUBLIC SPACED.5.10 Public art could be incorporated into pathways (e.g.interpretive walk).D.5.11 Temporary public art could be installed throughoutdowntown.D.5.12 Public art could include lighting.Durability and MaintenanceD.5.13 Durability and easy maintenance should beconsidered when selecting streetscape furnishings.AccessibilityD.5.14 Applicable accessibility codes shall be integratedinto streetscape and public space design.Surface Parking GuidelinesSurface parking should include the following:D.5.15 Be visually attractive, particularly when seen fromstreets and public spaces.D.5.16 Address security and safety concerns with adequatelighting and sight lines.D.5.17 Preserve existing mature trees to the extentpossible.D.5.18 Incorporate canopy trees for shade.D.5.19 Introduce safe pedestrian pathways, connecting theparking lot to building entries and public sidewalks, usingelements such as marked crossings, clear signage andsupplementary lighting.D.5.20 To reduce water consumption and heat island effect,incorporate shade, use indigenous plant materials and usepermeable materials, where appropriateD.5 GENERAL GUIDELINESThe Specific Plan proposes overarching guidelines forpublic space improvements in the plan area. The intentof the guidelines, in part, is to establish a coordinatedstreetscape and open space system.General GuidelinesWalkable StreetsD.5.01 All pedestrian pathways should be continuous,direct, shaded and lit for safety.Streetscape PaletteD.5.02 The streetscape palette should be consistent andcoordinated across downtown and the station area for mainstreetscape elements. The streetscape palette should alsobe consistent for El Camino Real.Street Trees and Planting MaterialsD.5.03 The street tree canopy should be extended forshade, and street tree rows completed for continuity.D.5.04 Iconic/differentiated trees should be used for civicspaces.D.5.05 Indigenous plant materials should be used forreduced water consumption.D.5.06 Deciduous/flowering plants could be used, whereappropriate, for seasonal variation and additional interest.SignageD.5.07 Signage should be coordinated, and it could be usedto enhance downtown identity.D.5.08 A comprehensive pedestrian way-finding systemshould be implemented.Public ArtD.5.09 Public art could be used to create focal points andmark destinations.
  • 126. D48MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAND.6 SUSTAINABLE PRACTICESThe Specific Plan proposes the following sustainablepractices for public space improvements based on theLeadership in Energy and Environmental Design forNeighborhood Development (LEED-ND). In addition to thepractices below, the Specific Plan proposes sustainablepractices for private and public development, inclusiveof LEED-ND, as described in Section E.3.8 “SustainablePractices”.GuidelinesWalkable StreetsD.6.01 Healthy activity and walking should be encouragedthrough well designed and attractive public spaces.D.6.02 Shaded streets and public spaces that optimize useand activity should be provided.Stormwater ManagementD.6.03 Pervious materials should be used on sidewalks andother paved surfaces wherever possible to minimize storm-water run-off from paved surfaces.D.6.04 Large soil-filled, planted catch basins areencouraged as a part of sidewalk design. They should becoordinated with street trees, lighting, and infrastructure onthe street.Heat Island Effect ReductionD.6.05 Dark colored paved areas should be minimized.D.6.06 Greening and the shading of paved areas areencouraged.Reduced Water Consumption, Maintenance andDurabilityD.6.07 Indigenous and drought-resistant plant materialsshould be used.Reduced Energy ConsumptionD.6.08 Energy consumption in landscape elements shouldbe minimized through these techniques: Solar power fixtures. Downward path lighting. Motion sensor lights or lighting controlled by timersset to turn off at the earliest practicable hour. Gravity fed water features/systems.
  • 127. LAND USE +BUILDINGCHARACTERE.1 OVERVIEWE.2 LAND USE DESIGNATIONS, USE REGULATIONS& SPECIAL USESE.3 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS & GUIDELINESE.4 ZONING DISTRICTSE.E2E2E12E45
  • 128. E2MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.1 OVERVIEWBased on the Specific Plan’s guiding principles and urbandesign framework as presented in Chapter C, this chapterestablishes the types and distribution of land uses alongEl Camino Real, in the station area and downtown. Italso establishes standards and guidelines for land usedevelopment. In general, the standards and guidelinesencourage redevelopment of underutilized parcels of land,enhance vibrancy and transit use and increase housingsupply. They also help ensure that new buildings arecompatible with the existing scale and character of adjacentdevelopment, enhance the character of streets, public spacesand overall pedestrian orientation, and are environmentallysensitive.To implement the vision as described in Chapter C, theSpecific Plan establishes five land use designations (includingone “overlay” area) and 10 zoning districts. The land usedesignations establish uses as either permitted, permittedwith limits, administratively or conditionally permitted, orprohibited. The zoning districts establish detailed rules fornew development, including both completely new constructionand additions to existing structures. Parking standardsrelating to new development are discussed in Chapter F“Circulation”.This chapter covers: E.1 Overview E.2 Land Use Designations, Use Regulations andSpecial Useso E.2.1 Land Use Designationso E.2.2 Use Regulationso E.2.3 Special Land Use Topics E.3 Development Standards and Guidelineso E.3.1 Development Intensityo E.3.2 Heighto E.3.3 Setbacks and Projections within Setbackso E.3.4 Massing and Modulationo E.3.5 Ground Floor Treatment, Entry andCommercial Frontageo E.3.6 Open Spaceo E.3.7 Parking, Service and Utilitieso E.3.8 Sustainable Practices E.4 Zoning DistrictsE.2 LAND USE DESIGNATIONS,USE REGULATIONS ANDSPECIAL USESThis section of the Specific Plan addresses the land usedesignations, land use regulations and special land usetopics, including uses permitted with limits, independentbusiness, the market place concept and non-parkingimprovements on downtown parking plazas.E.2.1 Land Use DesignationsThe Specific Plan’s land use designations allow for avariety of uses, either in separate buildings or in mixed-use buildings. Figure E1 depicts the different landuse designations and Table E1 summarizes the useregulations by designation. The table specifies whichuses are permitted, permitted with limits, conditionallypermitted and prohibited.El Camino Real Mixed UseThe El Camino Real Mixed Use designation allowsfor a variety of retail, office, residential and public andsemipublic uses. Building character in this land usedesignation relates to adjacent neighborhoods, withmaximum building heights of two to three stories, exceptfor buildings of up to three to four stories (with provisionof public benefit) on part of northeast El Camino Real,and buildings of up to four to five stories permitted onthe southeast end of El Camino Real. The alloweddevelopment intensities vary with the lowest intensityon the far northern end of El Camino Real, moderateintensities on the southwest end and highest intensitieson the southeast end of El Camino Real, where parcelsare separated from adjacent uses by El Camino Real (tothe west) and the railroad right-of-way (to the east).
  • 129. E3CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERleruaLleruaLMiddleIsabellaYaleEncinalWatkinsCollegekeerCRobleEmileMillsPineCambridgetnomerFLive OakAlejandraotlAFeltonHarvardArdenBurgessJohnsonPartridgeNoelGarwoodLennoxnotecnirPrevooHMerillSprucenylevERoseenarCairotciVLeonerialCeeLMillieLaneAlicenessucraMStone PineWerthFlorenceMac BainWaverlyPriorLllenroCoinotnAnaSBay LaurelBrittonYEROMDouglasMoultonBuckthornaccebbeRelyoDyenolaMBlakeSherwoodHopkinssitruCnorraBMichaelKENWOODtneKClaremontCherryForestMalletTudortuntsehCdoowemoHSurreydrawoHElizabethuaetahCdoownneFselliasreVBassettCreekPlxessuSManorekalBCreekenarCWaverlyrobrASherwoodWillowRoblerobrAsitruCAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AveMenloRavenswoodElCaminoRealyyyyeoayyynylevEysitruCtuntsehCtuenarClDM llMMlMlMlMlElCiotlAotlAotlAotlAyyyO k GMenMeMStonnyelyoDyDowntown/Station Area "Main Street" OverlayDowntown/Station Area Retail/Mixed UseDowntown Adjacent (Office/Residential)El Camino Real Mixed Use/ResidentialEl Camino Real Mixed UseLand Use Designations:Plan Area BoundaryMenlo Park City BoundaryFigure E1. Land Use Designations
  • 130. E4MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEl Camino Real Mixed Use/ResidentialThe El Camino Real Mixed Use/Residential designationemphasizes residential use in close proximity(approximately 1/2 mile) to the station area and downtown,in order to support area businesses, transit use and overalldowntown vibrancy. This designation also allows for avariety of retail, office and public and semipublic uses. Themaximum building heights vary from two to three stories inmost locations up to three to four stories (with provision ofpublic benefit) on part of northeast El Camino Real and fourto five stories, and the highest intensities, on the east sideof El Camino Real south of Ravenswood Avenue.Downtown/Station Area Retail/Mixed UseThe Downtown/Station Area Retail/Mixed Use designationfocuses on uses that enhance downtown vibrancy bybuilding upon existing community-serving retail andpersonal services in the downtown area. While emphasizingretail for ground-floor uses, the designation allows for a mixof uses, including office and residential uses, enhancingdowntown vibrancy through an increased customer basefor restaurants and retail businesses. It also allows fortheaters (commercial recreation), hotels and some publicand semipublic uses. This designation covers the currentpublic parking plazas, which could accommodate limitednon-parking uses (see Section E.2.3).To complement the size of existing downtown businessestablishments and building character, the size of sometypes of businesses are limited (see Section E.2.3), andallowable building heights are two to three stories forall but the area in closest proximity to the train station,where heights of either three to four or four to five storiesare allowed. Allowed intensities in the downtown coreare generally consistent with historic levels while higherintensities are allowed in the train station area.Downtown/Station Area “Main Street” OverlayThe Downtown/Station Area “Main Street” Overlayenhances the retail emphasis of the Downtown/StationArea Retail/Mixed Use designation by specifically limitingnon-retail ground floor uses on Santa Cruz Avenue.Development standards and guidelines otherwise matchthe underlying Downtown/Station Area Retail/Mixed Usedesignation.Downtown Adjacent (Office/Residential)Allowing for office, limited personal services andresidential uses, the Downtown Adjacent Office/Residentialdesignation complements but does not compete withretail uses in the downtown area. The category permitsoffices and personal services (with certain size limitations),residential uses and public and semipublic uses. It excludesretail and hotel uses. The allowable building height is twoto three stories, which complements buildings in downtownand adjacent neighborhoods.
  • 131. E5CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTER“Vibrant locally-ownedbusinesses keeps localcharacter and keeps dollarsspent within the community”- Workshop #1 Participant“Places for all ages”- Workshop #3 Participant“Want more night lifebusinesses so I can spendevenings in Menlo”- Workshop #3 ParticipantE.2.2 Use RegulationsAs noted previously, Table E1 establishes which uses arepermitted, permitted with limits, conditionally permitted (byadministrative permit or use permit), and prohibited withinthe various land use designations. Uses that are permittedwith certain limits are discussed in more detail in thefollowing section. Requests for administratively-permitteduses are reviewed and acted on by the CommunityDevelopment Director in accordance with Zoning OrdinanceChapter 16.82, Section VII (Administrative Permits), andrequests for conditionally-permitted uses are reviewed andacted on by the Planning Commission in accordance withZoning Ordinance Chapter 16.82, Section I (Use Permits).Both action types have appeal processes, culminating inCity Council review and action.The use regulations govern both new developmentand existing buildings within the plan area. However,existing developments that are already regulated by aUse Permit, Conditional Development Permit, PlannedDevelopment Permit, or other binding limitation (such asa limited environmental review approval) would continueto be regulated by existing site-specific regulations. Anysuch development could pursue a revision to the previousapproval, although this would be a discretionary action ofthe Planning Commission and/or City Council and couldrequire additional environmental review.The use regulations were derived primarily from the existinguse regulations and historical practices, revised to reflectthe Specific Plan’s guiding principles. In addition, theuse regulations and associated definitions (available inthe report’s appendix) leverage work that was conductedduring the 2006 Commercial Zoning Ordinance Update(CZOU) project, although the CZOU draft recommendationswere fully reviewed and revised to represent the currentcommunity preferences expressed through the SpecificPlan process.
  • 132. E6MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANTable E1. Land Use Designations and Allowable Uses, , ,Allowable UsesEl Camino Real MixedUseEl Camino Real MixedUse/ResidentialDowntown/Station AreaRetail/Mixed UseDowntown AdjacentOffice/ResidentialCommercialAdult Business Establishments C C - - -Animal Sales & ServicesAnimal Boarding C C C - -Animal Clinics and Hospitals C C C - -Animal Retail Sales andServiceP P P LC (less than 5,000 SF) -Automobile/Vehicle Sales andServiceAutomobile/Vehicle Sales &LeasingP P - - -Gas Stations and Light VehicleServiceC C - - -Banks and Financial Institutions P PLC(less than 5,000 SF)-LC(less than 5,000 SF)Business Services P PLC(less than 5,000 SF)-LC(less than 5,000 SF)Commercial RecreationSmall-Scale P C C - -Cinemas C P P - -Eating & Drinking EstablishmentsRestaurants, Full/LimitedServiceP P P P -Restaurants, Full/LimitedService with Alcohol and/orOutdoor SeatingA A A A -Restaurants, Full/LimitedService with Live EntertainmentA A A A -Restaurants, Take-Out Only P P - - -Bars and Lounges - C C C -Funeral & Interment Service C C - - -Hotels and Motels P P P C COffices, Business and ProfessionalL (no greater than one-half the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR)L (no greater than one-half the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR)L (no greater than one-half the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR)L (no greater than one-half the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR andupper floors only)L (no greater than one-half the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR)Offices, Medical and DentalL (no greater than one-third the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR)L (no greater than one-third the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR)L (no greater than one-third the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR)L (no greater than one-third the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR andupper floors only)L (no greater than one-third the base or publicbenefit bonus FAR)Land Use Designations and Allowable UsesDowntown/StationArea Main Street
  • 133. E7CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERPersonal Improvement Services PLC(less than 5,000 SF)LC(less than 5,000 SF)L(upper floors only)LC(less than 5,000 SF)Personal ServicesGeneral P PLC(less than 5,000 SF)L(upper floors only)LC(less than 5,000 SF)Restricted C C - - -Retail SalesGeneral P P P P -Convenience Market C C C - -Food and Beverage Sales P P P P -Liquor Stores C C C C -Restricted C C - - -Public, Semipublic andServiceClubs and Lodges C C C C -Community Social ServiceFacilitiesC C - - -Cultural InstitutionsLC(less than 5,000 SF)LC(less than 5,000 SF)LC(less than 5,000 SF)C -Day Care Center A A A - AParking Facilities, Public - P P - -Public Safety Facilities C C - - CReligious Facilities C C - - CResidentialResidential Dwelling Units P P P L (upper floors only) PP = uses permittedL = uses permitted subject to limitations which may not be exceeded/modifiedLC = uses permitted subject to limitations; limitations may be exceeded/modified following review/approval of Use Permit by Planning CommissionA = uses may be permitted following review/approval of administrative use permit by Community Development DirectorC = uses may be permitted following review/approval of Use Permit by Planning CommissionUse definitions available in Chapter H "Appendix", , ,Allowable UsesEl Camino Real MixedUseEl Camino Real MixedUse/ResidentialDowntown/Station AreaRetail/Mixed UseDowntown AdjacentOffice/ResidentialLand Use Designations and Allowable UsesDowntown/StationArea Main Street
  • 134. E8MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN Limiting the total square footage of specific typesof uses in a particular area. This can be difficult totrack and enforce. As establishments of the limiteduse change (go out of business, expand/contract insize), maintaining an accurate database and correctlyreviewing new requests against the current total canbe complex. In addition, determining the appropriatetotal square footage amount is challenging in a 20- to30-year plan. Also, limiting total square footage ofa particular use could result in vacant space duringperiods of economic downturn. Setting density limits on specific types of uses (e.g., upto one half of allowed FAR can be used for a specifictype of use in any given project) for individual newconstruction or conversions of use.In general, the Specific Plan supports mechanisms that areeasy to understand and monitor by the general community,developers and City staff. Therefore, the Specific Planincludes two of the limits discussed above: limits on thesize of specific types of uses (primarily non-retail serviceand office uses); and density limits for new construction orconversions of office and, more specifically medical anddental office. Table E1 includes the specific limitations.Section E.3.1 “Development Intensity” discusses theselimitations in more detail. In addition, the Downtown/StationArea “Main Street” Overlay limits permitted ground-flooruses on Santa Cruz Avenue to retail establishments andrestaurants.E.2.3 Special Land Use TopicsUses Permitted with LimitsCommunity members expressed interest in limiting certaintypes of uses for a variety of reasons, including limitingcompetition with independent retailers (discussed inmore detail below), limiting uses that can generate higheramounts of traffic, such as medical and dental offices, andensuring a desired retail mix downtown, particularly alongSanta Cruz Avenue. A general principle is that limiting usesshould relate to specific concerns of the community.Several mechanisms exist for limiting uses that mightotherwise dominate the land use mix and impede desirableuses in a particular area, including: Limiting the size of specific types of uses (i.e.,individual establishments). This has the advantage ofbeing relatively simple to enforce through individualbuilding permit and business license review. However,it does not necessarily limit the overall number of anyparticular use; an entire block, for example, could beoccupied by a particular use, as long as each businesswas below the size limitation. Size limitations shouldcorrespond to typical tenant space sizes for theparticular area. Limiting the number of specific types of uses (e.g.,no more than “X” banks total allowed on Santa CruzAvenue). This is also relatively easy to track, as long asthe number of uses so limited is relatively small and thegeographic area in question is not too large. However,determining the appropriate number of any particularuse can be difficult.
  • 135. E9CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERIndependent RetailIndependent retailers play an important role in the vitalityof downtown and the unique character of Menlo Park.Community representatives expressed a desire to promoteindependent retailers, particularly in the downtown andstation areas. The Specific Plan supports independentbusinesses by increasing demand for their goods andservices and by limiting the size of certain categories ofuses that might compete with independent businesses.ContextDuring the Specific Plan process, concerns were raisedabout the future of downtown’s independent businesses.In the short term, some independent retailers may struggleor even fail due to the dramatic drop in consumer spendingin the current recession. Unlike larger retailers, thesebusinesses do not typically have large cash reserves, andthey cannot easily obtain or extend credit to ride out asustained economic recession. The independent retailersthat are able to survive the tremendous competition frominternet sales, discount retailers and big-box stores, as wellas the current economic woes, will be those businessesthat have a large, loyal and local consumer base and areasonable rent structure. The real strengths of successfulsmall independent retail revolve around specialization,differentiation and finding profitable, defensible andsustainable niches.A common concern is that if independent retailers fail,national retail chains occupy the places left vacant.However, simply because spaces become availabledoes not guarantee that they will be occupied by nationalretailers as the space needs of national retailers aredifferent from the needs of independent retailers. Indowntown Menlo Park, in particular, opportunities toaccommodate larger format stores are limited. These typesof retailers typically prefer regionally positioned locationson El Camino Real, which has much higher traffic counts,greater visibility and various redevelopment opportunities toaccommodate their marketing needs.Increasing DemandOne of the best ways to protect existing downtownbusinesses is to increase the supply of local shoppers byencouraging more residential development in the downtownand station areas. Downtown districts with large residentpopulations can help support convenience and specialtyretail. Many households seek to reduce the amount of timespent on congested roadways for non-commute trips. Forthese types of residents, areas with abundant retail andservices like downtown Menlo Park are attractive places tolive and shop.Regulating UsesThe Specific Plan proposes two ways to regulatecompetition from formula or chain retailers and to limitcompetition for space from non-retail uses, such as banks:1) limit the size of particular establishments, and 2) limit thelocation of particular establishments. As noted previously,the Specific Plan establishes size limits for certain typesof uses, as summarized in Table E1. This may discouragelarger chain businesses from locating in the downtownand station areas. The plan also limits ground-floor usesin the Downtown/Station Area “Main Street” retail/mixeduse designation to primarily retail and restaurant uses. TheSpecific Plan includes use limits and also suggests that theCity continue to monitor changes in the composition of usesover time and, as necessary, institute additional regulationsthat restrict formula or chain retailers.
  • 136. E10MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANplace could include uses similar to those of the EmerybayPublic Market, offering a range of food stalls that cater toa variety of tastes. A project of this type would appeal toboth local residents (especially families) and daytime officeworkers, and provide increased local foot traffic to benefitother retailers in downtown.If the community decides to pursue this type ofimprovement, the City should engage a consulting firm,or perspective developer, to work with the community indetermining the appropriate size, character and tenantmix of such a facility, with the primary goals of increasingfoot traffic and complementing both existing grocers andthe weekly Farmer’s Market. If pursued, the City canprepare a Request for Proposal (RFP) for distribution toperspective consulting firms or developers. As describedabove, the initial improvement would be a temporaryfacility implemented on a trial basis. For both the trial andpermanent installations, consideration should be given toexisting Menlo Park merchants for use of the market place.“Allow for development tobe favorable to small, localbusinesses”- Workshop #3 ParticipantMarket Place Concept on Chestnut StreetOne concept included in the Specific Plan is a marketplace on either side of Chestnut Street south of Santa CruzAvenue. Initially, such a market place would be a temporaryfacility implemented on a trial basis to fully understandthe pros and cons of such an improvement and to betterdefine the character of a permanent facility. The intent ofthe market place in this locale is to reinforce and activatethis area as the center of downtown, in conjunction with thenetwork of paseos, widened sidewalks, pocket parks andthe Central Plaza.In general, the terms “public market”, “market place”or “market hall” describe a wide range of developmentprojects, and they can be designed to encompass a rangeof uses consistent with the goals of the community and realestate market conditions. A public market typically consistsof a single building with a variety of small- to- mid-sizedretailers (often food-related) and restaurants.The Emerybay Public Market in Emeryville, for example,focuses almost exclusively on prepared foods forimmediate consumption, functioning as an upscale foodcourt. The Emerybay Public Market is relatively large,incorporating approximately 20 unique food vendorsrepresenting a variety of cuisines. As another example, theMarket Hall in the Rockridge district of Oakland focuseson grocery-related uses, including a wine store, bakery,pasta store, fish and meat market and produce market,as well as a restaurant and florist. Another example isthe Ferry Building Marketplace in San Francisco. Thisproject is significantly larger, has a greater focus onprepared food and restaurants and incorporates a nationalretailer that specializes in gourmet cooking utensils andappliances (Sur La Table). The project also successfullyaccommodates three weekly farmer’s markets on plazasoutside the building, including a large farmer’s market onSaturday.A market place in Menlo Park needs to be tailored to thelocal market and existing character of the downtown and aprogram needs to be more effectively defined at the timethat the City solicits a developer for the project. It should berelatively small (4,000 square feet or so) and complementthe successful Sunday morning Farmer’s Market, as wellas nearby Draeger’s Market and Trader Joe’s, whichprovide an excellent foundation for the many functionstypical of a market hall. For example, a Menlo Park market“Love all the great, creative,bold ideas like the coveredmarket, pocket parks, plazas”- Workshop #3 Participant“Landmark destinations areimportant”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 137. E11CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERNon-Parking Improvements on DowntownParking PlazasThe Specific Plan calls for enhanced public spaces andincreased development intensities to increase downtownvibrancy, foot traffic and transit use. The plan considersthe public parking plazas as opportunities for publicopen space, and limited retail (see market place conceptabove), in conjunction with new parking structures thatsatisfy parking demand in downtown Menlo Park for bothvisitors and employees. In all cases, parking in support ofbusinesses must be the City’s top priority when consideringhow, when and if to implement changes to public parkingplazas.The Specific Plan allows for limited non-parking uses onparking plazas, in particular open space improvements,such as small pocket parks, and the market place concept.Except as specifically provided in the Specific Plan, thedowntown parking plazas shall remain in parking use.The majority of the parking plazas are publicly-owned. Afew portions of the parking plazas are privately-owned,and would require cooperation with, and approval of, theprivate owners to change the use of those parcels. If thecommunity decides it is in the city’s best interest to enhancethe parking plaza parcels with open space improvementsand/or a permanent market place concept, it is importantthat the City have a parking strategy in place to ensure anadequate parking supply.Retail Node on El Camino Real at MiddleAvenueWhile downtown and the station area are obviouslocations to focus additional retail, the Specific Planidentifies a second pedestrian-friendly retail node on theeast side of El Camino Real at Middle Avenue. Adjacent toand integrated with the open space plaza and linkage toBurgess Park, retail at this location activates this importantnew publicly-accessible open space amenity. Retail atthis location also complements the existing shoppingcenter on the west side of El Camino Real. To avoid directcompetition with retail in the downtown and station areas,the Middle Avenue node could be more focused on cafesor restaurants and other multi-tenant retail.As part of any new development in this area, the SpecificPlan requires a minimum of 10,000 square feet of retail/restaurant space, whether standalone or contained withinMixed Use buildings, in order to create a critical massof retail activity. Once built, the City should periodicallyrevisit the retail requirement to determine if it is resulting inongoing vacancies, and the City should consider revisingthe requirements if necessary and practical.
  • 138. E12MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDSAND GUIDELINESOf the listed standards and guidelines, developmentintensity and height are key factors in establishing theoverall size of buildings. In the Specific Plan, they areused to help define the character of the El Camino Realcorridor, station area and downtown by highlightingthose areas where higher intensities and heights serveto enhance vibrancy, support transit use and encouragethe redevelopment of underutilized properties, as well asenhance and protect those areas where it is important tostrengthen the existing smaller scale, fine grain patternof development. Table E2 summarizes the developmentintensity and the height standards for all of the zoningdistricts within the Specific Plan area in order to highlightthe relationships between the different areas. Figure E2identifies the 10 distinct zoning districts, summarizingin graphic form the locations and allowed developmentintensity in each district.The Specific Plan uses a combination of standards andguidelines to manage the design and construction of newbuildings. The standards and guidelines are intended toencourage infill development on underutilized parcels ofland while respecting the smaller scale, fine grain characterof the downtown and the surrounding residential area.Standards are the rules that new development isrequired to follow. Standards set the basic frameworkwithin which new development takes place, regulatingbuilding placement, size and height through objectiveand measureable rules. Guidelines serve to encouragefeatures of good design and may include elements that arenot as easily defined or measured but which are essentialto creating an overall character within the Specific Planarea. Standards and guidelines are both critical elementsin the review of new development. Development projectswill be required to adhere to applicable standards, whileconsistency with applicable guidelines will be a keycomponent of the discretionary review of a developmentproposal.The categories of standards included in the Specific Planare listed below, followed by a discussion of each categoryand its general applicability. The discussions incorporateapplicable guidelines. Section E.4 “Zoning Districts” appliesspecific standards to individual zoning districts. In particular,Tables E6 through E15 in Section E.4 should be read inreference to the standards and guidelines elaborated below. E.3.1 Development Intensity E.3.2 Height E.3.3 Setbacks and Projections within Setbacks E.3.4 Massing and Modulation E.3.5 Ground Floor Treatment, Entry and CommercialFrontage E.3.6 Open Space E.3.7 Parking, Service and Utilities E.3.8 Sustainable Practices
  • 139. E13CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERE.3.1 Development IntensityThe Specific Plan defines the permitted developmentintensity using both the floor area ratio (FAR) system and,for residential uses, dwelling units per acre, also referred toas density. FAR, which determines the amount of buildingpermitted on a parcel, is the ratio of gross floor area of allbuildings and structures to lot area, expressed in squarefeet. Gross floor area is defined in Section 16.04.325 ofthe Zoning Ordinance, and includes detailed descriptionsof what portions of a building are included and excludedin the calculation of gross floor area. Density is the ratioof dwelling units to lot size, expressed in acres. Whereall parcels included within a proposed development siteare contiguous and are in common ownership, the FARand density standards may be applied to the proposeddevelopment site as a whole, rather than on a parcel-by-parcel basis. The sum of the gross floor area of all uses ina development shall never exceed the allowable FAR of thezoning district.Figure E2 and Table E2 depict a base-level maximum FARand density, and a public benefit bonus-level maximum FARand density, for each of the Specific Plan Zoning Districts.The base figures represent FAR and density that arepermitted under the Specific Plan. The difference betweenthe base amounts and the public benefit bonus amountsrepresent the amount of intensity that could be achievedby a developer in exchange for more housing or otherpublic benefits (explained later in this section). Under nocircumstances may development exceed the public benefitbonus FAR and density amounts shown in Table E2 andFigure E2.The allowable FARs and densities reflect the communitypreferences and comfort as explored through the planningfor this Specific Plan. At the three community workshops,participants commented on overall building characterfor the plan area, depicted in precedent photographs,photo-montages, sections and sketches, and indicatedtheir preferences. Simultaneously, the consultant teamconducted a market analysis to understand market demandfor various uses (summarized in Chapter B “Plan Context”);site accommodation studies to test potential developmentprograms, reflecting community input, on representativeparcels; and a planning-level financial pro forma to gaugeSanta Cruz Avenue at Curtis: 2-3 storiesSanta Cruz Avenue at Curtis: 3-4 storiesAt Valparaiso looking south: 2-3 storiesAt Valparaiso looking south: 3-5 storiesExamples of photo-montages, precedent photographs,sections and plan views as used in a community workshopto depict possible building character, height and massingand street improvements
  • 140. E14MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANLAURELMIDDLECOLLEGEROBLEMILLSCAMBRIDGELIVE OAKRAVENSWOODHARVARDBURGESSPARTRIDGEGARWOODHOOVERMERRILLEVELYNCRANEMARCUSSENWAVERLEYSANANTONIOMOREYDOYLEBLAKECURTISKENWOODCHESTNUTELIZABETHBASSETTBLAKECRANESHERWOODWILLOWLINFIELDCURTISAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AveMenloRavenswoodElCaminoRealMALONEYSource: City of Menlo Park Zoning OrdinanceFremontParkNealonParkJack W. LyleMemorial Park BurgessParkCivicCenterECR NWEl Camino RealNorth-WestECR NEEl Camino RealNorth-EastECR NE-LEl Camino RealNorth-EastLow DensityECR NE-REl Camino RealNorth-EastResidential EmphasisECR SEEl Camino RealSouth-EastSA EStation Area EastSA WStation Area WestDDowntownECR SWEl Camino RealSouth-WestDADowntown AdjacentC3C4Residential EmphasisProject Area BoundaryMenlo Park City BoundaryC1-RECR NEECR NE-RECR SEECR NWECR SWSA ESA WDDAProject Area BoundaryMenlo Park City BoundaryECR NE-LProject Area BoundaryMenlo Park City BoundaryBase AllowableMaximum Allowable withPublic Benefit BonusProject Area BoundaryMenlo Park City Boundary1.10(1.50)ECR NE-RECR SEECR NWECR SWSA ESA WDDAECR NEECR NE-LECR NWEl Camino RealNorth-West1.10 (1.50) FAR25.0 (40.0) DU/AcreECR NEEl Camino RealNorth-East1.10 (1.50) FAR25.0 (40.0) DU/AcreECR NE-LEl Camino RealNorth-EastLow Density0.75 (1.10) FAR20.0 (30.0) DU/AcreECR NE-REl Camino RealNorth-EastResidential Emphasis1.10 (1.50) FAR32.0 (50.0) DU/AcreECR SEEl Camino RealSouth-East1.25 (1.75) FAR40.0 (60.0) DU/AcreSA EStation Area East1.35 (1.75) FAR50.0 (60.0) DU/AcreSA WStation Area West2.00 (2.25) FAR50.0 (60.0) DU/AcreDDowntown2.00 (2.25) FAR25.0 (40.0) DU/AcreECR SWEl Camino RealSouth-West1.10 (1.50) FAR25.0 (40.0) DU/AcreDADowntown Adjacent0.85 (1.00) FAR18.5 (25.0) DU/AcreFigure E2. Development Intensity / Density
  • 141. E15CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERFAR* DU/ACREECR NWEl Camino RealNorth WestMixed Use/Residential1.10(1.50)25.0(40.0)38 38ECR NE LEl Camino RealNorth EastLow DensityMixed Use0.75(1.10)20.0(30.0)38 30ECR NEEl Camino RealNorth EastMixed Use1.10(1.50)25.0(40.0)38(Public BenefitBonus 48)38ECR NE REl Camino RealNorth EastResidentialEmphasisMixed Use/Residential1.10(1.50)32.0(50.0)38(Public BenefitBonus 48)38ECR SWEl Camino RealSouth WestMixed Use &Mixed Use/Residential1.10(1.50)25.0(40.0)38 30ECR SEEl Camino RealSouth EastMixed Use &Mixed Use/Residential1.25(1.75)40.0(60.0)60 38SA WStation AreaWestRetail/Mixed Use &Main Street Overlay2.00(2.25)50.0(60.0)48 38SA EStation AreaEastRetail/Mixed Use &Main Street Overlay1.35(1.75)50.0(60.0)60(Alma Street 48)38DADowntownAdjacentOffice/Residential0.85(1.00)18.5(25.0)38 30DDowntownSanta CruzAvenueRetail/Mixed Use &Main Street Overlay2.00(2.25)25.0(40.0)38 30Development StandardsDEVELOPMENT INTENSITY BUILDING HEIGHTSOffice, General (inclusive of Medical and Dental Offices) shall not exceed one half of the base FAR or public benefit bonus FAROffice, Medical and Dental shall not exceed one third of the base FAR or public benefit bonus FARAREA LAND USEX(Y) = Base Allowable (Max. Allowable withPublic Benefit Bonus)HEIGHT MAX.FAR and DU/acre include both Base and Public Benefit Bonus standards, discussed in Section E.3.1 “Development Intensity”.*Specific Plan limits the amount of general office allowed and the amount of medical office, based on community concerns, to the following:ElCaminoRealElCaminoRealNorthElCaminoRealSouthDowntownStationFAÇADE HEIGHTMAX.Table E2. Development Standards by Zoning Districts
  • 142. E16MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANPublic Benefit Bonus and StructuredNegotiationA public benefit bonus is the additional developmentpermitted beyond the base intensity (and/or height, ifapplicable) for a project in exchange for extra publicbenefit, above and beyond the inherent positive attributesof a project (such as increasing vibrancy and redevelopingvacant and underutilized parcels). As noted previously,the Specific Plan’s recommendation for the base levelmaximum has been crafted to achieve overall projectgoals and represent community preferences for buildingtypes/sizes. The public benefit bonus would be expectedto increase profits from development in exchange forproviding additional benefits to the public. However,developers may choose to forgo the public benefit bonusbecause of perceived costs and risks.Two common approaches for sharing the benefits ofincreased development include bonuses for on-siteimprovements and bonuses achieved through individualdeveloper “structured” negotiations. These two approachesare distinct from, and not to be confused with, impact feesand other development exactions where the fee or otherexaction is based on the development’s impact on the needfor public facilities (for instance, more residents create agreater need for parks).The first bonus approach, for on-site improvements, canbe a prescriptive one and clearly stated, with a specificamount of additional FAR (e.g. 0.5) or density grantedto a developer in exchange for a specific on-site benefit(such as publicly accessible open space). This approachprovides more certainty for both the community anddeveloper. However, due to the variety of site and marketconditions, developing such a prescriptive approach can bechallenging.“Keep the village feel but withmore vibrancy”- Workshop #3 Participantproject viability and financial return of various developmentprograms. This iterative process of presenting at communityworkshops, analyzing, refining and presenting againresulted in development prototypes, inclusive of buildingsetbacks, upper floor setbacks and heights, as reflectedin this Specific Plan. The final step was to “translate” theprototypes into allowable development FARs and densities(dwelling units per acre or DU/Acre), as depicted in TableE2 and Figure E2.In addition to reflecting community input, the Specific Plan’sincreased allowable FARs and density also help achieveseveral Plan goals, including: stimulating redevelopment ofunderutilized parcels; activating the train station area andincreasing transit use; enhancing downtown vibrancy andretail sales; and increasing residential opportunities. Theplan FARs and density help finance public improvements(e.g., streetscape improvements) and produce more BelowMarket Rate (BMR) housing.The Specific Plan places the highest intensity ofdevelopment around the train station, consistent with goalsmentioned in the paragraph above. It also focuses higherdevelopment intensities on the parcels on the east sideof El Camino Real south of Ravenswood Avenue. Theselarger parcels can accommodate more development, andthey are isolated from adjacent residential neighborhoodsby El Camino Real to the west and the railroad tracksand Alma Street to the east. The plan also emphasizesresidential uses closest to downtown and the train station.In addition to the base FAR and public benefit bonusFAR summarized in Figure E2 and Table E2, followingpages, the Specific Plan limits the amount of business andprofessional office allowed, similar to existing City policy,and the amount of medical and dental office, based oncommunity concerns.StandardsE.3.1.01 Business and Professional office (inclusive ofmedical and dental office) shall not exceed one half ofthe base FAR or public benefit bonus FAR, whichever isapplicable.E.3.1.02 Medical and Dental office shall not exceedone third of the base FAR or public benefit bonus FAR,whichever is applicable.
  • 143. E17CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERIndividual Developer Structured NegotiationThe Specific Plan recommends an individual developerstructured negotiation approach for the sharing of thebenefits from increased development above the base FAR,density, and/or height. This approach is the most flexibleand effective way to determine appropriate public benefits.The downside is that it creates some uncertainty and oftendelays the approval process, which can increase cost andrisk for developers. However, the Specific Plan requires astructured process to minimize delays and uncertainty.Projects requesting a public benefit bonus FAR, densityand/or height are required to conduct an initial public studysession with the Planning Commission, in which both theproject and the proposed public benefit are presented forinitial evaluation and comment (both from the PlanningCommission and the public). Applicants may also requesta subsequent study session with the City Council, althoughthis should be expected only for larger or more complicatedprojects. The study session(s) should incorporateappropriate fiscal/economic review (with work overseen byCity staff), which should broadly quantify the benefits/costsof the bonus FAR/density/height and the proposed publicbenefit. Following the study session(s), the applicant wouldrevise the project and public benefit (if needed) and presentthem again for full review and action.The Planning Commission shall, concurrent with overallproject review, be the decision-making body on projectsproposing public benefits that are incorporated withinthe project (such as senior housing) and/or which can bememorialized in typical conditions of approval pursuantto the City’s normal zoning and planning authority. The“Encourage new development”- Workshop #3 Participant“Certain amenities mightbe considered communityinvestments and fundedthrough taxes to preservecharacter”- Workshop #3 ParticipantPlanning Commission action (along with the other projectactions) can be appealed to the City Council, per standardprocedures. For projects proposing public benefits thatcannot be imposed through the City’s planning and zoningauthority (such as payments that are not related to theimpact of a project), the public benefit proposal must beincluded in a proposed Development Agreement submittedby the developer. In that case, Planning Commissionshall be the recommending body and the City Council thedecision-making body, and the Development Agreementmust be adopted by ordinance as provided in the City’sDevelopment Agreement ordinance.The structured negotiation approach works best whendesired improvements are clearly understood by potentialapplicants. Based on community input (including duringthe review process for the Specific Plan) and the SpecificPlan’s goals, a public benefit bonus could be considered forelements including but not limited to: Senior Housing Affordable Residential Units, in particular for loweraffordability levels, particularly in areas nearest thestation area/downtown Hotel Facility, which generates higher tax revenue forthe City while also enhancing downtown vibrancy Platinum LEED Certified Buildings, which would exceedthe standards for sustainable practices found in SectionE.3.8 “Sustainable Practices” Preservation and reuse of historic resources Public parks/plazas and community rooms Shuttle services Public amenity fund Middle Avenue grade-separated rail crossingThe City shall keep this list updated over time by includingit with the required yearly reporting to the City Councilregarding the Maximum Allowable Development. If desired,the City Council may place the list on the agenda for newpublic review and direction.The Specific Plan’s process for public benefit bonusesshould not necessarily be considered a precedent for otherareas of the city, in particular areas that have not conductedan intensive community visioning process to establishgoals and guiding principles, and associated developmentstandards and guidelines.
  • 144. E18MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3.2 HeightBased on community input, the Specific Plan allowsfor buildings up to 38 feet tall in most locations, 48 feetnearer downtown and the station area and up to 60 feet inselected locations, principally in the station area and alongthe eastern side of El Camino Real south of RavenswoodAvenue. Figure E3 illustrates allowable maximum buildingheights and maximum façade heights in the Specific Planarea.A 38-foot height limit can accommodate a two storycommercial or commercial/mixed-use building (e.g., officeabove ground-floor retail) or a three story residential orresidential/mixed-use building (e.g., residential aboveground floor retail). The need for taller interior heights incommercial buildings effectively reduces the number ofstories that can be accommodated. The 38 foot height limitis generally consistent with the 35 foot height limit currentlyfound in many of the neighborhoods adjacent to theSpecific Plan area.A 48-foot height limit can accommodate a three-storycommercial or commercial/mixed-use building, or a fourstory residential or residential/mixed-use building. In areasnorth of the station area on the east side of El CaminoReal, the 48-foot height limit (i.e., the height above 38 feet/typically an additional story) is associated with a PublicBenefit Bonus.A 60-foot height limit can accommodate a four-storycommercial or commercial/ mixed-use building, or a five-story residential or residential/mixed-use building. Ingeneral, higher intensity development and taller buildingscan enhance downtown vibrancy, support transit use,increase housing supply and make redevelopment ofunderutilized lots more attractive. The 48 foot and 60 footheight limits are similar to some existing buildings within theSpecific Plan area, including Menlo Center at 46 feet talland the building at 800 El Camino Real at 56 feet tall.In addition to overall building heights, the Specific Planincludes standards for maximum façade heights alongpublic rights-of-way, sidewalks and other public spaces andsensitive areas. In general, a façade height requirementapplies to facades facing public rights-of-way and all publicspaces. Additionally in the districts where proposed buildingheight limit is appreciably taller than the surroundingbuildings, and the development abuts a smaller scale“Support increased heightsso long as architectural styleof the 4-5 story buildings isdiverse and not solid darklumps”- Workshop #3 Participant“Need transit-oriented housingon El Camino”- Workshop #3 Participant“More intensive developmentalong El Camino isacceptable if parking isprovided”- Workshop #3 Participant“Make downtown housingsized for walkable buyers”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 145. E19CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERleruaLleruaLMiddleIsabellaYaleEncinalWatkinsCollegekeerCRobleEmileMillsPineCambridgetnomerFLive OakAlejandraotlAFeltonHarvardArdenBurgessJohnsonPartridgeNoelGarwoodLennoxnotecnirPrevooHMerillSprucenylevERoseenarCairotciVLeonerialCeeLMillieLaneAlicenessucraMStone PineWerthFlorenceMac BainWaverlyPriorLllenroCoinotnAnaSBay LaurelBrittonYEROMDouglasMoultonBuckthornaccebbeRelyoDBlakeSherwoodHopkinssitruCyenolaMnorraBMichaelKENWOODtneKClaremontCherryForestMalletTudortuntsehCdoowemoHSurreydrawoHElizabethuaetahCdoownneFselliasreVBassettCreekPlxessuSManorekalBCreekenarCWaverlyrobrASherwoodWillowJohnsonRoblerobrAsitruCAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AveMenloRavenswoodElCaminoRealN0 300 600 1200Feetup to 38’ (ie., 2-3 Stories)up to 38’ (ie., 2-3 Stories), orup to 48’ (ie., 3-4 Stories)with Public Benefit Bonusup to 48’ (ie., 3-4 Stories)up to 60’ (ie., 4-5 Stories)X’(Y’) X’ = Max. Building HeightY’ = Max. Façade HeightNote: Parking structure could exceed numberof stories but may not exceed height limit.Project Area BoundaryMenlo Park City Boundary38’(30’)38’(30’)38’(30’)38’(30’)48’(38’)38’(30’)38’60’(38’)48’(38’)60’(38’)38’(38’)or 48’(38’)38’(30’)Figure E3. Maximum Building Height and Maximum Façade Height
  • 146. E20MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANresidential fabric outside the Specific Plan Study, façadeheight limit is required on all sides, except the interior side.These specifically are the districts ECR NE-L, ECR SW,SA E and ECR SE. The limits on façade heights help toattenuate the visual effects of taller buildings.At the three community workshops in 2009, the communitygenerally accepted taller buildings, as noted, with the strongproviso that building massing is modulated. Standardsand guidelines presented in Section E.3.4 “Massingand Modulation” help to effectively address massing,incorporating a modulated and articulated taller buildingvolume with adjacent open space.StandardsE.3.2.01 Roof-mounted mechanical equipment, solarpanels, and similar equipment may exceed the maximumbuilding height, but shall be screened from view frompublicly-accessible spaces.E.3.2.02 Vertical building projections such as parapetsand balcony railings may extend up to 4 feet beyond themaximum façade height or the maximum building height,and shall be integrated into the design of the building.E.3.2.03 Rooftop elements that may need to exceed themaximum building height due to their function, such as stairand elevator towers, shall not exceed 14 feet beyond themaximum building height. Such rooftop elements shall beintegrated into the design of the building.Figure E4. Heights, Setbacks and Building Profile“We need design guidelinesso there is enoughdetail – not dull blocks ofurban structures – needlandscaping and setbacks”- Workshop #1 Participant3572461Building HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear SetbackUpper Floor Setback determined by 45-degree Building Profile45-degree Building Profile1234567
  • 147. E21CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERE.3.3 Setbacks and Projections withinSetbacksThe Specific Plan uses several methods for controllingbuilding placement within the plan area, with a focus onstrengthening historic patterns while creating opportunitiesfor widened sidewalks, plazas and landscaped openspaces. The most common of those methods is the use ofsetbacks, which is the focus of this section. The SpecificPlan also uses other techniques such as building breaksand façade modulation, which are addressed in SectionE.3.4 “Massing and Modulation.”Setbacks are used to establish the minimum, and in somecases maximum, distance between a property line andwall of a building. The minimum and maximum setbacksprovide flexibility to allow each development to optimize thebuilding placement according to a specific situation suchas sidewalk condition or ground floor use. Setbacks canserve multiple purposes including helping to define a streetedge, providing adequate space for sidewalks, plazas andlandscaped open spaces and helping to manage buildingdesign and massing to ensure buildings fit well within thecontext of their specific location. Setbacks along a publicright-of-way help establish the character of a street andneighborhood. Most buildings in Menlo Park are parallelto the street and have a consistent setback. Buildings inthe downtown area and along El Camino Real closest todowntown have minimal or no setbacks, which is consistentwith the historic character of the area. Newer developmentsalong El Camino Real have larger setbacks.Buildings with minimal setbacks have a special relationshipwith the sidewalk and street. In these cases, buildingsframe the street and form a well-defined street edge.Activities within the building, if seen, particularly at groundlevel, can provide visual interest and a degree of safetyto passersby. Activities outside the building, such asoutdoor dining, can enliven adjacent sidewalks. Theseare desirable attributes in areas with high levels of activitysuch as the downtown and station area. Other areas,such as the northern and southern portions of El CaminoReal can benefit from greater setbacks as a way to helpwiden sidewalks and provide plazas and landscaped openspaces. This is particularly true of the east side of ElCamino Real (outside of the station area) where parcelsare deeper and can accommodate wider sidewalks. Wherelarger setbacks are established, the Specific Plan alsoLandscape treatment in front setback (Emeryville, California)Large setback contributes to a wider sidewalk (Santa Cruz,California)Small setbacks help hold the street edge while providingspace for spill-out that contributes to a vibrant character(Berkeley, California)Guideline E.3.3.01 Appropriate front setback treatment)
  • 148. E22MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANrequires wider sidewalks with differentiated clear zones forwalking and sidewalk furnishings (see Chapter D “PublicSpace,” Guidelines D.2.08 through D.2.15).Figure E7 depicts front and side setbacks facing streets forthe Specific Plan area that maintain and enhance existingpatterns. The Specific Plan places buildings close to thestreet with no or minimum setbacks in the downtown andstation area to help create a strong street edge or streetwall. One exception to this is for El Camino Real within theStation Area where setbacks are established that allow forwidening the sidewalks along El Camino Real between OakGrove Avenue and Menlo Avenue, consistent with setbacksfor other sections of El Camino Real. The Specific Plancalls for a range of setbacks in other areas.Specific front, side, rear and building profiles for eachZoning District are provided in Section E.4 “ZoningDistricts.” Similar to front setbacks, side and rear setbacks,as well as upper floor profiles, provide adequate space forplazas and landscaped open spaces and help to managebuilding design and massing to ensure buildings fit wellwithin the context of their specific location. Rear setbacks,in particular those adjoining residential neighborhoods,are used to provide appropriate transitions between areas.Upper floor profiles in particular help to mitigate the visualimpact of taller buildings and to reduce building scale.Most of the setback requirements are applied equally to alllevels of a building; however, in the ECR NE, ECR NE-R,and a portion of the ECR SW zoning districts, the minimuminterior side setback requirements differ between theground level and the floors above.In order to allow for features that help articulate the buildingdesign and provide for necessary operational featuressuch as mechanical equipment, the Specific Plan allows forsome variations and projections in the required setbacksas noted below. Section E.4 identifies the specific zoningdistricts where these may be applied.StandardsE.3.3.01 Front setback areas shall be developed withsidewalks, plazas, and/or landscaping as appropriate.E.3.3.02 Parking shall not be permitted in front setbackareas.E.3.3.03 In areas where no or a minimal setback isrequired, limited setback for store or lobby entry recessesshall not exceed a maximum of 4-foot depth and amaximum of 6-foot width.E.3.3.04 In areas where no or a minimal setback isrequired, building projections, such as balconies, baywindows and dormer windows, shall not project beyond amaximum of 3 feet from the building face into the sidewalkclear walking zone, public right-of-way or public spaces,provided they have a minimum 8-foot vertical clearanceabove the sidewalk clear walking zone, public right-of-wayor public space.E.3.3.05 In areas where setbacks are required, buildingprojections, such as balconies, bay windows and dormerwindows, at or above the second habitable floor shall notproject beyond a maximum of 5 feet from the building faceinto the setback area.Figure E6. Building and Architectural Projection StandardsFigure E5. Building and Architectural Projectionsmin. 8’ clearmax. 3’ projected over public ROWmax. 5’ projected into setback areamax. 6’ projectedover public ROW orinto setback areabuilding projectionsarchitecturalprojections
  • 149. E23CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERleruaLleruaLMiddleIsabellaYaleEncinalWatkinsCollegekeerCRobleEmileMillsPineCambridgetnomerFLive OakAlejandraotlAFeltonHarvardArdenBurgessJohnsonPartridgeNoelGarwoodLennoxnotecnirPrevooHMerillSprucenylevERoseenarCairotciVLeonerialCeeLMillieLaneAlicenessucraMStone PineWerthFlorenceMac BainWaverlyPriorLllenroCoinotnAnaSBay LaurelBrittonYEROMDouglasMoultonBuckthornaccebbeRelyoDBlakeSherwoodHopkinssitruCyenolaMnorraBMichaelKENWOODtneKClaremontCherryForestMalletTudortuntsehCdoowemoHSurreydrawoHElizabethuaetahCdoownneFselliasreVBassettCreekPlxessuSManorekalBCreekenarCWaverlyrobrASherwoodWillowJohnsonRoblerobrAsitruCAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AveMenloRavenswoodElCaminoRealNo Setback7’ Min. - 12’ Max. Setback10’ Min. - 20’ Max. SetbackPlan Area BoundaryMenlo Park City Boundary5’ Min. - 20’ Max. Setback5’ Min. - 8’ Max. SetbackN0 300 600 1200FeetFigure E7. Building Front and Corner Side Setbacks
  • 150. E24MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3.3.06 The total area of all building projections shall notexceed 35% of the primary building façade area. Primarybuilding façade is the façade built at the property or setbackline.E.3.3.07 Architectural projections like canopies, awningsand signage shall not project beyond a maximum of 6 feethorizontally from the building face at the property line orat the minimum setback line. There shall be a minimum of8-foot vertical clearance above the sidewalk, public right-of-way or public space.E.3.3.08 No development activities may take place withinthe San Francisquito Creek bed, below the creek bank, orin the riparian corridor.“Want variability along lengthof buildings, not just a longwall”- Workshop #3 Participant“Varied massing is important”- Workshop #3 ParticipantE.3.4 Massing and ModulationThe Specific Plan’s standards and guidelines for buildingmassing and modulation help to reduce the monolithiccharacter of a building, ensure that all new buildingscomplement the existing scale and character of the area,ensure appropriate transitions to adjacent neighborhoodsand provide variety and visual interest. The standardsand guidelines address a building’s relationship with thestreet and other public spaces as well as its relationship toadjacent buildings and uses.Building massing and modulation consider both vertical andhorizontal modulations. The modulation of buildings refersto change or variety across a building plane to providedistinction in the building as well as provide visual interest.Vertical modulation is the introduction of façade articulationthat creates a rhythm or pattern across the façade of abuilding. Horizontal modulation provides visual claritybetween ground floors, upper stories and roofs.The Specific Plan incorporates four sets of standards thathelp to accomplish vertical and horizontal modulation withthe following four elements: E.3.4.1 Building Breaks E.3.4.2 Façade Modulation and Treatment E.3.4.3 Building Profile E.3.4.4 Upper Story Façade LengthFigure E8. Allowable Building Projection Areabuilding projections not to exceed a total of35% of primary building façade areaprimary buildingfaçade area
  • 151. E25CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERNo: Monolithic character of buildingE.3.4.1 Building BreaksBuilding breaks are visual breaks in the building plane thatprovide for additional street edge modulation, variety andvisual interest and help avoid long, continuous façades alongstreets. Building breaks extend through the entire height ofthe building and act to separate buildings and create openspaces. Building breaks can also take the form of deeprecesses that create a perception of distinct building massand volume.Building breaks are most appropriate along El Camino Realand Alma Street, given the potential for development of largerbuildings on larger parcels of land. Along most of El CaminoReal and Alma Street, building breaks are required, especiallyin cases where parcels are or could be assembled into largertracts of land.Section E.4 “Zoning Districts” identifies the zoning districtsin which building breaks are required. The El CaminoReal Southeast Zoning District (ECR SE) is a unique areabecause, with the exception of one small parcel, the areais owned by three entities, including Stanford University.Stanford University owns the southern two-thirds of the areaor 12.8 acres, and it intends to prepare a comprehensive planfor the 8.5 acres of its site north of the Stanford Park Hotelonce ground lease agreements have expired. In addition, thisarea is unique because the rear edges of the properties arebordered by the railroad tracks and Alma Street providing alarge buffer to neighborhoods directly to the east. The SpecificPlan includes requirements for breaks between buildings inECR SE (both physical breaks and deep recesses) to breakup building mass and to provide open space, some publiclyaccessible, and an improved pedestrian environment. FigureE9 provides a diagram of required building breaks for ECRSE, almost all of which are aligned with streets on the westside of El Camino Real.StandardsE.3.4.1.01 The total of all building breaks shall not exceed 25percent of the primary façade plane in a development.E.3.4.1.02 Building breaks shall be located at ground leveland extend the entire building height.E.3.4.1.03 In all districts except the ECR-SE zoning district,recesses that function as building breaks shall have minimumdimensions of 20 feet in width and depth and a maximumdimension of 50 feet in width. For the ECR-SE zoning district,recesses that function as building breaks shall have aminimum dimension of 60 feet in width and 40 feet in depth.Yes: Varied building mass and height with appropriatefaçade articulation promotes visual interest(Mountain View, California)Building break (Victoria, British Columbia)
  • 152. E26MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3.4.1.04 Building breaks shall be accompanied with a majorchange in fenestration pattern, material and color to have adistinct treatment for each volume.E.3.4.1.05 In all districts except the ECR-SE zoning district,building breaks shall be required as shown in Table E3.E.3.4.1.06 In the ECR-SE zoning district, and consistent withTable E4 the building breaks shall: Comply with Figure E9; Be a minimum of 60 feet in width, except where noted onFigure E9; Be a minimum of 120 feet in width at Middle Avenue; Align with intersecting streets, except for the areabetween Roble Avenue and Middle Avenue; Be provided at least every 350 feet in the areabetween Roble Avenue and Middle Avenue; whereproperties under different ownership coincide with thismeasurement, the standard side setbacks (10 to 25 feet)Table E4. Required Building Breaks in the ECR SE Zoning Districtshall be applied, resulting in an effective break of between20 to 50 feet. Extend through the entire building height and depth at LiveOak Avenue, Roble Avenue, Middle Avenue, PartridgeAvenue and Harvard Avenue; and Include two publicly-accessible building breaks at MiddleAvenue and Roble Avenue.E.3.4.1.07 In the ECR-SE zoning district, the Middle Avenuebreak shall include vehicular access; publicly-accessible openspace with seating, landscaping and shade; retail and restaurantuses activating the open space; and a pedestrian/bicycleconnection to Alma Street and Burgess Park. The Roble Avenuebreak shall include publicly-accessible open space with seating,landscaping and shade.GuidelinesE.3.4.1.08 In the ECR-SE zoning district, the breaks at Live Oak,Roble, Middle, Partridge and Harvard Avenues may providevehicular access.Zoning DistrictBuilding BreakRequiredRecessAllowedMaximumDistance BetweenBuilding BreaksMinimum Width ofBuilding BreaksMaximum Widthof BuildingBreaksECR NE-L Yes Yes 100 20 50ECR NE Yes Yes 250 20 50ECR NE-R Yes Yes 250 20 50ECR NW Prohibited -- -- -- --ECR SWYes, only southof Live OakYes 100 20 50SA EYes, onlyalong AlmaYes 250 20 50SA W Prohibited -- -- -- --D Prohibited -- -- -- --DA Prohibited -- -- -- --Table E3. Required Building Breaks in the Zoning DistrictsLocationBuilding BreakRequiredRecessAllowedMaximum Distance BetweenBuilding BreaksMinimum Width ofBuilding Breaks*Public or PrivateAccessibleLive Oak Yes No Aligned with intersecting street 50 PrivateRoble Yes No Aligned with intersecting street 50 PublicBetween Roble& MiddleYes Yes 350 60 PrivateMiddle Yes No Aligned with intersecting street 120 PublicCollege Yes Yes Aligned with intersecting street 60 PrivatePartridge Yes No Aligned with intersecting street 60 PrivateCambridge Yes Yes Aligned with intersecting street 60 PrivateHarvard Yes No Aligned with intersecting street 60 Private
  • 153. E27CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERLaurelMiddleCollegeCambridgeLive OakAltoHarvardBurgessPartridgeWaverlyCornellLMOREYBlakeHopkinsKENWOODClaremontCreekPlManorBlakeCreekSherwoodWillowRobleCurtisAlmaStreetRavenswoodPublicly-accessiblePrivateExisting BuildingPlan Area BoundaryMenlo Park City BoundaryDevelopable AreaStanford Property BoundaryFrontage Break120’20’ to 60’Location of Building Breaksare variable in this area60’60’60’60’60’60’60’Figure E9. Minimum Building Break Requirements in ECR SE District
  • 154. E28MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3.4.2 Façade Modulation and TreatmentTo avoid long stretches of continuous or monotonousstreet frontage and to provide visual interest, the SpecificPlan recommends a range of façade modulation andtreatments depending on building façade length. In general,buildings should maintain a tight and varied rhythm offaçades compatible with the existing downtown character.In particular, they should relate to the typical 50-foot wideparcel width through building vertical modulation andfaçade articulation.StandardsE.3.4.2.01 Building façades facing public rights-of-wayor public open spaces shall not exceed 50 feet in lengthwithout a minor building façade modulation. At a minimumof every 50’ façade length, the minor vertical façademodulation shall be a minimum 2 feet deep by 5 feet widerecess or a minimum 2 foot setback of the building planefrom the primary building façade.E.3.4.2.02 Building façades facing public rights-of-way orpublic open spaces shall not exceed 100 feet in lengthwithout a major building modulation. At a minimum ofevery 100 feet of façade length, a major vertical façademodulation shall be a minimum of 6 feet deep by 20 feetwide recess or a minimum of 6 feet setback of buildingplane from primary building façade for the full height of thebuilding. This standard applies to all districts except ECRNE-L and ECR SW since those two districts are required toprovide a building break at every 100 feet.E.3.4.2.03 In addition, the major building façade modulationshall be accompanied with a 4-foot minimum heightmodulation and a major change in fenestration pattern,material and/or color.GuidelinesE.3.4.2.04 Minor façade modulation may be accompaniedwith a change in fenestration pattern, and/or material, and/or color, and/or height.E.3.4.2.05 Buildings should consider sun shadingmechanisms, like overhangs, bris soleils and clerestorylighting, as façade articulation strategies.No: Continuous street frontage(Redwood City, California)Yes: Varied primary building façade plane(Kirkland, Washington)Building façade modulation
  • 155. E29CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERFigure E10. Vertical Façade Modulation and Upper Floor FaçadeLengthE.3.4.3 Building ProfileThe Specific Plan includes a standard for a building profileat upper stories that requires a building to comply witha 45-degree building profile above the maximum façadeheight specified for the zoning district. Figure E11 (left)demonstrates the 45-degree building profile. The buildingprofile requires upper floors to be stepped back from thefaçade of the building.StandardsE.3.4.3.01 The 45-degree building profile shall be set at theminimum setback line to allow for flexibility and variation inbuilding façade height within a district.E.3.4.3.02 Horizontal building and architectural projections,like balconies, bay windows, dormer windows, canopies,awnings, and signage, beyond the 45-degree buildingprofile shall comply with the standards for Building Setbacks& Projection within Setbacks (E.3.3.04 to E.3.3.07) andshall be integrated into the design of the building.E.3.4.3.03 Vertical building projections like parapetsand balcony railings shall not extend 4 feet beyond the45-degree building profile and shall be integrated into thedesign of the building.E.3.4.3.04 Rooftop elements that may need to extendbeyond the 45-degree building profile due to their function,such as stair and elevator towers, shall be integrated intothe design of the building.E.3.4.4 Upper Story Façade LengthTo further break down the massing of large buildings, theSpecific Plan limits the size of a building’s upper stories,in particular those stories above the established 38-footfaçade height. Illustrated in Figure E10, the Specific Planachieves this break down of massing by limiting the façadelength of upper stories facing public rights-of-ways andpublic open spaces.StandardE.3.4.4.01 Building stories above the 38-foot façade heightshall have a maximum allowable façade length of 175 feetalong a public right-of-way or public open space.allowablefacadeheightmax.upper floor setbackwithin 45-degreebuilding profileFigure E12. 45-Degree Building Profile set atMinimum Setback LineFigure E11. 45-Degree Building Profile forFloors above the Maximum Allowable FaçadeHeightMinimum SetbackProperty Lineminimumfrontsetbackmaximum allowablefaçade heightBuildingProfile45°45°32211Minor façade modulation at a minimum at every 50’Major façade modulation at a minimum at every 100’Maximum upper story façade length (175’)123
  • 156. E30MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3.5 Ground Floor Treatment, Entryand Commercial FrontageA building’s ground floor is the portion of the building mostexperienced by the pedestrian. Its treatment can affect theoverall experience and feeling of safety of the passerby.Well-designed ground floor treatments, building entries andretail frontage help ensure a pleasant and safe pedestrianexperience and help create a successful retail environmentand an appropriate transition between buildings andsidewalks and other public places. The careful designof these features, either in isolated locations or along ashopping street such as Santa Cruz Avenue, is an essentialcomponent to overall building design.The Specific Plan encourages use of the followingstandards and guidelines in order to maximize thestrategies that lead to a vibrant and welcoming street andsuccessful retail environment.Ground Floor TreatmentStandardsE.3.5.01 The retail or commercial ground floor shall be aminimum 15-foot floor-to-floor height to allow natural lightinto the space.E.3.5.02 Ground floor commercial buildings shall have aminimum of 50% transparency (i.e., clear-glass windows)for retail uses, office uses and lobbies to enhance the visualexperience from the sidewalk and street. Heavily tinted ormirrored glass shall not be permitted.Standard E.3.5.02 Well designed, transparent groundfloor treatment ensuring a pleasant and safe pedestrianexperience (San Francisco, California)Guideline E.3.5.03 Ground floor uses and entries orientedto the street (Portland, Oregon)Guideline E.3.5.04 Active uses at ground-floor (SanFrancisco, California)
  • 157. E31CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERGuidelinesE.3.5.03 Buildings should orient ground-floor retail uses,entries and direct-access residential units to the street.E.3.5.04 Buildings should activate the street by providingvisually interesting and active uses, such as retail andpersonal service uses, in ground floors that face the street.If office and residential uses are provided, they should beenhanced with landscaping and interesting building designand materials.E.3.5.05 For buildings where ground floor retail, commercialor residential uses are not desired or viable, other project-related uses, such as a community room, fitness center,daycare facility or sales center, should be located at theground floor to activate the street.E.3.5.06. Blank walls at ground floor are discouragedand should be minimized. When unavoidable, continuouslengths of blank wall at the street should use otherappropriate measures such as landscaping or artisticintervention, such as murals.E.3.5.07 Residential units located at ground level shouldhave their floors elevated a minimum of 2 feet to amaximum of 4 feet above the finished grade sidewalk forbetter transition and privacy, provided that accessibilitycodes are met.E.3.5.08 Architectural projections like canopies and awningsshould be integrated with the ground floor and overallbuilding design to break up building mass, to add visualinterest to the building and provide shelter and shade.Guideline E.3.5.08 Example of awning integrated into overall buildingdesignFigure E13. Raised Residential Unit Entries2’ to 4’
  • 158. E32MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANBuilding EntriesStandardE.3.5.09 Building entries shall be oriented to a public streetor other public space. For larger residential buildings withshared entries, the main entry shall be through prominententry lobbies or central courtyards facing the street. Fromthe street, these entries and courtyards provide additionalvisual interest, orientation and a sense of invitation.GuidelinesE.3.5.10 Entries should be prominent and visuallydistinctive from the rest of the façade with creative use ofscale, materials, glazing, projecting or recessed forms,architectural details, color, and/or awnings.E.3.5.11 Multiple entries at street level are encouragedwhere appropriate.E.3.5.12 Ground floor residential units are encouraged tohave their entrance from the street.E.3.5.13 Stoops and entry steps from the street areencouraged for individual unit entries when compliant withapplicable accessibility codes. Stoops associated withlandscaping create inviting, usable and visually attractivetransitions from private spaces to the street.E.3.5.14 Building entries are allowed to be recessed fromthe primary building façade.Guideline E.3.5.12. Ground floor residential unitsencouraged to have their entrance from the streetGuideline E.3.5.09. Inviting, prominent shared entry from acentral courtyard facing the street (Portland, Oregon)
  • 159. E33CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERCommercial FrontageStandardsE.3.5.15 Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessedfrom the primary building façade a minimum of 6 inchesE.3.5.16 Retail frontage, whether ground floor or upperfloor, shall have a minimum 50% of the façade areatransparent with clear vision glass, not heavily tinted orhighly mirrored glass.GuidelinesE.3.5.17 Storefront design should be consistent with thebuilding’s overall design and contribute to establishing awell-defined ground floor for the façade along streets.E.3.5.18 The distinction between individual storefronts,entire building façades and adjacent properties should bemaintained.E.3.5.19 Storefront elements such as windows, entrancesand signage should provide clarity and lend interest to thefaçade.E.3.5.20 Individual storefronts should have clearly definedbays. These bays should be no greater than 20 feet inlength. Architectural elements, such as piers, recesses andprojections help articulate bays.Figure E14. Clearly Articulated Ground Floor Bays that are no GreaterThan 20’Guideline E.3.5.17. Storefront design consistent with the overalldesign of the building (San Francisco, California)Guideline E.3.5.19. Storefront elements lend visual interest to facades(Menlo Park, California)20’ max.
  • 160. E34MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3.5.21 All individual retail uses should have direct accessfrom the public sidewalk. For larger retail tenants, entriesshould occur at lengths at a maximum at every 50 feet,consistent with the typical lot size in downtown.E.3.5.22 Recessed doorways for retail uses should be aminimum of two feet in depth. Recessed doorways providecover or shade, help identify the location of store entrances,provide a clear area for out-swinging doors and offer theopportunity for interesting paving patterns, signage anddisplays.E.3.5.23 Storefronts should remain un-shuttered at nightand provide clear views of interior spaces lit from within.If storefronts must be shuttered for security reasons,the shutters should be located on the inside of the storewindows and allow for maximum visibility of the interior.E.3.5.24 Storefronts should not be completely obscuredwith display cases that prevent customers and pedestriansfrom seeing inside.E.3.5.25 Signage should not be attached to storefrontwindows.Guideline E.3.5.23. Clear vision glass for retail frontage (LosAngeles, California)Guideline E.3.5.22. Recessed doorways (Vancouver,Canada)Figure E15. Retail Entries at a Maximum of Every 50’max. 50’
  • 161. E35CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERE.3.6 Open SpaceThe provision and treatment of private open space onindividual parcels can enhance the character of publicstreets and sidewalks and private development. It canadd to available public open space in the area. TheSpecific Plan encourages use of the following standardsand guidelines when incorporating open space in privatedevelopments.StandardsE.3.6.01 Residential developments or Mixed Usedevelopments with residential use shall have a minimum of100 square feet of open space per unit created as commonopen space or a minimum of 80 square feet of open spaceper unit created as private open space, where private openspace shall have a minimum dimension of 6 feet by 6 feet.In case of a mix of private and common open space, suchcommon open space shall be provided at a ratio equal to1.25 square feet for each one square foot of private openspace that is not provided.E.3.6.02 Residential open space (whether in common orprivate areas) and accessible open space above parkingpodiums up to 16 feet high shall count towards theminimum open space requirement for the development.GuidelinesE.3.6.03 Private and/or common open spaces areencouraged in all developments as part of buildingmodulation and articulation to enhance building façade.E.3.6.04 Private development should provide accessibleand usable common open space for building occupantsand/or the general public.E.3.6.05 For residential developments, private open spaceshould be designed as an extension of the indoor livingarea, providing an area that is usable and has some degreeof privacy.E.3.6.06 Landscaping in setback areas should define andenhance pedestrian and open space areas. It shouldprovide visual interest to streets and sidewalks, particularlywhere building façades are long.E.3.6.07 Landscaping of private open spaces should beattractive, durable and drought-resistant.Guideline E.3.6.01. Private or common spaces as part ofbuilding articulationGuideline E.3.6.05. Private open space as an extension ofthe indoor living area (Cambridge, England)
  • 162. E36MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3.7 Parking, Service and UtilitiesThis section addresses the design-related aspects (i.e.,elements that could affect the orientation and footprint ofa building) of parking, related service access and utilitiesfor private development. The overall objective of theseguidelines is that parking, service access and utilities becarefully considered to improve a building’s character andto minimize impacts to the pedestrian realm.Off-street parking standards and policies are described inmore detail in Chapter F “Circulation”, in particular SectionsF.5 – F.8. The following guidelines apply to all zoningdistricts, although as noted in Chapter F, parcels within thedowntown may not be required to provide on-site off-streetparking, subject to availability in public facilities.General Parking and Service AccessGuidelinesE.3.7.01 The location, number and width of parking andservice entrances should be limited to minimize breaks inbuilding design, sidewalk curb cuts and potential conflictswith streetscape elements.E.3.7.02 In order to minimize curb cuts, shared entrancesfor both retail and residential use are encouraged. In sharedentrance conditions, secure access for residential parkingshould be provided.E.3.7.03 When feasible, service access and loading docksshould be located on secondary streets or alleys and to therear of the building.E.3.7.04 The size and pattern of loading dock entrancesand doors should be integrated with the overall buildingdesign.E.3.7.05 Loading docks should be screened from publicways and adjacent properties to the greatest extentpossible. In particular, buildings that directly adjoinresidential properties should limit the potential for loading-related impacts, such as noise. Where possible, loadingdocks should be internal to the building envelope andequipped with closable doors. For all locations, loadingareas should be kept clean.E.3.7.06 Surface parking should be visually attractive,address security and safety concerns, retain existingmature trees and incorporate canopy trees for shade.See Section D.5 for more compete guidelines regardinglandscaping in parking areas.UtilitiesGuidelinesE.3.7.07 All utilities in conjunction with new residential andcommercial development should be placed underground.E.3.7.08 Above ground meters, boxes and other utilityequipment should be screened from public view throughuse of landscaping or by integrating into the overall buildingdesign.
  • 163. E37CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERGuideline E.3.7.12. Overall building façade compatible withsurrounding building character (Santa Cruz, California)Guideline E.3.7.11. Screening of parking garage withseating areas and landscaping (Sacramento, California)Guideline E.3.7.10. Parking garage successfully avoidinga monolithic massing by change in height, material , patternand color (Palo Alto, California)Parking GaragesDue to their size, above ground parking garages are highlyvisible and affect the character of the surrounding area.Guidelines for parking garages help minimize their visualimpact and integrate them into the surrounding area.StandardsE.3.7.09 To promote the use of bicycles, secure bicycleparking shall be provided at the street level of public parkinggarages. Bicycle parking is also discussed in more detail inSection F.5 “Bicycle Storage Standards and Guidelines.”GuidelinesE.3.7.10 Parking garages on downtown parking plazasshould avoid monolithic massing by employing change infaçade rhythm, materials and/or color.E.3.7.11 To minimize or eliminate their visibility and impactfrom the street and other significant public spaces, parkinggarages should be underground, wrapped by other uses(i.e. parking podium within a development) and/or screenedfrom view through architectural and/or landscape treatment.E.3.7.12 Whether free-standing or incorporated into overallbuilding design, garage façades should be designed witha modulated system of vertical openings and pilasters,with design attention to an overall building façade that fitscomfortably and compatibly into the pattern, articulation,scale and massing of surrounding building character.E.3.7.13 Shared parking is encouraged where feasible tominimize space needs, and it is effectively codified throughthe plan’s off-street parking standards and allowance forshared parking studies.E.3.7.14 A parking garage roof should be approachedas a usable surface and an opportunity for sustainablestrategies, such as installment of a green roof, solar panelsor other measures that minimize the heat island effect.
  • 164. E38MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANE.3.8 Sustainable PracticesSustainable practices for new construction supportcommunity and environmental well-being by utilizingfinite resources in a responsible way, creating healthyenvironments for building inhabitants and minimizingimpacts to both natural systems and existing utilities (i.e.water, wastewater and energy systems). The City of MenloPark supports sustainable practices through its ClimateAction Plan.Sustainable practices address: 1) the environmentalimpacts of site development and building construction; and2) the long-term environmental impacts of the operation ofbuildings resulting in the emission of greenhouse gases(GHGs), in particular carbon dioxide (CO2), which is asignificant contributor to global climate change. Currently,there are excellent tools to measure ways to reduceenvironmental impacts caused by building construction,and new tools are emerging to measure greenhouse gasemissions caused by building operations over the longterm.To address impacts caused by construction, the U.S. GreenBuilding Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy andEnvironmental Design (LEED) rating system measuresspecific site development and new building constructionmethods related to environmental issues, such as energysavings, water efficiency, CO2 emissions reduction,improved indoor environmental quality and stewardship ofresources and sensitivity to their impacts.To address GHG emissions, the world’s leading greenbuilding organizations have agreed to adopt a commonglobal language for the measurement of the carbonfootprint of buildings. The “common carbon metric” willbe piloted by the leading green building rating tools. Thisshould lead to the cost-effective GHG mitigation potentialof buildings, which account for around 40% of the world’senergy use and 33% of global GHG emissions.11US Green Building Council
  • 165. E39CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERMeasurement ToolsDevelopment and Construction ToolsUS Green Building Council Leadership in Energy andEnvironmental Design (LEED)The LEED program has performance levels from “Certified”to “Platinum” and rating systems that address differenttypes of construction and building operation, includingLEED for New Construction and LEED for existingbuildings, operations and maintenance. In addition, LEEDfor Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) promotesbest practices in site selection, development programs,development patterns and design at the neighborhoodscale.GreenPoint RatingBuild It Green is a membership supported non-profitorganization whose mission is to promote healthy, energy-and resource-efficient homes in California. Build it Greenhas a GreenPoint rating system specifically designed toaddress residential construction. Many municipalities in theBay Area have adopted Green Building Ordinances thatrequire certain levels of LEED certification or a GreenPointrating for different types of projects. A residential buildingcan be GreenPoint Rated if it achieves the performancerequirements of the GreenPoint rating system; there isno sliding scale like there is with LEED (i.e. “Certified” to“Platinum”).2030 Challenge Greenhouse Gas Reduction TargetsThe 2030 Challenge is an initiative by Architecture2030 asking for the adoption of a series of greenhousegas reduction targets for new and renovated buildings.Architecture 2030 is a non-profit, non-partisan andindependent organization established in 2002 by architectEdward Mazria in response to the global-warming crisis.2030’s mission is to rapidly transform the US and globalbuilding sector from a major contributor of greenhouse gasemissions to a central part of the solution to the global-warming crisis.InitiativesA variety of state, regional and local initiatives addresssustainable development and reduction of greenhousegases.State InitiativesThe State of California has adopted a green buildingcode (CALGREEN) which took effect on January 1, 2011.The CALGREEN Code is a comprehensive and uniformregulatory code for certain categories of residentialbuildings and for commercial, hospital and school buildings.It is intended to ensure that most new buildings in Californiaare built using environmentally advanced constructionpractices. Some of the requirements of the code are thefollowing: 20 percent mandatory reduction in indoor water use,with voluntary goal standards for 30, 35 and 40 percentreductions; Separate water meters for nonresidential buildings’indoor and outdoor water use, with a requirementfor moisture-sensing irrigation systems for largerlandscape projects; Requiring diversion of 50 percent of constructionwaste from landfills, increasing voluntarily to 65and 75 percent for new homes and 80 percent forcommercial projects (Menlo Park currently implementsa Construction and Demolition ordinance that requiresconstruction projects to divert 60 percent of materialsfrom the landfill); Mandatory inspections of energy systems (i.e. heatfurnace, air conditioner, mechanical equipment) fornonresidential buildings over 10,000 square feet toensure that all are working at their maximum capacityaccording to their design efficiencies; and Requiring low-pollutant emitting interior finish materialssuch as paints, carpet, vinyl flooring and particle board. While the CALGREEN Code clearly advances“green” practices in building construction, the codecomplements, and does not replace, the LEEDprogram, which takes a more comprehensive approachto sustainable design.
  • 166. E40MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANRegional InitiativesSan Mateo County has adopted a Green BuildingOrdinance that applies to buildings requiring permitsissued by the County. San Mateo County’s Green BuildingOrdinance requires new and 50 percent remodels of singlefamily, two family and low rise multi-family residentialbuildings to receive either a GreenPoint rating or LEEDcertification and new commercial and industrial buildingsgreater than 3,000 square feet to receive LEED certification.Local InitiativesMenlo Park published a Climate Action Plan (CAP) in2009 that included measures to reduce greenhousegas emissions. In 2011, the City Council adopted asupplemental report to the CAP, which updated MenloPark’s community greenhouse gas inventories between2005 and 2009, and also provided a five year strategy ofclimate action initiatives. One of the initiatives includes thephased development of a sustainable building ordinancethat would enhance energy efficiency in newly constructedbuildings beyond that provided by CALGREEN. The firstphase of work resulted in the City adoption of three localamendments to CALGREEN. The local amendmentshave been effective since January 1, 2012. The localamendments include the following new requirements forbuildings currently subject to CALGREEN: All newly constructed buildings are required to exceedthe minimum energy efficiency standards established inthe 2010 California Energy Code by 15 percent. All newly constructed buildings are required to testheating and cooling ducts for leakage. All newly constructed residential buildings are requiredto install cool roofs or use alternative methods andmaterials to achieve equivalent energy savings.The second phase of work is expected to begin in fiscalyear 2012-2013 and will focus on the exploration ofadditional sustainability building measures, including theuse of various rating systems.All city-wide programs are applicable to the Specific Planarea.“Need to be concerned aboutthe greenhouse gas emissionincreases’ impact on climatechange. Require greenbuildings minimum thresholds”- Workshop #3 Participant“I am for progress and newideas and a “Gold LEED”business area”- Workshop #3 Participant
  • 167. E41CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERLeadership in Energy and EnvironmentalDesign (LEED) StandardsE.3.8.03 Development shall achieve LEED certification,at Silver level or higher, or a LEED Silver equivalentstandard for the project types listed below. For LEEDcertification, the applicable standards include LEED NewConstruction; LEED Core and Shell; LEED New Homes;LEED Schools; and LEED Commercial Interiors. Attainmentshall be achieved through LEED certification or through aCity-approved outside auditor for those projects pursinga LEED equivalent standard. The requirements, processand applicable fees for an outside auditor program shall beestablished by the City and shall be reviewed and updatedon a regular basis.LEED certification or equivalent standard, at a Silver leveror higher, shall be required for: Newly constructed residential buildings of Group R(single-family, duplex and multi-family); Newly constructed commercial buildings of GroupB (occupancies including among others office,professional and service type transactions) and GroupM (occupancies including among others display orsale of merchandise such as department stores, retailstores, wholesale stores, markets and sales rooms)that are 5,000 gross square feet or more; New first-time build-outs of commercial interiors thatare 20,000 gross square feet or more in buildings ofGroup B and M occupancies; and Major alterations that are 20,000 gross square feetor more in existing buildings of Group B, M and Roccupancies, where interior finishes are removed andsignificant upgrades to structural and mechanical,electrical and/or plumbing systems are proposed.All residential and/or mixed use developments of sufficientsize to require LEED certification or equivalent standardunder the Specific Plan shall install one dedicated electricvehicle/plug-in hybrid electric vehicle recharging stationfor every 20 residential parking spaces provided. Per theClimate Action Plan the complying applicant could receiveincentives, such as streamlined permit processing, feediscounts, or design templates.Standards and GuidelinesIn addition to the local initiatives described above, theSpecific Plan establishes the following standards andguidelines for sustainable practices in the plan area. Thestandards and guidelines reflect best practices as adoptedby other cities. The costs relating to sustainable practicesare absorbed by developers, which has become standardpractice. The Specific Plan recognizes the potential offinancial hardship for smaller buildings by establishingtwo sets of requirements -- one for larger buildings/developments and one for smaller buildings as noted below.Overall StandardsE.3.8.01 Unless the Specific Plan area is explicitlyexempted, all citywide sustainability codes or requirementsshall apply.Overall GuidelinesE.3.8.02 Because green building standards are constantlyevolving, the requirements in this section should bereviewed and updated on a regular basis of at least everytwo years.Summary of Green Building RequirementsBuilding Type Building Size Minimal StandardNew ConstructionNew Large Commercial 5,000 GSF (1) or larger LEED SilverNew Residential Single and duplex LEED SilverNew Residential Multi-Family 3 units or more LEED SilverNew Multi-BuildingMore than one building on oneacre or moreLEED-ND SilverRecommendedInteriors andAlterationsLarge First-Time BuildOuts of CommercialInteriors20,000 GSF or larger LEED SilverMajor Alterations toCommercial andResidential Interiors20,000 GSF or larger LEED Silver(1) GSF = Gross Square FeetTable E5. Summary of Green Building Requirements
  • 168. E42MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANLeadership in Energy and EnvironmentalDesign (LEED) GuidelinesE.3.8.04 The development of larger projects allows formore comprehensive sustainability planning and design,such as efficiency in water use, stormwater management,renewable energy sources and carbon reduction features.A larger development project is defined as one with twoor more buildings on a lot one acre or larger in size.Such development projects should have sustainabilityrequirements and GHG reduction targets that addressneighborhood planning, in addition to the sustainabilityrequirements for individual buildings (See StandardE.3.8.03 above). These should include being certifiedor equivalently verified at a LEED-ND (neighborhooddevelopment), Silver level or higher, and mandating aphased reduction of GHG emissions over a period of timeas prescribed in the 2030 Challenge.The sustainable guidelines listed below are also relevantto the project area. They relate to but do not replace LEEDcertification or equivalent standard rating requirements.Building Design GuidelinesE.3.8.05 Buildings should incorporate narrow floor plates toallow natural light deeper into the interior.E.3.8.06 Buildings should reduce use of daytime artificiallighting through design elements, such as bigger wallopenings, light shelves, clerestory lighting, skylights, andtranslucent wall materials.E.3.8.07 Buildings should allow for flexibility to regulate theamount of direct sunlight into the interiors. Louvered wallopenings or shading devices like bris soleils help controlsolar gain and check overheating. Bris soleils, which arepermanent sun-shading elements, extend from the sun-facing façade of a building, in the form of horizontal orvertical projections depending on sun orientation, to cut outthe sun’s direct rays, help protect windows from excessivesolar light and heat and reduce glare within.E.3.8.08 Where appropriate, buildings should incorporatearcades, trellis and appropriate tree planting to screen andmitigate south and west sun exposure during summer. Thisguideline would not apply to downtown, the station area andthe west side of El Camino Real where buildings have anarrower setback and street trees provide shade.Guideline E.3.8.06. Bris soleilE.3.8.09 Operable windows are encouraged in newbuildings for natural ventilation.E.3.8.10 To maximize use of solar energy, buildings shouldconsider integrating photovoltaic panels on roofs.E.3.8.11 Inclusion of recycling centers in kitchen facilities ofcommercial and residential buildings shall be encouraged.The minimum size of recycling centers in commercialbuildings should be 20 cubic feet (48 inches wide x 30inches deep x 24 inches high) to provide for garbage andrecyclable materials.
  • 169. E43CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERStormwater and Wastewater ManagementGuidelinesEffective stormwater management techniques arerecommended. Such techniques could include bioswaleson surface parking lots, rain gardens in landscaped areas,green roofs and porous materials on driveways and parkinglots.E.3.8.12 Buildings should incorporate intensive or extensivegreen roofs in their design. Green roofs harvest rain waterthat can be recycled for plant irrigation or for some domesticuses. Green roofs are also effective in cutting-back on thecooling load of the air-conditioning system of the buildingand reducing the heat island effect from the roof surface.E.3.8.13 Projects should use porous material on drivewaysand parking lots to minimize stormwater run-off from pavedsurfaces.Landscaping GuidelinesE.3.8.14 Planting plans should support passive heating andcooling of buildings and outdoor spaces.E.3.8.15 Regional native and drought resistant plantspecies are encouraged as planting material.E.3.8.16 Provision of efficient irrigation system isrecommended, consistent with the City’s Municipal CodeChapter 12.44 “Water-Efficient Landscaping”.Guideline E.3.8.12. Green roofsGuideline E.3.8.13. Porous materialsGuideline E.3.8.14. Planting supporting passive heating andcooling
  • 170. E44MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANLighting StandardsE.3.8.17 Exterior lighting fixtures shall use fixtures with lowcut-off angles, appropriately positioned, to minimize glareinto dwelling units and light pollution into the night sky.E.3.8.18 Lighting in parking garages shall be screened andcontrolled so as not to disturb surrounding properties, butshall ensure adequate public security.Lighting GuidelinesE.3.8.19 Energy-efficient and color-balanced outdoorlighting, at the lowest lighting levels possible, areencouraged to provide for safe pedestrian and autocirculation.E.3.8.20 Improvements should use ENERGY STAR-qualified fixtures to reduce a building’s energy consumption.E.3.8.21 Installation of high-efficiency lighting systemswith advanced lighting control, including motion sensorstied to dimmable lighting controls or lighting controlled bytimers set to turn off at the earliest practicable hour, arerecommended.Green Building Material GuidelinesE.3.8.22 The reuse and recycle of construction anddemolition materials is recommended. The use ofdemolition materials as a base course for a parking lotkeeps materials out of landfills and reduces costs.E.3.8.23 The use of products with identifiable recycledcontent, including post-industrial content with a preferencefor post-consumer content, are encouraged.E.3.8.24 Building materials, components, and systemsfound locally or regionally should be used, thereby savingenergy and resources in transportation.E.3.8.25 A design with adequate space to facilitate recyclingcollection and to incorporate a solid waste managementprogram, preventing waste generation, is recommended.E.3.8.26 The use of material from renewable sources isencouraged.
  • 171. E45CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERE.4 ZONING DISTRICTSThe Specific Plan includes five land use designationsand 10 zoning districts that together provide land uses,standards and guidelines governing building size,placement and design. Section E.1 “Overview” providesa discussion of the relationship between the land usedesignations and zoning districts. Additionally, SectionsE.2 “Land Use Designations, Use Regulations, and SpecialUses” and E.3 “Development Standards and Guidelines”discuss guidelines and general standards applicable to allzoning districts. The following tables provide the specificstandards applicable on a district-by-district basis.Development projects are required to adhere to both thegeneral and specific standards applicable to the zoningdistrict in which a project site is located. Although thespecific standards are provided below for the zoningdistricts, Sections E.2 and E.3 should also be consultedfor general standards as well as guidelines that may applyto a development project. Standards and guidelines areboth critical elements in the review of new development.Development projects will be required to adhere toapplicable standards, while consistency with applicableguidelines will be a key component in the review of aproject.Note: Building graphics are intended to illustrate howdifferent standards are measured and how guidelines couldbe implemented. They are not intended to necessarilydictate the placement of different uses, parking within adevelopment or illustrate the character and expression ofthe buildings.Figure E16. Key Map of Zoning DistrictsECRNWECR NEECR NE-LECR NE-RECRSESA ESA WSAWDDECR SWDADADAPage E87Page E93Page E66Page E46Page E51Page E56Page E76Page E82Page E61Page E71
  • 172. E46MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEl Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L)The ECR NE-L District is located on the east side of ElCamino Real at the northerly boundary of the City of MenloPark and is characterized by a mix of smaller format retail,restaurant and personal service uses, office uses, moteland residential uses. The area is directly adjacent to single-family and medium density residential uses.The District is located in the El Camino Real Mixed Useland use designation which supports a variety of retail uses,personal services, business and professional offices, andresidential uses while including development guidelines andstandards to ensure that building character relates to theadjacent residential neighborhoods.Table E6 provides the standards for the ECR NE-L District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. El Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L)
  • 173. Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L)E47CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERFigure E17. Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L) District30’Max.38’Max.1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building Profile2F ResidentialUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real10’-20’ 20’Building HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min. (Not Applicable)Building Break at 100’ Min.Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space17283941056121113Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street12345111013El Camino RealProperty Line Property Line123 5139133F Residential8650
  • 174. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L)E48MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANFigure E18. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L) District2F Office30’Max.38’Max. 1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building ProfileUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real10’-20’ 20’Building HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min. (Not Applicable)Building Break at 100’ Min.Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space17283941056121113Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street2345111013El Camino RealProperty Line Property Line123 5813913650
  • 175. E49CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E6. Development Standards for El Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L) DistrictLand Use (Refer toSection E.2)Base: 0.75Public Benefit Bonus: 1.10Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 38 feetFaçade height: 30 feet for all façades except interior side façadesMinimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 10 feetMaximum: 20 feetSetback shall be sufficient to provide a minimum 15-foot wide sidewalk with aminimum 10-foot wide clear walking zone and a minimum 5-foot widefurnishings zone.Minimum: 10 feetMaximum: 25 feetRear Minimum: 20 feetAllowed Projections Building and architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.Base Density: 20 dwelling units per acreDevelopment Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)El Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L)Front and Side facing a Public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7for standards applying to specificstreet faces)Interior SideSetback (Refer toSection E.3.3)Height (Refer toSection E.3.2)Maximum HeightSee Figure E1 and Table E1; El Camino Real Mixed Use DesignationMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesPublic Benefit Bonus Density: 30 dwelling units per acrecontinued
  • 176. E50MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEl Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L)Building Breaks Building breaks are required. Refer to Section E.3.4.1Building Façade Modulation Building façade modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2A 45-degree building profile above the maximum façade height is required forall facades except interior side façades. Vertical projections such as parapets,balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to heightand design standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3.Upper Story Façade Length Not applicableAll development 30% minimumMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created ascommon open space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shallbe created as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards andguidelines.Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includesresidentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Building ProfileGround Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and certain newinteriors and alterations.Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)Table E6. Development Standards for El Camino Real North-East - Low Density (ECR NE-L) District (continued)
  • 177. E51CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTEREl Camino Real North-East (ECR NE)The ECR NE District is located on the east side of ElCamino Real between Glenwood and Encinal Avenuesand is characterized by a mix of retail, personal service,office and residential uses. The area is directly adjacent tomedium density residential uses.The District is located in the El Camino Real Mixed Useland use designation which supports a variety of retail uses,personal services, business and professional offices andresidential uses while including development guidelines andstandards to ensure that building character relates to theadjacent residential neighborhoods.Table E7 provides the standards for the ECR NE District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.El Camino Realmin. 5’furnishings areamin. 10’ clearwalking zonemin. 15’ sidewalkFigure E19. ECR NE Required SetbackKey Map. El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE)setbac
  • 178. Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE)additional floor with public benefitbonus heightadditional floor withpublic benefit bonusheightE52MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN* Applicable when public benefit bonus heightis availed.Figure E20. Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE) District48’ Max.Public BenefitBonus Height38’Max. 1F Retail 1F Parking2F Residential3F Residential4F ResidentialUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real10’-20’ 10’Building HeightFaçade Height*Front SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable on ground floor)Rear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break at 250’ Min.Building Profile*Building ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length*Open Space17283941056121113Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street235111013El Camino Real87Property Line Property Line1213 5131345° Building Profile* 964100 50
  • 179. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE)Figure E21. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE) District2F Office3F Officeadditional floor with public benefitbonus heightadditional floor withpublic benefit bonusheightE53CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTER* Applicable when public benefit bonus heightis availed.211101381313948’ Max.Public BenefitBonus Height38’Max. 1F Retail 1F ParkingUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real10’-20’ 10’Building HeightFaçade Height*Front SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable on ground floor)Rear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break at 250’ Min.Building Profile*Building ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length*Open Space17283941056121113Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street35El Camino RealProperty Line Property Line1213 545° Building Profile*476100 50
  • 180. E54MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANTable E7. Development Standards for El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE) DistrictLand Use (Refer toSection E.2)Base: 1.10Public Benefit Bonus: 1.50Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 38 feetPublic Benefit Bonus Building Height: 48 feetFaçade height: 38 feet for façades facing a public ROW or a public openspaces. Applicable only when availing the Public Benefit Bonus Building Height.Minimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 10 feet, except along San Antonio Street where 7 feet is theminimumMaximum: 20 feet, except along San Antonio Street where 12 feet is themaximumFor buildings along El Camino Real, setback shall be sufficient to provide aminimum 15-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum 10-foot wide clear walking zoneand a minimum 5-foot wide furnishings zone.Minimum: 10 feet is required only for upper floors. There is no minimum sidesetback for ground floor.Maximum: 25 feetRear Minimum: 10 feetAllowed Projections Building and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE)Front and Side facing a Public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7 forstandards applying to specific streetfaces)Interior SideSetback (Refer toSection E.3.3)Height (Refer to SectionE.3.2)Maximum HeightSee Figure E1 and Table E1; El Camino Real Mixed Use DesignationMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesPublic Benefit Bonus Density: 40 dwelling units per acreDevelopment Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)Base Density: 25 dwelling units per acre
  • 181. E55CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E7. Development Standards for El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE) District (continued)El Camino Real North-East (ECR NE)Building Breaks Building Breaks are required. Refer to Section E.3.4.1Building Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2Building Profile Applicable only when availing the Public Benefit Bonus Building Height. A 45-degree Building Profile above the maximum façade height is required forfacades fronting a public ROW or a public open space. Vertical projectionssuch as parapets, balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permittedsubject to height and design standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3.Upper Story Façade Length Applicable only when availing the Public Benefit Bonus Building Height. Referto Section E.3.4.4.All development 30% minimumMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created ascommon open space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shallbe created as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards andguidelines.Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includesresidentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and certain newinteriors and alterations.Ground Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)
  • 182. E56MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEl Camino Real North-East- Residential (ECR NE-R)The ECR NE-R District is located on the east side of ElCamino Real between Oak Grove and Glenwood Avenuesand is characterized by a mix of retail, personal service,office and residential use. The area is bordered by therailroad tracks to the east and medium-density residentialuses beyond the railroad tracks. The area is within walkingdistance of the train station area and downtown.The District is located in the El Camino Real Mixed Use –Residential land use designation which supports a varietyof retail uses, personal services, business and professionaloffices and residential uses. The district provides for higherintensities with a focus on residential development given itslocation near the train station area and downtown.Table E8 provides the standards for the ECR NE-R District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. El Camino Real North-East - Residential Emphasis (ECRNE-R)El Camino Realmin. 5’furnishings areamin. 10’ clearwalking zonemin. 15’ sidewalkFigure E22. ECR NE-R Required Setback- setback
  • 183. additional floor with public benefitbonus heightadditional floor withpublic benefit bonusheightE57CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTER* Applicable when public benefit bonus heightis availed.Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-East - Residential (ECR NE-R)Figure E23. Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-East - Residential Emphasis (ECR NE-R) District1F Retail 1F Parking2F Residential3F ResidentialUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real10’-20’ 10’Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street235El Camino RealProperty Line Property Line3 538’Max.2145° Building Profile*Building HeightFaçade Height*Front SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable on ground floor))Rear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break at 250’ Min.Building Profile*Building ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length*Open Space1728394105612111348’ Max.Public BenefitBonus Height14F Residential111013813139476100 50
  • 184. additional floor with public benefitbonus height11101313139additional floor withpublic benefit bonusheight764100 50E58MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN* Applicable when public benefit bonus heightis availed.Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East - Residential (ECR NE-R)Figure E24. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-East - Residential Emphasis (ECR NE-R) District2F Office3F Office1F Retail 1F ParkingUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real10’-20’ 10’Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street235El Camino RealProperty Line Property Line3 538’Max.2145° Building Profile*Building HeightFaçade Height*Front SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable on ground floor)Rear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break at 250’ Min.Building Profile*Building ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length*Open Space1728394105612111348’ Max.Public BenefitBonus Height18
  • 185. E59CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E8. Development Standards for El Camino Real North-East - Residential Emphasis (ECR NE-R) DistrictLand Use (Refer toSection E.2)Base: 1.10Public Benefit Bonus: 1.50Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 38 feetPublic Benefit Bonus Building Height: 48 feetFaçade height: 38 feet for façades facing a public ROW or a public openspaces. Applicable only when availing the Public Benefit Bonus Building Height.Minimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 10 feet, except on Oak Grove Avenue and Garwood Way where 7feet is the minimumMaximum: 20 feet, except on Oak Grove Avenue and Garwood Way where 12feet is the maximumFor buildings along El Camino Real, setback shall be sufficient to provide aminimum 15-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum 10-foot wide clear walking zoneand a minimum 5-foot wide furnishings zone.For buildings along Oak Grove Avenue and Garwood Way, setback shall besufficient to provide a minimum 12-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum 8-footwide clear walking zone and a minimum 4-foot wide furnishings zone.Minimum: 10 feet is required only for upper floors. There is no minimum sidesetback for ground floor.Maximum: 25 feetRear Minimum: 10 feetAllowed Projections Building and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.El Camino Real North-East - Residential (ECR NE-R)Interior SideSetback (Refer toSection E.3.3)Height (Refer to SectionE.3.2)Maximum HeightFront and Side facing a Public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7 forstandards applying to specific streetfaces)Public Benefit Bonus density: 50 dwelling units per acreDevelopment Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)See Table E2; El Camino Real Mixed Use - Residential DesignationMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesBase Density: 32 dwelling units per acrecontinued
  • 186. E60MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEl Camino Real North-East - Residential (ECR NE-R)Building Breaks Building Breaks are required. Refer to Section E.3.4.1Building Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2Building Profile Applicable only when availing the Public Benefit Bonus Building Height. A 45-degree Building Profile above the maximum façade height is required forfaçades fronting a public ROW or a public open space. Vertical projectionssuch as parapets, balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permittedsubject to height and design standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3.Upper Story Façade Length Applicable only when availing the Public Benefit Bonus Building Height. Referto Section E.3.4.4.All development 20% minimumMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created ascommon open space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shallbe created as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards andguidelines.Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.Ground Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and certain newinteriors and alterations.Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includesresidentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Table E8. Development Standards for El Camino Real North-East - Residential Emphasis (ECR NE-R) District (continued)
  • 187. E61CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTEREl Camino Realmin. 5’furnishings areamin. 10’ clearwalking zonemin. 15’ sidewalkEl Camino Real South-East (ECR SE)The ECR SE District is located on the east side of ElCamino Real, south of Ravenswood Avenue and ischaracterized by a mix of larger office developments, hoteland retail and personal service uses. The area is borderedby the railroad tracks to the east beyond which are the CivicCenter complex and residential neighborhoods.The District is located in two distinct land use designations,El Camino Real Mixed Use and El Camino Real MixedUse – Residential designations. Both designations supporta variety of retail uses, personal services, business andprofessional offices and residential uses. Much of the areais under single ownership which provides an opportunityfor well-designed redevelopment of underutilized parcelsof land with a focus on creating publicly accessible openspace and essential pedestrian and bicycle linkages.Table E9 provides the standards for the ECR SE District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE)10’-20’ setbackPLFigure E25. ECR SE Required Setback
  • 188. 11101313139E62MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANMixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE)Figure E26. Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) DistrictPedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street38’Max.60’Max.1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building Profile2F Residential3F Residential4F Residential5F ResidentialUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real10’-20’Property Line Property Line123123412El Camino RealBuilding HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear Setback (Not Applicable)Minor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break at 250’ Min.Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade LengthOpen Space17283941056121113876100 50
  • 189. 13139E63CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERMixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE)Figure E27. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) DistrictPedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street1F Retail 1F Parking2F Office3F Office4F OfficeUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real45° Building Profile10’-20’Property Line Property Line34123El Camino RealBuilding HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear Setback (Not Applicable)Minor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break at 250’ Min.Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade LengthOpen Space1728394105612111338’Max.60’Max.1211101381276100 50
  • 190. E64MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANTable E9. Development Standards for El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) DistrictRetail Node at Middle Avenue (eastof El Camino Real)Minimum 10,000 sf of retail/restaurant space. Refer to Page E11.Base: 1.25Public Benefit Bonus: 1.75Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 60 feetFaçade height: 38 feet for all façades except interior sidesMinimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 10 feetMaximum: 20 feetSetback shall be sufficient to provide a minimum 15-foot wide sidewalk with aminimum 10-foot wide clear walking zone and a minimum 5-foot widefurnishings/planting zone.Minimum: 10 feetMaximum: 25 feetRear Minimum: 0 feetCreek No development activities may take place within the San Francisquito Creekbed, below the creek bed or in the riparian corridor.Building and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.Land Use (Refer toSection E.2)Allowed ProjectionsInterior SideFront and Side facing a public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7 forstandards applying to specific streetfaces)Development Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)Setback (Refer toSection E.3.3)El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE)Height (Refer to SectionE.3.2)Maximum HeightSee Figure E 1 and Table E1; El Camino Real Mixed Use and El Camino Real Mixed Use - ResidentialDesignationsMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesPublic Benefit Bonus Density: 60 dwelling units per acreBase Density: 40 dwelling units per acre
  • 191. E65CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E9. Development Standards for El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE) District (continued)El Camino Real South-East (ECR SE)Building Breaks Refer to Section E.3.4.1Building Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2A 45-degree Building Profile above the maximum façade height is required forall façades except interior side façades. Vertical projections such as parapets,balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to heightand design standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3Upper Story Façade Length Required. Refer to Section E.3.4.4.All development 30% minimumMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created ascommon open space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shallbe created as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and certain newinteriors and alterations.Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includesresidentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Ground Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards andguidelines.Building Profile
  • 192. E66MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEl Camino Real North-West (ECR NW)The ECR NW District is located on the west side of ElCamino Real between Oak Grove and Valparaiso Avenuesand is characterized by a mix of retail and service uses.The area is directly adjacent to medium density residentialuse and within walking distance to the train station area anddowntown.The District is located in the El Camino Real Mixed Use –Residential land use designation which supports a varietyof retail uses, personal services, business and professionaloffices and residential uses. The district provides for higherintensities with a focus on residential development given itslocation near the train station area and downtown.Table E10 provides the standards for the ECR NW District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW)
  • 193. 1313E67CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTER20’Figure E28. Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW) District38’Max.1F Retail 1F Parking2F Residential3F ResidentialUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real5’-8’Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW)Building HeightFaçade Height (Not Applicable)Front SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable)Rear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break (Not Applicable)Building Profile (Not Applicable)Building ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space17283941056121113Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street135111013El Camino RealProperty Line Property Line15376100 50
  • 194. E68MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN20’Figure E29. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW) District2F Office38’Max.1F Retail 1F ParkingUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real5’-8’Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW)Building HeightFaçade Height (Not Applicable)Front SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable)Rear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break (Not Applicable)Building Profile (Not Applicable)Building ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space17283941056121113Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street135El Camino RealProperty Line Property Line25313131110137610050
  • 195. E69CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E10. Development Standards for El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW) DistrictLand Use (Refer toSection E.2)Base: 1.10Public Benefit Bonus: 1.50Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 38 feetFaçade height: Not applicableMinimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, anddesign standards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 5 feet with limited setbacks allowed for store or lobby entrances,retail frontage and outdoor seating .Maximum: 8 feet with limited setbacks allowed for store or lobby entrances,retail frontage and outdoor seatingFor buildings along El Camino Real, setback shall be sufficient to provide a 12-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum 8-foot wide clear walking zone and aminimum 4-foot wide furnishings zone.Interior Side Not applicableRear Minimum: 20 feetBuilding and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.Development Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW)Allowed ProjectionsSetback (Refer toSection E.3.3)Height (Refer toSection E.3.2)Maximum HeightFront and Side facing a Public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7for standards applying to specificstreet faces)Public Benefit Bonus Density: 40 dwelling units per acreSee Figure E1 and Table E1; El Camino Real Mixed Use - Residential DesignationMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesBase Density: 25 dwelling units per acrecontinued
  • 196. E70MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANEl Camino Real North-West (ECR NW)Building Breaks Not applicableBuilding Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2 for façademodulation.Building Profile Not applicableUpper Story Façade Length Not applicableAll development 20% minimumMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created ascommon open space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unitshall be created as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards andguidelines.Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includesresidentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and certain newinteriors and alterations.Ground Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.Table E10. Development Standards for El Camino Real North-West (ECR NW) District (continued)
  • 197. E71CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTEREl Camino Real South-West (ECR SW)The ECR SW District is located on the west side of ElCamino Real between Menlo Avenue and the southern citylimits and is characterized by a mix of retail and serviceuses. The area is adjacent to multi-family and single-familyresidential uses and within walking distance to the trainstation area and downtown.The District is located in the El Camino Real Mixed Use- Residential and El Camino Real Mixed Use land usedesignations, which both support a variety of retail uses,personal services, business and professional offices andresidential uses. The district provides for higher intensitieswith a focus on residential development given its locationnear the train station area and downtown.Table E11 provides the standards for the ECR SW District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW)El Camino Real7’ setback fromproperty linemin. 4’furnishings areamin. 8’ clearwalking zonemin. 12’ sidewalkPLFigure E30. ECR SW Required Setback-1
  • 198. E72MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANFigure E31. Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW) DistrictNorth of Live Oak zero side setbackfor ground floor and five feet sidesetback for upper floors1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building Profile2F Residential3F ResidentialUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real7’-12’ 20’Mixed Use Residential Projects in El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW)Building HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide Setback (Note exception for North of Live Oak Avenue)Rear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation (Not Applicable)Building Break at 100’ Min.Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space17283941056121113Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the StreetProperty Line Property Line3 530’Max.38’Max.129131312345111013El Camino Real86
  • 199. E73CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERNorth of Live Oak zero side setbackfor ground floor and five feet sidesetback for upper floorsFigure E32. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW) District2F Office1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building ProfileUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real7’-12’ 20’Mixed Use Commercial Projects in El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW)Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the StreetProperty Line Property Line3 530’Max.38’Max.12Building HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide Setback (Note exception for North of Live Oak Avenue)Rear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation (Not Applicable)Building Break at 100’ Min.Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space17283941056121113235El Camino Real91313111013865041
  • 200. E74MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANTable E11. Development Standards for El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW) DistrictLand Uses (Refer toSection E.2)Base: 1.10Public Benefit Bonus: 1.50Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical and DentalOfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 38 feetFaçade height: 30 feet for all façades except interior side façadesMinimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 7 feet, except north of Live Oak Avenue where 5 feet is the minimumMaximum: 12 feet, except north of Live Oak Avenue where 8 feet is themaximumSouth of Live Oak Avenue, setback shall be sufficient to provide a minimum 12-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum 8-foot wide clear walking zone. A minimum 4-foot wide furnishings zone should be provided.Minimum: 5 feet, except north of Live Oak Avenue where there is no minimumside setback for ground floor and 5 feet minimum is required only for upperfloors.Maximum: 25 feetRear Minimum: 20 feet, except north of Live Oak Avenue, where 10 feet is required.Creek No development activities may take place within the San Francisquito Creekbed, below the creek bed or in the riparian corridor.Building and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.Base Density: 25 dwelling units per acreDevelopment Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)Public Benefit Bonus Density: 40 dwelling units per acreEl Camino Real South-West (ECR SW)Front and Side facing a public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7 forstandards applying to specific streetfaces)Interior SideAllowed ProjectionsSetback (Refer toSection E.3.3)Height (Refer to SectionE.3.2)Maximum HeightSee Figure E1 and Table E1; El Camino Real Mixed-Use and El Camino Real Mixed-Use/ResidentialDesignationsMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof Offices
  • 201. E75CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E11. Development Standards for El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW) District (continued)El Camino Real South-West (ECR SW)Building Breaks Required only for buildings south of Live Oak Avenue. Refer to Section E.3.4.1Building Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2A 45-degree Building Profile above the maximum façade height is required for allfaçades except interior side façades. Vertical projections such as parapets,balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to height anddesign standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3.Upper Story Façade Length Not applicableAll development 30% minimum, except for north of Live Oak Avenue which is 20% minimum.Minimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created as commonopen space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shall becreated as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall count towardthe minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and new certain interiorsand alterations.Ground Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards and guidelines.Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includes residentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Building Profile
  • 202. E76MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANStation Area East (SA E)The SA E District is located on the east side of El CaminoReal between Oak Grove and Ravenswood Avenues, andextends to the east side of Alma Street. The SA E District ischaracterized by a mix of retail and service uses. The areais directly adjacent to medium density residential use and isdirectly adjacent to the train station area and downtown.The District is located in the Downtown/Station AreaRetail - Mixed Use and Downtown/Station Area “MainStreet” Overlay land use designations which emphasizecommunity-serving retail and personal services at theground-floor level and residential/office uses above. Thedistrict provides for higher intensities with a focus onresidential development given its location at the train stationarea and downtown.Table E12 provides the standards for the SA E District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. Station Area East (SA E)
  • 203. Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area East (SA E)E77CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERFigure E33. Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area East (SA E) District112233111013139El Camino RealProperty Line Property Line5’-8’1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building Profile2F Residential3F Residential4F Residential5F ResidentialUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real38’Max.60’Max.Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the StreetBuilding HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable)Rear Setback (Not Applicable)Minor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade LengthOpen Space172839410561211131276100 50
  • 204. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Station Area East (SA E)E78MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANFigure E34. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Station Area East (SA E) District5’-8’1F Retail 1F Parking2F Office3F Office4F OfficeUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real45° Building ProfilePedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street123El Camino Real3139Property Line Property Line1238’Max.60’Max.Building HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable)Rear Setback (Not Applicable)Minor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade LengthOpen Space172839410561211131110131276100 50
  • 205. Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area East (SA E) - Alma Street EastE79CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERFigure E35. Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area East (SA E) District - Alma Street East10’1F Retail 1F ParkingBuilding Profile2F Residential3F Residential4F ResidentialUnderground ParkingAlma StreetPedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street12345111013Alma Street3 513139Property Line Property Line238’Max.Building HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break at 250’ Min.Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade LengthOpen Space172839410561211131287’-12’48’Max.176100 50
  • 206. E80MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANTable E12. Development Standards for Station Area East (SA E) DistrictLand Uses (Refer toSection E.2)Base: 1.35Public Benefit Bonus: 1.75Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 60 feet except east of Alma Street where it is 48 feetFaçade height: 38 feet for all façades except interior side facadesMinimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 0 feet, with limited setbacks allowed for store or lobby entrances,retail frontage and outdoor seating, except on El Camino Real where 5 feet isthe minimum and on Alma Street where 7 feet is the minimumMaximum: 0 feet, except on El Camino Real where 8 feet is the maximum andon Alma Street where 12 feet is the maximumFor buildings along El Camino Real, setback shall be sufficient to provide a 12-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum 8-foot wide clear walking zone and aminimum 4-foot wide furnishings zone.For buildings along Alma Street, setback shall be sufficient to provide aminimum 15-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum 10-foot wide clear walking zoneand a minimum 5-foot wide furnishings zone.Minimum: 0 feet, except on Alma Street where 10 feet is requiredMaximum: 0 feet, except on Alma Street where 25 feet is permittedRear Minimum: 0 feet, except on Alma Street, where 10 feet is requiredBuilding and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.Front and Side facing a public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7 forstandards applying to specific streetfaces)Maximum HeightSee Figure E1 and Table E1; Downtown/Station Area Retail/Mixed Use and Downtown/Station Area "MainStreet" OverlayMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesPublic Benefit Bonus Density: 60 dwelling units per acreBase Density: 50 dwelling units per acreDevelopment Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)Station Area East (SA E)Interior SideAllowed ProjectionsSetback (Refer to SectionE.3.3)Height (Refer to SectionE.3.2)
  • 207. E81CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E12. Development Standards for Station Area East (SA E) District (continued)Station Area East (SA E)Building Breaks Not applicable except along Alma Street where it is required. Refer to SectionE.3.4.1Building Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2A 45-degree Building Profile above the maximum façade height is required forall facades except the interior side facades. Vertical projections such asparapets, balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permitted subject toheight and design standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3.Upper Story Façade Length Required. Refer to Section E.3.4.4.All development 20% minimumMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created as commonopen space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shall becreated as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer to SectionE.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and certain new interiorsand alterations.Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards and guidelines.Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includes residentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Building ProfileGround Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.Massing and Modulation(Refer to Section E.3.4)
  • 208. E82MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANStation Area West (SA W)The SA W District is located on the west side of El CaminoReal between Oak Grove and Menlo Avenues, and extendsto Doyle and Maloney Streets. The SA W District ischaracterized by a mix of retail and service uses. The areais directly adjacent to downtown and it is very close to thetrain station area.The District is located in the Downtown/Station AreaRetail - Mixed Use and Downtown/Station Area “MainStreet” Overlay land use designations which emphasizecommunity-serving retail and personal services at theground-floor level and residential/office uses above. Thedistrict provides for higher intensities with a focus onresidential development given its location at the trainstation area and downtown. However, relative to the restof the Station Area, heights would be limited slightly inorder to provide a transition from the SA E District to the DDowntown District.Table E13 provides the standards for the SA W District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. Station Area West (SA W)
  • 209. E83CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERFigure E36. Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area West (SA W) DistrictPedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk5’-8’1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building Profile2F Residential3F Residential4F ResidentialUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real38’Max.48’Max.Mixed Use Residential Projects in Station Area West (SA W)123111013El Camino RealPedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street1 23139Property Line Property LineBuilding HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable)Rear Setback (Not Applicable)Minor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade LengthOpen Space172839410561211131276100 50
  • 210. E84MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANFigure E37. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Station Area West (SA W) District5’-8’1F Retail 1F Parking2F Office3F OfficeUnderground ParkingEl Camino Real38’Max.48’Max.45° Building ProfilePedestrian Eye-level View from SidewalkMixed Use Commercial Projects in Station Area West (SA W)123111013El Camino RealPedestrian Eye-level View from across the Street1 23139Property Line Property LineBuilding HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide Setback (Not Applicable)Rear Setback (Not Applicable)Minor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade LengthOpen Space172839410561211131276100 50
  • 211. E85CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E13. Development Standards for Station Area West (SA W) DistrictLand Use (Refer toSection E.2 )Base: 2.00Public Benefit Bonus: 2.25Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 48 feetFaçade height: 38 feet for façades facing a public ROW or public open spaceMinimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor to floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 0 feet with limited setbacks allowed for store or lobby entrances,retail frontage and outdoor seating, except on El Camino Real where 5 feet isthe minimum.Maximum: 0 feet, except on El Camino Real where 8 feet is the maximum.For buildings along El Camino Real, setback shall be sufficient to provide a 12-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum 8-foot wide clear walking zone and aminimum 4-foot wide furnishings zone.A setback, accommodating a small publicly-accessible plaza, is allowed at thenorthwest corner of El Camino Real and Santa Cruz Avenue. Such a plazawould provide a visual landmark from the train station along Santa CruzAvenue, and it would help connect the train station with downtown. The setbackshould be a minimum 35 feet along El Camino Real or match the alignment ofthe building on Santa Cruz Avenue on the northeast corner of El Camino Realand Santa Cruz Avenue, and it should have a minimum depth of 10 feet. Ifprovided, this plaza could be considered as a basis for a Public Benefit Bonus.Minimum: 0 feetMaximum: 0 feetRear Minimum: 0 feetBuilding and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.See Figure E1 and Table E1; Downtown/Station Area Retail/Mixed Use and Downtown/Station Area "MainStreet" OverlayMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesPublic Benefit Bonus Density: 60 dwelling units per acreFront and Side facing a public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7for standards applying to specificstreet faces)Station Area West (SA W)Interior SideAllowed ProjectionsSetback (Refer toSection E.3.3)Height (Refer toSection E.3.2)Base Density: 50 dwelling units per acreMaximum HeightDevelopment Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)continued
  • 212. E86MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANStation Area West (SA W)Building Breaks Not applicableBuilding Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2A 45-degree Building Profile above the maximum façade height is required forfaçades fronting a public ROW or a public open space. Vertical projectionssuch as parapets, balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permittedsubject to height and design standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3.Upper Story Façade Length Required. Refer to Section E.3.4.4.All development Not applicableMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created ascommon open space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shallbe created as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)Ground Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards andguidelines.Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includesresidentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Building ProfileLEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and certain newinteriors and alterations.Table E13. Development Standards for Station Area West (SA W) District (continued)
  • 213. E87CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERDowntown (D)The D District is located between Oak Grove and MenloAvenues on the north/south, and Doyle/Maloney Streetsand University Drive on the east/west. The D District ischaracterized by a mix of retail and service uses, with retailclustered directly on Santa Cruz Avenue. The area is veryclose to the train station area.The District is located in the Downtown/Station AreaRetail - Mixed Use and Downtown/Station Area “MainStreet” Overlay land use designations which emphasizecommunity-serving retail and personal services at theground-floor level and residential/office uses above.Table E14 provides the standards for the D District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. Downtown (D)
  • 214. E88MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN2F ResidentialFigure E38. Mixed Use Residential Projects in Downtown (D) District1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building Profile2F Residential3F ResidentialUnderground ParkingSanta Cruz AvenueMixed Use Residential Projects in Downtown (D)Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the StreetProperty Line Property Line13930’Max.38’Max.Building HeightFaçade HeightFront Setback (Not Applicable)Side Setback (Not Applicable)Rear Setback (Not Applicable)Minor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min. (Not Illustrated)Building Break (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space172839410561211131212111013Santa Cruz Avenue6100 50
  • 215. E89CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERFigure E39. Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Downtown (D) District2F Office1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building ProfileUnderground ParkingSanta Cruz AvenueMixed Use Commercial Projects in Downtown (D)Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the StreetProperty Line Property Line13930’Max.38’Max.Building HeightFaçade HeightFront Setback (Not Applicable)Side Setback (Not Applicable)Rear Setback (Not Applicable)Minor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min. (Not Illustrated)Building Break (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space17283941056121113122111013Santa Cruz Avenue650
  • 216. E90MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANParking Garage Project in Downtown (D)Podium parking withsolar panels1F ParkingPotential underground parkingProperty LineUnderground parking2F Parking3F Parking4F ParkingFigure E40. Parking Garage Project in Downtown (D) DistrictBuilding HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break at 250’ Min. (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding Projections (Not Applicable)Architectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space1728394105612111325’ Min.52456111330’Max.38’Max.1 245° Building Profile 9
  • 217. E91CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E14. Development Standards for Downtown (D) DistrictLand Use (Refer toSection E.2)Parking Plazas Except as specifically provided in the Specific Plan, the Downtownparking plazas shall remain in parking use.Base: 2.00Public Benefit Bonus: 2.25Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 38 feetFaçade height: 30 feet for façades facing a public ROW or a public openspace.Minimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 0 feet with limited setbacks allowed for store or lobby entrances,retail frontage and outdoor seating.Maximum: 0 feetMinimum: 0 feetMaximum: 0 feetRear Minimum: 0 feetParking Plazas Minimum: 25 feet on all sides directly abutting private property to provideservices and emergency accessBuilding and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.Development Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)Downtown (D)Interior SideAllowed ProjectionsSetback (Refer toSection E.3.3)Height (Refer to SectionE.3.2)Maximum HeightSee Figure E1 and Table E1; Downtown/Station Area Retail/Mixed Use and Downtown/Station Area "MainStreet" OverlayMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesFront and Side facing a public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7 forstandards applying to specific streetfaces)Public Benefit Bonus Density: 40 dwelling units per acreBase Density: 25 dwelling units per acrecontinued
  • 218. E92MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANDowntown (D)Building Breaks Not applicableBuilding Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2A 45-degree Building Profile above the maximum façade height is required forfaçades fronting a public ROW or a public open space. Vertical projectionssuch as parapets, balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permittedsubject to height and design standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3.All development Not applicableMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created ascommon open space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shallbe created as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards andguidelines.Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)See Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Development that includes residentialGround Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries should be oriented to a public street or other public space.LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and new certain interiorsand alterations.Building ProfileTable E14. Development Standards for Downtown (D) District (continued)
  • 219. E93CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERDowntown Adjacent (DA)The DA District is located on the ‘outer’ sides of OakGrove Avenue, University Drive, and Menlo Avenue andis characterized by a mix of office and residential uses.The area acts as a buffer between downtown and adjacentmedium density residential uses.The District is located in the Downtown Adjacent Office –Residential land use designation which supports a variety ofnon-retail office, residential and personal service uses. TheDistrict complements downtown with needed services thatdo not directly compete with the downtown’s retail core.Table E15 provides the standards for the DA District.Illustrations are provided to help demonstrate the standardsand guidelines.Key Map. Downtown Adjacent (DA)Oak Grove Avenue10’-20’ setback (north side)5’-20’ setback (south side)from property linePLmin. 5’furnishings areamin. 6’ clearwalking zonemin. 11’ sidewalkFigure E41. DA Required Setback
  • 220. E94MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANFigure E42. Mixed Use Residential Projects in Downtown Adjacent (DA) District1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building Profile2F Residential3F ResidentialUnderground Parking10’Mixed Use Residential Projects in Downtown Adjacent (DA)Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the StreetProperty Line Property Line3 51313930’Max.38’Max.variesBuilding HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space1728394105612111312123451113650
  • 221. E95CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTER10’Figure E43 Mixed Use Commercial Projects in Downtown Adjacent (DA) District2F Office1F Retail 1F Parking45° Building ProfileUnderground ParkingMixed Use Commercial Projects in Downtown Adjacent (DA)Pedestrian Eye-level View from Sidewalk Pedestrian Eye-level View from across the StreetProperty Line Property Line3 51313930’Max.38’Max.variesBuilding HeightFaçade HeightFront SetbackSide SetbackRear SetbackMinor Building Façade Modulation at 50’ Min.Major Building Façade Modulation at 100’ Min.Building Break (Not Applicable)Building ProfileBuilding ProjectionsArchitectural ProjectionsUpper Story Façade Length (Not Applicable)Open Space172839410561211131223451113650
  • 222. E96MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANTable E15. Development Standards for Downtown Adjacent (DA) DistrictLand Use (Refer toSection E.2)Base: 0.85Public Benefit Bonus: 1.00Maximum FAR for Offices, inclusiveof Medical and Dental OfficesOne half of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableMaximum FAR for Medical andDental OfficesOne third of the Base or Public Benefit Bonus FAR, whichever is applicableBuilding height: 38 feetFaçade height: 30 feet for façades facing a public ROW or a public open spaceMinimum Height Commercial ground floor: 15 feet floor-to-floorAllowed Projections Vertical building projections such as roof-mounted equipment, parapets andstair/elevator towers may be permitted subject to screening, height, and designstandards. Refer to Section E.3.2.Minimum: 5 feet except for area north of Oak Grove Avenue where 10 feet isthe minimumMaximum: 20 feetSetbacks shall be sufficient to provide an 11-foot wide sidewalk with a minimum6-foot wide clear walking zone and a minimum 5-foot wide furnishings/plantingzone.Minimum: 5 feetMaximum: 25 feetRear Minimum: 10 feetBuilding and Architectural projections are allowed. Refer to Section E.3.3.Public Benefit Bonus Density: 25 dwelling units per acreBase Density: 18.5 dwelling units per acreDowntown Adjacent (DA)Front and Side facing a public ROW(Note: please reference Figure E7 forstandards applying to specific streetfaces)Interior SideAllowed ProjectionsSetback (Refer toSection E.3.3)Height (Refer to SectionE.3.2)Maximum HeightSee Figure E1 and Table E1; Downtown Adjacent Office/ResidentialMaximum FAR for all uses, inclusiveof OfficesDevelopment Intensity(Refer to Section E.3.1)
  • 223. E97CHAPTER E LAND USE + BUILDING CHARACTERTable E15. Development Standards for Downtown Adjacent (DA) District (continued)Downtown Adjacent (DA)Building Breaks Not applicableBuilding Façade Modulation Building Façade Modulation is required. Refer to Section E.3.4.2A 45-degree Building Profile above the maximum façade height is required forfaçades fronting a public ROW or a public open space. Vertical projectionssuch as parapets, balcony railings and stair/elevator towers may be permittedsubject to height and design standards. Refer to Section E.3.4.3.All development Not applicableMinimum of 100 square feet of open space per unit shall be created ascommon open space or minimum of 80 square feet of open space per unit shallbe created as private open space.Private open space shall have a minimum least dimension of 6 feet.Residential open space, whether in common or private areas, shall counttoward the minimum open space requirement for the development.Accessible open space above parking podiums up to 16 feet high shall counttoward the common open space requirement.Parking (Refer toSection E.3.7)Sustainable Practice(Refer to Section E.3.8)Note: This table must be read in conjunction with Section E.3 "Development Standards and Guidelines" for additional relevant standards andguidelines.Massing andModulation (Refer toSection E.3.4)Open Space (Refer toSection E.3.6)Development that includesresidentialSee Chapter F for off-street parking and bicycle parking standards.Major portions of the building facing a street shall be parallel to the street.Building ProfileGround Floor (Refer toSection E.3.5)Commercial ground floor shall have 50% clear-glass transparency.Commercial windows/storefronts shall be recessed a minimum of 6 inches from the primary building façade.Building entries shall be oriented to a public street or other public space.LEED certification, at a silver level or higher, shall be required for all new construction and certain newinteriors and alterations.
  • 224. CIRCULATIONF.F.1 OVERVIEW F.2 VEHICULAR CIRCULATION F.3 PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS F.4 BICYCLE FACILITIES F.5 BICYCLE STORAGE STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES F.6 TRANSIT SERVICE F.7 PARKING F.8 PARKING STANDARDS F.9 DOWNTOWN PARKING F.10 TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT F2F2F4F9F13F14F17F18F20F31
  • 225. F2MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANF.1 OVERVIEWThe Menlo Park El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Planaccommodates all travel modes, with an emphasis onpedestrians, bicyclists and transit users. Focusing newdevelopment in an area well served by transit and witha mix of uses in close proximity reduces the relianceon private motor vehicles, helping to minimize trafficcongestion, the amount of land dedicated to parking andgreenhouse gas emissions.The Specific Plan envisions the following:• A vehicular circulation system that accommodatesboth local traffic and north/south through traffic onEl Camino Real.• An integrated pedestrian network of expansivesidewalks, promenades and paseos along ElCamino Real and within downtown. The networkprovides opportunities for safe crossing of ElCamino Real and the railroad tracks and connectsthe east and west sides of town, including theCity’s civic center with downtown.• A bicycle network that builds upon existing plansand integrates more fully with downtown andproposed public space improvements in the area.• An integrated circulation plan that supports transituse.• A public parking strategy and management planthat efficiently accommodates downtown visitorsand supports downtown businesses.• Modified parking rates for private developmentbased on current industry standards.F.2 VEHICULAR CIRCULATIONThe Specific Plan generally retains the existing vehicularcirculation system and travel patterns, with some minormodifications to better accommodate pedestrian and bicyclemovement. Figure F1 shows the classification of roadwaysin the Specific Plan area and surroundings. The vehicularcirculation system is consistent with the City’s General Plan.El Camino RealEl Camino Real is the primary north-south roadway in theSpecific Plan area. From south to north, El Camino Realenters the City of Menlo Park as a six-lane arterial, becomesa four-lane “main street” near downtown Menlo Park, andexits the City as a five-lane arterial (three southbound lanesand two northbound lanes) north of Valparaiso Avenue.(The outside southbound through lane becomes a right-turnlane at Valparaiso Avenue.) Figure F1 shows the number ofthrough-lanes on El Camino Real through the study area.The Specific Plan retains this general lane configuration forEl Camino Real.The average daily traffic (ADT) volume on El Camino Realis approximately 38,000 vehicles. The vehicular volumesare highest south of Menlo Avenue/Ravenswood Avenueand north of Valparaiso Avenue/Glenwood Avenue. BetweenMenlo Avenue/Ravenswood Avenue and Valparaiso Avenue/Glenwood Avenue in the downtown area, the throughmovement volumes decrease by approximately 25% (basedon the peak hour intersection turning movement data, withsome northbound vehicles turning right onto RavenswoodAvenue, heading east, and southbound vehicles turning rightonto Valparaiso Avenue).Although the number of through lanes striped on El CaminoReal decreases through the downtown core, the curb-to-curb width of the street remains fairly consistent through thecity. The right-most (curb-side) lanes in the downtown coreaccommodate on-street parking and pullouts for bus stops.At intersections, the parking lanes transition to right-turnpockets.Regarding the southern part of the plan area, the SpecificPlan provides access to new development, particularly at theStanford University property, via existing median breaks andtraffic signals and, potentially, additional ones as needed.
  • 226. F3CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONFehr & PeersStrategic EconomicsMiddlefieldLaurelLaurelMiddleYaleEncinalWatkinsCollegeCreekRobleMillsPineCambridgeFremontLive OakAltoLinfieldFeltonHarvardArdenBurgessJohnsonPartridgeNoelGarwoodLennoxPrincetonHooverMerillSpruceEvelynRoseCraneVictoriaLeonClaireLeeMillieLaneAliceMarcussenStone PineWerthFlorenceWaverlyPriorCornellLSanAntonioBay LaurelMOREYDouglasMoultonBuckthornRebbeccaDoyleBlakeSherwoodHopkinsCurtisWestfieldBarronKENWOODKentClaremontCherryForestMalletTudorChestnutHomewoodSurreyElizabethChateauFennwoodVersaillesBassettCreekPlSussexManorBlakeCreekCraneWaverlyArborSherwoodWillowRobleArborCurtisAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AvenueMenloRavenswoodWillowElCaminoRealCivic CenterBurgess ParkElCaminoRealFig 11: Vehicular CirculationSource: City of Menlo Park General Plan, 1994 and Perkins + Will, 2009ElCaminoRealPrimary ArterialMinor ArterialCollectorMinor Local Road / AlleyStreet Becomes Pedestrian-only PaseoCaltrain Railroad TracksCaltrain StationVehicle Through LanesSignalized Intersection on El Camino RealProject Area BoundaryMenlo Park City BoundaryFigure F1. Vehicular Circulation
  • 227. F4MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANSidewalk Extensions at Right-Turn PocketsEl Camino Real acts as a significant barrier to east-westpedestrian travel in the plan area. The Specific Plan endeavorsto improve connectivity by reducing the pedestrian crossingdistance across El Camino Real by allowing for curbextensions at key locations, as discussed below under ElCamino Real Pedestrian Circulation.Curb extensions could, in some cases, require the removal ofa right-turn lane. Only locations with low right-turn volumes areconsidered, such as the southbound right-turn lanes at OakGrove, Santa Cruz, and Menlo Avenues. Implementation ofcurb extensions shall require separate project-specific outreachand review.Improvements on Downtown StreetsThe Specific Plan proposes improvements on Santa CruzAvenue in the downtown area, in particular wider sidewalksand relocated parking spaces. It converts a portion of ChestnutStreet south of Santa Cruz Avenue to pedestrian-only. TheSpecific Plan makes Oak Grove Avenue a bicycle-priority streetwith added bicycle lanes (discussed in section F4 “BicycleFacilities”).Public Safety Facility StreetImprovementsThe Specific Plan currently has one public safety facility, theMenlo Park Fire Protection District Station 6 at 700 Oak GroveAvenue. However, the Specific Plan conditionally permits publicsafety facilities in the El Camino Real Mixed Use, El CaminoReal Mixed Use/Residential and Downtown Adjacent Office/Residential land use designations, so additional such facilitiesmay be developed in the future. In addition, the Fire Districthas discussed reconstruction of the existing Station 6.In order to ensure that public safety facilities operate withmaximum efficiency, the Specific Plan requires that new suchfacilities, or significant reconstructions/renovations, shallincorporate appropriate street modifications, such as additionalstreet markings, signage and emergency signaling.F.3 PEDESTRIANIMPROVEMENTSThe Specific Plan anticipates that new developmentand redevelopment will increase the number ofpedestrians in the plan area. With a more pedestrian-friendly environment along El Camino Real and inthe station area and downtown, the Specific Planencourages more travel to be made on foot, thusreducing the number of vehicles and their associatedparking needs.Figure F2 illustrates proposed pedestrianimprovements in the plan area. On El Camino Real,the plan proposes two types of pedestrian crossingtreatments:• Basic Crossing Treatment, which generallyincludes marked crosswalks and accessiblepedestrian signals, and which may includesidewalk extensions subject to additionalproject-specific outreach and review; and• Special Crossing Treatment, which generallyincludes high visibility crosswalks withenhanced pavement, accessible pedestriansignals, countdown pedestrian signals andmedian islands/pedestrian refuges, and whichmay include sidewalk extensions subject toadditional project-specific outreach and review.The sidewalk extensions could require the removalof right-turn lanes, such as the southbound right-turnlanes at Oak Grove, Santa Cruz, and Menlo Avenues.The number of through lanes will not be affected by theextensions.The Specific Plan’s pedestrian enhancements aredescribed below and in Chapter D “Public Space”where more specifics regarding design character andguidelines may be found.
  • 228. F5CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONEl Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo ParkFehr & PeersStrategic EconomicsBKF EngineersESAHDR/The Hoyt Company14 January 2010MiddlefieldLaurelLaurelMiddleYaleEncinalWatkinsCollegeCreekRobleMillsPineCambridgeFremontLive OakAltoLinfieldFeltonHarvardArdenBurgessJohnsonPartridgeNoelGarwoodLennoxPrincetonHooverMerillSpruceEvelynRoseCraneVictoriaLeonClaireLeeMillieLaneAliceMarcussenStone PineWerthFlorenceWaverlyPriorCornellLSanAntonioBay LaurelMOREYDouglasMoultonBuckthornRebbeccaDoyleBlakeSherwoodHopkinsCurtisWestfieldBarronKENWOODKentClaremontCherryForestMalletTudorChestnutHomewoodSurreyElizabethChateauFennwoodVersaillesBassettCreekPlSussexManorBlakeCreekCraneWaverlyArborSherwoodWillowRobleArborCurtisAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AveMenloRavenswoodElCaminoRealCivic CenterBurgess ParkPedestrian Improvements (DRAFT)IsabellaEmileMac BainBrittonHowardPedestrian Crossings of Railroad +EnhancementsPedestrian Crossing WithSpecial TreatmentProject Area BoundaryCaltrain R.O.WMajor Pedestrian Enhancements/Widened SidewalksOther Pedestrian Enhancements/Widened SidewalksPlanned/Proposed GradeSeparated Railroad CrossingMenlo Park City BoundaryPedestrian Crossing WithBasic TreatmentN0 300 600 1200FeetFigure F2. Pedestrian Improvements
  • 229. F6MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANIn addition, the Specific Plan allows for curb extensions,which would improve east-west pedestrian connectivity asfollows:• Reduce the pedestrian crossing distance across ElCamino RealImprove pedestrian comfort and accommodationThe Specific Plan proposes improving pedestrian comfortand accommodation by implementing the following:• Countdown timers for all pedestrian signal heads inthe downtown area;• High visibility crosswalks to more clearly delineatepedestrian crossing areas, including coloredpavement and standard parallel white lines atsignalized intersections to enhance crosswalkvisibility and the pedestrian environment;• Extended time for pedestrians to cross El CaminoReal, particularly at Santa Cruz Avenue, during off-peak periods; and• Pedestrian way-finding signage.Add track-separated pedestrian/bicycle crossingsacross the railroad tracksThe Specific Plan proposes adding track-separatedpedestrian/bicycle passageways beneath (or above) therailroad tracks at the train station and in the vicinity ofBurgess Park. Such passageways may go beneath orabove the railroad tracks depending on the final alignmentfor the proposed high speed rail (i.e., underground orelevated).Reduce the pedestrian crossing distance across ElCamino RealThe Specific Plan allows for the reduction of pedestriancrossing distance across El Camino Real by adding curbextensions at key locations. Curb extensions could in somecases require the removal of a right-turn lane, particularlythose intersections with low traffic volume (discussed aboveunder Vehicular Circulation).El Camino Real Pedestrian CirculationThe Specific Plan retains the existing number of throughlanes and their location on El Camino Real to accommodatethrough traffic. Although the overall vehicle capacity isnot changed, the Specific Plan improves the quality ofpedestrian facilities along El Camino Real by addingamenities, widening sidewalks and improving the ease ofcrossing El Camino Real.East-West ConnectivityEl Camino Real is a critical north-south transportationcorridor for the City of Menlo Park and other cities on thePeninsula, but it also acts as a significant barrier to east-west connectivity in the plan area. The sidewalk networkalong El Camino Real is complete; however, the sidewalkwidths vary considerably. The rail tracks are also asignificant barrier to east-west travel.The Specific Plan proposes two primary approaches toimprove east-west pedestrian connectivity:• Improve pedestrian comfort and accommodation;and• Add track-separated pedestrian/bicycle accessacross the railroad tracks.Comfortable pedestrian environment (Santa Cruz, California)
  • 230. F7CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONNorth-South ConnectivityNorth and south of Downtown, the Specific Plan proposesminimum 15-foot-wide sidewalks on the east side of ElCamino Real, inclusive of a 10-foot clear pedestrian throughzone. The 10-foot clear zone would be buffered by a five-foot-wide furnishings zone (as part of the sidewalk section)and a parking lane (where possible). The furnishing zoneprovides a place for plantings (e.g., planter strip) as well asstreet lamps, trees, hydrants and other street furnishings.Likewise, the Specific Plan proposes a minimum 12-footsidewalk on the west side of El Camino Real, inclusiveof an eight-foot wide clear pedestrian through zone anda four-foot wide furnishings zone. The plan proposes anarrower sidewalk on the west side, due to the tighter siteconditions and narrower parcels on the west side of thecorridor. The improvements would be implemented byprivate developers; the gains in sidewalk widths will beachieved over time by moving building frontages back assites redevelop.Within the Downtown area on El Camino Real (betweenOak Grove and Menlo Avenues), the Specific Planproposes 12-foot wide sidewalks separated from travellanes by on-street parking and future bicycle lanes.The sidewalks would consist of an eight-foot wide clearpedestrian zone and a four-foot wide furnishings zone.The gains in sidewalk widths, implemented by privatedevelopers, would be achieved over time by movingbuilding frontages back as sites redevelop.Sidewalk with clear zone and furnishings zone (Santa Cruz,California)Sidewalk with clear zone and planting zone (Santa Cruz,California)
  • 231. F8MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANDowntown Pedestrian CirculationThe Specific Plan proposes a number of pedestriancirculation improvements. The provision of streetscapeimprovements, promenades, pedestrian paseos, plazas,pocket parks and conversion of surface parking lots toserve as a more flexible space all contribute to a morecomplete pedestrian realm in the downtown. Described indetail in Chapter D “Public Space,” these improvements areconsistent with the City’s Sidewalk Master Plan, which callsfor improved pedestrian facilities in and around downtown.Ravenswood Avenue and Alma StreetIntersectionThe Specific Plan proposes safety enhancements at theintersection of Ravenswood Avenue and Alma Street. Inparticular, the Alma Street Civic Walk and RavenswoodGateway are proposed to be connected by a safe andupgraded pedestrian crossing. Improvements to thisintersection could include: enhanced pavement markings,additional warning lights, new or extended turn limitations,and “quad gates” at the Caltrain tracks. Such changesmay be expedited in advance of other Specific Planimprovements, if desired.
  • 232. F9CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONF.4 BICYCLE FACILITIESMenlo Park has an ideal environment for bicycling dueto the mild climate, relatively flat terrain and proximityof many recreational and non-recreational destinations.Approximately 4% of Menlo Park residents commute towork by bicycle1, a rate that is four times higher than therates for both San Mateo County and California and tentimes higher than the national rate. This indicates thatbicycling is actively used by residents and comprises animportant mode of transportation for the City. Enhancingand improving bicycle travel for all types and experiencelevels of cyclists is a key component of the Specific Plan.Bicycle Facilities TypesConsistent with the Menlo Park Comprehensive BicycleDevelopment Plan, 2005 (Bicycle Development Plan), theSpecific Plan establishes a comprehensive bicycle networkfor the plan area, recommending a combination of bicyclepaths, bicycle lanes and bicycle routes. Consistent withCaltrans standards, the definitions for such bicycle facilitiesfollow:• Class I Bikeway (Bike Path) provides a completelyseparate right-of-way and is designated for theexclusive use of bicycles and pedestrians withvehicle and pedestrian cross-flow minimized.• Class II Bikeway (Bike Lane) provides a restrictedright-of-way and is designated for the use ofbicycles with a striped lane on a street or highway.Bicycle lanes are generally five (5) feet wide.Adjacent vehicle parking and vehicle/pedestriancross-flow are permitted.• Class III Bikeway (Bike Route) provides for a right-of-way designated by signs or pavement markingsfor shared use with pedestrians or motor vehicles.12000 Census; 2010 Census data is not available at time of publica-tion.Class I Bikeway (Bike Path)
  • 233. F10MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANThe Specific Plan also contains a “Future Class II/Minimum Class III” designation for locations where bicyclelanes are desired but may be infeasible in the near-termbecause they would require parking removal or right-of-wayacquisition. These facilities would be designated Class IIIfacilities in the short-term, which may include the striping ofshared use pavement markings (sharrows) as appropriate,but would have the long-term goal of Class II bicycle lanes.Thresholds/triggers for implementation could include:• Bicycle lanes in proximity to Downtown may beconsidered for implementation after developmentof a parking garage, which would increase theoverall parking supply and make removal of on-street parking more reasonable.• Construction of the Middle Avenue grade-separated railroad crossing may be considered atrigger for implementation of the Middle Avenuebicycle lanes.• A certain percentage of residents and/or commercial property owners adjacent toproposed bicycle lanes may petition the City forimplementation.• Redevelopment of a significant continuous stretchof private property may justify implementing lanesalong that stretch.Recommended Bicycle FacilitiesFigure F3 depicts the location for existing and recommendedbicycle facilities. The recommended facilities include thoseplanned in the City’s Bicycle Development Plan. The facilities initalics listed below are not included in the Bicycle DevelopmentPlan, but are recommended as a part of the Specific Plan.Some of these recommendations are an upgrade to arecommendation (such as recommending Class II lanes insteadof Class III routes), while others are new recommendations.Recommendations for new east-west facilities include:• Bicycle route on Encinal Avenue between El CaminoReal and the railroad tracks;• Bicycle lanes on Oak Grove Avenue betweenUniversity Drive and Laurel Street. This improvementrequires removal of parking on one side of the street.The Specific Plan recommends the north side;• Bicycle route on Santa Cruz Avenue betweenUniversity Drive north and south;• Future Class II/Minimum Class III on Menlo Avenuebetween University Drive and El Camino Real withadditional striping modifications near the El CaminoReal and Menlo Avenue intersection;• Future Class II/Minimum Class III on westboundRavenswood Avenue between the railroad tracks andEl Camino Real;• Bicycle route on Middle Avenue west of UniversityDrive;• Future Class II/Minimum Class III on Middle Avenuebetween University Drive and El Camino Real withadditional striping modifications at the El Camino Realand Middle Avenue intersection; and• Bicycle/pedestrian grade-separated crossing of therailroad tracks at the train station and near MiddleAvenue, with the ultimate configuration depending onthe future configuration of Caltrain and/or high speedrail.
  • 234. F11CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONEl Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo ParkFehr & PeersStrategic EconomicsBKF EngineersESAHDR/The Hoyt Company22 November 2009Bicycle FacilitiesMiddlefieldLaurelLaurelMiddleYale EncinalWatkinsCollegeCreekRobleMillsPineCambridgeFremontLive OakAltoLinfieldFeltonHarvardArdenBurgessJohnsonPartridgeNoelGarwoodLennoxPrincetonHooverMerillSpruceEvelynRoseCraneVictoriaClaireLeeMillieLaneAliceMarcussenStone PineWerthFlorenceWaverlyPriorCornellLSanAntonioBay LaurelMOREYMoultonBuckthornRebbeccaDoyleBlakeSherwoodHopkinsCurtisWestfieldBarronKENWOODKentClaremontCherryForestMalletTudorChestnutHomewoodSurreyElizabethChateauFennwoodVersaillesBassettCreekPlSussexManorBlakeCreekCraneWaverlyArborSherwoodRobleArborCurtisUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodSanta Cruz AveOak GroveElCaminoRealCivic CenterBurgess ParkMenloMiddle AveRavenswoodDouglasClass I Bike PathClass II Bike LanePotential Major/Improved Bicycle Parking LocationPlanned/Proposed Grade Separated Railroad CrossingExisting Bike & Pedestrian BridgeClass III Bike RoutePlan Area BoundaryPlanned/ProposedProposed Future Class II / Minimum Class IIIExisting Planned/ProposedExistingPlanned/ProposedExistingMenlo Park City BoundaryRemoval of One Side of On-Street Parking toAccommodate Bike LaneRemoval of One Side of On-Street Parking inConjunction with Proposed Future Class II Bike LaneDetailed Comprehensive Analysis Required toAccomodate Bicycle LanesFigure F3. Bicycle Facilities
  • 235. Bicycle parking racksSharrows indicate where bicyclists should rideto avoid the “door zone” next to parkedSharrows indicating where bicyclists should ride on Class IIIfacilitiesF12MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANRecommendations for north-south facilities include:• Bicycle route on University Drive betweenSanta Cruz Avenue and Menlo Avenue with newcombined striped bicycle lane/left-turn lane fromsouthbound University Drive to eastbound MenloAvenue;• Future Class II/Minimum Class III on UniversityDrive north of Santa Cruz Avenue to ValparaisoAvenue and south of Menlo Avenue to MiddleAvenue;• Bicycle route on Crane Street between ValparaisoAvenue and Menlo Avenue;• Bicycle lanes on El Camino Real north of EncinalAvenue;• Future Class II/Minimum Class III on El CaminoReal south of Encinal Avenue to Palo Alto border;• Bicycle route along Garwood Way from EncinalAvenue to Oak Grove Avenue; and• Bicycle route on Alma Street between Oak GroveAvenue and Ravenswood Avenue.Other recommendations include:• Sharrows, as shown in the photo, implementedbased on street configuration and safety tosupplement pavement markings on Class IIIfacilities. Sharrows are painted street markings thatindicate where bicyclists should ride to avoid the“door zone” next to parked vehicles;• New major bicycle parking facilities in the proposedparking garages;• New bicycle parking racks in the plan area in newpocket parks, on the Chestnut Paseo, and alongSanta Cruz Avenue; and• Bicycle way-finding signage in any futuredowntown signage plan.
  • 236. F13CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONStandardsF.5.01 Outside downtown, new commercial and residentialdevelopment shall provide secure bicycle storage facilitiesfor long-term occupants (e.g., employees and residents)on-site.F.5 BICYCLE STORAGESTANDARDS AND GUIDELINESIn addition to proposed bicycle facilities in the previoussection, the Specific Plan supports bicycle use throughstandards and guidelines for bicycle storage. Many ofthe standards and guidelines are consistent with therequirements of Leadership in Energy and EnvironmentalDesign, Neighborhood Design (LEED ND) and theAssociation of Bicycle and Pedestrian Professionals(APBP).LONG-TERM AND SHORT-TERM BICYCLE PARKING REQUIREMENTS BY LAND USE TYPELand UseLong-Term Bicycle ParkingRequirement(Employees and Residents)Short-Term Bicycle ParkingRequirement(Visitors and Guests)ResidentialSingle Family Dwelling No spaces required. No spaces required.Multi-Family Dwelling - with privategarage for each unit1 No spaces required 1 space for every 10 unitsMulti-Family Dwelling - withoutprivate garage for each unit1 space per unit 1 space for every 10 unitsCommercialOffice and Medical Office1 space for each 10,000 SF of floorarea. Minimum requirement 2 spaces1 space for each 20,000 SF of floorarea. Minimum requirement 2 spacesRetail and Personal Service1 space for each 12,000 SF of floorarea. Minimum requirement 2 spaces1 space for each 5,000 SF of floor area.Minimum requirement 2 spaces.Supermarket and Restaurant1 space for each 12,000 SF of floorarea. Minimum requirement 2 spaces.1 space for each 2,000 SF of floor area.Minimum requirement 2 spacesHotel1 space for every 20 rooms. Minimumrequirement 2 spaces.1 space for every 20 rooms. Minimumrequirement 2 spaces.Automotive sales, rental, anddelivery; automotive servicing;automotive repair and cleaning1 space for each 12,000 SF of floorarea. Minimum requirement 2 spaces1 space for each 20,000 SF of floorarea. Minimum requirement 2 spacesOff-street parking lots and garagesavailable to the general public (withor without fee)1 space for each 20 automobile spaces.Minimum requirement is 2 spaces.Unattended surface parking lotsexceptedMinimum of 6 spaces or 1 per 20 autospaces. Unattended surface parkinglots excepted1. A private locked storage unit may be considered as a private garage if a bicycle can fit in it.Source: Association of Bicycle and Pedestrian Professionals (APBP), Bicycle Parking Guidelines, 2010.Table F1. Bicycle Parking Requirements
  • 237. F14MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANF.5.02 Outside downtown, new commercial and residentialdevelopment shall provide bicycle parking spaces for long-term occupants and short-term visitors (e.g., employeesand guests, respectively), per the requirements in Table F1.F.5.03 In downtown, new commercial and residentialdevelopment shall provide secure bicycle storages facilitiesfor long-term occupants and bicycle parking spaces forlong-term occupants and short-term visitors, per therequirements in Table F1 and as follows:• Bicycle parking for the first 1.0 FAR can beaccommodated in public facilities; and• Bicycle parking for additional FAR, up to the zoningdistrict maximum, can be accommodated either/both on-site and/or in public facilities if the Cityhas established an in-lieu off-site bicycle parkingprogram and the required number of spaces isavailable; in-lieu fee may be required.GuidelinesF.5.04 Visitor and customer bicycle racks should bepositioned in areas with active visual surveillance and nightlighting, and protected from damage from nearby vehicles.F.5.05 Outside downtown, bicycle racks should be locatedwithin 50 feet of each building’s main entries. For retailbuildings or other buildings with multiple main entries,bicycle racks should be proportionally distributed within 50feet of business or other main entries.F.6 TRANSIT SERVICEThe plan area is well served by Caltrain, San Mateo CountyTransit District (SamTrans) bus service, and local shuttles.SamTrans provides local and regional bus service, andCaltrain provides commuter rail service. Local shuttles arealso provided in Menlo Park for free during commute hoursby Caltrain and during mid-day hours by the City. Bothshuttles are operated during the week (Monday throughFriday) only. Figure F4 illustrates major transit service in theSpecific Plan area.More people will be traveling along El Camino Real and to,from and around downtown Menlo Park as the land usesintensify. As there is little to no opportunity to increase thevehicle-carrying capacity of the transportation system,transit must play an important role in accommodatingthis increased travel. Bus rapid transit (BRT) is currentlybeing considered for El Camino Real as part of the GrandBoulevard Initiative.The Specific Plan supports transit improvements byrecommending the following:• Accommodate potential BRT service in accordancewith the Grand Boulevard Initiative to serve addedtravelers on El Camino Real;• Increase shuttle service to serve added traveldemand, improve east-west connectivity andreduce demand for parking in the plan area basedon available funding; and• Continue employer-sponsored programs thatsupport and increase transit use (see Section F.10“Transportation Demand Management” (TDM)).
  • 238. F15CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONFehr & PeersMiddlefieldLaurelLaurelMiddleYaleEncinalWatkinsCollegeCreekRobleMillsPineCambridgeFremontLive OakAltoLinfieldFeltonHarvardArdenBurgessJohnsonPartridgeNoelGarwoodLennoxPrincetonHooverMerillSpruceEvelynRoseCraneVictoriaLeonClaireLeeMillieLaneAliceMarcussenStone PineWerthFlorenceWaverlyPriorCornellLSanAntonioBay LaurelMOREYDouglasMoultonBuckthornRebbeccaDoyleBlakeSherwoodHopkinsCurtisWestfieldBarronKENWOODKentClaremontCherryForestMalletTudorChestnutHomewoodSurreyElizabethChateauFennwoodVersaillesBassettCreekPlSussexManorBlakeCreekCraneWaverlyArborSherwoodWillowRobleArborCurtisAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AveMenloRavenswoodElCaminoRealCivic CenterBurgess ParkTransit ServiceElCaminoRealElCaminoRealEncinalLaurelLaurelBValparaisolRavenswoodMerillMerillSanta Cruz AveUniversityoCMiddleUniversityUniversityyyIsabellaEmileMac BainBrittonHowardSamtrans lines 83, 85, 295,296/297Caltrain StationBus StopPlan Area BoundaryCaltrain R.O.WMenlo Park City ShuttleSamtrans Express line KXMenlo Park City BoundaryRecommended BRT StopFigure F4. Transit Service
  • 239. F16MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANGrand Boulevard Initiative and BRTThe Grand Boulevard Initiative is a collaboration of 19cities, two counties, and several regional and local agenciesand other stakeholders with a goal of transforming theEl Camino Real corridor from Daly City to San Jose. Theinitiative seeks to balance the need for cars and parkingwith viable options for transit, walking, and biking. Theimprovement of transit service along the corridor with BRTservice is a major component of the initiative.The Specific Plan supports BRT with identification of apotential BRT stop at Menlo Center for northbound serviceand another south of Santa Cruz Avenue for southboundservice. Both are within walking distance of downtown andthe Caltrain station. A bus pullout is already provided fornorthbound service. A pullout for southbound service couldbe implemented by replacing on-street parking with a busstop. These stops would be the responsibility of the transitagency providing BRT service.City of Menlo Park ShuttlesFree shuttles2are currently provided via the Menlo ParkMid-day Shuttle service within Menlo Park and adjacentcities. These shuttles serve the Stanford Medical Center,Stanford Shopping Center, downtown Menlo Park, MenloPark Caltrain Station, Menlo Park Library, Veteran’sAdministration (VA) Medical Center and Menlo Park SeniorCenter. The shuttles are open to the public. Headways areapproximately 60 minutes and the shuttles operate duringmid-day hours on weekdays only.The Specific Plan recommends adding additionalshuttle buses to reduce the headways to 15 minutesand lengthening service hours to include morning andevening hours as well as weekends. Shuttle routes shouldbe modified to match evolving travel patterns, includingincreased service to eastern and western reaches ofthe city to bring residents and employees to downtown.These service improvements will make the shuttles moreconvenient to use, thereby increasing ridership andreducing automobile travel. The pace at which shuttles areadded and routes are modified will be dependent on thepace of development and available funding (discussed inmore detail in Chapter G “Implementation”).2These shuttles are funded by City/County Association of Govern-ments (C/CAG), San Mateo Transportation Authority (SMCTA), thePeninsula Joint Powers Board (JPB), and the City of Menlo Park.
  • 240. F17CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONF.7 PARKINGParking in the Specific Plan area is currently providedon private lots, on the street and in downtown publicparking plazas. New developments in areas outside ofthe downtown provide parking on-site, based on the size,land use type and requirements herein. Parking for newdowntown developments of up to 100% floor area ratio(FAR) is provided in the public parking plazas (with theexception of a limited number of parcels associated withprivate parking lots that have been zoned to be part ofthe P (Parking) zoning district). Parking for the portion ofdowntown developments over 100% floor area ratio mustbe accommodated on-site or, potentially, off-site.Results of parking surveys recently completed by WilburSmith Associates for the 2010 Downtown Menlo ParkParking Study show that approximately 80 percent of thedowntown parking spaces are full during peak times (i.e.,the weekday lunch period). Capacity differs by plaza andblock face, as some areas have more activity than others.The “practical” capacity, the capacity at which a new patroncan find a parking space with relative ease, is consideredto be 85 to 90 percent. Therefore, there is some, butrelatively little, capacity at this time to accommodateparking displaced by public space improvements (such asthe Santa Cruz Avenue Central Plaza) or parking demandgenerated by new development. In addition, because thesurveys were done during a period of economic downturnthey may underestimate the parking demands that wouldoccur under more robust economic conditions when therewould be even less excess capacity.In order to realize the full public space improvements andto achieve the vitality associated with new development,the Specific Plan recommends new off-street parking ratesand a revised policy for shared/unbundled parking in thedowntown. In addition, the Specific Plan recommendsimproving the downtown parking supply by constructing upto two parking garages, discussed in more detail in SectionF.8 “Downtown Parking.”With regard to parking rates, the existing City coderequirements were reviewed to determine whether they areappropriate for current and future development types, dueto their infill and mixed-use nature, and to account for theproximity to other travel modes, such as transit (especiallythe Caltrain station), walking and biking. These standardsare discussed first, followed by a discussion of downtownparking, including new facilities, financing and parkingmanagement strategies.
  • 241. F18MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANF.8 PARKING STANDARDSThe Specific Plan proposes new minimum parkingstandards consistent with the mixed-use nature of thearea, proximity of the Caltrain station and bus routes andthe high use of walking and biking modes by Menlo Parkresidents. Households in mixed-use developments neartransit stations and in mixed-use downtowns own fewervehicles3, reducing the demand for residential parking inthese areas. Similarly, commercial and retail developmentsnear transit and in downtowns support a greater percentageof trip making by modes other than private automobile,reducing the need to provide dedicated parking for allcustomers or employees4. In addition, some of the parkingspaces used by retail customers and employees duringthe day can be used by residents and their visitors in theevening, further reducing the number of spaces needed tobe provided.5These types of shared parking reductions arenot included in the City’s existing rates, although individualdevelopments can currently request parking reductionsbased on specific factors.Table F2 summarizes the Specific Plan’s proposedminimum (and in one case, maximum) parking rates andthe references used to generate the recommendation.Sources used in the rate selection include City of MenloPark Municipal Code, Title 16 Zoning, Chapter 16.72.;City of Menlo Park Parking Reduction Policy; Institute ofTransportation Engineers (ITE), Parking Generation (3rdEdition, 2004); Urban Land Institute (ULI), Shared Parking(2ndEdition, 2005); and Metropolitan TransportationCommission (MTC), Reforming Parking Policies toSupport Smart Growth, 2007. The City’s Zoning Ordinancerequirements are at the high end of the range of ratesfor many of the uses. Reducing the rates, with adequatesupport, is recommended for the reasons cited above.3Transportation Research Board, Transit Cooperative Research Pro-gram, TCRP Report 95, Traveler Response to Transportation SystemChanges, 2007.4Lund et al, Travel Characteristics of Transit-Oriented Development inCalifornia, January 2004.5Urban Land Institute, Shared Parking.The ULI rates have been selected as the basis for theSpecific Plan Area rates, with the exception of residentialand restaurant uses. Both ULI and ITE present rates forsuburban locations with little transit service or few nearbyuses within walking distance and, as such, provide arelatively conservative base.Rates for residential developments in the Station Areareflect MTC recommendations with a minimum rate of1.0 space per unit and a maximum rate of 1.5 spaces perunit. These rates support transit use and lower vehiclesownership for sites near rail stations. A minimum rate of1.0 space per unit also applies to residential developmentsin the Station Sphere of Influence (SOI), or sites withinwalking distance of the Caltrain station (approximately¼ mile). A minimum rate of 1.85 spaces per unit appliesto residential developments in other Specific Plan areas.Figure F5 illustrates the areas designated as Station Areaand Station Area Sphere of Influence.Restaurant uses have been kept at the existing rate, inpart because the ULI/ITE rates are so high as to potentiallydiscourage this type of use, but also because existing,conforming restaurants in the Specific Plan Area appear tofunction adequately with parking at the current rate.Developments outside downtown will be required to provideparking on-site, while in the downtown area, properties willcontinue to be able to rely in part on facilities in the publicparking plaza parcels, discussed in more detail in SectionF.9 “Downtown Parking”.Shared Parking ReductionsIn addition to the proposed rates, an individual developmentproposal may incorporate a shared parking study thatproposes additional ULI credits to account for the mixtureof uses, either on-site or within a reasonable distance. Byvirtue of the existing diversity of nearby uses, parcels in thedowntown area would effectively have lower parking rates.However, the precise credit would be subject to review andapproval based on the specific design and site conditions.
  • 242. F19CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONTable F2. Parking Rates8LocalSourcesZoningOrdinance1Use BasedGuidelines2 ITE3ULI4MTC52.0 - 1.68 1.85 / 1.85 51.0 - 1.5- - - 1.0 min - 1.5 max 81.0 9min- - - 1.85 9min6 3.3 3.27 3.8 / 0.38 52.0 - 3.0 3.8 min6 5 4.06 4.5 / 4.5 5- 4.5 min6 5 3.05 / 3.42 73.6 / 4.0 51.5 - 2.5 4.0 min6 - 5.01 / 5.46 5- - 5.5 min6 6 - - 3.0 - 5.0 6.0 min- - 17.7 / 19.78 718.0 / 20.0 7- -- - 11.6 / 15.53 /10.5 / 15.0 /- -- - 15.3 / 18.75 /- - -- 1.1 1.05 1.25 / 1.18 7- 1.25 min123456789ULI parking supply rates taken from Urban Land Institute ,Shared Parking (2nd Edition, 2005).ITE parking supply rates derived from parking demand rates in Institute of Transportation Engineers Parking Generation (3rd Edition, 2004). Theparking supply rates are derived from the parking demand rates by increasing the parking demand rates by 15%. This industry standard increase isused to ensure that the parking supply is slightly higher than the demand to allow for vehicles to find available spaces without having to circulatethrough the entire parking facility.Specific Plan Rates6Parking RatesMulti-Family Dwelling (per unit)General Office(per 1,000 sf gfa)Medical Office(per 1,000 sf gfa)Station AreaStation Area Sphere of InfluenceOtherSee Figure F5 for areas where this minimum parking rate applies.Existing CityRequirementsIndustry SourcesNotes: du = dwelling unit, sf = square feet, gfa = gross floor area, gla = gross leasable area.Land UseMTC parking requirements taken from Reforming Parking Policies to Support Smart Growth, 2007.If a use is not listed in this table, a project applicant may propose a rate from ULI Shared Parking or other appropriate source or survey for the reviewand approval of the Transportation Manager. If ULI Shared Parking is updated with a new edition, the Transportation Manager may consider newrates.Weekday/weekend parking rates. Weekend data shown where available.Residential developments in the station area have a minimum rate of 1.0 space per unit and a maximum rate of 1.5 spaces per unit. See Figure F5for areas where these rates apply.Retail and Personal Service(per 1,000 sf gla)Supermarket(per 1,000 sf gfa)Restaurants(per 1,000 sf gfa/gla)QualityHigh TurnoverWith LoungeHotel(per room)City of Menlo Park Parking Reduction Policy, http://www.menlopark.org/departments/pln/parkredpolicy.pdf. Parking reductions through administrativepermits.City of Menlo Park Municipal Code, Title 16 Zoning, Chapter 16.72. Parking requirements for zoning districts. The listed rates do not vary by use - theC-3 and C-4 (ECR) districts have a standard 6 spaces per 1,000 sf gfa rate. Residential units have a 2 spaces/dwelling unit rate in all districts exceptfor the R-4 district, which allows different rates by unit type.
  • 243. F20MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANF.9 DOWNTOWN PARKINGThe Specific Plan fully accommodates the parking demandassociated with the development levels permitted by theSpecific Plan. Although new public space improvementsand limited new development would otherwise resultin some loss of existing parking, the Specific Plan fullyaddresses this by increasing the parking supply and byimproving the management of existing and new parkingspaces. With the approaches outlined in the Specific Plan,the downtown builds parking capacity for the future.Figure F5 shows the downtown area, where parcels maylocate at least some of the required parking in publicparking facilities.Parking Supply and DemandAccording to the 2010 Downtown Menlo Park ParkingStudy, by Wilbur Smith Associates, the existing publicparking supply in the downtown area (bounded by ElCamino Real, Oak Grove Avenue, University Drive andMenlo Avenue) consists of 1,186 spaces on the publicparking plazas and 409 spaces on-street, for a total of1,595 public spaces. Additional spaces are provided inprivate parking lots.
  • 244. F21CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONN0 300 600 1200FeetEl Camino Real/Downtown Specific PlanCity of Menlo ParkFehr & PeersStrategic EconomicsBKF EngineersESAHDR/The Hoyt Company19 November 2009Parking Standards (DRAFT)MiddlefieldLaurelLaurelMiddleIsabellaYaleEncinalWatkinsCollegeCreekRobleEmileMillsPineCambridgeFremontLive OakAlejandraAltoLinfieldFeltonHarvardArdenBurgessJohnsonPartridgeNoelGarwoodLennoxPrincetonHooverMerillSpruceEvelynRoseCraneVictoriaLeonClaireLeeMillieLaneAliceMarcussenStone PineWerthFlorenceMac BainWaverlyPriorCornellLSanAntonioBay LaurelBrittonMOREYDouglasMoultonBuckthornRebbeccaDoyleBlakeSherwoodHopkinsCurtisWestfieldBarronMichaelKENWOODKentClaremontCherryForestMalletTudorChestnutHomewoodSurreyHowardElizabethChateauFennwoodVersaillesBassettCreekPlSussexManorBlakeCreekCraneWaverlyArborSherwoodWillowRobleArborCurtisAlmaStreetUniversityUniversityOak GroveGlenwoodValparaisoOak GroveSanta Cruz AveMenloRavenswoodElCaminoRealDowntown Shared / UnbundledParking AreaExisting Downtown P (Parking)District DesignationStation AreaStation Area Sphere of InfluenceOutside Downtown On-SiteParking AreaPlan Area BoundaryMenlo Park City BoundaryFigure F5. Parking Areas
  • 245. F22MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANParking SupplyThe Specific Plan’s proposed parking supply reflects theincrease in supply from the construction of up to two newparking garages on a combination of Parking Plazas 1, 2,and 3 and the relocation of parking spaces for public spaceimprovements, such as widened sidewalks. For ParkingPlaza 1, the Specific Plan proposes a 5-level garage – onelevel below ground and four above – with 650 publiclyaccessible spaces. For Parking Plaza 2, the Specific Planalso allows for a 5-level garage – one level below and fourabove – for a total of 250 publicly accessible spaces, or 310spaces without the proposed pocket park at Chestnut Streetand Oak Grove Avenue. For Parking Plaza 3, the SpecificPlan proposes a 5-level parking garage – one level belowground and four above – providing 650 publicly accessiblespaces. A decision on which garages to build will requirefurther evaluation at the time of implementation, to considerparking space needs, available budget, the redevelopmentof surrounding properties and community outreach, amongother factors.Table F3 and Figure F6 summarize and depict the existingand future parking supply in downtown Menlo Park. Thetable indicates the number of existing parking spaces ineach parking plaza and on each block face in the downtowncore area. It also describes the types of changes that areproposed by the Specific Plan, the resulting change innumber of spaces and the resulting future supply.An alternative parking garage near the Caltrain stationwas suggested during the public engagement process.The objective for this garage was to provide parkingfor downtown employees, to free up spaces in theparking plazas for customers of both existing and newdevelopments, as well as potentially provide parking forCaltrain patrons. A parking garage near the train stationwas not moved forward due to the lack of an available site.The existing Caltrain station parking lots are under thecontrol of the Joint Powers Board, not the City, and are toonarrow to serve as an effective garage site, due to designrequirements for ramps and access. In addition, these sitescould potentially get smaller depending on the final HighSpeed Rail design.
  • 246. F23CHAPTER F CIRCULATION3. For parcels that are associated with private parking lotsthat are currently part of the P (Parking) district (seeFigure F5):a. If a P parcel is redeveloped, parkingfor the first 1.0 FAR can be satisfied byaccommodating the parking provided by the Pdistrict parcel either/both:i. On-site (e.g. underground); and/orii. In public parking plazas if the requirednumber of spaces is available; in-lieu feerequired.b. Parking for additional FAR, up to the zoningdistrict maximum, can be accommodatedeither/both:i. On-site; and/orii. In public parking plazas if the requirednumber of spaces is available; in-lieu feerequired.The phasing of public parking facilities downtown isdiscussed in more detail in Chapter G “Implementation”.The cost of the in-lieu fee would be established tocorrespond to the cost of providing a structured parkingspace.Balancing Parking Demand and SupplyThe Specific Plan recognizes that balancing parking supplywith demand will be an ongoing challenge in downtown.The public parking facilities, including up to two new parkinggarages, must accommodate parking displaced by publicamenity improvements (e.g., widened sidewalks on SantaCruz Avenue) and some of the parking demand fromexisting and new development.The Specific Plan proposes the following approach, andnew policies, for balancing parking demand and supply.1. City to set up system to monitor parking supply anddemand, including the number of spaces that must beaccommodated by those displaced by public amenityimprovements.2. For parcels that are not associated with private parkinglots that are currently part of the P (Parking) district:a. Parking for the first 1.0 FAR can beaccommodated in public parking plazas,consistent with current policy; no in-lieu feerequired; andb. Parking for additional FAR, up to the zoningdistrict maximum, can be accommodatedeither/both:i. On-site; and/orii. In public parking plazas if the requirednumber of spaces is available; in-lieu feerequired.1.2.3.
  • 247. F24MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANTable F3. Existing and Future Downtown Parking SupplyParking LocationExistingSupply1 Specific Plan ChangeChange inSpacesFuture SupplyParking PlazasParking Plaza 1 249 Added Parking Garage 2446 695 3Parking Plaza 2 95 Added Parking Garage and Pocket Park 4155 250Parking Plaza 3 212 Added Parking Garage and Pocket Park5438 650Parking Plaza 4 105 Pedestrian Link -19 86Parking Plaza 5 150 Pedestrian Link -16 134Parking Plaza 6 136 Pedestrian Link, Market Place -32 104Parking Plaza 7 94 Pedestrian Link, Market Place -36 58Parking Plaza 8 145 Pedestrian Link -7 138Total 1,186 929 2,115Total with 2 Parking Garages 1,186 483 - 774 1669 - 19606On-Street SpacesSanta Cruz Avenue 116 Sidewalk Widening -48 68Chestnut Street North 26 Sidewalk Widening -11 15Chestnut Street South 17 Chestnut Paseo -11 6Oak Grove Avenue 80 Added Bike Lanes -35 45Other Streets 170 No Change 0 170Total 409 -105 3047Downtown Core Area Total 1,595 824 2,419Total with 2 Parking Garages 1,595 378 - 669 1973 - 2264 67On street parking space could be affected with proposed future Class II / Minimum Class III improvements.6Although three parking garages are shown, the Specific Plan assumes that up to two parking garages will be built in downtown Menlo Park.The parking total reflects the range of parking spaces that could be provided if only two garages were built, rather than three.5A new parking garage and pocket park at Parking Plaza 3 would displace 212 existing spaces.Existing and Future Downtown Parking SupplyNotes:2A new parking garage at Parking Plaza 1 would displace 204 existing spaces.12009-2010 Downtown Menlo Park Parking Study, Wilbur Smith Associates.4A new parking garage and pocket park at parking plaza 2 would displace 95 existing spaces.3Future parking supply for Parking Plaza 1 includes a 650-space parking garage + 45 surface spaces remaining.
  • 248. F25CHAPTER F CIRCULATION4 5 6 7 8116502504565086 134 104 58 13832Public Parking in Downtown Menlo Park per Emerging Plan (DRAFT)11 February, 2010Potential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below grade; andpocket parkPotential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below grade; andpocket parkPotential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below grade; andpocket parkPotential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below grade; andpocket parkPotential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below gradePotential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below gradePublic PAlthassdowThebe pNotes:On-streTotal1Addfutu23PublicOn-streLive OakHooverMERRILLEvelynRoseCraneMillieMenloDoyleCurtisMaloneyRyan’sChestnutCraneJohnsonUniversityUniversityOak GroveSanta Cruz AvenueMenlo AvenueRavenswoodElCaminoRealAlmaStreetfected by Specific Plan ImprovementsPublic Parking PlazasAlthough three parking garages are shown, the Specific Planassumes that up to two parking garages will be built indowntown Menlo Park.The parking total reflects the range of parking spaces that couldbe provided if only two garages were built, rather than three.Notes:1,669 - 1,9601,973 - 2,264On-street ParkingParking Spaces304TotalProject Area Boundary1Additional on street parking could be affected with proposedfuture Class II / Minimum Class III improvements. See Figure F3.23Parking GaragesSurface ParkingPublic Parking PlazasOn-street Parking Spaces21aStreetlevel ga5 l aarage:aevls abo4 lv ovve grade +ovvl below1 lv ww gradewv5 level garage:4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below grade6 7 81165045104058 1382Park per Emerging Plan (DRAFT)Affected by Specific Plan ImprovementsPublic Parking PlazasFor Parking Plaza 3, Option A, the parking garage accomodatespublic parking / parking for residential above; 370 spaces shownin the diagram represent parking that is publicly accessible.For Parking Plaza 3, Option B, the parking count for parking garageis based on “Parking Structure Feasability Options for Plaza 3”prepared by Watry Design, Inc. as referenced in the City of MenloPark, Public Works Department Staff Report #:05-060.Notes:1547185118272131On-street Parking 304 304Option A Option BTotalProject Area Boundary12Parking GaragesSurface ParkingPublic Parking PlazasUnaffected by Specific Plan ImprovementsDowntown Parking Plaza NumberOn-street SpacesHooverMERRILLCraneDoyleCurtisMaloneyRyan’sChestnutJohnsonOak GroveSanta Cruz AvenueMenlo AvenueRavenswoodElCaminoAlmaStreetAffected by Specific Plan ImprovementsPublic Parking PlazasAlthough three parking garages are shown, the Specific Planassumes that up to two parking garages will be built indowntown Menlo Park.The parking total reflects the range of parking spaces that couldbe provided if only two garages were built, rather than three.Notes:1,669 - 1,9601,973 - 2,264On-street ParkingParking Spaces304TotalProject Area Boundary1Additional on street parking could be affected with proposedfuture Class II / Minimum Class III improvements. See Figure F3.23Parking GaragesSurface ParkingPublic Parking PlazasUnaffected by Specific Plan ImprovementsOn-street Parking Spaces2316 7 81165025045104 58 1382Park per Emerging Plan (DRAFT)Potential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below grade; andpocket parkPotential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below grade; andpocket parkPotential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below gradePotential 5 level garage4 lvls above grade +1 lvl below gradeAffected by Specific Plan ImprovementsPublic Parking PlazasAlthough three parking garages are shown, the Specific Planassumes that up to two parking garages will be built indowntown Menlo Park.The parking total reflects the range of parking spaces that couldbe provided if only two garages were built, rather than three.Notes:1,669 - 1,9601,973 - 2,264On-street ParkingParking Spaces304TotalProject Area Boundary1Additional on street parking could be affected with proposedfuture Class II / Minimum Class III improvements. See Figure F3.23Parking GaragesSurface ParkingPublic Parking PlazasUnaffected by Specific Plan ImprovementsDowntown Parking Plaza NumberOn-street Parking Spaces231Live OakHooverMERRILLCraneDoyleCurtisMaloneyRyan’sChestnutJohnsonOak GroveSanta Cruz AvenueMenlo AvenueRavenswoodElCaminoRealAlmaStreetFigure F6. Proposed Public Parking Downtown
  • 249. F26MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANBenefits of Garaged ParkingThe Specific Plan proposes up to two new parkinggarages to accommodate increased parking demand.Parking garages can have a number of benefits includingincreased parking efficiencies, enhanced urban design andimprovements to traffic circulation.Because the parking garages will be shared by multipleuses, the individual spaces can be shared by different usersthroughout the course of the day. This allows for providingfewer total parking spaces in a mixed-use area, allowingmore land to be dedicated to other non-parking uses. Otherbenefits of parking garages include the following.• Garages provide the parking supply for newdowntown development, which can allow for thedevelopment of smaller or oddly shaped parcelswhere providing required on-site parking isinfeasible.• The consolidation of parking to a single locationcreates a more cohesive urban fabric that is notbroken up by numerous surface parking lots.• Construction of parking garages can be a goodopportunity to underground utilities and providecentralized and covered garbage locations, as wellas provide facilities for car-sharing services andpotentially electric car charging stations.• Garages can accommodate the increaseddevelopment intensities needed to support andenhance a viable transit system.• Garages provide a concentrated and remotelocation for all day employee parking for downtownbusinesses, helping free up spaces in surface lotsfor customers.• Parking garages consolidate traffic at fewer accesspoints, which can lead to more orderly circulationpatterns.Public parking garage wrapped with retail use (Mountain View,California)“You could use the parkingplazas to create a small parkif you built a classy parkinggarage on a parking plaza”- Workshop #3 ParticipantParking garages can be equipped to provide real-timeinformation on the number of available spaces, therebyreducing traffic related to drivers “cruising” for availablespaces, which has been found to constitute up to 30% oftraffic in some downtown areas6.6Donald Shoup, The High Cost of Free Parking
  • 250. F27CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONCost of Garaged ParkingThe benefits above must be considered in the context ofthe higher construction costs of garaged parking whencompared to surface parking. The recommended sites fornew parking garages in Downtown Menlo Park are theexisting City-owned surface parking lots, so land acquisitionwill not be required.Assuming a five-level 650-space parking garage, withone level of parking underground and 4 levels above,the magnitude of cost estimate for the parking garageis $28,800 to $32,400 per parking stall, in 2012 dollars,which equates to between $18,700,000 and $21,000,000total cost. The magnitude of cost estimate consists ofconstruction costs and soft costs. The probable constructioncost covers the base construction cost; miscellaneouscosts; general contractor overhead and insurance costs;design contingency; and escalation costs, which comesto $24,000 to $27,000 per parking stall7. The soft costs,estimated at 20% of the construction cost, include designservices, environmental review, surveying, building permits,utility connections and construction administration. Fora less efficient, smaller garage with a smaller floor plateon a more constrained site, such as the one suggestedfor Parking Plaza 2, the probable construction cost issignificantly higher at $33,000 to $43,000 per parking stall7.7Watry Design, Inc. On-Line Parking Structure Cost Calculator (www.watrydesign.com), March 2010.Parking Garage FundingThe Specific Plan proposes several options for financingthe parking garages. The most direct option for funding theconstruction, operations and maintenance of the garageis to charge for parking in the garage. The parking ratesneeded to cover all of these costs may be too high for theMenlo Park market to accommodate given the amount offree (or low cost) parking in nearby communities. Underthis option, existing (and new) businesses would not berequired to pay directly. However, they may choose tosubsidize employee parking and validate customer parking.A second funding option, often used in conjunction withcharging for parking, is the payment of in-lieu fees wherea new business pays a fee instead of providing parkingon their site. This requires the creation of a parking districtto collect the fees and manage the supply of parking inthe area. The in-lieu fees are often lower than the costof providing parking spaces on-site in small site-specificgarages.Many cities partially subsidize the cost of new garages,based on the overall economic benefit of the new land usessupported by the garage. Another option is a public-privatepartnership where a private entity finances a portion of thegarage, and typically has a portion of the spaces dedicatedfor their use either all the time or for selected hours.A combination of in-lieu fees for new developmentand charging for parking, and possibly a public-privatepartnership, could provide a viable funding program for theparking garages.
  • 251. F28MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANParking Management PlanThe Specific Plan recommends that the City prepare aParking Management Plan to improve the managementand utilization of existing parking spaces downtown.Consideration of commencement of a Parking ManagementPlan shall be added to the yearly Capital ImprovementProgram (CIP) process, so that implementation of sucha plan can be timed appropriately with Plan-relatedchanges in parking. In addition, development of a parkingmanagement plan, as well as discussion of related parkingtopics, should be informed by a Downtown Parking TaskForce. The membership composition, objectives and typicalmeeting schedule of such an advisory group shall beseparately established and regularly updated by the CityCouncil.The Parking Management Plan aims to utilize the City ofMenlo Park’s parking supply within the downtown area toits fullest extent possible and to create a Park Once andWalk strategy where downtown visitors can park in onelocation and visit numerous destinations without fear ofreceiving a parking ticket. With a successful managementplan, the number of new parking spaces needed may bereduced and the timing for constructing a parking garagemay be postponed. A successful plan is based on an 85percent targeted occupancy rate, considered the optimalparking level because it provides for full use of the parkingsupply while providing sufficient vacancy so that vehiclestrying to park can find a space without excessive searching.(This goal of 85 percent occupancy is a typical thresholdin evaluating parking supply and demand. It is supportedby Professor Donald Shoup of UCLA, author of The HighCost of Free Parking, who states that 85 percent occupancyaccomplishes the goal of managing the supply of parkingwhile making parking reasonably available when and whereneeded).The Parking Management Plan could encompass thefollowing strategies:• Vary time limits for parking to enhance turnover ofthe most convenient spaces;• Implement pricing for parking to control parkingoccupancies;• Unbundle parking to demonstrate the true costof parking spaces, reduce the amount of parkingneeded and minimize underutilized parking(discussed in more detail later);• Establish a Parking Benefits District to captureparking revenues and finance public improvementsdowntown; and• Prepare a Parking Implementation Plan.Other Parking Management Plan strategies include:• Create well-designed pedestrian-friendly linkagesbetween the major parking areas (lots andgarages) and downtown destinations (addressed inPublic Space chapter); and• Accommodate car-share programs to providevehicles to those who need them infrequently.Time LimitsTime limits can be used to manage the parking supply.Short time limits should be used to encourage turnover(e.g., spaces in front of a dry cleaners so that patrons candrop off or pick up their cleaning). Alternatively, longer timelimits can be used to encourage employees to park in moredistant locations (such as the parking garages), freeing-upnearby spaces for customers. Longer term parking can alsoaccommodate multi-purpose trips such as shopping anddining. This will increase patron convenience since they willnot need to be concerned about moving their vehicle andreduce the number of parking tickets.The City recently undertook a parking study to selectappropriate time limits for the current supply of parking.This study resulted in Council approval to change SantaCruz Avenue on-street parking time limits to one hour,with a number of 15-minute zones for convenience stops.The Council retained two-hour free parking in the parkingplazas, but allowed for paid parking above those time limitson Parking Plazas 1 and 5. These actions have been putinto effect, and are consistent with the Specific Plan goals.
  • 252. F29CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONMetered Parking/Parking PricingCharging for parking (with associated appropriate timelimits) can be used to manage the parking supply byencouraging turnover in highly desirable spaces (e.g.,those on Santa Cruz Avenue). The key characteristics ofsuccessful paid parking programs are listed below.• Price the most convenient/desirable spaces(typically curbside spaces) at a higher rate thanless convenient spaces.• Set, manage and review the parking price so that85% of curbside spaces are occupied during peakperiods. This helps businesses by increasing theavailability of the most convenient parking spaces.• Create a “Parking Benefits District” (discussedbelow) which invests meter revenues intostreetscape and parking lot improvements likebenches, street trees, street sweeping and otherpublic amenities for the areas served by themetered parking.The City could consider implementing a metered parkingsystem for existing spaces in the plan area (both on parkingplazas and on-street), preferably using spaced, pay-by-space parking meters to allow visitors to pay with cash,credit card or, perhaps, through cell phones/smart phones/PDAs. This will increase the convenience of meteredparking and allow visitors flexibility in how they pay forparking. Spaces in the parking garages should be free ofcharge for the first hour or two and then charged a fee forthe subsequent hours; thus increasing the desirability ofspaces in parking garages.One of the initial impediments to parking pricing is theperception that charging for parking will reduce the numberof visitors to the downtown. However, if pricing strategiesare set up so that convenient spaces are available and thechance of getting a parking ticket is minimized, the numberof visitors to the downtown would not be reduced andmay increase. Burlingame and Redwood City are nearbycities that charge for parking. Redwood City has alsoimplemented metered parking with varied pricing strategiesin its downtown. The City reports that the combinationof removing both free parking and time restrictions hasresulted in better parking compliance and issuance of fewerparking tickets.Pay-by-Space Parking Meter(Redwood City)Solar Powered Pay-by-SpaceParking Meterrking MeterCity)Solar Powered Pay-by-SpaceParking MeterParking meters
  • 253. F30MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANUnbundled ParkingWhen parking is included in tenant leases, the true cost ofparking is hidden. For example the price for an apartmentwith two parking spaces may be rented for $1,500 permonth. However, if the parking spaces were unbundled, theprice for rent for the apartment would be $1,300 per month,plus $100 per month for each space. Unbundled parkinghelps tenants to understand the true cost of parking, andmay influence a resident’s decision to own a car (ReformingParking Policies to Support Smart Growth, MTC, 2007).The Specific Plan recommends unbundled parking – therenting or selling of parking spaces separately, rather thanautomatically including them with building space – in allresidential developments in the plan area. Unbundlingparking makes particular sense in mixed-use developmentareas within walking distance to transit, because peopleare less likely to need a car. Available parking spacescreated by unbundling parking could also be set aside forcar sharing providers such as ZipCar or CityCarShare.(These services allow members to reserve a vehicle bythe day or by the hour for a fee inclusive of mileage, gas,maintenance, and insurance. The services can supporthouseholds or businesses that choose not to own a car).Parking Benefits DistrictOther cities in California that have implemented parkingmeters/pricing strategies, such as West Hollywood,Pasadena, Santa Monica and San Francisco, have beenable to do so successfully through the creation of a ParkingBenefit District where all or portions of parking revenues arereturned to the district where the revenues are collected.The revenues can be used to provide improvements suchas benches, street trees, street sweeping and other publicamenities serving the plan area or to potentially fund shuttleservice enhancements.Parking Implementation PlanOnce the City of Menlo Park decides to implement aParking Management Plan, it will be vital to the plan’ssuccess to prepare a detailed implementation plan toensure that the parking strategies are implemented in astrategic and cost-effective way and are monitored foreffectiveness.In the first phase of the Parking Implementation Plan, theCity should analyze existing and future parking demandpatterns and identify specific parking managementstrategies to accommodate those demand patterns. Oncethe City has identified appropriate strategies, it shouldconsider forming a Parking Benefits District as a secondphase of the implementation plan. The formation of thebenefits district should include clear guidelines on theoperating principles of the parking plan, define a monitoringplan to ensure that the parking pricing strategies areappropriate and meet the City’s goal of maintaining therecommended 85 percent parking occupancy. As part ofthe Parking Benefits District formation, the City should alsocreate an in-lieu parking fee program (further discussedin “Costs of Garaged Parking” section) and set up aresidential parking permit program, if needed. It is assumedthat the City would have revised its parking regulations toreduce the current minimum parking requirement to thoserecommended in the plan, as discussed above.In the long-term the plan should include ongoing monitoringof a Parking Management Plan and evaluation of how theparking revenue is used for amenities, parking and shuttleswithin the plan area.
  • 254. F31CHAPTER F CIRCULATIONFunding of an area wide TDM program could beprovided through annual assessments on newdevelopment or by the in-lieu parking fees. Some of therecommended implementation policies discussed in theprevious sections, such as bicycle parking, unbundledparking, and reduced parking rates are also TDMmeasures commonly considered in programs to reducevehicle travel.Caltrain GO Pass – An Employer-Sponsored ProgramNew and existing qualified employers in the plan areashould be encouraged to participate in the GO Passprogram to encourage Caltrain use, reduce automobileuse and reduce vehicle parking needs. GO Pass is anemployer-sponsored annual pass that offers unlimitedrides on Caltrain seven days a week through all zones.The GO Pass is purchased by employers for all full-time employees. Employers pay an annual fee toprovide the pass to each full-time employee regardlessof how many employees use the pass, and employeesmust have photo ID badges to participate in theprogram.F.10 TRANSPORTATIONDEMAND MANAGEMENTThe Specific Plan encourages Transportation DemandManagement (TDM) programs for all new developments,including those that generate fewer than 100 peak hourtrips. (Currently, only projects generating over 100 peakhour trips are required by C/CAG (San Mateo City/CountyAssociation of Governments) to pay an impact fee ordevelop TDM program.) The purpose of TDM programsis to reduce vehicle trips to mitigate impacts on roadwaysegments and intersections, and to reduce associatedparking demand, by encouraging the use of modes otherthan single-occupant vehicles for travel.TDM strategies that could be implemented by individualdevelopments in the plan area include:• Commute alternative information;• Bicycle storage facilities;• Showers and changing rooms;• Pedestrian and bicycle subsidies;• Operating dedicated shuttle service (or buying intoa shuttle consortium);• Subsidizing transit tickets;• Preferential parking for carpoolers;• Provide child care services and convenienceshopping within new developments;• Van pool programs;• Guaranteed ride home program for those who usealternative modes;• Parking cash-out programs and discounts forpersons who carpool, vanpool, bicycle or usepublic transit;• Imposing charges for parking rather than providingfree parking;• Providing shuttles for customers and visitors; and/or• Car share programs.
  • 255. IMPLEMENTATIONG.G.1 OVERVIEW G.2 KEY ACTIONS TO ENABLE THE SPECIFIC PLAN G.3 KEY ACTIONS TO IMPLEMENT THE SPECIFICPLAN G.4 FINANCING METHODS FOR PUBLICIMPROVEMENTS G.5 PHASING OF PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS G.6 UTILITY IMPROVEMENTS G2G2 G14G17G26G28
  • 256. G2MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANG.1 OVERVIEWThe Menlo Park El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Planestablishes a framework for the implementation of landuse regulations and public improvements outlined in theSpecific Plan.This chapter contains five major components.• G.2 Key Actions to Enable the Specific Plan• G.3 Key Actions to Implement the Specific Plan• G.4 Financing Methods for Public Improvements• G.5 Phasing of Public Improvements• G.6 Utility ImprovementsG.2 KEY ACTIONS TO ENABLETHE SPECIFIC PLANThe Specific Plan addresses the key actions necessary toenable the Specific Plan, which includes:• Relationship to the Menlo Park General Plan; and• General Plan and Zoning Ordinance Amendments.Overall, the Specific Plan refines the City’s GeneralPlan policy direction for the plan area. It carries out theSpecific Plan’s vision through new land use designationsand zoning districts specifically aimed at the variety ofphysical environments and range of outcomes identifiedin the Specific Plan. Therefore, the Specific Plan replacessections of the General Plan and Zoning Ordinance andprovides standards and guidelines for the plan area, unlessspecifically identified otherwise in this document.
  • 257. G3CHAPTER G IMPLEMENTATIONRelationship to the Menlo ParkGeneral PlanPer Government Code Section 65451, a specific plan mustinclude a statement of the relationship of the specific planto the general plan. Many of the goals and policies in theGeneral Plan documents remain relevant, although othersmay not reflect physical and economic changes and desiredfutures within the plan area.Table G1 (following pages) describes the relationship ofselected General Plan goals and policies to the SpecificPlan. Only policies that relate to the Specific Plan areaare included, although other goals and policies could beconsidered by some to have relevance to the Specific Plan.The Seismic Safety and Safety Element is not included atall, as its goals and policies are either more broad reachingor project specific, and therefore do not have directrelevance to the Specific Plan. All private developmentand public improvements envisioned in the Specific Planwould adhere to all City standards related to seismic safetyissues. As described in more detail below, the adoptionof the Specific Plan was preceded by a General Planamendment that replaces the existing General Plan forthese geographic areas; however, the Table G1 analysisdescribes the relationship between the existing GeneralPlan and the Specific Plan.General Plan and Zoning OrdinanceAmendmentsThe Specific Plan includes within it a comprehensive setof General Plan-type components (e.g., goals, policies,land use designations, and circulation plans). As such,prior to the adoption of the Specific Plan, the General Planwas amended to include the Specific Plan as part of theGeneral Plan itself, governing the plan area. The SpecificPlan also includes Zoning Ordinance-type elements (e.g.,detailed development regulations). After adoption of theSpecific Plan, the City adopted similar Zoning Ordinanceamendments that constitute the Zoning Ordinance for thePlan area, unless otherwise specified. The General PlanLand Use Diagram and the City’s Zoning Map have beensimilarly amended to show changes consistent with theSpecific Plan.General Plan and Zoning Ordinance Amendments werepresented concurrent with review of the Final Specific Plan.
  • 258. G4MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANSpecific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Plan includes standards and guidelinesto encourage quality design in infill development.Additionally, architectural review will be required fornew development to ensure consistency with thestandards and guidelines. The standards includespecific requirements for open space in residentialdevelopments.I-A-4Residential uses may be combined with commercialuses in a mixed use project, if the project is designedto avoid conflicts between the uses, such as traffic,parking, noise, dust and odors.The Specific Plan allows for mixed use commercialand residential development that will be subject toarchitectural review to ensure design features thathelp address compatibility issues.I-A-5Development of housing, including housing forsmaller households, is encouraged in commercially-zoned areas in and near Downtown. (Downtown isdefined as the area bounded by Alma Street,Ravenswood Avenue/Menlo Avenue, UniversityDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.The Specific Plan encourages housing developmentalong El Camino Real and in the station anddowntown areas through increased allowabledevelopment intensities. It requires adequate off-street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.I-A-9Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorarea of residential projects up to a maximum of 15The Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. NothingCity of Menlo Park General Plan Goals and PoliciesTo maintain and improve the character and stability of Menlo Parks existing residentialneighborhoods while providing for the development of a variety of housing types. Thepreservation of open space shall be encouraged.SECTION I: LAND USE POLICIES (1994)ResidentialTable G1. El Camino Real/Downtown Specific Plan/City of Menlo Park General Plan Consistency Analysis
  • 259. G5CHAPTER G IMPLEMENTATIONTable G1 (continued)Specific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Plan includes standards and guidelinesto encourage quality design in infill development.Additionally, architectural review will be required fornew development to ensure consistency with thestandards and guidelines. The standards includespecific requirements for open space in residentialdevelopments.I-A-4Residential uses may be combined with commercialuses in a mixed use project, if the project is designedto avoid conflicts between the uses, such as traffic,parking, noise, dust and odors.The Specific Plan allows for mixed use commercialand residential development that will be subject toarchitectural review to ensure design features thathelp address compatibility issues.I-A-5Development of housing, including housing forsmaller households, is encouraged in commercially-zoned areas in and near Downtown. (Downtown isdefined as the area bounded by Alma Street,Ravenswood Avenue/Menlo Avenue, UniversityDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.The Specific Plan encourages housing developmentalong El Camino Real and in the station anddowntown areas through increased allowabledevelopment intensities. It requires adequate off-street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.I-A-9Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorarea of residential projects up to a maximum of 15The Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. NothingCity of Menlo Park General Plan Goals and PoliciesTo maintain and improve the character and stability of Menlo Parks existing residentialneighborhoods while providing for the development of a variety of housing types. Thepreservation of open space shall be encouraged.SECTION I: LAND USE POLICIES (1994)ResidentialDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.I-A-9Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorarea of residential projects up to a maximum of 15percent above that otherwise permitted by theapplicable zoning.The Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. Nothingin the Specific Plan contradicts this City policy.I-A-10All utilities installed in conjunction with newresidential development shall be placedunderground.The Specific Plan provides for guidelines to thiseffect.Goal I-BI-B-1The Downtown shall include a complementary mix ofstores and services in a quality design, addingnatural amenities into the development pattern.The Specific Plan allows for a complementary mix ofstores and services, coupled with design standardsand guidelines which help ensure quality design. Itadds significant new public space and landscapedowntown.I-B-2Parking which is sufficient to serve the retail needsof the Downtown area and which is attractivelydesigned to encourage retail patronage shall beprovided.The Specific Plan provides for a variety of parkingfacilities, including surface parking lots, on-streetparking and parking garages to provide adequateparking to meet the needs of visitors and employees.Design guidelines and standards will ensureattractive designs for any new parking facilities.I-B-3New development shall not reduce the number ofexisting parking spaces in the Assessment District,on P-zoned parcels, or on private property whereparking is provided in lieu of Assessment Districtparticipation.The Specific Plan increases the number of parkingspaces in the Assessment District with up to two newparking garages on downtown parking plazas.Existing P-zoned parcels would be required tocontinue to serve as parking, unless spaces areavailable in the public parking facilities and theproperty owner pays an in-lieu fee.I-B-4Uses and activities shall be encouraged which willstrengthen and complement the relationshipbetween the Transportation Center and theDowntown area and nearby El Camino Real corridor.The Specific Plan proposes new public spaceimprovements and sidewalk extensions that enhanceconnections between downtown and the stationarea. It encourages Santa Cruz Avenue "main street"retail uses to extend from El Camino Real to theCaltrain Station.I-B-5New development with offices as the sole use that islocated outside of the boundary of the Downtownarea along the south side of Menlo Avenue and thenorth side of Oak Grove Avenue shall not create atraffic impact that would exceed that of a housingproject on the same site.The Specific Plan requires that new office uses,either in isolation or as part of a mixed-use project,have a maximum FAR that is one-third to one-half ofthe overall maximum FAR, which should reducetraffic impacts in comparison to a housing project.Overall traffic impacts are studied in more detail inthe EIR.Goal I-C To encourage creativity in development of the El Camino Real CorridorTo strengthen Downtown as a vital and competitive shopping area while encouraging thepreservation and enhancement of Downtowns historic atmosphere and character.Commercial
  • 260. G6MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANI-B-4strengthen and complement the relationshipbetween the Transportation Center and theDowntown area and nearby El Camino Real corridor.connections between downtown and the stationarea. It encourages Santa Cruz Avenue "main street"retail uses to extend from El Camino Real to theCaltrain Station.I-B-5New development with offices as the sole use that islocated outside of the boundary of the Downtownarea along the south side of Menlo Avenue and thenorth side of Oak Grove Avenue shall not create atraffic impact that would exceed that of a housingproject on the same site.The Specific Plan requires that new office uses,either in isolation or as part of a mixed-use project,have a maximum FAR that is one-third to one-half ofthe overall maximum FAR, which should reducetraffic impacts in comparison to a housing project.Overall traffic impacts are studied in more detail inthe EIR.Goal I-CI-C-1New and upgraded retail development shall beencouraged along El Camino Real near Downtown,especially stores that will complement the retailingmix of Downtown. Adequate parking must beprovided and the density, location, and site designmust not aggravate traffic at congestedintersections. The livability of adjacent residentialareas east and west of El Camino Real and northand south of Downtown must be protected.The Specific Plan encourages development along ElCamino real that incorporates ground floor uses,including retail, that activates the street and providesfor adequate on-site parking. The Specific Plandesign guidelines also require setbacks and othermassing limitations that protect residentialneighborhoods.I-C-2Small-scale offices shall be allowed along most of ElCamino Real in a balanced pattern with residentialor retail development.The Specific Plan encourages a mix of appropriateuses, including offices. The Specific Plan alsorequires that new office uses, either in isolation or aspart of a mixed-use project, have a maximum FARthat is one-third to one-half of the overall maximumFAR, which will additionally encourage a mixture ofuses.Goal I-EI-E-1All proposed commercial development shall beevaluated for its fiscal impact on the City as well asits potential to provide goods or services needed bythe community.The Specific Plans land use designations anddevelopment intensities are based on communityinput, market analysis and fiscal impact analysis.I-E-2Hotel uses may be considered at suitable locationswithin the commercial and industrial zoning districtsof the City.The Specific Plan permits hotel uses in the planarea.I-E-3Retention and expansion of auto dealerships in thecity shall be encouraged. Development of new autodealerships or combined dealerships in an autocenter shall be encouraged at suitable locations inthe city.The Specific Plan allows for auto dealerships alongEl Camino Real.I-E-4Any new or expanded office use must includeprovisions for adequate off-street parking, mitigatingtraffic impacts, and developing effective alternativesto auto commuting, must adhere to acceptablearchitectural standards, and must protect adjacentresidential uses from adverse impacts.The Specific Plan standards and guidelines call foradequate on site-parking and proposes ways toencourage transit use, such as throughTransportation Demand Management programs.Additionally, the standards and guidelines addressbuilding design with particular attention tocompatibility with adjacent residentialneighborhoods.I-E-5The City shall consider attaching performancestandards to projects requiring conditional usepermits.The Specific Plan establishes certain uses assubject to use permit review, at which pointperformance standards may be considered.Goal I-GTo encourage creativity in development of the El Camino Real CorridorTo promote the preservation of open-space lands for recreation, protection of natural resources,the production of managed resources, protection of health and safety, and/or the enhancementof scenic qualities.To promote the development and retention of commercial uses which provide significantrevenue to the City and/or goods and services needed by the community and which have lowenvironmental and traffic impacts.Open SpaceTable G1 (continued)Specific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Plan includes standards and guidelinesto encourage quality design in infill development.Additionally, architectural review will be required fornew development to ensure consistency with thestandards and guidelines. The standards includespecific requirements for open space in residentialdevelopments.I-A-4Residential uses may be combined with commercialuses in a mixed use project, if the project is designedto avoid conflicts between the uses, such as traffic,parking, noise, dust and odors.The Specific Plan allows for mixed use commercialand residential development that will be subject toarchitectural review to ensure design features thathelp address compatibility issues.I-A-5Development of housing, including housing forsmaller households, is encouraged in commercially-zoned areas in and near Downtown. (Downtown isdefined as the area bounded by Alma Street,Ravenswood Avenue/Menlo Avenue, UniversityDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.The Specific Plan encourages housing developmentalong El Camino Real and in the station anddowntown areas through increased allowabledevelopment intensities. It requires adequate off-street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.I-A-9Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorarea of residential projects up to a maximum of 15The Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. NothingCity of Menlo Park General Plan Goals and PoliciesTo maintain and improve the character and stability of Menlo Parks existing residentialneighborhoods while providing for the development of a variety of housing types. Thepreservation of open space shall be encouraged.SECTION I: LAND USE POLICIES (1994)Residential
  • 261. G7CHAPTER G IMPLEMENTATIONI-E-4Any new or expanded office use must includeprovisions for adequate off-street parking, mitigatingtraffic impacts, and developing effective alternativesto auto commuting, must adhere to acceptablearchitectural standards, and must protect adjacentresidential uses from adverse impacts.The Specific Plan standards and guidelines call foradequate on site-parking and proposes ways toencourage transit use, such as throughTransportation Demand Management programs.Additionally, the standards and guidelines addressbuilding design with particular attention tocompatibility with adjacent residentialneighborhoods.I-E-5The City shall consider attaching performancestandards to projects requiring conditional usepermits.The Specific Plan establishes certain uses assubject to use permit review, at which pointperformance standards may be considered.Goal I-GI-G-1The City shall develop and maintain a parks andrecreation system that provides areas and facilitiesconveniently located and properly designed to servethe recreation needs of all Menlo Park residents.The Specific Plan proposes expansive new publicspace improvements, particularly in the downtownand station areas. Such improvements includewidened sidewalks, plazas, paseo, and pocketparks.I-G-2The community should contain an ample supply ofspecialized open space in the form of squares,greens, and parks whose frequent use isencouraged through placement and design.The Specific Plan proposes expansive new publicspace improvements, particularly in the downtownand station areas. Such improvements includewidened sidewalks, plazas, paseo, and pocketparks.I-G-3Public spaces should be designed to encourage theattention and presence of people at all hours of theday and appropriate hours of the night.Among many public space improvements, theSpecific Plan proposes widened sidewalks alongSanta Cruz Avenue in downtown and a paseo onChestnut Street, affording ample space for outdoordining and gathering. Downtown will continue toemphasize active retail and restaurant uses thatinteract with public spaces.I-G-4Dedication of land, or payment of fees in lieu thereof,for park and recreation purposes shall be required ofall new residential developmentThe Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. Nothingin the Specific Plan contradicts this City policy.I-G-10Extensive landscaping should be included in publicand private development, including greaterlandscaping in large parking areas. Whereappropriate, the City shall encourage placement of aportion of the required parking in landscape reserveuntil such time as the parking is needed. Plantmaterial selection and landscape and irrigationdesign shall adhere to the Citys Water EfficientLandscaping Ordinance.The Specific Plan calls for the incorporation ofsustainable practices in construction and operationof public and private realm improvements.I-G-11Well-designed pedestrian facilities should beincluded in areas of intensive pedestrian activityThe Specific Plan proposes expansive new publicspace improvements, particularly in the downtownand stations areas. Such improvements includewidened sidewalks, crosswalk improvements,bike/pedestrian tunnel, and paseo.Goal I-HI-H-1The community design should help conserveresources and minimize waste.The Specific Plan calls for the incorporation ofsustainable practices in construction and operationof public and private realm improvements.The use of water-conserving plumbing fixtures in all The Specific Plan calls for the incorporation ofPublic and Quasi-Public Facilities and ServicesTo promote the development and maintenance of adequate public and quasi-public facilities andservices to meet the needs of Menlo Parks residents, businesses, workers, and visitors.To promote the preservation of open-space lands for recreation, protection of natural resources,the production of managed resources, protection of health and safety, and/or the enhancementof scenic qualities.Open SpaceTable G1 (continued)Specific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Plan includes standards and guidelinesto encourage quality design in infill development.Additionally, architectural review will be required fornew development to ensure consistency with thestandards and guidelines. The standards includespecific requirements for open space in residentialdevelopments.I-A-4Residential uses may be combined with commercialuses in a mixed use project, if the project is designedto avoid conflicts between the uses, such as traffic,parking, noise, dust and odors.The Specific Plan allows for mixed use commercialand residential development that will be subject toarchitectural review to ensure design features thathelp address compatibility issues.I-A-5Development of housing, including housing forsmaller households, is encouraged in commercially-zoned areas in and near Downtown. (Downtown isdefined as the area bounded by Alma Street,Ravenswood Avenue/Menlo Avenue, UniversityDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.The Specific Plan encourages housing developmentalong El Camino Real and in the station anddowntown areas through increased allowabledevelopment intensities. It requires adequate off-street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.I-A-9Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorarea of residential projects up to a maximum of 15The Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. NothingCity of Menlo Park General Plan Goals and PoliciesTo maintain and improve the character and stability of Menlo Parks existing residentialneighborhoods while providing for the development of a variety of housing types. Thepreservation of open space shall be encouraged.SECTION I: LAND USE POLICIES (1994)Residential
  • 262. G8MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANI-G-10 portion of the required parking in landscape reserveuntil such time as the parking is needed. Plantmaterial selection and landscape and irrigationdesign shall adhere to the Citys Water EfficientLandscaping Ordinance.sustainable practices in construction and operationof public and private realm improvements.I-G-11Well-designed pedestrian facilities should beincluded in areas of intensive pedestrian activityThe Specific Plan proposes expansive new publicspace improvements, particularly in the downtownand stations areas. Such improvements includewidened sidewalks, crosswalk improvements,bike/pedestrian tunnel, and paseo.Goal I-HI-H-1The community design should help conserveresources and minimize waste.The Specific Plan calls for the incorporation ofsustainable practices in construction and operationof public and private realm improvements.I-H-2The use of water-conserving plumbing fixtures in allnew public and private development shall berequired.The Specific Plan calls for the incorporation ofsustainable practices in construction and operationof public and private realm improvements.I-H-3Plant material selection and landscape and irrigationdesign for City parks and other public facilities and inprivate developments shall adhere to the CitysWater Efficient Landscaping OrdinanceThe Specific Plan calls for the incorporation ofsustainable practices in construction and operationof public and private realm improvements.I-H-7The use of reclaimed water for landscaping and anyother feasible uses shall be encouraged.The Specific Plan calls for the incorporation ofsustainable practices in construction and operationof public and private realm improvements.I-H-11Buildings, objects, and sites of historic and/orcultural significance should be preserved.The EIR provides additional analysis on this topic,and future project-specific proposals will conductadditional analysis and mitigations as needed.I-H-12Street orientation, placement of buildings, and use ofshading should contribute to the energy efficiency ofthe community.The Specific Plan calls for the incorporation ofsustainable practices in construction and operationof public and private realm improvements.Goal I-II-I-2The regional land use planning structure should beintegrated within a larger transportation network builtaround transit rather than freeways and the Cityshall influence transit development so that itcoordinates with Menlo Park’s land use planningstructure.The Specific Plan concentrates development,through increased allowable developmentintensities, at the station area in support of transituse.Goal II-ALevel of Services D (40 seconds average stoppeddelay per vehicle) or better shall be maintained at allPublic and Quasi-Public Facilities and ServicesAnnexation and Intergovernmental CoordinationRoadway NetworkTo maintain a circulation system using the Roadway Classification System that will provide forthe safe and efficient movement of people and goods throughout Menlo Park for residential andcommercial purposes.SECTION II: CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORTATION POLICIES (1994)To promote the development and maintenance of adequate public and quasi-public facilities andservices to meet the needs of Menlo Parks residents, businesses, workers, and visitors.To promote the orderly development of Menlo Park and its surrounding area.Specific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Plan includes standards and guidelinesto encourage quality design in infill development.Additionally, architectural review will be required fornew development to ensure consistency with thestandards and guidelines. The standards includespecific requirements for open space in residentialdevelopments.I-A-4Residential uses may be combined with commercialuses in a mixed use project, if the project is designedto avoid conflicts between the uses, such as traffic,parking, noise, dust and odors.The Specific Plan allows for mixed use commercialand residential development that will be subject toarchitectural review to ensure design features thathelp address compatibility issues.I-A-5Development of housing, including housing forsmaller households, is encouraged in commercially-zoned areas in and near Downtown. (Downtown isdefined as the area bounded by Alma Street,Ravenswood Avenue/Menlo Avenue, UniversityDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.The Specific Plan encourages housing developmentalong El Camino Real and in the station anddowntown areas through increased allowabledevelopment intensities. It requires adequate off-street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.I-A-9Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorarea of residential projects up to a maximum of 15The Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. NothingCity of Menlo Park General Plan Goals and PoliciesTo maintain and improve the character and stability of Menlo Parks existing residentialneighborhoods while providing for the development of a variety of housing types. Thepreservation of open space shall be encouraged.SECTION I: LAND USE POLICIES (1994)ResidentialTable G1 (continued)
  • 263. G9CHAPTER G IMPLEMENTATIONGoal I-II-I-2The regional land use planning structure should beintegrated within a larger transportation network builtaround transit rather than freeways and the Cityshall influence transit development so that itcoordinates with Menlo Park’s land use planningstructure.The Specific Plan concentrates development,through increased allowable developmentintensities, at the station area in support of transituse.Goal II-AII-A-1Level of Services D (40 seconds average stoppeddelay per vehicle) or better shall be maintained at allCity-controlled signalized intersections during peakhours, except at the intersection of RavenswoodAvenue and Middlefield Road and at intersectionsalong Willow Road from Middlefield Road to US 101.The EIR includes a traffic impact analysis conductedto all City standards.II-A-2The City should attempt to achieve and maintainaverage travel speeds of 14 miles per hour (Level ofService D) or better on El Camino Real and otherarterial roadways controlled by the State and 46miles per hour (Level of Service D) or better on US101. The City shall work with Caltrans to achieveand maintain average travel speeds and intersectionlevels of service consistent with standardsestablished by the San Mateo County CongestionManagement Plan.The EIR includes a traffic impact analysis conductedto all City standards.II-A-3The City shall work with Caltrans to ensure thataverage stopped delay on local approaches to State-controlled signalized intersections does not exceedLevel of Service E (60 seconds per vehicle).The EIR includes a traffic impact analysis conductedto all City standards.II-A-4New development shall be restricted or required toimplement mitigation measures in order to maintainthe levels of service and travel speeds specified inPolicies II-A-1 through II-A-3.The EIR includes a traffic impact analysis conductedto all City standards.II-A-8New development shall be reviewed for its potentialto generate significant traffic volumes on localstreets in residential areas and shall be required tomitigate potential significant traffic problems.The EIR includes a traffic impact analysis conductedto all City standards.II-A-9The City shall establish, as a priority, the protectionof local streets in residential areas from excessivespeeding and excessive volumes of through traffic.For the purposes of this policy, “through traffic” shallmean traffic having neither an origin nor destinationwithin the relevant neighborhood. Adequatecapacity on arterial streets should be provided toencourage, to the extent possible, their use forMenlo Park residential traffic.The EIR includes a traffic impact analysis conductedto all City standards.II-A-12The City shall endeavor to provide for the safe,efficient, and equitable use of streets by pedestriansand bicyclist through good roadway design,maintenance, and effective traffic law enforcement.The Specific Plan proposes pedestrian and bicycleenhancements, including widened sidewalks,sidewalk extensions, increased bike lanes and bikeparking facilities.It shall be the intent of the City to design trafficThe Specific Plan proposes streetscapeimprovements on El Camino Real and Santa CruzRoadway NetworkTo maintain a circulation system using the Roadway Classification System that will provide forthe safe and efficient movement of people and goods throughout Menlo Park for residential andcommercial purposes.SECTION II: CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORTATION POLICIES (1994)To promote the orderly development of Menlo Park and its surrounding area.Specific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Plan includes standards and guidelinesto encourage quality design in infill development.Additionally, architectural review will be required fornew development to ensure consistency with thestandards and guidelines. The standards includespecific requirements for open space in residentialdevelopments.I-A-4Residential uses may be combined with commercialuses in a mixed use project, if the project is designedto avoid conflicts between the uses, such as traffic,parking, noise, dust and odors.The Specific Plan allows for mixed use commercialand residential development that will be subject toarchitectural review to ensure design features thathelp address compatibility issues.I-A-5Development of housing, including housing forsmaller households, is encouraged in commercially-zoned areas in and near Downtown. (Downtown isdefined as the area bounded by Alma Street,Ravenswood Avenue/Menlo Avenue, UniversityDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.The Specific Plan encourages housing developmentalong El Camino Real and in the station anddowntown areas through increased allowabledevelopment intensities. It requires adequate off-street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.I-A-9Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorarea of residential projects up to a maximum of 15The Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. NothingCity of Menlo Park General Plan Goals and PoliciesTo maintain and improve the character and stability of Menlo Parks existing residentialneighborhoods while providing for the development of a variety of housing types. Thepreservation of open space shall be encouraged.SECTION I: LAND USE POLICIES (1994)ResidentialTable G1 (continued)
  • 264. G10MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANmitigate potential significant traffic problems.II-A-9The City shall establish, as a priority, the protectionof local streets in residential areas from excessivespeeding and excessive volumes of through traffic.For the purposes of this policy, “through traffic” shallmean traffic having neither an origin nor destinationwithin the relevant neighborhood. Adequatecapacity on arterial streets should be provided toencourage, to the extent possible, their use forMenlo Park residential traffic.The EIR includes a traffic impact analysis conductedto all City standards.II-A-12The City shall endeavor to provide for the safe,efficient, and equitable use of streets by pedestriansand bicyclist through good roadway design,maintenance, and effective traffic law enforcement.The Specific Plan proposes pedestrian and bicycleenhancements, including widened sidewalks,sidewalk extensions, increased bike lanes and bikeparking facilities.II-A-19It shall be the intent of the City to design trafficimprovement projects to preserve and improve theaesthetics of the city.The Specific Plan proposes streetscapeimprovements on El Camino Real and Santa CruzAvenue to preserve and improve the aesthetics ofthe city, and to improve circulation for pedestriansand bicyclists.Goal II-BII-B-1The City shall consider transit modes in the designof transportation improvements and the review andapproval of development projects.The Specific Plan proposes transit pull-outs anddrop-offs in the Station area.II-B-2As many activities as possible should be locatedwithin easy walking distance of transit stops, andtransit stops should be convenient and close to asmany activities as possible.The Specific Plan proposes increased intensities ofdevelopment, including housing, retail andcommercial uses, in the station and downtownareas. It proposes enhanced public improvements,including sidewalks, and accommodates increasedbus service and access to the Caltrain station.II-B-3The City shall promote improved public transitservice and increased transit leadership, especiallyto office and industrial areas and schools.The Specific Plan supports transit service throughincreased intensities, improved sidewalks andconnections, enhanced drop-offs, and aTransportation Demand Management proposal.II-B-4The capacity and attractiveness of the commuterrailroad service should be increased, and rights-of-ways for future transit service should be protected.The Specific Plan supports and protects the rights-of-way for future transit service, accommodating HighSpeed Rail service as appropriate.Goal II-CII-C-1The City shall work with all Menlo Park employers toencourage employees to use alternatives to thesingle occupant automobile in their commute towork.The Specific Plan proposes a TransportationDemand Management program that encouragesemployees to use alternative modes of transit.II-C-2The City shall provide information to existing andnew Menlo Park employers to assist their employeesin identifying potential carpools, transit alternativesand other commute alternatives.The Specific Plan proposes a TransportationDemand Management program that encouragesemployees to use alternative modes of transit.II-DII-D-2The City shall, within available funding, work tocomplete a system of bikeways within Menlo Park.The Specific Plan supports and enhances thebikeway system in Menlo Park.II-D-3The design of streets within Menlo Park shallconsider the impact of street cross section,intersection geometrics and traffic control devices onThe Specific Plan supports and enhances thebikeway system in Menlo Park, including street crosssections which accommodates bikes.To promote the use of public transit.To promote the use of alternatives to the single occupant automobile.To promote the safe use of bicycles as a commute alternative and for recreation.Transportation Demand ManagementBicyclesPublic TransitSpecific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Plan includes standards and guidelinesto encourage quality design in infill development.Additionally, architectural review will be required fornew development to ensure consistency with thestandards and guidelines. The standards includespecific requirements for open space in residentialdevelopments.I-A-4Residential uses may be combined with commercialuses in a mixed use project, if the project is designedto avoid conflicts between the uses, such as traffic,parking, noise, dust and odors.The Specific Plan allows for mixed use commercialand residential development that will be subject toarchitectural review to ensure design features thathelp address compatibility issues.I-A-5Development of housing, including housing forsmaller households, is encouraged in commercially-zoned areas in and near Downtown. (Downtown isdefined as the area bounded by Alma Street,Ravenswood Avenue/Menlo Avenue, UniversityDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.The Specific Plan encourages housing developmentalong El Camino Real and in the station anddowntown areas through increased allowabledevelopment intensities. It requires adequate off-street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorThe Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesCity of Menlo Park General Plan Goals and PoliciesTo maintain and improve the character and stability of Menlo Parks existing residentialneighborhoods while providing for the development of a variety of housing types. Thepreservation of open space shall be encouraged.SECTION I: LAND USE POLICIES (1994)ResidentialTable G1 (continued)Goal I-II-I-2The regional land use planning structure should beintegrated within a larger transportation network builtaround transit rather than freeways and the City shallinfluence transit development so that it coordinateswith Menlo Park’s land use planning structure.The Specific Plan concentrates development,through increased allowable developmentintensities, at the station area in support of transituse.Goal II-AII-A-1Level of Services D (40 seconds average stoppeddelay per vehicle) or better shall be maintained at allCity-controlled signalized intersections during peakhours, except at the intersection of RavenswoodAvenue and Middlefield Road and at intersectionsalong Willow Road from Middlefield Road to US 101.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-2The City should attempt to achieve and maintainaverage travel speeds of 14 miles per hour (Level ofService D) or better on El Camino Real and otherarterial roadways controlled by the State and 46miles per hour (Level of Service D) or better on US101. The City shall work with Caltrans to achieveand maintain average travel speeds and intersectionlevels of service consistent with standardsestablished by the San Mateo County CongestionManagement Plan.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-3The City shall work with Caltrans to ensure thataverage stopped delay on local approaches to State-controlled signalized intersections does not exceedLevel of Service E (60 seconds per vehicle).The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-4New development shall be restricted or required toimplement mitigation measures in order to maintainthe levels of service and travel speeds specified inPolicies II-A-1 through II-A-3.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-8New development shall be reviewed for its potentialto generate significant traffic volumes on localstreets in residential areas and shall be required tomitigate potential significant traffic problems.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-9The City shall establish, as a priority, the protectionof local streets in residential areas from excessivespeeding and excessive volumes of through traffic.For the purposes of this policy, “through traffic” shallmean traffic having neither an origin nor destinationwithin the relevant neighborhood. Adequatecapacity on arterial streets should be provided toencourage, to the extent possible, their use forMenlo Park residential traffic.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-12The City shall endeavor to provide for the safe,efficient, and equitable use of streets by pedestriansand bicyclist through good roadway design,maintenance, and effective traffic law enforcement.The Specific Plan proposes pedestrian and bicycleenhancements, including widened sidewalks,sidewalk extensions, increased bike lanes and bikeparking facilities.II-A-19It shall be the intent of the City to design trafficimprovement projects to preserve and improve theaesthetics of the city.The Specific Plan proposes streetscapeimprovements on El Camino Real and Santa CruzAvenue to preserve and improve the aesthetics ofthe city, and to improve circulation for pedestriansTo promote the orderly development of Menlo Park and its surrounding area.Roadway NetworkTo maintain a circulation system using the Roadway Classification System that will provide for thesafe and efficient movement of people and goods throughout Menlo Park for residential andcommercial purposes.SECTION II: CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORTATION POLICIES (1994)
  • 265. G11CHAPTER G IMPLEMENTATIONGoal II-CII-C-1The City shall work with all Menlo Park employers toencourage employees to use alternatives to thesingle occupant automobile in their commute towork.The Specific Plan proposes a TransportationDemand Management program that encouragesemployees to use alternative modes of transit.II-C-2The City shall provide information to existing andnew Menlo Park employers to assist their employeesin identifying potential carpools, transit alternativesand other commute alternatives.The Specific Plan proposes a TransportationDemand Management program that encouragesemployees to use alternative modes of transit.II-DII-D-2The City shall, within available funding, work tocomplete a system of bikeways within Menlo Park.The Specific Plan supports and enhances thebikeway system in Menlo Park.II-D-3The design of streets within Menlo Park shallconsider the impact of street cross section,intersection geometrics and traffic control devices onbicyclists.The Specific Plan supports and enhances thebikeway system in Menlo Park, including street crosssections which accommodates bikes.II-D-4The City shall require new commercial and industrialdevelopment to provide secure bicycle storagefacilities on-site.The Specific Plan provides for standards andguidelines for on-site bicycle storage facilities.Goal II-EII-E-1The City shall require all new development toincorporate safe and attractive pedestrian facilitieson-site.The Specific Plan focuses pedestrian improvementsalong public streets, requiring new development toprovide such improvements, particularly along ElCamino Real.II-E-2The City shall endeavor to maintain safe sidewalksand walk-ways where existing within the public right-of-way.The Specific Plan proposes improved sidewalksalong El Camino Real and Santa Cruz Avenue, aswell as other enhanced pathways and crosswalks.II-E-4The City shall incorporate appropriate pedestrianfacilities, traffic control, and street lighting withinstreet improvement projects to maintain or improvepedestrian safety.The Specific Plan proposes enhanced pedestrianamenities and streetscape improvements,particularly along El Camino Real and Santa CruzAvenue.II-E-5The City shall support full pedestrian access acrossall legs of an intersection at all signalizedintersections which are City-controlled and at thesignalized intersections along El Camino Real.The Specific Plan proposes enhanced pedestriancrossings, including sidewalk extensions, along ElCamino Real at many signalized intersections andalong Santa Cruz Avenue.Goal II-FII-F-1Adequate off-street parking should be required for allnew development in the Downtown Area.The Specific Plan requires on-site parking, oraccommodates parking in public parking plazas, forall new development in the downtown area.II-F-2Short-term retail customer parking shall be firstpriority for the allocation of parking spaces inDowntown parking plazas. Long-term employeeparking shall be located in such a manner that itdoes not create a shortage of customer parkingadjacent to retail shops.The Specific Plan proposes ways to more efficientlyuse parking spaces on downtown parking plazas,giving priority to short-term retail customers whileaccommodating long-term employee parking.Goal III-AThe City will promote development of mixed mediumor high-density residential and commercial projectsin the Central Business District and along El CaminoThe Specific Plan, through increased allowabledensities and other incentives, encourages higherSECTION III: HOUSING ELEMENT POLICIES (1992)To promote the use of alternatives to the single occupant automobile.To promote the safe use of bicycles as a commute alternative and for recreation.To promote walking as a commute alternative and for short trips.Transportation Demand ManagementPedestriansBicyclesTo provide adequate parking in the Downtown area, especially for retail customers and CalTrainpatrons.To promote the development of a balanced range of housing types and densities for alleconomic segments and all geographic areas of the community.ParkingSpecific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Plan includes standards and guidelinesto encourage quality design in infill development.Additionally, architectural review will be required fornew development to ensure consistency with thestandards and guidelines. The standards includespecific requirements for open space in residentialdevelopments.I-A-4Residential uses may be combined with commercialuses in a mixed use project, if the project is designedto avoid conflicts between the uses, such as traffic,parking, noise, dust and odors.The Specific Plan allows for mixed use commercialand residential development that will be subject toarchitectural review to ensure design features thathelp address compatibility issues.I-A-5Development of housing, including housing forsmaller households, is encouraged in commercially-zoned areas in and near Downtown. (Downtown isdefined as the area bounded by Alma Street,Ravenswood Avenue/Menlo Avenue, UniversityDrive and Oak Grove Avenue.) Provisions foradequate off-street parking must be assured.The Specific Plan encourages housing developmentalong El Camino Real and in the station anddowntown areas through increased allowabledevelopment intensities. It requires adequate off-street parking.I-A-6Development of residential uses on the north side ofOak Grove Avenue and on the south side of MenloAvenue adjacent to the Downtown commercial areais encouraged.The Specific Plan allows for housing development inthese areas.I-A-8Residential developments of ten or more units shallcomply with the requirements of the City’s Below-Market Rate (BMR) Housing Program.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram, which now requires development of five ormore units to participate in the BMR program, willcontinue to apply to the Specific Plan.I-A-9Residential developments subject to requirements ofthe BMR Housing Program may be permitted toincrease the total density, number of units and floorarea of residential projects up to a maximum of 15The Specific Plan assumes all relevant City policiesapply to improvements within the plan area. NothingCity of Menlo Park General Plan Goals and PoliciesTo maintain and improve the character and stability of Menlo Parks existing residentialneighborhoods while providing for the development of a variety of housing types. Thepreservation of open space shall be encouraged.SECTION I: LAND USE POLICIES (1994)ResidentialTable G1 (continued)Goal I-II-I-2The regional land use planning structure should beintegrated within a larger transportation network builtaround transit rather than freeways and the City shallinfluence transit development so that it coordinateswith Menlo Park’s land use planning structure.The Specific Plan concentrates development,through increased allowable developmentintensities, at the station area in support of transituse.Goal II-AII-A-1Level of Services D (40 seconds average stoppeddelay per vehicle) or better shall be maintained at allCity-controlled signalized intersections during peakhours, except at the intersection of RavenswoodAvenue and Middlefield Road and at intersectionsalong Willow Road from Middlefield Road to US 101.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-2The City should attempt to achieve and maintainaverage travel speeds of 14 miles per hour (Level ofService D) or better on El Camino Real and otherarterial roadways controlled by the State and 46miles per hour (Level of Service D) or better on US101. The City shall work with Caltrans to achieveand maintain average travel speeds and intersectionlevels of service consistent with standardsestablished by the San Mateo County CongestionManagement Plan.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-3The City shall work with Caltrans to ensure thataverage stopped delay on local approaches to State-controlled signalized intersections does not exceedLevel of Service E (60 seconds per vehicle).The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-4New development shall be restricted or required toimplement mitigation measures in order to maintainthe levels of service and travel speeds specified inPolicies II-A-1 through II-A-3.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-8New development shall be reviewed for its potentialto generate significant traffic volumes on localstreets in residential areas and shall be required tomitigate potential significant traffic problems.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-9The City shall establish, as a priority, the protectionof local streets in residential areas from excessivespeeding and excessive volumes of through traffic.For the purposes of this policy, “through traffic” shallmean traffic having neither an origin nor destinationwithin the relevant neighborhood. Adequatecapacity on arterial streets should be provided toencourage, to the extent possible, their use forMenlo Park residential traffic.The Draft EIR will include a traffic impact analysisconducted to all City standards.II-A-12The City shall endeavor to provide for the safe,efficient, and equitable use of streets by pedestriansand bicyclist through good roadway design,maintenance, and effective traffic law enforcement.The Specific Plan proposes pedestrian and bicycleenhancements, including widened sidewalks,sidewalk extensions, increased bike lanes and bikeparking facilities.II-A-19It shall be the intent of the City to design trafficimprovement projects to preserve and improve theaesthetics of the city.The Specific Plan proposes streetscapeimprovements on El Camino Real and Santa CruzAvenue to preserve and improve the aesthetics ofthe city, and to improve circulation for pedestriansTo promote the orderly development of Menlo Park and its surrounding area.Roadway NetworkTo maintain a circulation system using the Roadway Classification System that will provide for thesafe and efficient movement of people and goods throughout Menlo Park for residential andcommercial purposes.SECTION II: CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORTATION POLICIES (1994)
  • 266. G12MENLO PARK EL CAMINO REAL AND DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLANII-F-1Adequate off-street parking should be required for allnew development in the Downtown Area.The Specific Plan requires on-site parking, oraccommodates parking in public parking plazas, forall new development in the downtown area.II-F-2Short-term retail customer parking shall be firstpriority for the allocation of parking spaces inDowntown parking plazas. Long-term employeeparking shall be located in such a manner that itdoes not create a shortage of customer parkingadjacent to retail shops.The Specific Plan proposes ways to more efficientlyuse parking spaces on downtown parking plazas,giving priority to short-term retail customers whileaccommodating long-term employee parking.Goal III-AIII.A.5The City will promote development of mixed mediumor high-density residential and commercial projectsin the Central Business District and along El CaminoReal as a means of providing more housing on jobsites to help offset the impact of new employment onthe regional housing market.The Specific Plan, through increased allowabledensities and other incentives, encourages higherdensity housing in the plan area, particularly in thestation area and downtown.III.A.8The City will continue to require residentialdevelopers to contribute to the provision of belowmarket rate housing opportunities in the city.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram will continue to apply to the Specific Plan.III.A.9The City will continue to require developers ofemployment-generating commercial and industrialdevelopments to contribute to the provision of belowmarket rate housing opportunities in the city.The Citys Below Market Rate (BMR) HousingProgram will continue to apply to the Specific Plan.III.A.10The City will increase the supply of land available forresidential development by redesigning and rezoningtargeted residential and non-residential parcels formulti-family residential use, particularly near publictransit and major transportation corridors in the city.The Specific Plan, through increased allowabledensities and other incentives, encourages higherdensity housing in the plan area, particularly in thestation area and downtown. It allows for housingthroughout the entire plan area.III.A.11The City will promote the distribution of new, higher-density residential developments throughout the city,taking into consideration compatibility withsurrounding existing residential uses, particularlynear public transit and major transportation corridorsin the city.The Specific Plan, through increased allowabledensities and other incentives, encourages higherdensity housing in the plan area, particularly in thestation area and downtown. Design guidelines andstandards, such as for upper-story setbacks, willprovide protections to neighboring residentialproperties.III.D.1The City will continue to promote energyconservation in the design of all new residentialstructures and will promote incorporation of energyconservation and weatherization features in existinghomes.The Specific Plan includes policies which encouragesustainable practices in construction and operationof buildings.III.D.2To the extent practical, the City will require that thedesign of all new residential development takesadvantage of solar access.The Specific Plan includes policies which encouragesustainable practices in construction and operationof buildings.12812Provide open space lands for a variety of recreation The Specific Plan proposes increased publicSECTION III: HOUSING ELEMENT POLICIES (1992)PoliciesGoalsOPEN SPACE AND CONSERVATION POLICIES (1973)To encourage the enhancement of boulevards, plazas, and other urban open spaces inresidential, commercial, and industrial neighborhoods.To preserve historic buildings, objects, and sites of historic and cultural significance.To enhance and preserve air quality in accord with regional standards.To promote the development of a balanced range of housing types and densities for alleconomic segments and all geographic areas of the community.To develop a parks and recreation system which provides area, facilities, and improvementsconveniently located and properly designed to serve the recreation needs of all residents ofMenlo Park.Specific Plan Relationship with PoliciesGoal I-AI-A-1New construction in existing neighborhoods shall bedesigned to emphasize the preservation andimprovements of the stability and character of theindividual neighborhood.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-2New residential developments shall be designed tobe compatible with Menlo Park’s residentialcharacter.The Specific Plan area does not include existingresidential neighborhoods (although someresidential uses exist in the plan area) and, as such,this policy is not directly relevant. However, theSpecific Plan includes standards and guidelines forbuilding design to ensure that new infill developmentwill be sensitive to adjacent residential uses.I-A-3Quality design and usable open space shall beencouraged in the design of all new residentialdevelopments.The Specific Pl