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Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
Recipe Cards
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Recipe Cards

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  • 1. SOAPROOT BULBS In all the fields and hillsides there is an abundance of wild onion or soap-root (amole), the size of our onion, with a long, round head. Batches of these are covered with earth, a fire is kept burning over them three or four days and when they are well done they are taken out and eaten, and are as sweet and tasty as jam. Another variety of this plant is not eaten, for it is not sweet, but it serves as soap, making a lather and taking out spots the
  • 2. same as soap of Castile. Francisco Palou, priest at the San Francisco mission, 1776. Del otro lado del arroyo encontramos una bonita Barbecued Soaproot Bulbs ranchería de gentiles…y nos Gather soaproot bulbs. Leave the dieron diferentes bateas de husks on. unas como sebollitas Cover with dirt. tatemadas, que gusté, y tenían un agridulce mui Build a fire over them; keep it sabroso…Nos quadraron mucho esta gentilidad; y parecen going for three or four days. unos españoles. Remove the fire, dirt and husks. The soaproot will be sweet, tender We met with a fine little and ready to eat. village at the other side of the stream...they gave us several bowls full of sort of barbecued small onions, which I tasted and
  • 3. found to have a very agreeable sweet-sour flavor...We were greatly pleased with this heathen folk; they are just like so many Spaniards. Father Crespí, Spanish Priest traveling through the East Bay in 1772 ACORNS and MOONS Throughout the year the people held Every day, my various feasts, festivals and ancestors would religious dances, many of them tied to the biological rhythms of the oak pound acorns to trees. Time itself was measured by make into a hot the oaks. The acorn harvest marked mush to eat. I do the beginning of the new year. this once a year Winter was spoken of as so many
  • 4. at the Ohlone months (moons) after the acorn harvest, summer as so many months gathering. before the next acorn harvest. The - Ruth Orta, rhythm of the oak trees marked the Ohlone passage of the year and defined the descendant rhythms of Ohlone life. from The Ohlone Way by Malcolm Margolin
  • 5. They have acorns, ACORN MUSH too, that they Pick tan oak acorns in late October or early grind and make November. into their Discard acorns with wormholes. porridge or balls. Put acorns in containers and set next to heat. Father Palou, After two weeks, crack open and remove meat. S.F. Mission, Let dry until reddish fibers fall off. 1776 Remove fibers and let meat dry. Grind or pound into flour. The whole of this cookery consists Cover a sieve with cloth and put flour over the in roasting the grain before it is cloth. cooked. As the Indian women have Fill a sieve twice with lukewarm water and no clay or metallic vessels for strain. this operation, they use baskets Cover flour with cold water and soak for two into which they put small burning days, stirring often. coals. They turn these vessels When the flour is no longer bitter or water- with such dexterity that they soaked, the flour is ready succeed in causing the grain to To cook, put flour in boiling water and let boil swell and burst without burning until desired thickness or cook with black the basket. (We can affirm that rocks in a tightly woven basket as the our best coffee is far from being ancestors did. roasted with equal skill.) Wrapped in thick alder leaves, the acorn mush It is distributed to them every can be baked into bread. morning, and the slightest
  • 6. embezzlement is punished by the whip, though it seldom happens that they expose themselves to the danger. Count Galaud de la Pérouse, French visitor, writing on food in the missions, 1786
  • 7. The Indians...live on CHIA the seeds of the wild from an grasses which it falls Ohlone Story to the lot of the women to gather when Kaknu, Peregrine they are in season. Falcon, These they grind and make flour for their Hero of the Early porridge (atole). People, Among the seeds they killed Body of gather is a black Stone, variety and from its Lord of the flour they make a sort Underworld, of dumpling, ball- making the world shaped and the size of safe. Kaknu an orange, which are provided food. very rich and savory, like toasted almonds.... They have “This is for the acorns, too, that they People to eat,” he
  • 8. grind and make into said, throwing it their porridge or from his nose. From balls. then on, there were Francisco Palou, San patches of chia to Francisco Mission, harvest. 1776-7
  • 9. Chia Fresca Spanish-speaking colonists used a Chia Cakes teaspoonful of seeds plus Gather and roast the a little sugar and lemon seeds. in water to make a Grind or pound into flour. refreshing drink. One Soak in water and shape teaspoonful was said to into round balls or patties. be sufficient to sustain Cook and eat. an individual going on a forced march for twenty-four hours.
  • 10. They also derive sustenance from fish of many kinds, all very healthful, that they catch Fish in the rivers and on the coasts..., and from streams provided the the various mussels and Ohlone with delicious other shellfish that protein. Francisco Palóu always abound. They hunt enthuses about the fish and deer, rabbits, geese, meat, 1776: ducks, quail, and thrush. When a whale chances to strand on the shore they always make the most of it and celebrate the occasion with a great feast, for they are extremely fond of whale meat, which is all fat and blubber. They cut it in strips, roast it underground and hang it in the trees, and when they want to eat cut off a piece and eat it together with their other foods.
  • 11. They do likewise with sea- lion, of which they are no less fond than of the whale, for it also is all fat. Farm Saechow’s Noodle Salad 1 package Chinese Rice Noodles 3 tablespoons Italian and Ranch-style Finh Luang’s Noodle Salad bottled dressing, combined 1 tablespoon mayonnaise Rice noodles, cooked 1/3 cup peanuts, fried Hard boiled egg 5 lettuce leaves, torn up Peanuts 3 Eggs, boiled, 3 without yolks Cilantro 2 tomatoes, cut in sections Cucumber Lettuce Combine all ingredients. Serve cold. Lemon, a little Tamarind powder “They use noodles at home, but no Dried red pepper, a little dressing.” Combine all ingredients, serve cold.
  • 12. Nae Sieuw’s Noodle Salad Add tiny bits of cooked and seasoned chicken and small fresh lettuce leaves to cooked warm rice noodles.
  • 13. Muong’s Cabbage and Pork Pork Cabbabe Yien’s Dried Mushrooms Garlic Onion Buy a package of dried Oil mushrooms of the Chinese/Laotian/Thai kind. Pork: Use a cut of like Soak and wash. bacon, but thicker. Cut up Add salt and oil. in small pieces and fry until Serve with just rice, or add fish crunchy. or meat. Cabbage: Slice into small pieces. Cook in oil with 2 garlic cloves and a bit of onion. Mix pork and cabbage together and serve.
  • 14. Nai Siew’s Broccoli Raab, Lai Buah Nai Sieuw, Farm and Ying Fu’s Garden Greens Oil Garlic, 2 cloves Pick fresh greens and place aside. Thai chili peppers Put into a large pot: Broccoli raab 1/4 cu. Chicken fat Salt 2 cloves chopped garlic salt Pick fresh broccoli raab with the green couple small whole hot peppers flowers left on. Heat oil well. Cook together until fragrant. Put in pressed garlic. Pour in water, several inches deep. Add whole hot red or green pepper. Pour a Put greens into the water, tearing them into couple of quarts of water in the mixture. smaller pieces as you do so. Wait for it to boil. Bring to the boil, cook to taste until tender, Drop the fresh-picked broccoli raab into the strain off the water and serve. water. Add salt to taste. Boil about 5 minutes. If it’s soft, it’s ready. Don’t overcook.
  • 15. Finh’s Geen La Meng (Mustard with Yellow Flowers) Yien’s Lai Papiú—Seed Pods Pick young mustard plants with bright yellow flowers left on. (Pod from a variety of mustard with Heat up water. white lavender flowers. The pod is Drop in the mustard and boil a few about 3/4ths of an inch long with a minutes. pointed tip and tastes somewhat like Boil it again, whenever you want to a radish.) eat it, adding vegetable oil, salt. Wash them and take off the little “In Laos we wouldn’t have used pointed tip. vegetable oil. We would kill a pig and Heat oil in a frying pan. save the fat, or if we didn’t have Fry them quickly—about 2 minutes. that, we would just use water. We Add salt and serve. grow mustard greens because they grow for such a long season.”
  • 16. Yien’s Egg Rolls Ying Fu’s Chicken—Che Kyie Filling Chicken legs and thighs Cabbage, one head Sugar, salt, flour Mushrooms Rice noodles, a package Sprinkle the chicken with sugar Carrot, 2 or 3 and salt. Bell Pepper, 2 Dredge in rice flour. Salt Deep fry in 2 inches of oil, 15-20 minutes. Buy wrappers in the store. “We make this just the same in Chop ingredients and mix. Scoop Laos.” filing with wrappers and fold closed. Deep fry, serve hot.

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