Finding Value In Enterprise Architecture

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What is the value of enterprise architecture?

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  • Finding Value In Enterprise Architecture

    1. 1. Finding the Value in Enterprise Architecture Peter Evans-Greenwood 2008-04-24 In collaboration with
    2. 2. Who am I? <ul><li>Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of Capgemini Australia </li></ul><ul><li>Main interests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Massively distributed systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biologically inspired approaches to software </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Long history of working at the interface between research technology and business </li></ul><ul><ul><li>traditional back-office covering finance, billing, logistics, B2B, B2C and CRM applications for local and global companies; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>turn-key solutions including MUARC's advanced driving simulator and air traffic control; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>innovative B2B and voice portal solutions such as OnStar. </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. The business value of Enterprise Architecture ?
    4. 4. The business value of Enterprise Architecture 0
    5. 5. The problem Technology Cycle Business Cycle Intensifying Competition Static IT cycle There is an growing disconnection between the business & IT cycles
    6. 6. Our focus has moved Process & Information Integration Platform Application Services UI UI UI Field Operations Back Office Partners Platform Application Services UI UI UI Platforms Application Services UI UI UI <ul><li>Partner Integration </li></ul><ul><li>Sales and operational data </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibility for end-to-end business processes </li></ul><ul><li>Facilities and other assets </li></ul><ul><li>Software as a Service & </li></ul><ul><li>Mash-ups </li></ul><ul><li>Enable end-to-end processes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lower error rates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased throughput </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lower user workload </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No more swivel-chair integration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides the right data, at the right time, presented to enable users to make better decisions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mobility </li></ul><ul><li>Extending the reach of our back office </li></ul><ul><li>Providing field workers with joined-up IT support </li></ul><ul><li>Sensor Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage technologies such as RFID and smart appliances to instrument operations </li></ul>
    7. 7. … as technology has changed A standards development timeline U.S. software sales in billions of dollars Source: INPUT SOAP 1.0 WS-I founded SAP WS J2ME Web Services ESB Apache SOAP MS SOAP IBM Web Services Apache Axis JAX-RPC Oracle WS Sun WS WS (J2EE & .NET) WS-* starts exploding WS-* OASIS SOA Reference Model OASIS SOA Blueprints SAP Netweaver Oracle Fusion JAX-WS MS Indigo BPEL BizTalk 2004 Oracle BPEL WBI-SF WS-Policy and WS-Security 2004 2005 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 The Past Yesterday Now
    8. 8. We need to support multiple technology cycles Personalize Solutions focused on supporting specific roles Organise Using services to achieve cohesive executions Comply Enterprise transactions and data in ERP and legacy applications Innovation Business as usual Technology Cycle Business Cycle Years Weeks Months Deliver Mixing IT in the right amount to align with the business cycle
    9. 9. The future requires a more organic approach <ul><li>A long term plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work with the business landscape </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create stable infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Manage the process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Appoint a zoning board </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make the most of what you have </li></ul></ul>City planners try to preserve viable old assets, to replace outmoded assets, and to add new assets—all in the context of an infrastructure linking them coherently. IT developers have a good deal to learn from that approach. The Paris Guide to IT Architecture Jürgen Laartz, Ernst Sonderegger, and Johan Vinckie, McKinsey Quarterly, 2000, Number 3 Today, our greatest challenge is effectively combining new and existing assets to cost effectively deliver business capabilities
    10. 10. Electricity distribution since Samuel Insull We generate electrons They get pumped down a wire Devices consume them
    11. 11. Fast forward to the present Population A growing population that is becoming increasingly urban Energy Increasing energy demands to feed our modern lifestyle Water Global warming is changing where the water falls There is less water to go around We’re struggling to keep up with energy demands Water needs energy Energy needs water We need to use less!
    12. 12. Demand shaping via AMR Smart appliances let us shape demand Smart appliances let us shape demand Smart appliances let us shape demand PowerCorp balances supply and demand In home panels providing (near) real time visibility into usage Two-way AMR lets us read the meter, and send control signals Smart appliances let us shape demand
    13. 13. Demand shaping via AMR Smart appliances let us shape demand Smart appliances let us shape demand Smart appliances let us shape demand PowerCorp balances supply and demand In home panels providing (near) real time visibility into usage Two-way AMR lets us read the meter, and send control signals Smart appliances let us shape demand There are problems… <ul><li>How do we scale centralised decision making? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the impact of an open energy market? </li></ul><ul><li>Where does micro generation and/or CHAP fit? </li></ul>
    14. 14. Electricity distribution tomorrow A network, rather than a chain
    15. 15. Electricity distribution tomorrow Multiple manufactures A network, rather than a chain Consumers exporting excess Micro Generation Micro Generation Multiple manufactures A more diverse range of technologies No common owner !
    16. 16. Moving to supply driven Match supply & demand Price signal Energy Market
    17. 17. Moving to supply driven Match supply & demand Price signal Smart meters let us leverage a real time supply signal in the home Control signals let us turn of unwanted devices We make a local decision to optimise our own environment We can factor micro generation into the decision Energy Market
    18. 18. Moving to supply driven Match supply & demand Price signal Smart meters let us leverage a real time supply signal in the home Control signals let us turn of unwanted devices We make a local decision to optimise our own environment We can factor micro generation into the decision Energy Market There are problems… <ul><li>How do we manage configuration? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we optimise individual devices? </li></ul><ul><li>How does import/export work? </li></ul>
    19. 19. An private internal market Price signal Devolve decisions to optimise power usage to the appliances (agents) Create a market to support price location Explicit support for export/import P2P auto-configuration Multi-agent market-based resource balancing Energy Market Internal Energy Market
    20. 20. The big picture <ul><li>What happens when we have </li></ul><ul><li>demand driven homes </li></ul><ul><li>demand driven regions </li></ul><ul><li>demand driven networks </li></ul>Local generation, sharing our excess Each participant generates, imports and exports to optimise their usage
    21. 21. How do we manage this process? <ul><li>Bottom up action </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reacting to changes in the environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No conscious plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Solutions created to meet pressing needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only addressing needs as understood that time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Top-down planning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Days spent filling Zachman cells </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Major transformation initiatives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Left behind by people on the ground who need to get the job done </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hard to justify the investment </li></ul></ul>Reactive Omniscient Both result in inflexible systems-of-systems
    22. 22. People use a more pragmatic planning process <ul><li>Establish our goal </li></ul><ul><li>Understand where we are on the landscape </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the paths available to us </li></ul><ul><li>Choose one and head to the junction </li></ul><ul><li>Return to step 1 </li></ul>
    23. 23. We can do something similar in IT <ul><li>Optimise new product introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce costs </li></ul><ul><li>Improve process efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Manual processes </li></ul><ul><li>No support for product management </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple, redundant, applications </li></ul><ul><li>Capture business in service architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Identify scenarios by determining miss-match between current IT and service architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Make a tactical decision on which scenario to deliver, and execute </li></ul><ul><li>Return to 1 or 2 </li></ul>Business Architecture IT Landscape
    24. 24. We can do this in collaboration with the business Big scary diagram A strategy map Business Services Architecture Facilitated Event Heat Map Current State Scenarios Actions!
    25. 25. Case study: IT strategy for finance The problem <ul><li>Business has developed a new strategic plan </li></ul><ul><li>The existing programme of work is very technology focused </li></ul><ul><li>IT has been given less than three months to respond </li></ul>Our solution <ul><li>A facilitated approach </li></ul><ul><li>based on: </li></ul><ul><li>Business service architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy maps </li></ul><ul><li>Business engagement </li></ul>Benefits <ul><li>Short turn around </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Delivered in ~five weeks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Demonstrable connection between IT actions and business goals </li></ul><ul><li>Business buy-in </li></ul>
    26. 26. Questions ? Peter Evans-Greenwood [email_address]
    27. 27. www.capgemini.com

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