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Salient features of paris convention, madrid,

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  • 1. SALIENT FEATURES OF PARIS CONVENTION,MADRID, LISBON& TRIPS Presented By: Parveen S.H.
  • 2. PARIS CONVENTION The Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, signed in Paris, France, on March 20, 1883, was one of the first intellectual property treaties. It was revised at Brussels in 1900, at Washington in 1911, at The Hague in 1925, at London in 1934, at Lisbon in 1958 and at Stockholm in 1967, and it was amended in 1979. The Convention applies to industrial property in the widest sense, including patents, marks, industrial designs, utility models (a kind of “small patent” provided for by the laws of some countries), trade names (designations under which an industrial or commercial activity is carried on), geographical indications (indications of source and appellations of origin) and the repression of unfair competition
  • 3. CONTD… The principal features of the Paris Convention have been listed below: National treatment; Right of priority ; Independence of patents; Parallel importation ; Protection against false indications and unfair competition . The total number of Nation States party to the Convention are 173.
  • 4. CONTD… Article 10-False Indications: Seizure, on Importation, etc., of Goods Bearing False Indications as to their Source or the Identity of the Producer(1) The provisions of the preceding Article shall apply in cases of direct or indirect use of a false indication of the source of the goods or the identity of the producer, manufacturer, or merchant.(2) Any producer, manufacturer, or merchant, whether a natural person or a legal entity, engaged in the production or manufacture of or trade in such goods and established either in the locality falsely indicated as the source, or in the region where such locality is situated, or in the country falsely indicated, or in the country where the false indication of source is used, shall in any case be deemed an interested party. Article 10ter-Marks, Trade Names, False Indications, Unfair Competition: Remedies, Right to Sue(1) The countries of the Union undertake to assure to nationals of the other countries of the Union appropriate legal remedies effectively to repress all the acts referred to in Articles 9, 10, and 10bis.(2) They undertake, further, to provide measures to permit federations and associations representing interested industrialists, producers, or merchants, provided that the existence of such federations and associations is not contrary to the laws of their countries, to take action in the courts or before the administrative authorities, with a view to the repression of the acts referred to in Articles 9, 10, and 10bis, in so far as the law of the country in which protection is claimed allows such action by federations and associations of that country.
  • 5. MADRID AGREEMENT FOR THE REPRESSION OFFALSE OR DECEPTIVE INDICATIONS OF SOURCE ONGOODS (1891) The Agreement, concluded in 1891, was revised at Washington in 1911, at The Hague in 1925, at London in 1934, at Lisbon in 1958, and at Stockholm in 1967. The Agreement is open to States party to the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property (1883). The total number of Nation States party to the to Agreement 35 parties.
  • 6. CONTD… According to the Agreement, all goods bearing a false or deceptive indication of source, by which one of the contracting States, or a place situated therein, is directly or indirectly indicated as being the country or place of origin, must be seized on importation, or such importation must be prohibited, or other actions and sanctions must be applied in connection with such importation. The Agreement provides for the cases and the manner in which seizure may be requested and effected. It prohibits the use, in connection with the sale or display or offering for sale of any goods, of all indications in the nature of publicity capable of deceiving the public as to the source of the goods. It is reserved to the courts of each contracting State to decide what appellations (other than regional appellations concerning the source of products of the vine) do not, on account of their generic character, come within the scope of the Agreement. The Agreement does not provide for the establishment of a Union, any governing body or a budget.
  • 7. THE LISBON AGREEMENT FOR THE PROTECTION OFAPPELLATIONS OF ORIGIN AND THEIR INTERNATIONALREGISTRATION The Lisbon Agreement for the Protection of Appellations of Origin and their International Registration was a treaty of 31 October 1958. The Lisbon System was established in order to facilitate the international protection of AOs. An appellation of origin (AO) is a special kind of geographical indication. It generally consists of a geographical name or a traditional designation used on products which have a specific quality or characteristics that are essentially due to the geographical environment in which they are produced.
  • 8.  The Lisbon system offers a means of obtaining protection for an AO in the contracting parties to the Lisbon Agreement through a single registration. Registrations are published in the official Bulletin “Appellations of Origin” and can be searched through the Lisbon Express database. Article 1(2) of the Lisbon Agreement lays down that, in order to qualify for registration at the International Bureau of WIPO, an “appellation of origin” must be “recognized” and “protected” in the “country of origin”. Article 2(1) elaborates on this by defining “appellation of origin” and Article 2(2) by defining “country of origin”.
  • 9. CONTD… On this basis, the condition that the appellation of origin must be “recognized” and “protected” in the country of origin means that the appellation of origin must be constituted by a geographical denomination that is protected in the country of origin as the denomination of a geographical area (country, region or locality) recognized as serving to designate a product that originates therein and meets certain qualifications. Such recognition of the denomination must be based on the reputation of the product and protection of the appellation of origin must have been formalized by means of legislative provisions, administrative provisions, a judicial decision or any form of registration. The manner in which recognition takes place is determined by the domestic legislation of the country of origin.
  • 10.  Registration Procedure and Possibility of RefusalApplication Procedure When a geographical denomination is recognized in the country of origin as the denomination of a geographical area (country, region or locality) serving to designate a product that originates therein and meets certain qualifications, in accordance with the definition of Article 2(1) of the Lisbon Agreement, and is protected in that country as an appellation of origin so defined and recognized, it is possible to seek its registration with the International Bureau of WIPO. The application for registration has to be filed by the competent national authority of the country of origin. Registration is in the name of the natural persons or legal entities, public or private, having, according to their national legislation, the right to use the appellation in the country of origin. Apart from the name of the appellation and of the holder or holders of the right to use the appellation, the application must indicate the product to which the appellation applies, the area of production of the product and an indication of the legal basis for the protection in the country of origin.
  • 11.  The application has to be filed in English, French or Spanish and be accompanied by the registration fee (500 Swiss francs). The International Bureau does not carry out a substantive examination of the application for registration, but it does undertake an examination as to form. If the application contains a defect of form, a period of three months is allowed for the defect to be remedied. If the application meets all the requirements as to form, the International Bureau records the appellation of origin in the International Register of Appellations of Origin and notifies the registration to the national authorities of the countries of the Lisbon Union. The registration is also published in the Bulletin Appellations of Origin. The international registration bears the date on which the international application was received by the International Bureau, except where such international application was missing any of the following particulars: the country of origin; the holders of the right to use the appellation of origin; the appellation of origin for which registration is sought, and the product to which the appellation applies. In this case, the international registration bears the date on which the last of the missing elements was received by the International Bureau.
  • 12. Refusal Procedure The competent authorities of the Member States that have received notice of the registration of an appellation of origin have the right to refuse to protect it in their territory. The declaration of refusal of protection has to meet two requirements:(i) The first is a time requirement: the refusal has to be notified to the International Bureau within a period of one year from the date of receipt by that country of the notice of registration.(ii) The second is a requirement regarding content: the declaration of refusal has to specify the grounds for refusal. For instance, a country may refuse to protect an appellation of origin because it considers that the appellation has already acquired a generic character in its territory in relation to the product to which it refers or because it considers that the geographical designation does not conform to the definition of an appellation of origin in the Lisbon Agreement or because the appellation would conflict with a trademark or other right already protected in the country concerned. When the International Bureau receives a declaration of refusal within the prescribed period, it notifies it to the competent authority of the country of origin, enters it in the International Register and publishes it in the Bulletin. The competent authority of the country of origin communicates it in turn to the parties concerned, who may avail themselves of the same administrative and legal remedies against the refusal as nationals of the country that pronounced it.
  • 13.  Refusal can be based on any situation of fact or law. However, the grounds on the basis of which the country decides not to grant protection constitute a basis for possible discussions for the purpose of reaching an understanding. Such an understanding may result in the withdrawal of a refusal, in whole or in part. A procedure is available for the notification of such withdrawals and their recording in the International RegisterProcedures in case no refusal is issued or if a refusal is withdrawn A member country that does not refuse protection to an appellation of origin that was being used by a third party on its territory prior to the date of notification of the international registration has the option of allowing that third party a period not exceeding two years within which to terminate such use. In that case, the competent authority of the country in question has to inform the International Bureau accordingly within the three months following the expiry of the period of one year provided for the refusal of protection. Since January 1, 2010, a contracting country has the option to issue, instead of tacitly accepting the protection in its territory of a given appellation of origin registered under the Agreement, a statement of grant of protection. Such statements of grant of protection are not obligatory but can be issued either (a) where no declaration of refusal has been notified, or (b) following a refusal. In respect of statements as mentioned under (a), the date of the statement will be recorded in the International Register and, in respect of statements as mentioned under (b), the date on which protection was granted.
  • 14. Procedures in case of invalidation If no declaration of refusal is submitted but the effects of an international registration are, subsequently, invalidated in a contracting country and the invalidation is no longer subject to subject to appeal, the competent authority of the country concerned is to notify the International Bureau accordingly. Following such a notification, the International Bureau enters the invalidation in the International Register and sends a copy of the notification to the competent authority of the country of origin. As regards the grounds for invalidation, reference is made to what has been said above in connection with the possibility for a contracting party to submit a declaration of refusal. However, as long as an appellation is protected in the country of origin, a member country that did not submit a declaration of refusal cannot deem that appellation to have become generic in its territory. This does not prevent, however, such an invalidation to be based on the fact that the appellation had already become generic prior to the date of international registration; another exception to this general rule may apply in case of acquiescence.Cancellation and Amendment of Registration The international registration of an appellation of origin may be cancelled at any time at the request of the competent authority of the country of origin.
  • 15.  That authority may likewise renounce protection in one or more countries party to the Lisbon Agreement, either in the actual application for registration or in a request filed later. The competent authority of the country of origin may also request the entry in the International Register of one or more of the following:(i) a change in the holder of the right to use the appellation of origin;(ii) a modification to the names or addresses of the holders of the right to use the appellation of origin;(iii) a modification to the limits of the area of production of the product to which the appellation of origin applies;(iv) a modification relating to the titles and dates of legislative or administrative provisions or of court decisions recognizing protection in the country of origin;(v) a modification relating to the country of origin that does not affect the area of production of the product to which the appellation of origin applies.
  • 16. TRIPSScope (Art. 1);;Copyright and related rights; trademarks; geographical indications;industrial designs; patents; layout designs of integrated circuits;undisclosed information. National treatment (Art. 3)Requires all Members to treat nationals of other countries no lessfavourably than their own nationals on all matters concerning IPRs, subjectto certain exceptions already provided in conventions/treaties related toIPRs. Most-favoured-nationtreatment (Art. 4)Advantages, privileges granted by a Member to the nationals of any othercountry should be extended unconditionally to the nationals of all otherMembers.
  • 17.  Exhaustion of intellectual property rights (Art. 6):For the purposes of dispute settlement, nothing in the Agreement shall be used to address the issue of exhaustion of IPRs, provided there is compliance with national treatment and most-favoured-nation treatment.Basic objectives and principles (Arts. 7 & 8):The protection and enforcement of IPRs should contribute to thepromotion of technological innovation and to the transfer and dissemination oftechnology. They should also contribute to the mutual advantage ofproducers and users of technological knowledge, and in a manner conduciveto social and economic welfare and to a balance of rights and obligations.The Agreement allows members to adopt measures necessary to protectpublic health and nutrition, and to promote the public interest in sectors ofvital importance to their socioeconomic and technological development. Atthe same time, appropriate measures can be taken in order to prevent theabuse of IPRs or the resort to practices which unreasonably restrain tradeor adversely affect the international transfer of technology.
  • 18.  Geographical indications Geographical names (Art.22)Provides means to prevent use of geographical direct or indirect namesfrom misleading the public as to the true origin of the good, or whichconstitutes an act of unfair competition.Additional protection (Arts. 23 & 24)With regard to wines and spirits, protection must be provided even where there is no threat of the public being misled as to the true origin of the good. Negotiations are being undertaken with respect to the establishment of a multilateral system of notification and registration for wines.