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PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
PEC Annual Report 2011
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PEC Annual Report 2011

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Our Annual Report details the work The Piedmont Environmental Council did in 2011 and includes a list of our contributors.

Our Annual Report details the work The Piedmont Environmental Council did in 2011 and includes a list of our contributors.

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  • 1. Piedmont Environmental Council 2011 ANNUAL REPORT
  • 2. Celebrating PEC at 40  “I’m sure there are a lot of communities where the meeting rooms are empty, and the decisions get made without much citizen understanding or participation. But, then, they get what they get. There are just hundreds of things in this community that wouldn’t have happened if PEC wasn’t there to promote the citizen participation, to provide the information that citizens need—to do some pushing, from time to time, of the elected officials, to be present at all of the meetings. With PEC, people take action.” SALLY THOMAS , former member of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors “The discussions that took place during the Exploring the Small Farm Dream course opened my mind to the local food scene— to the possibilities for small farmers. At first it seemed almost impossible to make a living and be successful at this, but during the class, it gave me hope that we can be successful in the local food movement.” —Amir “It’s hard being a farmer! It’s hard work! Having an organization like PEC instantly gives us access to like-minded people who are there to network with us, support us, point us to the resources— giving us a sense of home and a community. The class was filled. It was standing room only. So, we felt like, ‘OK, we’re not the only crazy ones here. We can make this happen.’” —Diana DIANA BOEKE AND AMIR ABDELMALEK , Owners of Glean Acres, LLC, and alumni of PEC’s Exploring the Small Farm Dream Course, Madison County. Photos by Katherine VanceCOVER: APPLE TREE IN ALBEMARLE COUNTY. Photo by David Anhold.
  • 3. Founded in 1972 “What we try to do at nature camp is just get children outside —get them to wake up and pay attention to what’s happening around them. Get them to come to an understanding of how the natural systems work, and to come to an appreciation and a respect for our fellow earth-dwelling creatures. That is our hope. That they will look more closely at butterflies and moths, and learn how a honey bee hive works inside, and really take a close look at flowers and birds. What we’re trying to do is get them to come to a direct relationship with the living things in their natural habitat.” LYT WOOD , director of the PEC-sponsored Rappahannock Nature Camp “In our view, the PEC has become the single most significant regional conservation organization over the past 25, 30 years. And we’re grateful for that. The Piedmont Environmental Council gave Mary Lynn and me the opportunity to participate as citizens in two great fights to protect the landscape, and to protect its history. One of these was the fight to keep the Disney Corporation from building a sprawling city on the edge of the Manassas battlefield. PEC also helped us create a 4,000 acre National Rural Historic District here at Thoroughfare Gap.” NICK AND MARY LYNNE KOTZ , Fauquier County residents and founders of Protect Historic America Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 1
  • 4. Dear Friends, PEC got its start 40 years ago this year, when a small group restoring wildlife habitat or improving water quality. The local of active citizens recognized that our region was poised for food movement here is one of the strongest in the nation—and dramatic growth. They knew that with a thoughtful and it’s still growing. Reversing decades of trends, many young proactive approach, Piedmont communities could grow people now find farming to be an appealing and viable career, without losing the qualities that make this region truly and they are starting new farms in the Piedmont. special—its beautiful scenery, historic landscapes, productive All of these good things have happened thanks to people farmland, and abundant nature. So, in 1972, they founded PEC, who take action. Citizens help to shape local plans. They to act on that vision. give their input on proposed developments. Support local Their efforts—and those of the many people who worked farmers. Donate conservation easements. Plant trees beside with PEC over the years—have been strikingly successful. streams. Learn more about native flora and fauna. Remove The population in our region has doubled in the last 20 invasive species. Volunteer to monitor water quality. Run years alone, a faster rate than either the state average or the nature day camps. Plant pollinator gardens. Add insulation national average. Our economy has grown substantially, to their houses—and later, solar panels. And so on. PEC acts as well, creating a robust job market that remained as a resource, providing citizens with the information and assistance they need to make a positive difference. comparatively stable, even through hard times. Four decades AN INTERN TENDS SEEDLINGS AT WATERPENNY FARM of intense growth might have come at a devastating cost to Now, one of our key challenges is to engage a new generation the landscape—but, instead, most of the Piedmont region IN RAPPAHANNOCK COUNTY. Photo by Katherine Vance. of Piedmont residents in the work—and the joy—of good remains beautiful, open land. In some places, we do see the stewardship for this amazing place that we call home. impacts of sprawling growth, and we are working to address Now, one of our key the challenges, including strain on the transportation network, Because the population has grown rapidly, many current challenges is to engage that result. But there is a great deal to celebrate. residents of the Piedmont don’t have a long personal or family a new generation of history with this land. But the potential for them to form a Thanks to proactive local planning efforts, most development connection is strong (after all, they chose to live here for a Piedmont residents in has taken place in towns, cities and designated growth areas, reason). The fact that 75% of Piedmont residents today live the work—and the joy— and historic downtowns have been revitalized throughout in urban or suburban communities challenges us to think the region. Private land conservation efforts have been about environmental conservation in new ways—so that these of good stewardship for extraordinarily successful, with nearly 350,000 acres now constituents will find it relevant to their lives and take part. this amazing place that protected by conservation easements. In many cases, people Of course, many of the Piedmont’s new residents are children, we call home. are not just preserving land—they’re making it better, by in a generation where children’s access to nature is often2
  • 5. AYLIN AND OYA SIMPSON FIND A BIRD’S NEST IN THE POLLINATOR GARDEN NEAR THEIR HOME IN BROADLANDS. Photo by Rose Jenkins.restricted. Whether children or adults, when people are cut off fromnature, they cannot learn to love it, and they will not act to protect it. ContentsSo, PEC is reaching out in new ways to engage people in the work MAP OF THE PIEDMONT 4that we do—and our membership is growing. We have expanded land conservation 6our communications and outreach capacity. We are holding moreoutdoor events. We have directly helped to create four new public clean water 8parks and trails in recent years. Our Buy Fresh Buy Local program history and beauty 10connects about 240,000 households with local farms. And PEC’spopular sustainable habitat program, now in its third year, shows better communities 12people how they can improve the natural world where they live, sensible transportation 14whether that’s a large farm or a city lot. healthy air 16PEC, at 40, is vital and dynamic, growing and changing—whilestaying strong in our core mission to protect the land. When we strong rural economies 18preserve land we preserve the potential for people to use and enjoy habitat restoration 20it in many ways—from growing food to exploring wild places.We are happy that people in the Piedmont today can enjoy these connecting people 22 and natureopportunities, and our goal is to offer this same abundance ofpotential for people in the Piedmont tomorrow. THE PIEDMONT FOUNDATION 24Sincerely, CONTRIBUTIONS 25 BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND STAFF 32Chris Miller, President STATEMENTS OF INSIDE FINANCIAL CONDITION BACK COVERTony Vanderwarker,Chair of the Board Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 3
  • 6. Protecting the Piedmont
  • 7. Easements Recorded in 2011 Conservation Easements Civil War Battlefields Rivers / Streams Publicly Owned Lands Historic Districts National Historic Landmarks Map created by PEC for presentation purposes only. Data source: County Governments, VDHR, VDCR, CWPT, USGS, and PEC. Although efforts have been made to verify data, accuracy is not guaranteed. For more information, please visit www.pecva.org. March 2012 Conservation Easements Conservation Easements in the Piedmont Public Lands 40 Years of Land Conservation Conservation Easements 0 10 20 Public Lands q Miles L O L O L O L O U U 2002 U U 1982 1992 2012 D RK E D D RK E RKE CLA RKE O CLA CLA CLA D O O O U U U U N N N N A A IA F IA F F F A A A NI NI A U IN U U I I IN U Q Q Q G Q U G NNOCK U U U NNOCK NNOCK PAHA NNOCKRG PAHA RG PAHA RAP PAHA IE IR RAP RAP RAP IE IE IE IR R R V R RVI VI V MA CULP MA MA MA CULP CULP EPE CULP D EPE EPE R EPE D D D R R R IS IS IS IS O O O GR O N GR GR N N GR N E EE E E G E EE EE EE G G N G N E AN N N E AN E AN OR E AN OR OR OR E E E RL LE RL RL A A A M AR M E E EM B EM B B L B L L A L A A A
  • 8. land conservation VOLUNTARY ACTION  • OUTSTANDING SUCCESS  • SAVING PLACES PEOPLE LOVE THE MCKAY FAMILY—BEV, STEPHANIE, AND ALEX—WORKED WITH PEC AND THE USDA TO PROTECT THIS DAIRY FARM IN CLARKE COUNTY. Photo by George Patterson.6
  • 9. land conservation PEC as a Land Trust ``PEC conducted extensive outreach to ``PEC held a well-attended workshop for PEC is expanding our role as a full-service land trust— landowners, including a targeted mailing landowners in Culpeper, covering topics one of the key goals of our 2010 Strategic Plan. Historically, that reached 5,700 homes, successful media from conservation easements to riparian outreach, and numerous presentations. buffers to habitat restoration. PEC has concentrated on policy advocacy and landowner PEC’s staff made personal contact with outreach, and partnered with other land trusts (largely approximately 375 interested landowners ``PEC strengthens local Purchase of state agencies) as easement holders. Going forward, we are about their conservation options. Development Rights (PDR) programs holding more easements ourselves. This adds to landowners’ by building citizen support, collaborating on projects, and providing matching options and makes more conservation projects possible. In funds from donations or grants. In 2011, 2011, PEC accepted four easements, so that we now hold PDR programs in Clarke, Fauquier and easements on a total of nearly 6,000 acres. Altogether, PEC Rappahannock protected nine working currently holds easements on nearly 6,000 acres. PEC was in farms, totaling approximately 1,450 acres. the vanguard of land trusts nationwide when, ``Through the Piedmont Foundation, PEC in early 2011, we achieved accreditation manages ten land conservation funds through the Land Trust Accreditation focused on specific priority areas (see Commission, ensuring easement donors p. 24). In 2011, our Clarke County Land Conservation Fund helped the local PDR the highest level of responsible stewardship. program to purchase an easement on 103 acres of a working dairy farm within a rural historic district (pictured on facing page). ``With the help of generous donors, PEC 12,000+ Acres Protected 1,850 ACRES OF PRIVATE LAND ALONG THE CONWAY RIVER IN established the new Greene County Land MADISON AND GREENE ARE PROTECTED. Photo by Frank Crocker. Conservation Fund, a revolving fund that 2011 Acres Total Land Percentage of Land assists landowners with the up-front costs Protected by Protected by Protected by FAWNBOROUGH, A 218-ACRE FARM IN FAUQUIER, WASCounty Conservation Easements Conservation Easements Conservation Easements PROTECTED LAST YEAR, PRESERVING RURAL SCENERY DIRECTLY of donating a conservation easement. ACROSS FROM GREAT MEADOWS. Photo by Heather Richards.Albemarle 2,300 85,700 18%Clarke 700 20,750 18%Culpeper 400 13,600 5.5%Fauquier 3,200 94,500 22.5%Greene 1,300 10,000 10%Loudoun 2,050 50,250 15%Madison 300 13,400 6%Orange 1,300 31,200 14%Rappahannock 650 29,300 17%PEC Region 12,200 348,700 15% 7
  • 10. STEVEN HENSLEY FENCED CATTLE OUT OF 2,000 FEET OF STREAMS AT HIS FARM IN RAPPAHANNOCK. Photo by Katherine Vance. clean water SAFE DRINKING SOURCES  • HEALTHY STREAMS  • PLACES TO SWIM AND FISH8
  • 11. clean water Radioactive risk from ``Almost 50 miles of streams were protected by conservation ``PEC is working with the Town of Leesburg to encourage low impact uranium easements in 2011, bringing the total development that will leave intact to more than 1,400 miles. more of the natural systems that filter water. mining ``Over 275 acres of wetlands were protected with conservation ``PEC partnered with high school easements in 2011, for a total of students in Purcellville on a multi- PEC has been a powerful fighter in the nearly 8,200 acres. year project that expanded riparian face of a major corporate push to open buffers on the banks of Catoctin Virginia to uranium mining. Nowhere Creek, saved their outdoor lab, andBuilding in the United States has uranium been mined in a rainy, volatile climate like created a new public trail (see p. 23). ``PEC co-organized the 10th Annualfences for Virginia’s, and the risk of releasing toxic and radioactive contaminants, Loudoun Family Stream Day, an educational event for students andcleaner including numerous carcinogens, into families.streams water supplies is very high. Uranium deposits exist throughout Virginia, ``PEC worked with students to create a rain garden at Eastern View High School in Culpeper, to absorb and including the Piedmont region.Farmers have used a unique filter stormwater runoff. PEC and our partners succeeded inincentive program coordinated preventing a bill to lift Virginia’s ban ``Due in part to PEC’s long-runningby PEC to fence over 1,000 cattle EXAMINING A LARGEMOUTH BASS AT PEC’S POND on uranium mining in 2012, although MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP. Photo by Katherine Vance. community outreach, Culpeperout of streams. These incentives moved forward on a plan for water mining interests are moving toward ahave resulted in livestock and sewer infrastructure that renewed push in 2013.exclusion fencing along 13 miles of ``PEC hosted a free pond supports reasonable growth and management workshop near reduces the allocation for effluentstreams, including eight miles in Warrenton, for people interested in going into local streams by oneRappahannock, where the program improving water quality and wildlife million gallons per day.began. It has since expanded habitat.to include Culpeper, Greene, ``Albemarle and Charlottesville gave ``PEC built support for local measures final approval to a communityMadison and Orange. Funds are to protect Loudoun’s streams, water supply plan long advocatedprovided through a National Fish with partial success, resulting in by PEC—providing a reliable, locallyand Wildlife Foundation grant. stronger rules to prevent leaking sourced water supply.In combination with government septic systems and erosion from construction sites, expanded ``PEC co-chairs the Choose Cleancost-share programs, they cover Water coalition, which brings nearly incentives for riparian buffers, andthe total costs of stream fencing in funding for suburban tree-planting 200 groups in the Chesapeake Baymost cases. NAOMI HODGE-MUSE, A LEADER IN THE STATEWIDE projects. watershed together to work for EFFORT TO KEEP VIRGINIA’S BAN ON URANIUM MINING, clean streams and a healthy Bay. SAYS, “WE HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO THE FUTURE CITIZENS OF VIRGINIA.” Photo by Katherine Vance. Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 9
  • 12. history and beauty SENSE OF PLACE  • SCENIC VIEWS  • BATTLEFIELDS  • HISTORIC DISTRICTS PEACH ORCHARD IN ALBEMARLE COUNTY. Photo by David Anhold.10
  • 13. history and beauty ``PEC scored two major victories in keeping giant transmission lines from scarring our scenic and historic landscapes—ending designation of our region as a priority transmission line corridor and getting the PATH line application withdrawn (see p. 17). ``The second annual PEC Photo Contest brought in another outpouring of stunning images—a great celebration of this beautiful and unique place. ``Over 3,700 acres of land visible from the WINNER OF THE BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPES CATEGORY IN THE 2011 Appalachian Trail were protected last year, for a PEC PHOTO CONTEST. Photo by Tom Lussier. total of nearly 103,000 acres. ``PEC’s staff spent a summer Saturday greeting ``Over 2,500 acres along Scenic Byways were visitors on overlooks in Shenandoah National protected last year, for a total of nearly 97,000 Park, increasing awareness of how private land acres. conservation protects cherished views.HISTORICAL DRAWING OF THE BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS. ``Over 90,000 acres of land in rural historic districts are now protected by conservationSaving Wilderness easements, including nearly 1,700 acres protected in 2011.Battlefield—the ``Over 400 acres of Civil War battlefields werebigger picture protected by conservation easements in 2011, including portions of Thoroughfare Gap and Buckland Mills in Fauquier and Upperville in Loudoun. Altogether, conservation easementsIn a dramatic win for Civil War historic preservation, permanently protect over 22,000 acres ofPEC and our partners stopped Walmart from building battlefields in the Piedmont.a Supercenter at Wilderness Battlefield in Orange ``PEC contributed to efforts to highlight local CivilCounty. Last year, Walmart withdrew their plans for UNISON BATTLEFIELD HISTORIC DISTRICT. Photo by Rose Jenkins. War history throughout our region, as part of thethe battlefield site and chose an alternative location. ``The 8,000-acre Unison Battlefield Historic Sesquicentennial Anniversary of the Civil War.But this fight underscores the need for a better plan for District in Loudoun County, including some ofthe Rt. 3 corridor—one that balances economic growth the nation’s most pristine Civil War historic sites, ``PEC is coordinating a workshop on minimizing became official in 2011, thanks to a grassroots the impact of infrastructure—like roads, cellwith historic preservation, and optimizes potential for effort supported by PEC. towers, or transmission lines—on Thoroughfaretourism. As Orange revises its Comprehensive Plan, PEC Gap Battlefield in Fauquier.is working toward a positive vision for this exceptionally ``PEC helped to keep a bridge over Scenic Bywayhistoric area. Rt. 231 in Madison in keeping with the area’s rural ``PEC is helping to plan a network of trails linking character (see p. 15). historic sites and tourist destinations in Orange. Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 11
  • 14. better communities CITIZEN INVOLVEMENT  • GREAT PLACES TO LIVE  • MANAGING TRAFFIC AND TAXES DOWNTOWN CULPEPER. Photo by Katherine Vance.12
  • 15. better communitiesReasonablegrowth ``PEC advocated for maintaining ``PEC helped to stop a flawed the current size of the Albemarle cluster zoning ordinance County Growth Area, helping in Culpeper, which wouldin Fauquier to defeat numerous proposals for unnecessary expansions— have allowed many years of development to go up at once, including one that would have without permanent protection forIn spite of weak demand in the eliminated community open space open space.housing market, Fauquier keeps in the Redfields neighborhood.seeing one oversized development ``PEC joined with historic ``PEC has long advocated for preservation partners to provideproposal after another. PEC Albemarle’s Places 29 plan, a earthquake aid in Culpeper,successfully advocated against smart-growth blueprint for land to assist with stabilization ofthe proposed Village of Catlett, use and transportation in the historic buildings in the revitalizedwhich would have more than Route 29 corridor, which was downtown area. adopted in 2011.doubled the size of the existing ``PEC is taking part in the ongoingvillage. We continue to work for ``PEC helped to rally overwhelming review of the Madison County NEW DEVELOPMENT NEAR METRO STOPS, INCLUDING THEreasonable growth in Fauquier by PLANNED SILVER LINE TO DULLES AIRPORT, WILL MEAN SMART citizen support for Albemarle’s Comprehensive Plan, advocatingopposing the 500-unit Mintbook GROWTH INSTEAD OF SPRAWL IN THE D.C. AREA. sustainability initiatives, although for rural preservation and a the County responded by proactive plan for growth alongproposal in Bealeton, supporting proceeding with one program Rt. 29.the County’s move toward a morecomprehensive fiscal impact model, D.C. goes for and cancelling others. ``PEC is working with the Town ofand encouraging efforts to promotegreen development design. smart growth ``PEC mobilized citizen opposition to a rezoning that would swell Leesburg on incorporating low impact development standards Creekside, in Greene, to almost into the zoning ordinance. PEC works closely with our partner in 1,200 units, increasing strain onSUE SCHEER AND HOPE PORTER HAVE BEEN the D.C. area, the Coalition for Smarter local schools and roads. ``PEC co-organizedFIGHTING FOR SENSIBLE GROWTH IN FAUQUIERFOR DECADES. Photo by Rose Jenkins. Growth, which made major strides EarthDay@Loudoun, an outdoor festival in suburban last year in advancing transit-oriented Loudoun that drew over 6,000 development—a model that would people! Numerous exhibitors, channel much of the region’s growth educational activities, and a into vibrant neighborhoods within Green Marketplace all focused on celebrating nature and walking distance of Metro stops. This learning how to be more goal gained traction in Prince George’s, environmentally friendly. Fairfax, Montgomery, Arlington and D.C., and at the regional planning level. The federal government added significant momentum, announcing a plan to locate EARTHDAY@LOUDOUN. its large-scale agencies near Metro stops. Photo by Oya Simpson. Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 13
  • 16. PEC SUCCESSFULLY ADVOCATED FOR THE ROUTE 50 TRAFFIC CALMING PROJECT, INCLUDING THIS ROUNDABOUT AT GILBERTS CORNER—WHICH IS NOW IMPROVING SAFETY AND TRAFFIC FLOW AND SAVING TAXPAYERS THE EXPENSE OF A MAJOR ROAD-WIDENING. Photo by Katherine Vance. sensible transportation FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY  • LESS SPRAWL  • MORE OPTIONS14
  • 17. sensible transportation VIRGINIA MARYLAND § ¦ ¨ 270 £ ¤ 33 ! ¬ « 7 Ruckersville ! The right G RE Leesburg EN E GREENE ALB CO EM UN GROWTH ARL TY £ ¤ 15 EC OU ! AREA bridge for a NT Y ! ``PEC has been leading ¬ « 28 § ¦ ¨495 efforts to stop the Proposed Stoplight ¬ ! « 7 Charlottesville Western £ ¤ Scenic Byway 29 V U Proposed Dulles 267 Washington Bypass since plans for Bypass ! ! this exorbitantly expensive, EA £ ¤ 50 DC ! AR ¦ ¨ § ! ineffective road project were Hollymead 66 When a family in Madison learned TH ! suddenly reintroduced. ! Fairfax § ¦ ¨ ! OW £ about VDOT’s high-impact plans ! ¦ ¨ § ¤ The bypass competes for § 29 ¦ ¨ GR 66 V U ! Rivanna for a bridge on Rt. 231 near their 495 ille funding with smart-growth Reservoir LE sv ! 7100 ine AR !Ga Manassas farm—doubling its width while also alternatives that would ! ¬ « £ M ¤ ! 20 1 BE address the real source of ! ! straightening and widening the road, ! AL ! ! Woodbridge congestion on Route 29— ! ! removing trees and blasting a rock 0 1 2 £ ¤ ! Miles local traffic—by improving 250 ! ! ¬ « ! Rt 29 Stoplights Charlottesville ! 28 outcropping—they got in touch with ! the local street grid. Catlett PEC. We agreed that these plans Quantico MARYLAND were more suited to a fast-paced MEGAN LIDDLE GUDE, A CITIZEN WHO SUPPORTS VIRGINIA highway than this rural Scenic THE PLACES29 PLAN Built or Partially-Built RATHER THAN THE Segments Byway. The project would cost more CHARLOTTESVILLE 0 5 10 Proposed Segments than necessary, take away from the WESTERN BYPASS, SAYS § 95 Miles Publicly Owned Lands scenery, and encourage drivers to go “PLACE MATTERS, AND ADAPTING ANY IDEA TO THE PLACE IS VERY ¨ at dangerous speeds. We launched a IMPORTANT.”Zombie ¦ attack grassroots advocacy campaign that succeeded in changing VDOT’s plan, Photo by Katherine Vance.Plans for an Outer Beltway around D.C. have come so the new bridge will be a better fitback so many times that it’s called the “zombie” for its surroundings.beltway. In 2011, the Commonwealth TransportationBoard resurrected this long-cherished dream road for THIS BRIDGE, ON RT. 231 IN MADISON, DOESN’T NEED TO BE TWICE AS BIG. Photo by Beth Burnam.developers by declaring this route to be a statewidetransportation priority—with no public input or ``PEC sponsored much-needed investigative journalism byexpert review, and over the objections of impacted the online political magazine Bacon’s Rebellion, including anlocalities, including Loudoun and Clarke. This vast exposé of the questionable politics behind the revival of the Charlottesville Western Bypass.new ring road around Northern Virginia would costtaxpayers billions of dollars, fail to address Northern ``PEC led an online advocacy campaign on statewideVirginia’s real traffic problems, and push sprawl transportation priorities that resulted in over 500dramatically further out into Virginia’s countryside, messages to the Governor, asking him to direct the state’s limited transportation funds to existing cities, towns andso stopping it—again—is a priority for PEC. neighborhoods instead of new roads that lead to sprawl. Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 15
  • 18. healthy air CLEAN ENERGY  • GOOD HEALTH  • CLEAR VIEWS CLIFTON FARM IN WARRENTON. Photo by Katherine Vance.16
  • 19. healthy airTransmission line ``PEC is a leader in the fight to keep Virginia’s banvictory—and a on uranium mining and milling, which could release radioactive and toxic particles into bothparadigm shift air and water (see p. 9). ``PEC advocates for transportation solutions that decrease people’s reliance on automobiles—andEarly in 2011, PEC won a federal case that overturned so reduce air pollution. PEC promotes well-two National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor planned communities, with homes near job(NIETC) designations spanning 100 million acres in centers so people can spend less time driving.10 states, including most of our region. Before this case, PEC also promotes transit-oriented development and improved bicycle and pedestrian networksthe NIETC designations gave utility companies access (see pp. 14-15).to federal eminent domain to seize land for transmissionlines—many of which would reinforce Americans’reliance on dirty coal power plants. Subsequently, theU.S. Department of Energy has improved its criteria ``In a surprising partnership that got good results,for designating NIETCs, to include non-transmission PEC joined with Dominion Virginia Power to passalternatives such as demand management and a bill expanding solar power in Virginia, throughdistributed power generation—a shift that PEC has small scale, distributed generation projects.advocated for years. ``PEC helped to stop the proposed 275-mile long, 765-kV PATH transmission line, which would have cut through Frederick, Clarke and Loudoun Counties, by demonstrating that the line is unnecessary. The proposal was withdrawn, although the utilities may reapply. ``PEC stayed active in the permitting process for a proposed natural gas power plant near Front Royal, only five miles from Shenandoah National Park. While significant emissions offsets from other sites in Virginia will result in a net pollution reduction, concerns remain about the scenic impacts of the plant’s smokestacks. AYLIN SIMPSON IN LOUDOUN COUNTY. Photo by Rose Jenkins. Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 17
  • 20. strong rural economies THRIVING FARMS  • LOCAL FOOD  • INNOVATION  • HEALTHY LAND GAIL HOBBS-PAGE RAISES GOATS AND MAKES ARTISANAL CHEESES AT CAROMONT FARM IN ALBEMARLE. Photo by Katherine Vance.18
  • 21. strong rural economiesProtected ``PEC organized two Meet the Farmer Dinners, one hosted by Robert and Luciana Duvall at their home inand prosperous The Plains and one at Bluemont Vineyard in Loudoun. ``PEC co-sponsored the popular Heritage Harvest Festival, held on the West Lawn of Monticello.If we want to keep our region’s healthy, beautifulrural landscapes, even outstanding conservation ``PEC helped the Rappahannock County publicefforts aren’t enough. We need to make sure that schools celebrate Local Foods Day, with deliciousrural land uses are economically viable—and so ease local burgers, salad and apple crisp served in all the cafeterias.the constant pressure to convert farms and forestsinto developments. Building on our popular Buy ``PEC held our seventh Exploring the Small FarmFresh Buy Local campaign, PEC has launched a new Dream course. The course guides participantsAgriculture and Rural Economy program—one of through a decision-making process about starting a farm-related business. Now, alumni who are runningthe key goals identified in our 2010 Strategic Plan. successful businesses come back to help guide JUSTIN GARRISON PREPARES GOURMET MEALS FROM LOCAL INGREDIENTS AT THE WINE KITCHEN, IN LEESBURG. Photo by Katherine Vance. the course.Already, PEC has contributed to a local foodmovement that is strong enough to encourage ``In 2011, nearly 5,700 acres of prime farmland were ``PEC celebrated the Living Local art exhibit—apeople to start or protected by conservation easements, for a total series of paintings of animals at sustainable, local farms. The paintings, by Nancy Bass, were displayed 20 Piedmont of over 163,000 acres. Over 5,900 acres of forests Foexpand businesses. o d Environmental 11 G u loudoun county id Council e were protected, for a total of over 159,000 acres. in downtown Charlottesville, following a receptionSales at farmers These and other protected resources assure that the at the artist’s home on newly protected landmarkets are setting necessary base for strong rural economies will be in Albemarle.records, and more available in the long term. F r E s h F o o d s F r o m L o u d o u n C o u n t y ’ s Fa m i Ly Fa r m s TALL COTTON FARM BY NANCY BASS. Photo by Murray Whitehill.restaurants are The many reaSonS To Buy loCal! ``PEC produced updated Buy Fresh Buy Local food Buying local gives you freedom of choiceseeking out delicious for your family’s health and nutrition. Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Michael Locally grown produced foods are exceptionally fresh, delicious abundant. Buying local protects the environment. guides for communities throughout our region,local ingredients. Buying local supports endangered family farms strengthens the local economy. Buying local protects open space farmland. learn more aT Don’t miss Loudou n’s Tour Spend a Weekend in the Country! May 21 22, 2011 listing nearly 600 farms, markets, restaurants and 2011 Spring FarmAspiring farmers fill www.BuylocalVirginia.org DeTailS inSiDe other businesses. We sent the guides to every home www.loudounfarms.org FarmerS markeTS CSaS (CommuniTy SupporTeD agriCulTure)PEC’s Exploring the Small Farm Dream courses. Ashburn Farmers Market At the Corner of Ashburn Village Blvd and Farmwell Rd (behind IHOP) Loudoun Flavor 38363 Stevens Road, Lovettsville (703) 350 · 2790 www.LoudounFlavor.com What is a CSa? When you join a CSA, you make a financial commitment to a farm (usually before the growing season begins) and receive a weekly basket of produce. in our nine-county area—about 240,000 homes. www.loudounfarmersmarkets.org Chicama Run, LLC Herban Avenues at (540) 454 · 8089 Browse online market 24/7 Shop Mondays 1 pm – Wednesdays 6 pm. 14809 Purcellville Road the AHHA Ranch Cheese SpecialtyAnd the number of businesses listed in our Buy May 7 – October 30, Saturdays 8 am – 12 pm Purcellville 38363 Stevens Road, Lovettsville Pick up at host site of choice on Fridays, Dairy Products 1 – 6 pm Joseph and Dana Sacco Laura Davimes · (804) 320 · 0665 (540) 668 · 9828 greatday@chooseherbs.com Brambleton dana@chicamarun.com www.HerbanAvenues.com Farmers Market Meat Produce Middleburg Community ``PEC produced Buy Fresh Buy Local holiday guides www.chicamarun.com In the Parking Lot of Sport Health CSA, Sells at www.HerbanAvenues.com, Farmers Market Sells on-site (check website www.LoudounFlavor.com, Purcellville Near Olympia Drive Soave Marshall Street and Stonewall Avenue for days/times) Middleburg Farmers Markets www.loudounfarmersmarkets.org (Behind Community Center) Free-Range Eggs; Pastured Chicken Pork; Herbal Teas, Potted Herbs, Eggs, Grass-Fed Beef, Lamb Goat; Heirloom Poultry U-Pick Body Care and Bath Products, DriedFresh Buy Local guides has nearly doubled—to May 1 – October 3, Sundays 9 am – 1 pm www.middleburg.org Vegetables; Meat Egg CSA Available Fresh Cut Herbs/Flowers (540) 687 · 5152 May 7 – October 29, Saturdays, 8 am – 12 pm for the Charlottesville Area and the Northern Cascades Farmers Market Great Country Farms Mountain View Farm Senior Center Parking Lot 18780 Foggy Bottom Road at Blue Ridge Center Quarter Branch Farm (Behind Staples) Purcellville Bluemont for Environmental Stewardship 40327 Quarter Branch Road 21060 Whitfield Place , Sterling Community Market Mark Kate Zurschmeide 11661 Harpers Ferry Road Lovettsville www.loudounfarmersmarkets.org Purcellville Town Hall Parking Lot (540) 554 · 2073 Purcellville Kevin Grove · (540) 822 · 0123 130 East Main Street kate@greatcountryfarms.comapproximately 600—since we began sending May 1 – November 20, Sundays 9 am – 1 pm Shawna DeWitt and Attila Agoston kevin@quarterbranchfarm.com (703) 967 · 0431 www.greatcountryfarms.com www.quarterbranchfarm.com Piedmont, listing sources for seasonal, locally grown (571) 271 · 2136 www.purcellvillecommunitymarket.com Sells on-site, CSA, agritourism fun, shawna_dewitt@yahoo.com CSA, Sells at Rockville Sat. Farmers Leesburg Farmers Market May – October, Saturdays 9 am – 1 pm school tours, corporate picnics, weddings www.blueridgecenter.org Market, LoudounFlavor.com, Catoctin Circle in the Parking Lot of Strawberries, Blueberries, check website for more Blackberries, Peaches, CSA, sells on-site, DC Area the Virginia Village Shopping Center Farmers Markets 200+ Crops including Carrots, Celery, Loudoun Valley HomeGrown Veggies, Apples, Parsnips, Garlic, Leeks, Shallots, Lettuce, www.loudounfarmersmarkets.org Markets Cooperative, Inc. (LVHMC) Pumpkins Certified Naturally Grown Produce, Tomatoes, Peppers, Raspberries, Herbs “Producer Only” market. Free Range Eggs, Pastured Pork foods and decorations. May 7 – October 29, Saturdays, 8 am – 12 pm www.loudounfarmersmarkets.orgthem a few years ago. Now, PEC aims to take November – April, Saturdays 9 am – 12 pm (540) 454 · 8089 Moutoux Orchard Singing Frog Farm 15290 Purcellville Road 18685 Canby Rd. Purcellville Leesburg Rob Moutoux Meredith Kope · (571) 212 · 5625 Piedmont Environmental Council Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage moutouxorchard@yahoo.com meredith@singingfrogfarm.com www.moutouxorchard.com www.singingfrogfarm.com Post Office Box 460 • Warrenton, VA 20188 PAID www.pecva.org Charlottesville, VA CSA (on-farm pick-up), farm stand Sells at Purcellville Community Market, Natural Mercantile,this movement to the next level, with a focus on Permit No. 232 Peaches, Apples, Seasonal Vegetables, Whole Wheat and Spelt Flours, Wegmans, Restaurants, CSA Pastured Eggs, Grass Fed Lamb Heirloom Tomatoes, Salad Greens, Microgreens, Herbs, Cut Flowers ``PEC updated our Farm to Chef directory, which Potomac Vegetable Farm 15227 Berlin Turnpike Stoneybrook Organic Purcellville Farm and Market 37091 Charles Town Pike Ellen Polishuk · (540) 882 · 3885 Hillsbororeintroducing food-processing infrastructure and ellen@potomacvegetablefarms.com www.potomacvegetablefarms.com Luke Wiseman · (540) 668 · 9067 luke@stoneybrookfarm.org creates a direct link between local restaurants CSA delivery to Leesburg, Ashburn, www.stoneybrookfarm.org Sterling, Herndon and Reston, Farmstand (Tues – Sun, 10 am – 7 pm) Sells on-site, roadside stand, CSA Ecoganically Grown Vegetables, Farm: Certified Organic Produce. Farm Herbs, Cut Flowers and Meats Market: Produce, Eggs, Dairy, Meat, Cheese, Grains, Bulk Foods, Natural Foods, etcfacilitating purchases of local food by institutions. and local growers that can provide fresh, delicious ingredients. Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 19
  • 22. habitat restoration WILDLIFE CORRIDORS  • POLLINATORS  • NATIVE PLANTS  • BIODIVERSITY BUMBLEEBEE ON A CONEFLOWER. Photo by David Anhold.20
  • 23. habitat restorationHabitathow-toPEC led a tour of habitat restorationprojects in Clarke County, givingparticipants examples of how theycan build wildlife habitat where theylive. The tour featured gardens thatattract an abundance of pollinators;native grasslands that support quail Virginiaand other bird populations; natural Pollinatorareas along streams that providehabitat for many species; and a Week YOUNG BLACK BEAR.presentation of rehabilitated raptors Photo by Edward Payne. Virginia celebrated its firstby the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center. ever pollinator week, after Gov. ``PEC launched a new habitat section ``PEC is partnering with landowners on our website, with resources to to study wildlife populations with McDonnell accepted PEC’s help people start building habitat at camera traps on protected propertiesDR. BELINDA BURWELL PRESENTS A REDTAIL HAWK request for the designation. Over home: www.pecva.org/habitat around the Environmental Studies onAT PEC’S HABITAT TOUR IN CLARKE COUNTY. 350 people signed PEC’s petition, the Piedmont center, near Warrenton.Photo by Rose Jenkins. and partners throughout the ``PEC provided a seasonal column for the Piedmont Virginian magazine on ``Approximately 1,150 acres were state supported this effort to how to enhance wildlife habitat. protected in the Culpeper Basin recognize pollinators—essential Important Bird Area—a vital habitat contributors to our agriculture ``PEC’s sustainable habitat staff for bobwhite quail and other and our natural systems. At a consulted with about 115 families grassland bird species. about potential habitat projects where time when some bee populations they live. ``PEC worked with volunteers to are at risk, Virginia Pollinator prevent the spread of wavyleaf Week helped build awareness of ``PEC organized a native plants walk, basketgrass, a damaging invasive what pollinators do for us and led by four renowned naturalists, plant, from PEC’s property at Ovoka, at the Jones Nature Preserve in near Sky Meadows State Park and the what we can do for them. Rappahannock. Appalachian Trail. ``At a free pond management ``PEC is working with a Culpeper workshop that PEC hosted near landowner and state agencies to Warrenton, experts discussed ways to remove a dam on the Hazel River— improve pond and riparian habitats for the last impediment to fish movement fish and other animals. between the river’s headwaters and the Chesapeake Bay. Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 21
  • 24. connecting people and nature OUTREACH  • PARKS AND TRAILS  • KIDS OUTDOORS  • TRAINING LEADERS CHILDREN AT THE RAPPAHANNOCK NATURE CAMP HOLD A DRONE HONEYBEE. Photo by Rose Jenkins.22
  • 25. connecting people and nature ``Every summer, PEC sponsors Natural History Day Camps throughout our region—opening doors for children to connect with the natural world. ``PEC publicized local efforts to reconnect PEC Fellowship children with nature—a project that was inspired by Richard Louv’s best-selling Program book Last Child in the Woods and that led PEC to arrange for Louv to give two talks in the Piedmont in the spring of 2012. 2011 marked the fifth year of the PEC Fellowship ``PEC successfully advocated for improved Program—a premier educational experience for public access on the Hazel River inSIERRA CARTER HELPED CREATE THIS TRAIL NEAR HER HIGH SCHOOL IN PURCELLVILLE. students with an interest in environmental work. Culpeper, resulting in two new accessPhoto by Rose Jenkins. Twelve college students, graduate students, and points for swimmers and boaters. recent graduates spend seven weeks with PEC each ``PEC led our annual Bluebell Walk, along summer, gaining hands on experience in a wide rangeStudents save their the banks of Cedar Run in Fauqiuer, of fields and learning strategies that get results. As enjoying the carpets of spring blossoms alumni grow in their careers, the PEC Fellowship on land that is protected forever.outdoor lab Program is creating an expanding network of young professionals and activists who are working for ``PEC held numerous outdoor walks and workshops, including a pondYears ago, PEC started working with the Environmental positive change across the country. management workshop in Fauquier, aExplorations classes at Loudoun Valley High School in tour of habitat projects in Clarke and a native plants walk in Rappahannock.Purcellville, planting trees along Catoctin Creek. As the PEC FELLOWS KAITLIN MEESE AND LIZA STONER LEARN ABOUT LOCAL,project grew, the students set a goal of saving the woods SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE. Photo by Katherine Vance. ``PEC organized the fifth annual Clarkealong the creek that connect their school with a nearby Conservation Fair for all fourth-gradersnature preserve. And they did. The landowner agreed to in the county, this year on the theme “The Riches of Nature.”protect the forest and assure public access, if the studentswould build and maintain a trail. Now the woods are ``PEC co-organized EarthDay@Loudoun, aprotected forever, preserving the school’s outdoor lab and celebration that drew over 6,000 people!providing a nature trail for the whole community. ``PEC sends action alerts to an online network of more than 15,000 citizens, who use information and advocacy tools from PEC to change the course of local, state and federal decisions. Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 23
  • 26. The Piedmont Foundation Established to hold and manage special funds in support of PEC, the Piedmont Foundation assures PEC’s capacity to respond to key opportunities and challenges as they arise and to fulfill our core mission over the long term. A separate 501(c)(3) charitable organization governed by a six-member board, the Foundation accepts gifts of cash, securities, property and appreciated assets. The Foundation also offers opportunities for tax advantaged planned gifts including trusts, bequests and life income plans. Currently, the Piedmont Foundation manages funds in the following categories: ``Core Mission Endowment ``Conservation Stewardship Fund ``Legal Defense Fund ``Education and Outreach Fund ``Headquarters Expansion Fund Contributors to the Piedmont Foundation ``Land Conservation Fund Within this fund, the following Regional Land Conservation Funds Anonymous (4) Stephanie Ridder and John Beardsley have been established: Mr. and Mrs. William M. Backer Robert F. Roberts Albemarle County Land Conservation Fund Band Foundation Victor Rosenberg Bull Run Mountains Land Conservation Fund Blue Ridge Foothills Conservancy Suzanne H. Scheer Piedmont Foundation Clarke County Land Conservation Fund Fauquier County Land Conservation Fund Mr. and Mrs. David Crowe Mr. and Mrs. William A. Schmidt Board of Directors Mark and Elizabeth Epley Skyemare Foundation James M. Rowley Goose Creek Land Conservation Fund William M. Backer, President Julian W. Scheer Cedar Run Land Conservation Fund Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. V. French The Robert H. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Gerhardt Family Foundation John H. Birdsall III, Vice President Krebser Fund for Rappahannock County Conservation Alton Keel Mary C. de Butts Spencer John H. Snyder Madison County Land Conservation Fund Orange County Land Conservation Fund Mr. and Mrs. Nathan K. Kotz Ms. Beverly Stickles Charles Akre Richard S. Lykes Estate Mr. and Mrs.Philip C. Strange George deGarmo Opportunities remain to establish additional regional Mr. and Mrs. Michael Morency Mr. and Mrs. James Wofford Tony Vanderwarker conservation funds.24
  • 27. contributionsContributionsWith much gratitude, PEC presents the names ofindividuals, families, foundations, businesses and organizations that suppportedThe Piedmont Environmental Council during 2011. Although we do not havethe space to honor everyone, we are extremely grateful for the generosity ofeach of our members. We offer sincere thanks for your ongoing commitment topromoting and protecting the Piedmont region.Champions of Mr. and Mrs. George de Garmo National Fish and Wildlife Foundationthe Piedmont The Farkas Family Foundation$ 10,000 + Greg and Candy Fazakerley Mr. James W. Newman, Jr. Mrs. George L. Ohrstrom, Jr.Anonymous (7) Mr. and Mrs. H. Todd Flemming Mr. and Mrs. GeorgeMrs. William Abel Smith Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. V. French L. Ohrstrom, IIAgua Fund, Inc. The Helen Clay Frick Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Mark J. OhrstromMr. and Mrs. William M. Backer Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Graham The Ohrstrom Foundation, Inc. Intersections, Inc. “As a native of the Piedmont—the red clay under my feet runsMr. and Mrs. David H. Bass Ms. Jean Perin in my blood. So, for me, it’s just a part of life. I appreciate andDorothy Batten Mr. Edward S. Kasprowicz Prince Charitable Trusts love it, and I try to convey that to people. For me, PEC is aRobert and Dani E. Bernard Estate of Elizabeth C. Keith Frederick H. and Diana C. Prince support. It’s like your backbone, you know. You know you’veGeoffry and Suzanne Best Ms. Cornelia Keller Dr. and Mrs. Jerold J. Principato got somebody there that’s on your side. You know you’ve got James L. KleeblattMr. and Mrs. Benjamin Brewster Mrs. Marie W. Ridder somebody there that’s supporting how you choose to farm. Memorial FoundationMr. and Mrs. John H. Birdsall, III Mr. Bill Rigg You know you’ve got somebody there that’s outreaching into James R. KleeblattMr. and Mrs. Edward S. Bonnie the community. So, for me, it gives me strength to know that Mr. and Mrs. Nathan K. Kotz Sacharuna FoundationThe Bonnie Family Foundation there are others out there who appreciate what I do. Mr. and Mrs. Steven Lamb Shenandoah National Park Trust Honor the things that makeThe Keith Campbell Foundationfor the Environment The Lazar Foundation The Honorable and Mrs. S. Bruce Smart, Jr.Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Cheek, IIIThe Chichester duPont Leon Foundation Mr. and Mrs. H. Eugene Lockhart Mr. and Mrs. John H. Snyder your heart sing, and if theFoundation, Inc. Loudoun Convention and Visitors Association Mr. and Mrs. Michael Stanfield Janet Stone Jones Foundation Piedmont makes your heart sing, definitely get involved with PEC.”Mr. and Mrs. John Sheldon ClarkClark Family Foundation Inc. Estate of Richard Lykes Mr. James R. TreptowMr. and Mrs. Brian Conboy Mr. and Mrs. James P. Mills, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. William Wolf TERRY INGRAM , organic dairy farmer and conservationAileen B. Crawford Jane T. Moore Trust Wrinkle In Time Foundation easement donor, Culpeper CountyMr. and Mrs. David Crowe Mr. and Mrs. Michael Morency Irene and Alan Wurtzel Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 25
  • 28. Stewards of The Walden Trust Stephen and Sherry Bullock Mr. H. Stewart Dunn, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick P. Hitz National Wildlife Federation the Piedmont M. Douglas Wise Mr. and Mrs. Childs Frick Burden Mr. and Mrs. Scott Elliff The Fauquier Hospital, Inc. Mr. Robert J. Norton, Jr. 5,000 - $9,999 $ Mr. and Mrs. Rene Woolcott Harry and Jean Burn Mark and Elizabeth Epley Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Irwin Oak View National Bank Anonymous (2) Mr. and Mrs James M. Wyeth Ms. Barbara J. Byrd Farmington Hunt Club, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. C. Oliver Iselin, III Jaime Ojeda Armfield, Miller Ripley The Hon. and Mrs. Virginia Farrar and James Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Jawer Dr. and Mrs. Edward H. Oldfield Robert Calhoun Timberlake, Jr. Fine Properties, LLC. Patrons of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce J. Jones The H. O. Peet Foundation Eleanor and Francis Biasiolli the Piedmont Mr. and Mrs. James Fauquier County Farm Junior North American Field Nicole Perry and M. Campbell, III Bureau, Inc. Black Dog Foundation 1,000 - $4,999 $ Hunter Championship Andrew T.C. Stifler Jack and Page Carter Barbara and Andrew U. Ferrari Alton Keel, Jr. Scott and Page Peyton Blue Ridge Foothills Conservancy Anonymous (5) Mr. and Mrs. George Jane Fisher Mr. and Mrs. Donald King Mrs. Edward J. Pope The Boston Foundation American Foundation M. Chester, Jr. Mr. Charles H. Foster, Jr. Ms. Anna T. Lane Mrs. S. Prentice Porter The Beachcomber Fund Mr. and Mrs. George Andreas Citizens for Fauquier County Diana Foster and Joan Lewis Mr. and Mrs. Michael Prentiss Mr. and Mrs. Steven D. Brooks Richard Arentz Mr. and Mrs. P. Hamilton Clark, III Thomas H. Jones Hunter Lewis and Elizabeth Mr. and Mrs. William G. Prime Ms. Barbara Hill Chacour The Marjorie Sale Arundel Clarke County Florence Bryan Fowlkes Sidamon-Eristoff Fund For The Earth Fund of the Community Produce Source Partners, Inc. Lynn R. Coleman and Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Cockburn Foundation Serving Richmond Dale A. Lindsay and Ingrid Sylvia de Leon Audubon Naturalist Society and Central Virginia Richard and Nancy Raines Mr. William S. Coleman, Jr. Hinckley Lindsay Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm The Frank Mangano Foundation James C. Rees Mr. and Mrs. John Coles Lena Scott Lundh and F. Dungan, Jr. Forbes Baldwin Lennart Lundh Mrs. Lucy S. Rhame James C. Collins Friends of the Blue Glenn and Natalie Epstein Ms. Sara Lee Barnes Ridge Mountains The Luminescence Peter Rich Elizabeth Barratt-Brown Mr. and Mrs. John Kent Cooke Foundation, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. C. Russell Fletcher Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Gale Margaret and John Richardson and Bos Dewey Benjamin S. Cooper The Gannett Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Charles and Polly L. Gault The Gale Foundation Stephanie Ridder and Michael and Nancy Baudhuin G. Mackall, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Michael John Beardsley Countryside Natural Mrs. Margaret Iliffe Gardner Kenneth Gewirz Mr. and Mrs. Zohar Ben-Dov Dr. and Mrs. M. P. Mackay-Smith Products, Inc. The Dorothy and Jonathan Sumner Gerard Foundation H B B Foundation Benjamin J. Rosenthal Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Manaker Rintels Charitable Foundation Foundation County of Fauquier Mark, Lisa and Adam The Hall Family Foundation Jennifer Manly Dr. and Mrs. David P. Rochester James and Rebecca Craig Koteen Gerchick Eric and Lisa Benson Mr. and Mrs. Manuel H. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Michael M. Massie Catherine Rogers Mr. Carey Crane, III Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Gerhardt The J E Berkley Foundation Mrs. Robert A. Marmet Jessica Tuchman Mathews Mrs. James M. Rowley Mr. and Mrs. Jesse C. Crawford Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Gibbens Lucy Bernstein and Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. McIntosh Gregory and Anna May Pam and Brad Ryder Mitch Diamond W. Bowman and Abigail T. Cutter Mr. and Mrs. Donald Glickman Ethan A. and Diane E. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Peter C. Schaumber Mr. and Mrs. Donald Bird Mr. and Mrs. J. Bradley Davis Porter J. Goss Family L. McLean Robert C. Musser and Mr. Carl Schmitt Ronald E. Bird and Peter Stetson Hank and Aline Day Terry Grant Barbara L. Francis Rachel Lambert Mellon Mr. Claude M. Schoch Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Bishop Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. L. de Butts Greenwood Middleburg Forum Nature and Culture International Mary B. Schwab BlackRock Financial Mr. and Mrs. John B. Denegre The William and Mary Bill Miller Mrs. Priscilla B. Rogers Management, Inc. Greve Foundation, Inc. Peter B. Schwartz and James and Christina W. Donovan Mr. J. Clifford Miller, III Anna M. Moser Roger W. and Victoria P. Sant Mr. and Mrs. Langhorne Bond Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Shannon Downey Guarriello, Jr. Mary McGue Millhiser The Seilheimer Foundation Suzanne H. Scheer Robert F. Bonnie and Julie Gomena Dreaming Hand Foundation Mr. and Mrs. R. Barry Hamilton Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Mitchell Mrs. Georgia Shallcross Ellen Stofan and Tim Dunn Thomas and Geraldine Borger Ms. Thayer H. Drew Parker and Adele Harrell Bryan Mitchell Southern Seed Exposure Eric and Jackie Stromquist Brambleton Group, LLC. DuBois Family Fund Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Harvey, III Constance Chamberlin Sharon and Randy Soderquist The Gingery Family Mr. and Mrs. Ike Broaddus Nick Duke and Gardy Bloemers Mr. and Mrs. Seth Heald Monomoy Fund, Inc. Mrs. Harold R. Spencer Mr. and Mrs. Adalbert von Gontard, III Cary Brown and Steven Epstein Mr. and Mrs. Robinson M. Duncan Georgia H. Herbert Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Nash Dana Squire26
  • 29. contributions“It was the students who wanted to have a trail down John R. Staelin and Mr. and Mrs. David S. Aldrich Thomas T. Gilpin Elizabeth F. Locke Robert E. Allen Glenowen Farm, LLC.here, and who brought it to the Town Council. They’re Thomas and Dagmar Stapleton Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Andreae Ed and Janet Gorskithe ones who actually made it come to fruition. Once you Mr. T. Garrick Steele Animal Connection, LLC. Grills Family Foundationget the students outside, and you show them what’s here, Ms. Beverly Stickles Mr. Tom Armstrong Donna and Neal Gumbinthey become very involved. We wouldn’t have gotten The Whitney and Anne Ms. Peggy Augustus Brian and Frankie Hall Stone Foundationthe trail started without the PEC. This project got started Ms. Susanne Bachtel Mr. and Mrs. Sydney D. Hall Mr. and Mrs. Philip C. Strangebecause PEC worked with us on the Suzanne Kane Nature Page D. Styles Dr. and Mrs. Jack Bagley Peter HampelPreserve, and, because of that partnership with PEC, we Dr. Nancy Telfer Mrs. Charles Baird, III Mr. and Mrs. David Hartleywere able then to build the Chapman DeMary Trail. Thomas and Talbot The. Rev. and Mrs. Mrs. Raymond Heatherton Real Estate, LLC George K. BeachPEC’s been with us all along.” Mark and Barbara Heller Mr. and Mrs. R. Moses Thompson Richard and Leslie Benson Mr. and Mrs. James H. Herbert Tri-County Feeds, Etc. Eric Vaughn Blankenship Heritage Farm Museum LIAM MCGRANAGHAN , environmental science teacher Mr. and Mrs. John R. Twiss, Jr. Clifford Boyle and of Loudoun County at Loudoun Valley High School Debby Michelson Mr. and Mrs. James Ukrop Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Hesse Mrs. Mary S. B. Braga Tony and Anne Vanderwarker Dr. Robert R. Humphris The Brennan Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Via, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William Mr. and Mrs. Boris Brevnov T. Jackson, Jr. The Honorable R. N. Viets Kate and Stuart Brown Mr. and Mrs. John B. Jaske Virginia Environmental Endowment Susan and Larry Brown Dr. Judith K. Jones Mary France and Bill Walde Diana Taylor Brown Ann L. Jones Mr. and Mrs. J. Frederick Warren Dr. and Mrs. John Buursink Joe Kasputys and Vicki Van Mater Mr. Charles E. Westbrook Mr. and Mrs. John Cheatham, III Dennis Kernahan and Jeff Price Janet G. Whitehouse Taylor Cole Patricia and Nicolaas Ms. Terry Whittier Roger and Kem Courtenay Kortlandt Community Fund Mr. and Mrs. Justin H. Wiley Elizabeth Crawford Larkspur Services, Inc. Lynn and James Wiley Mrs. McCullough Darlington Mr. Ronald T. Lyman Mr. and Mrs. David F. Williams Mr. and Mrs. James G. Davis, Jr. Mr. Redmond L. Manierre Blair Williamson Mr. Dulaney F. deButts Mary Jo and Michael J. Manning The Wine Kitchen Mr. and Mrs. Guy O. Dove, III Kathleen and Robert Marmet Wise Foundation Dun Foundation Cri Kars-Marshall Mr. and Mrs. David J. Wood Roy and Ann Dye Jack Marshall Loring Woodriff Victoria Edmund Dr. and Mrs. Paul Massimiano Farm Credit of the Virginias, ACA Lee H. McGettigan Supporters of Phyllis Freedman and Tom Glass C. Thomas McMillen the Piedmont Mr. and Mrs. Herbert F. Gammons Charles and Sharon Medvitz 500 - $999 $ John D. Gavitt Robert and Kathie Menuet Anonymous (1) Suzy and Jim Gehris Mr. and Mrs. Robert Monk Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 27
  • 30. “As a suburban mother, I was getting involved in our community, Ms. Catherine C. Murdock Friends of Mr. Charles L. Bell and wanted to do some positive things for our environment. Colonel and Mrs. the Piedmont Mr. F. Kaid Benfield So, we founded EarthDay@Loudoun. The event was meant Robert W. Newton 100 - $999 $ Mr. and Mrs. H. K. Benham, III Charles and Theresa J. Niemeier to reach out to the community—to educate them and inspire Anonymous (4) Berman McAleer, Inc. Jay and Elizabeth Norman them to protect our resources and our environment. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Abeles Gordon D. Berne Mr. and Mrs. Ernest M. Oare The only way I could accomplish Jason Paterniti and Mrs. Eleanor M. Adams Mr. and Mrs. Donald G. Akers Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell H. Bernstein Best of What’s Around this was because of PEC’s support. Nicole V. Watson Mr. Peter Pejacsevich C. Richard and Loreen D. Allen Ms. Dianne Bignoli Their support allowed us to make the event as successful as Dr. and Mrs. Michael J. Petite Ms. Sandra Alm Miriam A. Bishop and Ron P. Ludin it is today. It was called one of the most successful family Mr. Jeffrey Alvey Ms. Linda K. Pranke Sharon Bishop festivals in Loudoun County! So, we’re very thankful that Roger and Susan Amato Jamie Resor and Catherine Scott Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Bishop PEC enabled us to do this.” Bill and Margaret Anderson Ms. Althea D. Richards Stuart and Lynn Blain OYA SIMPSON , founder of EarthDay@Loudoun Robert F. Roberts, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Anderson Mr. Wales E. Blair Mr. and Mrs. Mark D. Andersen Rockley Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Keith Boi Mr. and Mrs. David V. Anthony Mrs. Theodore Roessel Kellie Boles Fred and Emily Anton Richard Ryan Walt Bordas Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Armbrust William and Eleanor Sawyer Mr. David F.Boston Mr. and Mrs. Howard Armfield Mr. and Mrs. William A. Schmidt George and Elizabeth Boteler Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Atherton James R. Sebastian, III Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Brader Sarah Atkins Skyemare Foundation Ms. Louisa Bradford AWA Family Foundation Mrs. David V. Strider Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Ms. Susan Bailey P. Bresee, Jr. Jefferson S. Strider Karen and Frederick Baillie Wallace E. Brewer, Jr. Ms. Mary H. D. Swift Denton Baldwin Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Brewster The Land Trust Alliance Albert A. Barber and Ms. Elaine T. Broadhead The Thomas Jefferson Lynn S. Grinna Foundation Philip L. Brock Rebecca A. Barlow Mark Thompson Mrs. Adrianne Brooks Mr. and Mrs. F. Robert Barnet Walmart Ms. Catherine W. Brown Douglas Bartley and Nicholas D. Ward Debra Simmons Janine Brown The John W. Warner, Mr. and Mrs. Gregory A. Bates Mrs. Jean Brown IV Foundation, Inc. Gwen and Ralph Bates Mr. and Mrs. Basel H. Brune Viviane M. Warren Mrs. C. McGhee Baxter Mr. Mark Brzezinski Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mr. and Mrs. Nathan J. Bayer Mr. and Mrs. Zbigniew Brzezinski C. Wheelwright Ms. Jill Beach Robert and Amee Burgoyne Wolf Creek Farm Mr. Russell T. Beal Ms. Mary Anne Burkhart Stanley and Marie Jose Woodward Ms. Katrina H. Becker Donna Burnett Mr. John F. Zugschwert Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Beddall Mr. John F. Burridge, Jr.28
  • 31. contributionsCarol and Landon Butler Mr. and Mrs. James Mr. Charles E. Dorkey, Jr. Florence Bryan Fowlkes Mr. Paul E. Hagen and Dirck T. Holscher and Karen Fox E. Covington, Jr. and Bryan Wisner Christine JahnkeKristen and Duane Byers Alan and Susan Dranitzke Laura Hopkins Dr. and Mrs. Reynolds Cowles Lindsay Freedman Mr. and Mrs. John C. HalePerry Cabot Mr. and Mrs. John Dudinsky Britton and Ken Horne Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey W. Cox Ms. Joanie Freeman Kendra HallAnne B. Caldwell and Peter Elzer Mrs. Frances Dulaney Dr. and Mrs. Albert Huber Mr. and Mrs. Claiborn Crain Paul and Lillian Fry Halle Family FoundationPatricia Callahan Katharine Michie Dulaney Mr. and Mrs. David Humm Winfield P. Crigler and Mr. James T. Fuller and Nicole and Gil HamiltonAnn M. Callaway Mr. and Mrs. William N. Dunning Elna B. Hunter Timothy A. Harr Catherine T. Porter Ms. Lynn HamiltonMr. and Mrs. Rodion Cantacuzene Sheryl DuPuis Ms. Ginevra M. Hunter Candy Crosby Fursman Kennel, LTD. Barbara HamranMr. Jeremy O. Caplin Dr. and Mrs. William Duvall Hunting Creek Garden Club James Crowley Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Gale Priscilla L. HanfordDr. and Mrs. M. Gregory Carbone Mr. Jon Duvall Ms. Mary Southwell Hutchison Steven Crutchfield Ms. Margaret Megan Gallagher Cassandra HanleyMerrill and Tim Carrington Mollie Eckelberry Kirby R. Hutto Mr. and Mrs. Raymond P. Cultrera Dr. and Mrs. James N. Galloway Scott and Elizabeth Harry Victoria and William Edmonds Ms. Mary HuttonMatt Carson Mr. and Mrs. James S. Cumming Martin Gammon Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Harvey Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Eliot James L. HutzlerCedar Hill Seven, LLC. Mr. and Mrs. David Cushman The Garden Club of Virginia Gene Harwell Robin and Craig Ellis Linda Y. IngramMr. and Mrs. Wayne Mr. and Mrs. Jay Dalgliesh Brandon Garrett Henry Harwood andChatfield-Taylor Bonnie Ellis and Greg Foster Frances Purcell Ms. Melanie Ingram William H. Dalton Peter, Fredona and Joan GartlanMs. Priscilla B. Chen Rae H. Ely Mr. James L. Hatcher, Jr. Mr. R. Phillip Irwin, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Dart Norman and Joan GetsingerMark and Deanna Child Robert H. Emery Juergen and Patricia Hauber Dr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Jackson Susan W. Davenport Karen GillJeffrey and Paula Christie The Rev. Gail and Mr. Perry Epes Dr. and Mrs. William H. Hay Mr. Stacey Jansen W. Edgar Spigle Fund Bonnie S. and John W. Epling Mr. and Mrs. Philip B. Glaize, Jr.Mr. Roger B. Clapp Brenda J. and Daniel C. Davis Geoffrey and Joan Hazzan Mrs. Gail Jeffries Patricia C. Eveland and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. GlascockBill and Deirdre Clark Marjorie S. Davis Jeanette and Larry Heath Mr. and Mrs. T. Larry Christensen Charles Howard Gobin, III Christopher JenkinsMrs. Theda Clark Ms. Janet Davis Jeff and Jamie Hedges Mr. and Mrs. Gregory C. Ewert Mr. David Goetz Mr. and Mrs. Gene JensenSherman Clevenson Mr. Rick Davis Mr. and Mrs. John L. Helmly The Fauquier Bank Mr. and Mrs. Peter Goltra Ms. Deborah JewellClipper City Brewing Co., LP Ms. Julie Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Richard Fausnaught W. Henderson Mr. and Mrs. Dean H. Jewett Mr. and Mrs. Richard GookinMeghan and Hunter Cloud James Day and Cemile Bingol Bob and Lisa Goshen J. Owen Hendley Gale and Sabeeha JohnsonPatty and Michael Cloud Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. de Butts John Feeney The Hon. Joseph W. Goss Michael Henke and Cynthia F. JohnsonMr. and Mrs. Joseph Coleman, Jr. Josephine de Give Mr. and Mrs. William A. Ferster Judy Campbell L. Trice and Laurel C. Gravatte J. Lee Johnson andMrs. Edward J. Coles Joy de Vink Mr. Thomas Finn Ken and Laura Henson Barbara Tourtelot GRC Properties, Inc.Dr. Bruce Collette W. Hunter deButts, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Firestone Erika Heuel Barry and Pat Johnston C Read deButts Daniel E. Fisher Great Country FarmJohn and Christine Colley James Hewitt Joyce E. Jones Lisa Ostroff C.J. Arban FitzHenry Mr. Franklin “Bucky” GreenWilliam and Marie Comstock Susan Heytler Ruth and Timothy Jost Mr. and Mrs. C. Stanley Dees Mr. Jeremy Flachs Anne Michael Greene Mrs. Jane G. HeywardDiana Edensword Conway Mr. and Mrs. Bruce A. Kaiser Mr. and Mrs. Gordey Denisenko Mr. and Mrs. Holly Flannery Miss Stuart T. Greene Mrs. Lida W. HigginsonMr. and Mrs. Peter J. Cook Michael and Margaret Kane Mr. John G. Dennis J. Fleck Greenstone Fields Walter and Josine HitchcockMs. Suzanne M. Corcoran Colonel and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. William M. Dietel Thomas and Debi Flynn Ann, Bob and Adam Grogg Peter Hoagland Robert L. KaplanThe Corduroy Foundation forthe Advancement of Agriculture David and Barbara Dipietro Carol Gallagher Fochtman Eugene Gulland Hobert and Kerr P.C. David H. KaplanSusan L. Corning Ms. Celia Dollarhide Charles and Victoria Fortuna Mr. and Mrs. Bradley H. Gunter Mrs. J. O. Hodgkin, III Fred Karns and Susan WinslowMs. Celeste Corrigan Mr. and Mrs. John J. Donovan, Jr. Mrs. Rockwood H. Foster Roberta Guralnik Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Hoerner, III Neal KassellMark and Laura Cotterman Mrs. R. Frederick Dorkey Mr. Sam Fowler Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Hagan Jack and Kathleen Hoffman Mrs. Howard Kaye Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 29
  • 32. Jane Keathley Ms. Allyson C. Louthan Rebecca McDermott Nathaniel H. Morrison Mr. Geoff Potvin Lynne C. Sayles and Mark M. Newland Holly and Mike Keaton Jonathan S. Lynn Maggie McElhone Lani Morrissey Ronda Powell Sazeraco Company Inc. Richard and Johanna Keeling Robert B. and JoAnn V. Lyon Ms. Marie Helen McGlone Mr. and Mrs. Roger Morton Marjorie and Jerome Prochaska Laura Scharfenberg Elizabeth Baker Keffer Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Mr. and Mrs. James E. McGowan George and Karen Mosebrook Carol Proven M. Macaulay Ms. Susan Scheer Mr. and Mrs. William G. Keller Sean P. McGuinness and Mr. Patrick Murphy Craig Rains Mhairi MacDonald Florence R. Keenan Mr. Jan Schoonmaker Sandy H. Kendall Mr. and Mrs. James B. Murray Judy Rasmussen Mr. and Mrs. Talbot Mack Anne Wall McIntosh Mr. Donald L. Schupp, Jr. Laura Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. John F. Myers, Jr. Ms. Muriel M. Ratcliff Mr. and Mrs. Justin Mackay-Smith Patsy L. McKelvy and Mr. John D. Schutte David L. Kennell and Mr. Timothy C. Neale Mr. Edward M. Reardon Marilyn Lister Clare Lindsay John Magee Anne D. Schwartz Cdr. and Mrs. Nathaniel P. Neblett Mr. and Mrs. Forbes R. Reback Russell B. McKelway Lt. Gen. and Mrs. William M. Keys Mr. and Mrs. David W. Mailler Barbara L. Scott and Laura Dabinett Mr. and Mrs. Tom Neel Paul Reisler Kelly and Diana Kincannon Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Maio Mrs. Frederic W. Scott Katherine McLeod Rebecca Nesselrodt Renaissance Charitable King Family Vineyards, LLC. Elizabeth Maish Foundation, Inc. Babette Scully Harry F. McNaught, Jr. David Neverman Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Kirchner Mr. and Mrs. David Malinowski Ms. Kathleen D. Ribaudo Carolyn Faulconer Sedwick The Nelson Mead Fund The New Dominion Bookshop William and Denise M. Klein Dr. and Mrs. Leo Mallek Ms. Jeanne B. Rich Mr. and Mrs. Charles Candy and Howard Means Marion and Anita Vere Nicoll H. Seilheimer, III Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mr. Kevin Maloney Ms. Jessica A. Rich K. Knapp, Jr. Mr. Richard Mears Mrs. Nelson C. Noland Ann F. Sentz B. Thomas Mansbach Lisa Richard and David Roos Tom and Helen Knaus Kymberly Messersmith Ron Nolley Dr. Thomas C. Sentz Mr. William R. Marshall Richard C. Riemenschneider Charles Koteen Steven Metz and Lynne Goldman Tacy H. Slater Norris Mr. and Mrs. R. Keith Severin Mr. and Mrs. Ramsey Martin Ruth W. Ripley Mr. and Mrs. Myron W. Krueger Michel Michel, LLC. Carolyn O’Connell Mr. and Mrs. V. R. Shackelford, III Easter and Chris Martin Mr. and Mrs. E. M Risse Steven F Kuchner Mr. and Mrs. Christopher G. Miller Joy M. Oakes and Maitland and Susan Sharpe G. Richard and Eileen F. Marzolf Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Robinson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Clifton M. Miller Thomas J. Cassidy Alice Laimbeer Mr. and Mrs. W. Cullen Sherwood Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Mateer Dr. and Mrs. Maurice Mr. and Mrs. Michael G. Miller Mrs. Ricard Ohrstrom Ms. Elizabeth Langhorne-Reeve A. Roesch, III Mr. and Mrs. Stanwyn G. Shetler Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Osteen Mr. and Mrs. George R. Larie Matheson, III Mr. Allen Rogers Mr. and Mrs. J. Donald Ms. Rebecca Mills George and Susan Overstreet Shockey, Jr. Todd A. LaRochelle Dr. Alan and Julie Matsumoto Mr. and Mrs. Stanley E. Rollison Richard and Hollee Mills Mrs. George C. Palmer, II Margaret and Sidney Silver Mr. and Mrs. Douglas C. Larson Ashley and Jamie Matthews Janet and Lee Rose Howard and Heidi Mitnick Dr. Helen Schwiesow Parker Oya Simpson Drs. Rekha and Ratnakar Lawande Stephen Matthews Richard and Kathleen Rose Mr. Jeffrey Modliszewski Mr. J.B. Riggs Parker Kathy and Nick Smart Mr. and Mrs. Robert Valerie A. Matthews Victor Rosenberg de T. Lawrence William Mohrman John Randolph Parks Mr. and Mrs. Charles Birgitta Mattingley Elsa S. Rosenthal Henry Smith, Jr. Paul and Lee Lawrence Monica Patty James Maxwell Mr. and Mrs. John P. Moliere Mr. and Mrs. Sarah Rudy Dell W. Smith Aliene M. Laws Scott Pearce and Paul Mayer and Susan Southard Montague-Betts Company Valerie Ruland-Schwartz Mr. and Mrs. G. Donald Smith Anna and Tom Lawson Rebecca Lindsay Randall and Catherine Mayes Ms. Joan T. Moore Mr. and Mrs. Harry Russell Mr. and Mrs. James C. Smith, Jr. Mr. Douglas H. Lees, III Roy and Denice Perry Richard and Judith Laurel Moore and Ms. Christine C. Ryan Mr. John S. Smith Judith A. Lefferts L. Mazzucchelli James M. White Glenn Petty E. P. Sanford Ken and Pam Smith Robert J. Levy and Jennie Mr. and Mrs. John J. McAleer, IV Walt Moore Piedmont Fox Hounds, Inc. Lee Thompson Monk and Carolyn Sanford Mr. and Mrs. Matthew I. Smith Ms. Georgiana Hubbard McCabe Jim and Brenda Moorman Natalie C. Pien and Cheryl and Michael A. Lewis Steven W. Sawtelle David and Julia Sarr Dr. and Mrs. David M. Snyder Mrs. James P. McCormick Ms. Maralyn D. Morency John and Marjorie Lewis John and Merrily Pierce Steve and Jo Satterfield Mr. Mark T. Snyder Margaret and Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel William and Peyton Lewis McCormick Morison, III Cindy Polk Michelle Satterlund Mr. and Mrs. John Sodolski Mr. and Mrs. Graham Lilly Kate McCullough Mr. George H. Morison Ridge and DeLane Porter Eliza Savage Solar Odyssey, Inc.30
  • 33. contributions Somerset Plantation, Inc. Marsha Thompson William and Mary Weinhold Mary C. de Butts Spencer Dr. Jonathan Thompson Mr. and Mrs. George Y. Wheeler Damian Spilman Sheri Thorpe Mr. and Mrs. Richardson Victoria Stack Three Fox Ventures, LTD White, Jr. Ted and Anne Stelter Mr. and Mrs. Stephen E. Thurston Dan White Christopher and Janet Sten Kathleen Timberlake Carey C. Whitehead Sidney and Sara Stern Thomas Timmerman Mr. and Mrs. Russell Whitfield The Stern Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Vincent C. Tompkins Mrs. William N. Wilbur Eric and Lee Steuer Juanita A. Tool Mr. and Mrs. Harvey J. Wilcox Mr. and Mrs. Michael Stevens Mr. and Mrs. Amadeo Melissa and Peter Wiley C. Tortorella Mr. and Mrs. John Stewart William C. Wilkinson, III Lili Townsend Mr. David C. Stewart Paul and Marie Travesky Robin K. Williams Mr. H. Edward Stick Mr. John L. Trimmer Stirling L. Williamson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Harry F. Stimpson, Jr. Ms. Michele Trufant Ms. Eileen A. Wilson Richard Stokes Sherry Twining Kimberly Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Twining Jean Wilson and H. Baker W. Strittmatter Diane and Larrie Uberte Mary Weeden Winants Mr. and Mrs. Reid P. Stuntz Kathryn Uphaus Katherine Pharibe Wise Elizabeth H. Sutton Theo Van Groll and Pam Black Mr. and Mrs. James Wofford Mr. and Mrs. David G. Swan Mr. and Mrs. Alfred P. Van Huyck Paula Wolferseder Mr. Wes Swenson Mr. and Mrs. John A. Van Ness Wendy Wolff“You look at the three biggest economic drivers in Virginia: Byron Swift and Valeria Merino Mr. and Mrs. Michel Van Yahres Mrs. Sheryl Heckler Woodagriculture, forestry, and tourism. What common denominator Evelyn Randolph Talbert Donna Vande Poldo all three of those things have in common? They need open Mr. Stewart Fraser Taylor Thomas and Susan Virginia Dietetic Association V. Woodchekespace to be successful. You know, our forests are important for Mr. and Mrs. Donald G. Taylor Virginia Eagle Distributing Mr. and Mrs. T. K. Woodsa lot of different reasons. From an economic standpoint, they John J. Taylor Company LLCcontribute $24 billion to the state’s economy. But think about Mr. and Mrs. Henry Alison Teetor Virginia Horse Center Foundation N. Woolman, IIIthe clean air, the clean water, the wildlife habitat—just the sense Jessica Thayer Virginia Society of Ornithologyof place that our forest lands give us. Mr. and Mrs. Edward T. Wright Gretchen Theobald David Wagner Cate and Steven WyattFor all of those reasons, it’s Elizabeth Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Donald Mr. and Mrs. Eric C. Wagner Mr. James P. Waite, III Mr. Mark Wysockiimportant to protect them, and A. Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Frank S. Walker, Jr. James and Leslie YarbroughPEC’s on the front lines— Mr. and Mrs. George R. Thompson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Wallach Gregory M. Yates Dr. and Mrs. Harold E. Younghelping protect those areas.” Mr. James K. Thompson Mr. and Mrs. W. McIlwaine William Walton Ms. Virginia S. Warner Gary and Jene Younkin MIKE SANTUCCI , Madison County resident and Thompson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Matthew W. Weeden Anne and William Ziegler forester with the Virginia Department of Forestry Mr. Peter M. Thompson Peter Weeks W. Denman Zirkle Piedmont Environmental Council · Annual Report · 2011 31
  • 34. PEC Board of Directors Officers Clarke County Loudoun County Tony Vanderwarker William “Jake” Dunning Mitchell Diamond CHAIRMAN George Ohrstrom, II * Karen Ficker David Crowe Scott Kasprowicz * VICE-CHAIR Culpeper County Bruce Smart Scott Kasprowicz Margaret “Meg” Campbell VICE-CHAIR Seth Heald Madison County Mark Ohrstrom Linda “Boo” Ingram * David Crowe * VICE-CHAIR Lindy Sanford Fauquier County William von Raab Jack Snyder Mimi Abel Smith * Randy Soderquist VICE-CHAIR Lynn Coleman * Alton Keel Brian Conboy Orange County SECRETARY Virginia Dorkey Steven Brooks * Barry Hamilton Luciana Duvall Frank Gillan TREASURER Barry Hamilton * John Jaske James Kleeblatt David Perdue Albemarle County Steve Lamb John H. “Jack” Snyder * John Birdsall III Mark Ohrstrom * Nancy Wiley Antionette Brewster Jean Perin * Scott Elliff James Rees Rappahannock Peter Taylor * Margaret “Peggy” Richardson County Tony Vanderwarker * Marie Ridder * David Aldrich Lynn Wiley Leslie Cockburn David Massie Greene County Merrill Strange * Roy Dye * Alton Keel * * Denotes Executive Committee member “The Piedmont Environmental Council does extraordinary work. They have a tremendous staff that is very supportive of all kinds of protection and conservation in these counties. The counties PEC Staff differ, somewhat, in their needs and in their resources. But, the FRONT ROW: Chris Miller, Andy Washburn, PEC is ready all of the time to help with whatever needs doing. Mike Kane, Karen Hunsberger, Gem Bingol, The work is never done, and I’m Tiffany Parker, Watsun Randolph, Douglas Stewart, Brian Higgins, hoping that PEC will continue to James Barnes, Kate Hopkins SECOND ROW: Ali Rau, Kristie Kendall, be as effective and have as much Tom Bolan, Katherine Vance, Rose outreach as it does today. I hope Jenkins, Jonathan Marquisee THIRD ROW: Bri West, Julie Bolthouse, that, in the future, twice as Heather Richards, Beth Burnam, Trish Carter, much land will be protected as Sue Ellen Johnson, Jeff Werner, Sabrina Dohm FOURTH ROW: Rex Linville, Dan Holmes, is protected today.” Don Loock, Diana Norris, Rob Marmet, Ed Gorski, and Jay Clevenson WINKIE MACKAY-SMITH , NOT PICTURED: Tim Dunn, Diana Gebhart, conservation easement donor, Clarke County Doug Larson, Dawn Wilmot32
  • 35. 2011 2010 2009Statements Support Amount % Amount % Amount %of Financial Donations and Grants $ 4,003,000 92% $ 4,213,000 96% $ 5,136,000 97%Condition Special Events, Net 249,000 6% 126,000 3% 77,000 2% Investments/Other 99,000 2% 48,000 1% 64,000 1% Total Support 4,351,000 100% 4,387,000 100% 5,277,000 100% Uses of Funds Expenses County Issues $ 1,120,000 25% $ 1,084,000 26% $ 1,633,000 31% Growth Management 476,000 11% 260,000 6% 318,000 6% Transportation 69,000 2% 263,000 6% 283,000 5%Financial information was derived Land Conservation 1,093,000 25% 746,000 18% 1,226,000 23%from the organization’ books andagrees with the audited financial Land Use 334,000 7% 297,000 7% 446,000 9%statements and IRS Forms 990,except for the 2009 presentation— Outreach and Education 885,000 20% 1,036,000 25% 968,000 18%where adjustments have beenrecorded to eliminate the impactof non-recurring transactions in Development 306,000 7% 292,000 7% 177,000 4%order to facilitate comparison withsubsequent year’s data. Administration 155,000 3% 191,000 5% 186,000 4%For more information, pleasecontact PEC’s accounting officeat 540-341-0175, extension 4. Total Expenses 4,438,000 100% 4,169,000 100% 5,237,000 100%Copies of our most recent financialstatements and IRS Form 990 areavailable by request. They can Change in Net Assets ($ 87,000) $ 218,000 $ 40,000also be found on PEC’s website,www.pecva.org/donate
  • 36. Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID PPCOPiedmont Environmental CouncilPost Office Box 460 • Warrenton, VA 20188 Photo by Richard RuddleHeadquarters Office Charlottesville OfficeP.O. Box 460 410 East Water Street45 Horner Street Suite 700Warrenton, VA 20188 Charlottesville, VA 22902540.347.2334 434.977.2033 PRINTED BY Progress Printing, Lynchburg, VA Keith Damiani, Sequoia DesignFind contact information for PEC staff throughout our region at www.pecva.org DESIGNED BY

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