Open Source Software You Can Use

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Review of open source software for desktop and server

Review of open source software for desktop and server

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  • 1. Open Source Software You Can Use Michelle Murrain Nonprofit Open Source Initiative MetaCentric Technology Advising October 23, 2008
  • 2. Using Open Source Software
    • There are open source tools you can download right now and use, no matter what your platform, that are useful, mature, secure and easy to use.
    • 3. If your website is on a Unix or Linux based host – you've been using open source software already.
    • 4. Some of the software I'll talk about you might implement with help of a provider.
  • 5. Types of Software
    • Operating Systems
    • 6. Server software
      • Fileserver software
      • 7. Web/mail server software
      • 8. Database systems
      • 9. Web application platforms
    • Desktop applications
  • 10. About this review This is not an exhaustive list of all free and open source software that is mature and usable. But it is a good review of most of the software out there that is going to be useful to nonprofit organizations. For more tools, go to: http://socialsourcecommons.org
  • 11. There are two common, mature open source operating systems...
    • BSD
      • FreeBSD
      • 18. OpenBSD
      • 19. NetBSD
      • 20. Darwin (Basis of Mac OS X – based on FreeBSD)
      • 21. a few others, not much used
  • 22. Operating Systems
    • Linux and BSD are very mature and strong on the server/appliance side
      • Varied flavors of Linux are used in network and security appliances
      • 23. Linux and BSD are virtually ubiquitous in web hosting environments, from virtual host companies, to large enterprises (like Yahoo and Google.)
  • 24. How to get Linux
    • There are commercial versions of Linux that include enterprise-level support (RedHat, Novell, Ubuntu)
    • 25. You can buy a box sometimes (relatively inexpensive) in a store (may come with installation support.)
    • 26. Download an ISO from the website of the distribution or a mirror, either directly or via bittorrent (won't come with any support except community support.)
    • 27. Buy a CD from OSDisc, or another vendor (also won't come with support – these just duplicate the CDs from the websites – so they are cheap if bandwidth is an issue.)
  • 28.  
  • 29. Server Applications
    • Samba – allows Linux to act as a Windows file and print server – very mature
    • 30. Mailman – mailing list manager
    • 31. Applications for internet services and systems administration
      • very mature, some in use for 15 years or more
  • 32. Server Applications
    • LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP/Perl/Python)
      • This has become an industry standard web application development stack
      • 33. Included in all unix-based virtual hosting services.
      • 34. Each component of the stack is Mature
      • 35. PHP/Perl/Python are programming languages
    • Ruby on Rails
      • Newer web framework that is gaining steam. Uses the Ruby language.
  • 36. Server Applications
    • Web platforms/CMS
      • Drupal
      • 37. Joomla
      • 38. Plone
      • 39. These three have become standard. They have overlapping feature sets, and they are differently customizable. But all are very solid CMS platforms
      • 40. Others:
  • 42. Blogging platforms
      • Wordpress – specialized for blogging – the others can be used that way, but if all you want is a blog – Wordpress is great.
      • 43. Movable Type – also specialized for blogging
  • 44. Drupal
  • 45. Joomla
  • 46. MediaWiki
  • 47. Project Pier
  • 48. Moodle (Courseware)
  • 49. phpBB
  • 50. Server Applications: Business Processes
    • CiviCRM – server-based CRM/Fundraising package
    • 51. SugarCRM – server-based enterprise CRM package
  • 52. SugarCRM
  • 53. CiviCRM
  • 54. Desktop Software
    • Mozilla Suite (all platforms)
      • Firefox
      • 55. Thunderbird
      • 56. Spinoffs:
        • Flock
        • 57. Camino (Mac browser)
        • 58. Sunbird (Calendaring - not so mature)
      • Open Office (all platforms)
      • 59. Adium (Mac OS X)
      • 60. GIMP
  • 61. Firefox
  • 62. Thunderbird
  • 63. OpenOffice.org
    • Has word processor, spreadsheet, presentation program, drawing program, HTML and XML editors, and a database.
    • 64. It will read and write Microsoft Office formats (except Office Open XML).
    • 65. It uses open standards for native document formats
    • 66. It exports PDFs
    • 67. OO Base ≠ Access (way too immature)
  • 68.  
  • 69. OO Writer OO Calc
  • 70. GIMP
  • 71. What FOSS is being used in nonprofits?
    • A recent NOSI survey found:
      • 60% of respondents used FOSS on webservers
      • 72. 80% used FOSS on Windows desktops (largely Firefox)
      • 73. Many fewer (~20%) used FOSS as a desktop operating system
  • 74. What are the barriers to FOSS adoption
    • Familiarity with proprietary tools
    • 75. Lack of support
    • 76. Lack of staff expertise
    • 77. Lack of training
  • 78. Resources
    • http://wiki.metacentric.org/ - list of links for software mentioned here, and other resources.
    • 79. http://nosi.net/projects/primer - Updated Open Source primer written in 2007.
    • 80. http://nosi.net - NOSI's website.