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TIRP II Yearlong planning and lesson pacing April 14, 2012

TIRP II Yearlong planning and lesson pacing April 14, 2012

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  • 1. TIRP Planning/Pacing 4/21/12 Barbara A. Toney Objectives: By the end of the class teachers will be able to 1. create a lesson plan calendar for the coming year. 2. ballpark time needed for various units 3. Create and pace a lesson plan 4. Create a lesson plan including brain- based principles
  • 2. Your 1st Year is Almost Over! What Did You Learn?• You survived!• Improved classroom management• Created and given tests*• Dealt with Parents• Lesson Planning• Worked with peers and administrators• Increased student achievement*
  • 3. • Handling stress• Balancing home and school*• Created a system for reaching kids• Rules and Routines*• Own Grading and assessment system.• Differentiation of lessons• Teaching material in different ways• Task Analysis*• Flexibility
  • 4. • Today we will be:• 1. Creating a lesson plan calendar: Your text book has 20 chapters, each of which carries equal weight. Determine roughly how much time you can spend on each chapter, taking into account- snow days, sick days (yours), different schedules, testing days, ACT, MAPS, CSAPs• How to start the year: Do you start with content lessons the first day?
  • 5. End of the year: you can make it!• 2. Thinking about the rest of the current school year- Questions/Help?• 3. Steps in planning a single unit• Create daily lesson plans• 4. Create individual lesson plans.
  • 6. ACADEMIC YEAR PLANNING• Creating your year-long plan
  • 7. Unit Planning• 10 days to cover a unit• What must be included?• 10-24-7• Assessments• What will students learn and be able to do• What will you do daily to create student engagement?• Final Assessment
  • 8. What’s Important?• Structure of a lesson plan:• Focus not on what you need to cover but what students will be doing.• Transitions: When are transitions needed?How long will it take to get in and out of each transition. Test it yourself initially. Assume everything will take you more time than planned but have sponges available as well.• Emphasize what’s important: 10/24/7
  • 9. ASSESSMENTS• Tests: what’s the point of the test? Is it a test based on studying or knowledge? Make it up or adapt using textbook software.• What to do if most students fail or do very poorly on a test?• Determine your culpability and respond accordingly. Reteach and retest if necessary. Offer students an option of retaking if receive C or below.• Utilize testing software that comes with your text. May need to be tweaked and you can often do that (editing)• Make 2 or 3 versions of a• test- 2 for class and one for makeups.
  • 10. What this means to you:• It is critical that we plan learning with the brain in mind to ask a different set of questions. Rather than, what should I teach, ask how will students best learn? As you plan the learning, keep the focus on basic principles that support the brain’s natural learning tendencies. Create a complex interdisciplinary curriculum that provides for plenty of learner choice. Provide structure, but in an environment that represents the unique nature of each learner and their individual needs and experiences.
  • 11. • Lesson Pacing:How much time is spent on different parts:• Intro to lesson• Transitions• Giving Directions• Lecturing- the day’s content• Answering questions• Asking Questions• Practice work• DisciplineIncluding Jensen brain elements
  • 12. Marcia Tate• Brain-Based Lesson Plan handout
  • 13. The 7 Stage Brain BasedLearning Lesson Planning Outline
  • 14. The process• The following strategies are organized in a sequence as outlined by Jensen that makes sense to the brain. The list is by no means exhaustive. Use this outline as a means to check against your lesson plans to make sure that you have set appropriate goals for each of the learning stages.
  • 15. Stage 1: Pre Exposure• This phase provides the brain with an overview of • Ideas of this stage: the new learning before – Post an overview of the new topic on the bulletin board. really digging into the – Encourage good nutrition and concept. Pre exposure drinking plenty of water. helps the brain develop – Start here student knowledge better conceptual maps. base begins and build upon their interests related to the concept. – Have learners set their own goals and discuss goals for the class as well. – Plan Brain wake-ups, such as cross laterals.
  • 16. Stage 2: Preparation• This is the phase where you create the curiosity or the • Ideas to incorporate: excitement. It is similar to – Create a “you are there” experience. the “Anticipatory Set” but – Elicit from learners what possible goes farther in preparing value and relevance the topic has the learner. to them personally. – The brain learns very well from concrete experiences. Provided a real, physical or concrete exposure for the class. – Provide a hook or surprise or a bit of novelty to engage learner emotions.
  • 17. Stage 3 – Initiation and Acquisition• • This stage provides the immersion. Flood Try these: with content! Instead of the single, lock – Provide concrete learning experiences such as step, one bite at a time presentation, case studies, experiment, a field trip, provide an initial virtual overload of ideas, interviews, etc. details, complexity, and meanings. Allow – Provide activities that employ a majority of a sense of temporary overwhelm to occur the multiple intelligences. in learners. This will be followed by – Offer a group or team project that anticipation, curiosity, and a encompasses building, finding, exploring, or designing. determination to discover meaning for oneself. Over time it all gets sorted out by – Attend the theater, put on a skit, produce a commercial, or create a class/school the learner. It is like the real world newspaper. outside the classroom, – Provide enough choice so that learners have the opportunity to explore the subject using their preferred learning modality: visual, auditory, kinesthetic, etc. – A well designed computer program or activity can be very helpful at this stage.
  • 18. Stage 4: Elaboration• This is the process stage. It requires genuine thinking on the • Try these: part of the learner. This is the – Provide and open ended debriefing of the previous activity. time to make intellectual sense of the learning. – Tie things together so the learning across disciplines occurs. – Have learners design an evaluation procedure or rubric for their own learning. – Have learners explore the topic online. – Hold a debate, essay contest or panel discussion on the topic. – Have students to the teaching in small groups, as class presenters, in pairs.
  • 19. Stage 5: Incubation and Memory Encoding• This phase emphasizes the importance of down time • Try these: and review time. The brain – Provide time for unguided reflection. learns most effectively over – Have learners keep a journal time, not all at once. of their learning. – Have learners take a walk in pairs to discuss the learning. – Provide stretching and relaxation exercises. – Provide a music listening area. – Ask learners to discuss new learning with their family and friends.
  • 20. Stage 6: Verification and Confidence Check• This phase is not just for the benefit of the teacher. • Try these: Learners need to confirm – Have learners present their their learning for learning to others. themselves, as well. – Student interviews and Learning is best evaluate each other. remembered when the – Students write about what they have learned in a student possesses a model journal, essay, news article, or metaphor regarding the report. new concepts or materials. – Students demonstrate learning with a project. – Students present a role play or skit or theatrical performance. – Quiz, verbal or written.
  • 21. Stage 7: Celebration and Integration• In the celebration phase it is critical to engage emotions. Make it fun, • Try these: light, and joyful. This step instills the – Have a class toast with juice. important love of learning. It must – Provide sharing time, peer sharing, never be missed. demonstration, acknowledgements. – Play music, hang streamers and blow horns to celebrate the end of a successful unit. – Invite another class, parents, principal, or community guest through video conferencing to view projects. – Facilitate a class designed and produced celebration party. – Incorporate the new learning in future lessons! Never introduce something, then drop it. If it is not important enough to refer to in the future, don’t waste time on it to begin with.
  • 22. What this means to you:• It is critical that we plan learning with the brain in mind to ask a different set of questions. Rather than, what should I teach, ask how will students best learn? As you plan the learning, keep the focus on basic principles that support the brain’s natural learning tendencies. Create a complex interdisciplinary curriculum that provides for plenty of learner choice. Provide structure, but in an environment that represents the unique nature of each learner and their individual needs and experiences.
  • 23. Time• When something is taught can be as important as what is taught.
  • 24. Primacy-Recency EffectWe remember best what weexperience first, and secondbest what comes last. BEM
  • 25. Primacy-Recency Effect• Prime Time 1 Retention during learning episode• Down time 16 Degree of Retention• Prime Time 2 14 12 10 8 Series1• Teach new info when 6 4 you have students’ 2 0 focus. 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 Time in minutes
  • 26. Primacy-Recency Effect• New info should be taught in Prime time 1 Retention during learning episode• It is important that only correct info be 16 Degree of Retention 14 presented at this time. 12 10• The new material 8 6 Series1 should be followed 4 2 with practice during 0 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 down time. Time in minutes
  • 27. Primacy-Recency Effect• Closure should take place during prime time 2. Retention during learning episode• This is the second 16 Degree of Retention 14 most powerful 12 10 learning position & an 8 Series1 6 important opportunity 4 2 to determine sense 0 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 and meaning. Time in minutes
  • 28. Retention varies with length of teaching episode• More retention occurs when lessons are shorter. Retention during learning episode• A block containing 4 twenty 16 minute lessons will be much Degree of Retention 14 12 more productive than one 10 8 Series1 long lesson. 6 4 2 0 1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22 25 28 31 34 37 40 Time in minutes
  • 29. Prime Time 1 (First 15 minutes)Mr. X : “Today we’re going to Mr. G: “Today we will learn the 3rd cause learn the 3rd cause of the of the Civil War and how it relates to current times. And here is the 3rd cause.. Civil War and its (cause, examples, how it relates to relevance…. Before that, previous..) let me give back some homework, collect and go over today’s homework, collect the notes from Bill and Mary who were absent and get them caught up, take attendance, read announcements…”
  • 30. Down-Time (next 15 minutes)• “Here is the 3rd “Get into your discussion groups and cause…” discuss this 3rd cause. What are similarities and differences compared to the first two causes…”
  • 31. Last 15 minutes (Prime Time 2)• “OK, we’ve got only 5 “Take 2 minutes to review to yourself minutes to the end of the what we’ve learned about the 3rd period. You’ve listened cause. Be prepared to share your thoughts with the class in a moment.” well so you can do what you want quietly until the bell rings.”