Hurricane Preparedness for Business Continuity - GRC Learning Series

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Learn how to prepare for disaster and assess your company's level of preparedness.

Learn how to prepare for disaster and assess your company's level of preparedness.

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  • A very useful resource with helpful tips for everyone living in coastal & near coastal regions, especially at the height of an active hurricane season.
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  • I joined the Peak 10 team a little over 10 years ago. Prior to that I managed my own consulting firm and served as an information technology manager within many different industries. In my current role I administer Peak 10’s governance, risk, and compliance activities including quality assurance, internal and external auditing, data center commissioning, legal affairs, insurance, emergency management, and disaster recovery planning.I have previously served as president of the 7x24 Exchange of the Carolinas and has received professional training and certification through my involvement with DRII and ISACA.
  • Hurricanes are classified into five categories of increasing destructive power.Category 1 storms have wind speeds of up to 95 miles per hour and produce a storm surge of 4 to 5 feet. A category 1 storm can be very disruptive to travel and interrupt power, equipment delivery, and all forms of travel.Category five storms are the most devastating and can lay waste to enormous areas and permanently reshape costliness. Category 5 storms produce winds of over 155 miles per hour and a storm surge of over 18 feet.A category 4 storm is expected to cause 100 times the damage of a category 1 storm.
  • The destructiveness of these storms comes form two elements:wind and water.The storm surge is a creation of the wind, waves and low pressure as the storm comes ashore. The flooding and rapid movement of the water can very quickly flood low areas and destroy property. In the case of powerful storms a storm surge can be well over 18 feet.To put that in perspective let me show you some pictures of what that looks like.
  • Here you can see in Biloxi, MS where there high tide, storm surge, and high waves produced a high water mark of over 34 feet after Hurricane Katrina.Imagine if you were on that beach when that much water came to shore. Even when you go far inland this amount of water does not stop.
  • As we mentioned hurricanes can deliver winds over 155 miles per hour. That force can easily destroy homes, commercial buildings, and uproot trees.At the right you can see wind damage caused by Hurricane Fredric at the top of the screen. The picture on the lower right is the inside of Burger King’s CEO’s office in Miami after winds from Hurricane Andrew struck.While the storm surge is a costal concern, high winds from a hurricane can impact inland areas as well. Wind speeds drop significantly after landfall, however winds can stay above hurricane strength well inland.We have had tropical storms and hurricanes impact cities well to the north of the Gulf coast. In 1989 when Hurricane Hugo struck the Carolina coast, winds caused significant damage in Charlotte over 175 miles inland with gusts of 100 miles per hour.
  • Every hurricane season is different, but on average eleven tropical storms develop in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico. Typically six of these eleven storms will become hurricanes and two will be considered “major” storms meaning they are classified as category 3 or higher.The hurricane season is between June and November.Each year in May, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issues it’s forecast for the approaching hurricane season. For 2011, the forecast is for an above normal hurricane season with up to 18 named storms and 3 to 6 major hurricanes.
  • With this many storms in the forecast you can expect to hear these names over the next few months. From this list there will be at least 3 and as many as 6 major hurricanes. A major hurricane is category three or greater.
  • What makes this important to Peak 10?Of all hurricanes reaching the United States shore:Over 1 in 4 strike FloridaOver 1 in 10 strike North CarolinaPeak 10 operates 13 data centers in coastal states. We operate 5 data centers in coastal cities. Peak 10 serves as the primary service provider or the recovery service provider for hundreds of Florida businesses’ IT operations.Most importantly this is where we live with our families and friends.
  • For obvious reasons, our customers are most concerned about the five data centers we operate in coastal Florida cities. We have already seen that Florida is the state with the highest probability of being impacted by a hurricane.Let’s look at the probability of a hurricane striking our Florida markets in any given year.
  • Each year we perform a risk assessment to consider how to prioritize our resources. We consider possible events and assign a numerical score to each. In analyzing our risks we consider the probability of the event and the level of impact on our operations along with other factors.This is part of our planning for our insurance policies and our emergency management planning.
  • Planning and PreparationIn response to the threat of a hurricane we have incorporated this risk into our planning and preparation. It is a part of our facility design and our staff training. We have developed emergency communications systems and procedures and backups. We have assigned teams for recovery of our operations and have assigned roles for our crisis management team.Staff ReadinessA major update to our plans is in development and will be published soon.In response to a storm we will deploy out-of-region staff to the threatened site as necessary.We encourage each of you to have a family emergency plan. To help with this I will be sending out an e-mail later today with links to the Intranet with informational videos, forecast information, evacuation maps and information to help you prepare your home and your family.
  • Peak 10’s Disaster Recovery Resources for Hurricane Seasonhas additional information for implementing or enhancing your disaster recovery and business continuity plans.

Transcript

  • 1. GRC Learning Series: Hurricane Preparedness
    PRESENTED BY:
    May 25, 2011
    David KiddDirector, Quality Assurance and Compliance
    Peak 10, Inc.
  • 2. About the Speaker
    David Kidd, CRISC, Director of Quality Assurance and Compliance
    David Kidd joined the Peak 10 management team in November 2000 and has more than 20 years of management experience in information technology. Mr. Kidd oversees Peak 10’s governance, risk management, and regulatory compliance activities including quality assurance, data center commissioning, business continuity planning and related activities.
    Mr. Kidd previously served as president of the 7x24 Exchange of the Carolinas and has received professional training and certification through his involvement with the Disaster Recovery Institute International (DRII) and the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA).
    Prior to joining Peak 10, Mr. Kidd served in the management team of several entrepreneurial, high-growth ventures in software development, banking, and telecommunications.
    Mr. Kidd holds a B.A. degree in Business Economics from Wofford College where he was recognized as a Wofford Scholar.
  • 3. Hurricane Basics
    Tropical Cyclones
    A hurricane is a type of tropical cyclone, which is a generic term for a low pressure system that generally forms in the tropics. The cyclone is accompanied by thunderstorms and, in the Northern Hemisphere, a counterclockwise circulation of winds near the earth's surface. Tropical cyclones are classified as follows:
  • 4. Hurricane Basics
    Hurricane Categories
    Hurricanes are classified into five categories. Category one being the most minimal hurricane and category five being the most destructive with wind speeds in excess of 155 miles per hour.
    A category 4 storm is expected to cause 100 times the damage of a category 1 storm.
  • 5. Hurricane Basics
    Storm Surge
    The storm surge is created by wind, waves, and low pressure
    There are three mechanisms that contribute to the storm surge:
    • The action of the winds piling up water (typically more than 85% of the surge).
    • 6. Waves pushing water inland faster than it can drain off. This is called wave set-up. Wave set-up is typically 5 - 10% of the surge.
    • 7. The low pressure of a hurricane sucking water higher into the air near the eye (typically 5 - 10% of the surge).
  • Hurricane Basics
    Storm Surge
  • 8. Hurricane Basics
    High Winds
    High winds are the second element of a storms force. At the right you can see wind damage caused by Hurricane Fredric at the top of the screen. The picture on the lower right is the inside of Burger King’s CEO’s office in Miami after winds from Hurricane Andrew struck.
    While the storm surge is a costal concern, high winds from a hurricane can impact inland areas as well. Wind speeds drop significantly after landfall, however winds can stay above hurricane strength well inland.
    We have had tropical storms and hurricanes impact cities well to the north of the Gulf coast. In 1989 when Hurricane Hugo struck the Carolina coast, winds caused significant damage in Charlotte over 175 miles inland with gusts of 100 miles per hour.
  • 9. Hurricanes Season
    Atlantic Hurricane Season (June 1 – November 30)
  • 10. 2011 Hurricane Season
    Expectations
    Expect to hear these names over the next few months:
    ArleneBretCindyDonEmilyFranklinGertHarveyIrene*JoseKatiaLeeMariaNateOpheliaPhilippe**RinaSean*
    * No relation to our Irene or Sean.
    ** From the French side of the Reissig family.
  • 11. Hurricanes and Peak 10
    Of all hurricanes reaching the United States shore:
    • Over 1 in 4 strike Florida
    • 12. Over 1 in 10 strike North Carolina
  • Peak 10 Costal Facilities
    Probability of Hurricane Strike
    1%
    4%
    13%
  • 13. Hurricanes: Risk Management
    Risk Assessment
    • Annual risk assessment to inform planning and preparations
    • 14. Assign a numerical risk score and prioritize our resources
    Considerations in assigning levels of risk are:
    • The frequency of particular types of disasters (often versus seldom).
    • 15. The degree of predictability of the disaster.
    • 16. The speed of onset of the disaster (sudden versus gradual).
    • 17. The amount of forewarning associated with the disaster.
    • 18. The estimating the duration of the disaster.
    • 19. Identifying the consequences of a disaster
    • 20. Determining the existing and required redundancy levels throughout the organization to accommodate critical systems and functions.
    • 21. Potential monetary loss.
    • 22. Costs of contingency planning and risk mitigation.
  • Hurricanes: Peak 10 Response
    Planning and Preparation
    • Facility design
    • 23. Staff training
    • 24. Communications systems and plans
    • 25. Recovery team assignments and emergency management team assignments
    • 26. On-site emergency supplies
    Staff Readiness
    • Updated Plan
    • 27. Deployment of out-of region staff
    • 28. Family Emergency Plan
    Resources
    • Intranet Site
    • 29. Informational Videos
    • 30. Forecast Information
    • 31. Downloads
    • 32. Emergency Planning Brochure for Families
    • 33. Family Emergency Plan Quick Reference Sheet
    • 34. Evacuation Maps
  • Thank you.
    Peak 10’s Disaster Recovery Resources for Hurricane Seasonhas additional information for implementing or enhancing your disaster recovery and business continuity plans.