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Presentation v9

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Published in: Design, Business

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Design is LeadershipPatrick Gibson
    • 2. ProblemA designer has limited influence to advance bolddecisions in the typical role as tradesperson.
    • 3. HypothesisBy taking ownership over client goals, a designercan become a leader who measurably impactsbusiness and society.The more designers shoulder the consequences offailure, the greater authority they possess inemploying their conviction and courage ofimagination to profound effect.
    • 4. Content OutlineI. Introduction and Hypothesis A. Problem •Designs crisis of identity: What is todays designer supposed to do? (SOURCE: Survey?) •The limited role of designers in decision making •The lack of innovative, design-driven companies •Design has the greatest potential to advance bold ideas B. Hypothesis •Taking ownership of a clients objective changes the relationship •Designers must tackle the clients problem and not their own •Measurable/visible results are necessary to prove designs worth •A virtuous circle: Greater responsibility, greater influence, greater success •Profound accomplishments possible from the marriage of design and leadership
    • 5. Content OutlineII. The Problem A. Overview of problem •The designers gripe: Clients dont "get it" (SOURCE: clientsfromhell.net, similar websites) •What do clients really think designers are for? •Paul Rand and Enron: Where a detached designer ultimately failed •Rand, following an old model of design, has no investment in his client, only his craft B. The Evolution of the profession •Design is a threatened trade •Designs origins in the typesetting/printing trade (SOURCES: A History of Graphic Design, PhilipB. Meggs; Graphic Design HIstory: A Critical Guide, Johanna Drucker and Emily McVarish) •Modern design and the birth of advertising, branding (SOURCES: "Mad Men," ABC; Paul Rand,Steven Heller) •Macintosh and desktop publishing: A rattled print trade •Digital design: A specialty trade, but less design than engineering •Outsourcing design: China, India, logoworks.com
    • 6. Content OutlineC. The profession today • Adapting to more automated design: the designer/consultant/strategist mishmash • Schizophrenia in academia: Varied and conflicting viewpoints (SOURCE: "The Valorized Designer," Nigel Whiteley; Interview with Tom Klinkowstein)D. The need for another way • The future of design must focus on making actions, not artifacts • Design must be more than another a tool in the kit • IDEO case study • Netflix and Quickster: Ignoring the end-user • Apple versus Microsoft: Tomorrow versus yesterday • Expanding information, choices for consumers leads to higher selectiveness • The future U.S. economy must move beyond the industrial
    • 7. Content OutlineIII. Claiming A Stake A. The power of responsibility •Example: Aristotle and the duties of citizenship •Clients have more responsibility than designers, which gives them more say •Having a stake in something gives weight to ideas •Design as self expression nullifies importance to business •Sharing the risk, sharing the reward B. Design and leadership •What makes a leader •The design process as it relates to leadership •The importance of conviction •David Plouffe: Designing a campaign victory
    • 8. Content OutlineC. Ownership • No single model to cover all situations • Ownership could be financial, emotional, procedural • Learning from related professions • The advertising model of agency involvement • The designer as strategist • The designer as entrepreneurD. Barriers • The concrete actions and practices required • The heightened consequences of failure • New skills: leadership, advocate, evangelist
    • 9. Content OutlineIV. Conclusion •Design as a organizational core value trickles down •Jonathan Ive: When smart design advances business •Designs importance in a complex society/economy •Dutch design: An integral component of society •What a designer-led world could look like