Design is LeadershipPatrick Gibson
ProblemA designer has limited influence to advance bolddecisions in the typical role as tradesperson.
HypothesisBy taking ownership over client goals, a designercan become a leader who measurably impactsbusiness and society....
Creative References             Jonathan Ive             Senior Vice President of Industrial Design             at Apple, ...
Creative References             David Plouffe             Chief Campaign Manager for Barack Obama’s             2008 presi...
Creative References              Paul Rand             Designer of Enron Logo             “ You couldnt take a picture of ...
From the Valorized Designer"What we need in the next century areindependently-minded, creative, constructivedesigners who ...
From the Valorized DesignerIndeed, tomorrows designer must not create meregraphic artifact and ephemera, but instead desig...
Content OutlineI. Introduction and Hypothesis A.   Problem   •   Anecdotal story lead-in introduction (SOURCE: clientsfrom...
Content OutlineII. he Problem   T  A. Introductory case study   • Paul Rand and Enron: Where design failed   • Rand has no...
Content OutlinePart 3: "Claiming Ownership" • The Importance of Measurable Results • Becoming a Leader • Designer as Entre...
Content OutlinePart 4: "The Courage of Imagination" • What the New Responsibility Means for the Profession • Designs Impor...
SourcesInterviewsPeter J. Pultorak, marketer, on relationship between designers and strategistsMartin Venezky, designer/bu...
SourcesMagazines / PeriodicalsFast CompanyWiredGoodEye MagazineThe New York TimesThe Wall Street Journal"The Valorized Des...
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  • Presentation v8

    1. 1. Design is LeadershipPatrick Gibson
    2. 2. ProblemA designer has limited influence to advance bolddecisions in the typical role as tradesperson.
    3. 3. HypothesisBy taking ownership over client goals, a designercan become a leader who measurably impactsbusiness and society.The more designers shoulder the consequences offailure, the greater authority they possess inemploying their conviction and courage ofimagination to profound effect.
    4. 4. Creative References Jonathan Ive Senior Vice President of Industrial Design at Apple, Inc. “Today, Apple represents the most successful and faithful marriage of business and design, as $32 billion in sales last year attest. And Ive has been the companys lodestar in its journey to global trendsetter.” — Chuck Salter, Fast Company
    5. 5. Creative References David Plouffe Chief Campaign Manager for Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign “ The story of Mr. Obama’s journey to the pinnacle of American politics is the story of a campaign that was, even in the view of many rivals, almost flawless. Mr. Plouffe [was] known for his mathematic invocation of data in making decisions. When Mr. Obama decided to run for the presidency, Mr. Plouffe and a half-dozen staff members began plotting out a strategy.” — Adam Nagourney, Jim Rutenberg and Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/05/us/politics/05recon.html
    6. 6. Creative References Paul Rand Designer of Enron Logo “ You couldnt take a picture of Enrons crime: it all happened in the world of numbers and spreadsheets, of financial reports and affidavits. But there was something you could take a picture of, and that was Rands logo. A company with a made-up name, incomprehensible business practices, and largely intangible assets suddenly had a vivid manifestation, a logo that once might have stood for nimbleness, balance and connectivity, now given new life as the crooked E.” — Michael Bierut, Design Observer
    7. 7. From the Valorized Designer"What we need in the next century areindependently-minded, creative, constructivedesigners who are not just capitalist lackeys,ideologues, or technical whiz-kids."— Nigel Whiteley
    8. 8. From the Valorized DesignerIndeed, tomorrows designer must not create meregraphic artifact and ephemera, but instead designlarger architectures employing these artifacts toprofound and noticeable consequence, withaccountability for the results.
    9. 9. Content OutlineI. Introduction and Hypothesis A. Problem • Anecdotal story lead-in introduction (SOURCE: clientsfromhell.net, similar websites) • The most common gripe: Clients dont listen to designers • Perception of the designer as machine operator • The limited influence of designers in agencies or in-house • Frequent timidity and ineffectiveness of real-world design • Opportunities lost, growth unrealized for organizations, society B. Hypothesis • Clients have more responsibility than designers, which gives them final say • Designers are perceived to think more about their portfolio than the clients success • Taking ownership of a clients mission changes the equation • Ownership could be financial, emotional, procedural • Designers must think holistically and make decisions as leaders • Measured, quantifiable results necessary to prove a designers effectiveness
    10. 10. Content OutlineII. he Problem T A. Introductory case study • Paul Rand and Enron: Where design failed • Rand has no concern of the company, only his craft B. Timeline of the profession • Designs origins in the typesetting/printing trade (SOURCES: A History of Graphic Design, Philip B.Meggs; Graphic Design HIstory: A Critical Guide, Johanna Drucker and Emily McVarish) • Modern design and the birth of advertising, branding (SOURCES: "Mad Men," ABC; Paul Rand, Steven Heller) • Macintosh and the personal computing revolution: A rattled print trade • Digital design: A specialty trade, but less design than engineering • Outsourcing design: China, India, logoworks.com C. The profession today • Adapting to desktop publishing: the designer/consultant/strategist mishmash
    11. 11. Content OutlinePart 3: "Claiming Ownership" • The Importance of Measurable Results • Becoming a Leader • Designer as Entrepreneur • Examples of the New Designer • Barriers to this Model
    12. 12. Content OutlinePart 4: "The Courage of Imagination" • What the New Responsibility Means for the Profession • Designs Importance in a Complex Society/Economy • What a Designer-led World Could Look Like
    13. 13. SourcesInterviewsPeter J. Pultorak, marketer, on relationship between designers and strategistsMartin Venezky, designer/business owner, on establishing reputations and trust with clientsRay Mancini, designer/business owner, on joint ventures with clientsTom Klinkowstein, designer/business owner, on differing views of design in academiaBooksPaul Rand, Steven HellerHow to be a Graphic Designer without Losing Your Soul, Adrian ShaughnessyA History of Graphic Design, Philip B. MeggsGraphic Design HIstory: A Critical Guide, Johanna Drucker and Emily McVarishSwitch, Chip Heath and Dan HeathMade to Stick, Chip Heath and Dan HeathOn Marketing, Philip KotlerThe Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell
    14. 14. SourcesMagazines / PeriodicalsFast CompanyWiredGoodEye MagazineThe New York TimesThe Wall Street Journal"The Valorized Designer," Nigel WhiteleyWebsitesclientsfromhell.netgoodfuckingdesignadvice.comlogoworks.comVideo / Television / MoviesTED lecturesMad Men, ABC
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