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Maine Poll Slides (2013)
 

Maine Poll Slides (2013)

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    Maine Poll Slides (2013) Maine Poll Slides (2013) Presentation Transcript

    • March 6, 2013Paul DiPernaFriedman Foundation for Educational Choicepaul@edchoice.orgMaineK-12 & School Choice SurveyWhat Do Voters Say About K-12 Education?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgAbout the Friedman Foundation• Established in 1996• Headquarters in Indianapolis, IN• 501(c)(3) / Nonpartisan / Nonprofit• What do we do?Working with local and state partners,we are committed to research,education, and outreachon the vital issues and implicationsrelated to choice and competitionin K-12 education.
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgWhy did we do this poll?• ME public opinion wrt school choice• K-12/policy conversations• seek fresh perspectives• assess/compare to other states
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgMaine’s K-12 ProfileAverage State Rank on NAEP 14High School Graduation Rate 82.8%# Regular Public School Students 184,830# Charter School Students NA# Private School Students 16,124# Home School Students 4,730% Regular Public School Students 89.9%% Charter School Students NA% Private School Students 7.8%% Home School Students 2.3%# School Districts 235# Regular Public Schools 657# Charter Schools 2# Private Schools 145$ Revenue Per Student $13,950$ “Total” Per Student Spending $13,839$ “Current” Per Student Spending $12,452
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgSurvey Project & ProfileInterview Dates: January 30 to February 6, 2013Interview Method: Live Telephone | 68% landline and 32% cell phoneSample Frame: Registered VotersSampling Method: Dual Frame; Probability Sampling; RDDSample Sizes: MAINE = 604Margins of Error: MAINE = 4.0 percentage pointsSplit Sample (Q5) = 5.6 percentage pointsResponse Rates: Landline (LL) = 14.4%Cell Phone = 11.5%Weighting? Yes (Age, Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and Region)Oversampling? No
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgSurveySnapshots
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgConsidering…~ Levels~ Differences(Favor – Oppose)~ Intensities(Strong Favor – Strong Oppose)
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgWhat do registered voters say aboutK-12 Education in Maine?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org• Parents (37%) are more likely than non-parents(29%) to see things going in the right direction.• Republicans (55%) and conservatives (57%)are significantly more likely to think things areon the wrong track, compared to other politicalparty and ideological groups.• Democrats (54%), Independents (57%), andliberals (59%) are more likely to expresspositive ratings for the public school system,compared to other political party andideological groups.
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgWhat do voters know aboutspending in K-12 Education?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgHow do respondents grade schools intheir communities?What type of school is firstpreference?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgQ8. What is the most important characteristic orattribute that would cause you to choose a [INSERTSCHOOL TYPE FROM PREVIOUS QUESTION] for yourchild? Please use one word, or a very short phrase.Specific impressions offered by respondents in the statewidesample. Numbers represent counts (n), not percentages.BETTER EDUCATION / QUALITY 93INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION / ONE-ON-ONE 74BETTER TEACHERS / TEACHERS / TEACHING 50SOCIALIZATION / PEERS / OTHER KIDS 48
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgHow much do voters know aboutstructural reforms in K-12 Education?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgWhat do voters sayabout charter schools?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org• Large positive net support (+42 net) favoringcharter schools. The enthusiasm is also verypositive (+15 intensity).• Approximately 66% of parents favor charters.• Democrats significantly differ from Republicansand Independents, although all three groupsoverwhelmingly support charter schools (53%,73%, and 62%).• Intensity of support for charters is greatestamong parents, Republicans, conservatives,young voters, and low-income voters.
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org… virtual schools?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org… tax-credit scholarships?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org… education savings accounts?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org… school vouchers?
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org• Significant positive net support (+17 points)favoring school vouchers. The intensity isslightly positive (+3 points).• Net support for school vouchers is highestamongparents, Republicans, conservatives, youngvoters, middle-age voters, and low-incomehouseholds.• Enthusiasm for this type of school choice policyis highest among these same groups.
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org• Net support for “universal” eligibility is +38points, compared to –38 points for “targeted”eligibility.• The differences of intensity between questionsare in stark contrast: For universal eligibility,there is solid positive intensity (+24). Bycomparison, for targeted eligibility, there isconsiderable negative intensity (-34).
    • edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgBroad Points | What did we learn?• negative about direction of K-12• mixed/lean positive: public schools• very positive: private schools• support for school choice policiesacross most demographicspositive net differencesmixed/lean positive intensities• eligibility: universal > targeted
    • Thank YouQuestions, Comments, or Suggestions?Contact: Paul DiPerna, paul@edchoice.org