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Poison
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Poison
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Poison
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Poison
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Poison

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Student presentation for PDHPE

Student presentation for PDHPE

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  • 1. Poison Shannon Rumble
  • 2. Poison, What is it? <ul><li>A poison is any material (liquid, solid, gas) that by reason of an intrinsic toxic property has the tendency to be fatal or hinder one’s health. </li></ul><ul><li>Poisons can have an extensive array of affects such as: </li></ul><ul><li>Slight pain and discomfort. </li></ul><ul><li>Skin irritation. </li></ul><ul><li>Anaphylaxis. </li></ul><ul><li>Cardiac arrest. </li></ul><ul><li>Death etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Poisons can be acquired through four different means: </li></ul><ul><li>Ingested (swallowed). </li></ul><ul><li>Inhaled (through breathing). </li></ul><ul><li>Absorbed (through skin). </li></ul><ul><li>Injected (through syringe or bite). </li></ul>Poison Ivy – Skin Irritation
  • 3. How Poisoning May Occur, &amp; Poisonous Products <ul><li>Overdosing on medicine or using medicine that doesn’t belong to you. </li></ul><ul><li>Being bitten or stung by venomous animals </li></ul><ul><li>Swallowing or sniffing Paints </li></ul><ul><li>Coming in contact with poisonous chemicals </li></ul><ul><li>Touching poisonous plants. </li></ul><ul><li>Inhaling poisonous gases such as carbon monoxide, or fumes from strong cleaning products. </li></ul><ul><li>Pesticides </li></ul><ul><li>Petrochemical products eg. Vasoline </li></ul><ul><li>Illegal drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Household cleaning products </li></ul>Drug overdose Poison Ivy Cleaning Products Venomous Bites
  • 4. Recognition <ul><li>It may be easily observable that someone has been poisoned if: </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical products are evident at the victims scene. </li></ul><ul><li>Drugs are on or around the victim (medical or illegal). </li></ul><ul><li>A syringe is in or next to victim. </li></ul><ul><li>Warning signs of gases and chemicals are at/around the location. </li></ul><ul><li>Victim is conscious and tells first aider they have been poisoned. </li></ul><ul><li>If none of these points are apparent in a possible poisoning case, there are numerous signs and symptoms to look for in the victim, that will enable you to establish if they have been poisoned. </li></ul>Sign indicating presence of hazardous chemicals Syringe Example of poisonous chemical
  • 5. Signs &amp; Symptoms of Poisoning <ul><li>Lower level, if any of consciousness. </li></ul><ul><li>Altered mood: lethargic, ecstatic, </li></ul><ul><li>violent or hostile. </li></ul><ul><li>Differed breathing rate. </li></ul><ul><li>Increased or lowered heart rate. </li></ul><ul><li>Dilated or shrunken pupils </li></ul><ul><li>Change of colour around mouth </li></ul><ul><li>Cramps </li></ul><ul><li>Nausea </li></ul><ul><li>Vomiting </li></ul><ul><li>Diarrhoea </li></ul>Dilated Pupil. Vomiting
  • 6. Current Primary Management Techniques <ul><li>Management for a responsive patient. </li></ul><ul><li>Execute a Primary Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Placate and reassure the victim </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor the vital signs of the victim </li></ul><ul><li>Inquire as to what poison was consumed, the </li></ul><ul><li>amount and how long ago it was taken </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t encourage vomiting </li></ul><ul><li>Contact Poisons Information Centre; 13 11 26 </li></ul><ul><li>Get medical advice or assistance </li></ul>Call 000 for an ambulance . Poisons Information Centre: 13 11 26
  • 7. Management of Ingested and Injected Poisons <ul><li>An unconscious or unresponsive patient. </li></ul><ul><li>Seek an ambulance immediately on 000 or 112 if using a mobile phone. </li></ul><ul><li>Execute a Primary Survey. </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor the vital signs of the victim. </li></ul><ul><li>If available give patient supplemental oxygen. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to determine what poison was consumed, the amount and how long ago it was taken </li></ul>Damage resulting from drug use.
  • 8. Management of Absorbed Poisons <ul><li>An unconscious or unresponsive patient. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t disregard prospective hazards when executing a Primary Survey. </li></ul><ul><li>Seek an ambulance immediately on 000 or 112 if using a mobile phone. </li></ul><ul><li>Irrigate the poisoned part of the body with a great quantity of water </li></ul>Chemical Spill
  • 9. Management of Inhaled Poisons <ul><li>An unconscious or unresponsive patient. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t disregard prospective hazards, ensuring you yourself doesn’t get contaminated. </li></ul><ul><li>Seek an ambulance immediately on 000 or 112 if using a mobile phone. </li></ul><ul><li>Remove patient from infected area before executing a Primary Survey. </li></ul><ul><li>If available give patient supplemental oxygen. </li></ul>
  • 10. Bibliography <ul><li>1. “ Poisons Safety Brochure on the WWW” Google. (2008) http://www.chw.edu.au/parents/kidshealth/poison_safety_brochure.pdf 23 rd August. </li></ul><ul><li>2. “ NSW Poisons Information Centre on the WWW” Google. (2008) http://www.nsw.gov.au/package.asp?PID=9520 23 rd August. </li></ul><ul><li>3. “ Bites and Stings on the WWW” Google. (2008) http://covertress.blogspot.com/2008/02/medicine-bites-and-stings.html 24 th August. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Lippmann, J. and Natoli, D. (2006) Royal Life Saving: First Aid. L.J. Publications: Ashburn, Victoria, Australia. </li></ul>

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