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Eye Injuries
Eye Injuries
Eye Injuries
Eye Injuries
Eye Injuries
Eye Injuries
Eye Injuries
Eye Injuries
Eye Injuries
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Eye Injuries

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Student presentation for PDHPE

Student presentation for PDHPE

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  • 1. Eye Injuries By Shauna Mainprize
  • 2. The nature of eye injuries
    • Eye injuries can result from many causes. Some causes can include:
      • Direct Trauma
      • Flash Burns
      • Chemical Contamination
      • Infection
      • Allergies
      • Other medical conditions
      • Eye injuries can be dangerous as there is the possibility of permanent visual impairment. If a person suffers from damage to the eye they may loose partial or entire eye sight. The extent of the injury will vary according to its cause and can be harmless, mild, or very dangerous. Immediate attention will prevent extensive injury in most cases.
      • The environment that a person is in may be harmful to their eyes if protection is not worn. For example, exposing naked eyes to ultra-violet radiation can cause flash burns; working with chemicals without eye protection can cause chemical contamination in the eyes; touching the eye with an object that is not sterile, like fingers, can cause infection in the eye; exposing the eyes to environments abundant in pollen, like a garden, may produce an allergic reaction to the eyes and cause them to swell, itch, and appear red; being in an environment when there are sharp objects around, like bush walking, can cause direct trauma to the eye and a possible embedded object in the eye. Treatment of an eye injury depends upon the type of injury, and the appropriate management technique must be taken to ensure no further damage is caused to the eye.
      • ( Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC)
    Blinding Keratoconjunctivitis
  • 3. Signs and Symptoms
    • Signs and Symptoms of eye injuries include :
    • Chemical contamination
    • Pain and Burning
    • Redness
    • Swollen Eye lids
    • Stinging
    • ( Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC)
    • Flash Burns
    • Pain
    • Changes in vision
    • Loss of vision
    • Bloodshot eyes
    • Watery eyes
    • Light sensitivity
    • ( Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC)
    • Direct Trauma (Corneal Abrasion)
    • Pain
    • Bleeding
    • Bruising
    • Swelling
    • Cuts or wounds
    • Headache
    • Loss or impairment of vision
    • Stinging
    • ( MedlinePlus (4/8/08) Eye Emergencies (online) http://www. nlm . nih . gov /MEDLINEPLUS/ ency /article/000054. htm Retrieved 31/8/08)
    Chemical Contamination Direct Trauma
  • 4. Signs and Symptoms
    • Infections
    • Persistent itching
    • Flaking of the eye lids
    • Discomfort of the eyes
    • Blurring vision
    • Watery eyes
    • Eye discharge
    • Pain
    • Swelling of surrounding tissue
    • ( Eye care Source (2008) Symptoms and treatments for fungal, viral and contact lenses (online) http://www. eyecaresource .com/conditions/eye-infections/ Retrieved 31/8/08)
    • Allergies
    • Redness
    • Persistent itching
    • Watery eyes
    • Burning sensation
    • Blurred vision
    • Mucous production
    • ( eMedicineHealth (28/8/08) Eye Allergies (online) http://www. emedicinehealth .com/eye_allergies/page3_ em . htm Retrieved 31/8/08)
    Infection Allergy
  • 5. Signs and Symptoms
    • Other medical Conditions in general:
    • Pain
    • Irritation
    • Impairment or loss of vision
    • Swelling
    • Closure of eye
    • Loss of fluid or blood from the eye
    • Tearing
    • Light Sensitivity
    • Bleeding within the eye
    • Sensation of something being in the eye
    • ( Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC)
    Hyphaema
  • 6. Current Primary Management Techniques
    • General eye injuries
    • Attempt to flush any foreign objects from the eye whilst keeping the injured eye downwards.
    • Keep the person still and comfortable
    • Place a sterile pad over the eye
    • Avoid putting any pressure on the eye.
    • Encourage the person not to blink or move either eyes as movement of the unaffected eye will also cause movement of the injured eye.
    • If possible the victim should keep the uninjured eye closed or covered
    • Seek medical advice
    • Do not place any objects, including fingers, into the persons eye.
    • ( Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC)
    Prolapsed Iris
  • 7. Current Primary Management Techniques
    • Small Foreign body in the eye
    • Encourage person to blink several times
    • Flush the affected eye with clean water (or preferable sterile saline if available)
    • Seek medical advice if the object does not remove
    • ( Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC)
    • Embedded Object in the eye
    • Do not try to remove the object
    • Try to place a protective cover around and over the injured eye. Ensure that no pressure is placed on the eye or object. An object such as a plastic or polystyrene cup can be used. If the person will allow, place a pad over the uninjured eye to minimise the movement in both eyes.
    • Seek urgent medical aid
    • ( Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC)
    Metal foreign object on cornea
  • 8. Current Primary Management Techniques
    • Chemical Injury
    • Rinse the affected eye for at least 15 minutes with copious fresh, clean flowing water ensuring that any fluid does not enter the uninjured eye
    • Seek urgent medical aid
    • ( Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC)
  • 9. Bibliography
    • Lippmann, J and Natoli, D (2006) First Aid. J.L. Publications: Ashburton, VIC
    • MedlinePlus (4/8/08) Eye Emergencies (online) http://www. nlm . nih . gov /MEDLINEPLUS/ ency /article/000054. htm Retrieved 31/8/08
    • Eye care Source (2008) Symptoms and treatments for fungal, viral and contact lenses (online) http://www. eyecaresource .com/conditions/eye-infections/ Retrieved 31/8/08
    • eMedicineHealth (28/8/08) Eye Allergies (online) http://www. emedicinehealth .com/eye_allergies/page3_ em . htm Retrieved 31/8/08

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